The Hydrologic Analysis of the Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

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Water Resources Report No. 41

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Conr Photo: Test.pumping theCity ofRolla Well NO.1 at Scventhand Walnut streets about 1930, lB. Bronson,standingsccond from left. headed the operation ofRolla's power and water systems from 1924 to 1970, Identity of the other people in the photo arc not known. Uncredited photograph. courtesy of Rolla Municipal Utilities.

Waler Resources Report No. 41

A HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS

OF THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA, MISSOURI

by

James E. Vandike

9 -A ~ Missouri Depanment of Natural Resources Division of Geology and Land Survey P.O. Box 250, Rolla, MO 65401 (314) 368-2125

Library o/Congress Catalog Card Number: 93-77308 Missouri Classification Number: Ge 9:41 Vandike, James E.. 1992, A HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE OZARK AQUIFER IN TIlE ROLLA AREA, MISSOURI, Missouri Department o/NaturalResources, Division o/GeologyandlAnd Survey, Water Resources Report No.4 1,84 p., 29 figs., 34 tbIs. Asa r~cipi~fll off~d~ral/unds, Ih~ Ikparlm~fllo/Natural krsourcu cannOI di.Jcrlminou ogainsl an)'On~ an Ih~ basi.J o/race. color, national origin, ag~. sa, or handicap. Jf anyon~ beficva Mlsh~ has be~n swbj~cttd 10 discriminalion/oran)'o/th~~ nasoll.J, he/she mayfileQ comp/Qint w/lh either Ihe LNparlm~nt of Natural Ruourcrs or Ih~ 0jJk~ 0/ EqJlQI Opportunity, U.S. LNparlmenl ofth~ /nUrior, Washington, D.C., 10140.

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CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT INTRODUCfION HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA GROUNDWATER SUPPLY IN THE ROLLA AREA Introduction

Water well construction City of Rolla wells Old City well and City of Rolla. well #1 City of Rolla. well #2 City of Rolla. well #3 City of Rolla, well #4 City of Rolla, well #5 City of Rolla, well #6 City of Rolla, wen #7 City of Rolla. well #8 City of Rolla, well #9 University of Missouri-Rolla, well #2 City of RoHa, well #10 Hypoint Industrial Park wells #1 and #2 City of Rolla. well #11 City of Rolla. wells #12and #13 City of RolJa. well HI4 Phelps County Public Water Supply District #2 wells City of St. James wells WATER USE FROM THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA Introduction Population trends Water usc WATER-LEVEL CHANGES IN THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS REFERENCES CITED THE HISTORY OF THE ELECTRIC AND WATER SYSTEMS IN ROLLA, MISSOURI (prepared by J. B. Bronson)

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1 1

2 7 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 13 13 13 14 45 45 45 45 48 48 49 78 78 79

LIST OF FIGURES Page

Figure 1.

2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. I I. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

Monthly precipitation, deviation from monthly mean, and deviation from yearly mean Specific capacities for Rolla, University of Missouri-Rolla, and Phelps Co. PWSD #2 wells Location and construction information, City of Rolla, University of Missouri-Rolla, and Phelps Co. PWSD 112 wells .........................................•..•.•.................................................__ Monthly production, Phelps Co. PWSD #2 wells ;; I, #2, #3, and #4 Populalion ucnds for Rolla, rural Rolla, 51. James, and Phelps Counly Monthly and yearly watcr production, City of Rolla Yearly watcr production, City of St. James Monthly and yearly production, Phelps Co. PWSD #2 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957·1990, City of Rolla well #2. Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957·1990, City of Rolla well #3 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #4 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #5 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #6 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #7 Water·level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #8 Water·levcl changes and monthly production, 1957·1990, UMR well #2 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #9 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #10 Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well # I I Hydrograph, 1969-1990, Rolla Inn observation well Hydrograph, 1975-1991, Hypoint #3 observation weJl Prcdevclopment potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer Potentiometric map ofthc Ozark aquifer, August, 1960 Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1970 POlentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1980 Potentiometric map of the O,...ark aquifer, August, 1990 Potentiometric map ofthc Ozark aquifer, August, 1992 Water·level decline in the Ozark aquifer from predcvelopmcntto 1992 Water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer between 1960 and 1992

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__..__ 5 6 10

14 47 52 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 6S 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76

LIST OF TABLES Table

Page

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31.

Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #2, 1957-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #2 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #3, 1957-1991 Perccnlage of 10lal monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #3 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #4, 1957-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #4 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #5, 1957-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #5 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #6, 1957-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #6 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #7, 1957-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #7 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #8, 1960-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #8 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #9, 1966-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #9 Monthly and yearly production, UMR well #2, 1970-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by UMR well #2 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #10, 1%7-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #10 Monthly and yearly production, Hypoint well #1, 1975-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by Hypoint well #1 Monthly and yearly production, Hypoint well #2, 1975-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by Hypoint well #2 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #11, 1972-1991 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well # II Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #12, 1990 Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #t2 Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #13, 1990 Percentage of IOtal monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #13 Population and percentage change in population, 1980-1990, Rolla, SI. James, rural Rolla, and Phelps Collnty 32. Combined production, City of Rolla wells, 1957-1991 : 33. Monthly percentage of total yearly water use, 1957-1991, City of Rolla 34. Yearly water production for Rolla, St. James, and Phelps Co. PWSD #2

v

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 46 50 51 53

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Abstract and IntrodUClion

ABSTRACT The Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area is a l,OCK> ft- to 1,200 fHhick sequence of nearly horizontal Ordovician and Cambrian cherty dolomites and minor sandstones. Specific capacity of fully penetrating wells ranges from less than 1 gpm/ft to about 27 gpm/fl. Transmissivity varies from about4,OOJ gpd/ft to more than 25,OOJ gpd/ ft; where unconfined specific yield is about 0.1. Groundwater withdrawals from the aquifer has caused an average water-level decline in City wells of 3 ft/year. Since 1900, approximately 32.6 billion gallons of water has been produced in Rolla and the rural Rolla area; about 72 percent of this was produced by the City. A prominent northeast-trending cone of depression about 4 mi long and 1.5 mi to 2 mi wide has developed in the

Ozark aquifer in Rolla. The axis of this drawdown cone roughly parallels 1-44 in the western and northern parts ofthe City. Water-level declines in excess of 200 ft have occurred near City wells #9 and # 10, but average waterlevel decline is between 75 ft and 100 fi in Rolla,and less beyond the corporate boundary of Rolla. Future lowering of water-table elevation is likely to occur in and near Rolla. Magnitude of the water-level change will depend on population and per capita wateruse changes. Further drawdown in the City can be minimized by selectively using the highest-yielding wells in areas of the least water-level decline, and decreasing use at low-yielding wells in areas of the greatest waterlevel decline.

INTRODUCTION For nearly 90 years, residents of Rolla have received water from a public water supply system. Prior to oonstruction of the first deep well by the City in 1907, residents supplied water to themselves using cisterns and shallow wells. These individual private systems probably supplied an adequate volumeofwater much of the time, but were not adequate to meet needs during droughts or even through dry summer months. A growing town needed a moredependablesupplyofwater than cisterns and shallow wells offered, so in 1906 the City contracted for the drilling of the first well.

billion gallons have been produced since 1957. The City of Rolla, as well as nearly every person in the Rolla area, depends entirely on groundwater produced from the Ozark aquifer for water supply. Use of this aquifer is shared with several other nearby major water users including the City ofSt. James, the Phelps County Public WatcrSupply District #2, and several private high-yield well owners. Additionally, there are several thousand private domestic wells within a few miles of Rolla that produce water from this same aquifer.

Rolla has changed in many ways since the first Citywcll was drilled. Population at that time was less than 2,000; yearly waler use by the residents was probably less than 2Omillion gallons. In 1990, the 15wcUssupplyingtheCity produced a total of about 730 million gallons ofwater for 14,I00 residents, the UniversityofMissouri· Rolla campus, numerous businesses. and several industries.

In August, 1991, Rolla Municipal Utilities (RMU), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Division of Geology and Land Survey (DGLS) began a cooperative study to determine the effects of groundwater withdrawal on the O....ark aquifer in the Rolla area. To date, the Rolla area, including the City of Rolla, has not experienced significant water-supply problems. However,an analysis oftheaquifer, the City's groundwater supply system, and area water-usc information is necessary to determine if groundwater wilhdrawal is causing excessive water·level decline in the Ozark aquifer, and 10 help Rolla Municipal Utilities and other area water producers maintain the integrity and longevity of their supplies.

As the first century of its operation draws to an end, Rolla's water supply system has produced an estimated 23 billion gallons of water from the O.....ark aquifer; 19.2

Much of the detail presented in this report is possible due to extensivewatcrwell and production records maintained by Rolla Municipal Utilities. Since 1957, RMU

From 1906 to 1945, thewatersupplysystem was owned at different limes by the City, and by private individuals and companies. Since 1945, the system has been owned by the City, and operated by a board of public works as Rolla Municipal Utilities.

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

has regularly measured pumping and non-pumping water levels, pumping rates, length of pumping periods, amount of water pumped, and other peninent information for each well, and entered the data into ledgers. As part of this study, DGLS developed a computerized data-storage system into which RMU entered 34years of records. Monthly averages and totals were entered for data from 1957 to 1983; daily records were entered from 1983 through 1990. Without these data, much of this study would not have been possible.

From 1924 to 1970, J.B. Broru;on headed operation of Rolla's power and water systems, first for Ameriam Utilities who then owned thesy.;tems and after 1945 for City of Rolla. After he retired, Mr. BrollSOn prepared a manuscript for RMU entitled The Historyofthe E/ectrit: and Wato .systems in Rolla, Missowi Not previously publi
HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA If the water level in the well rises above land surface, it is termed a nowing artesian well. The height to which water will rise in wells penetrating an artesian aquifer defines the potcntiometric surface of the aquifer.

The Ozark aquifer is a series of nearly hori7.ontal cherty dolomite and sandstone formations more than a thousand feet thick. Eachofthe formations has differing hydrologic characteristics; some yield little water while others have high yields. Groundwater is stored in, and moves through, openings in the bedrock. Unweathered and unfractured dolomite is nearly impermeable and allows little water movement, but in the Ozarks the dolomite contains numerous vertical fractures called joints that have been enlarged by solution activily from slightly acidic groundwater. Additionally, chemical action of groundwater in the horizontal zones between successive rock beds, called bedding planes, has created additional openings. Groundwater movement in the Ozark aquifer is primarily through these solution-enlarged openings in the rock. The term "groundwater reservoir" is often used, and to many people brings to mind a large opening in the bedrock housing an underground lake. This is not usually the case. Groundwater, for the most part, is stored in relatively small openings dissolved in thedolomiticbcdrock. Exceptions to this do occur. The large springs for which the Ozarks is so famous are essentially extensive water-filled caves. Most wells to not penetrate such cavc systems.

There are several properties of aquifers including uansmissivity, storativity, and vertical hydraulic conductivity that describe their water-yielding characteristics. Numerical values for these aquifer coefficients can be determined from carefully controlled pumping tests on wells, and can be used to quantitatively predict the response of an aquifer to the addition or removal of water. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity are measures of how easily water can move through an aquifer. Transmissivity is defined as the amount of water, in gallons per day, which will move through a I-foot wide vertical strip of the saturated thickness of the aquifer under a hydraulic gradicnt of 1 foot per foot. It is equal to the hydraulic conductivity of Ihe aquifer times its saturated thickness. In an unconfined aquifer, the hydraulic gradient is the slope of the water table; the hydraulic gradient in a confined aquifer is the slope of the potentiometric surface. The transmissivity of an aquifer controls the amount of water which the aquifer will yield. Aquifers with high transmissivities can yield greater volumes of water than aquifers with low transmissivitics.

Aquifers are classified as unconfined or confined. In an unconfined aquifer the water table forms the upper boundary of the aquifer. The water table is the twodimensional surface between unsaturated rock above the water table and the saturated rock below it. In a wcll drilled into an unconfined aquifer, the water table is the watersurfacc in the well. A confined aquifer is bounded above and below by low-permeability confining layers called aquitards which allow littlewaler 10 move through them. Water level in a tightly cased well drilled into a confined aquifer will usually be some distance above the top of the aquifer due to the head pressure on the water in the aquifer. An aquifer having such characteristics is termed an artesianaquifer,and thewell an artesian well.

Thestorativityofan aquifer is a measure ofthcamount of water a given volume of aquifer can storc. In an artesian aquifer it is defined as the amount of water which can be taken into or released from storage per unit surface area of the aquifer per unil change in hydraulic head normal to the potcntiometric surface. For example, ira 1 ft~ area of an aquifer yields 0.01 ftlofwater with a 1 fI decline in waler level, the aquifer has a storativity of 0.01. Under artesian conditions, water

2

Hydrogeologic CharocterislU:s

released from slOrage inanaquiferis from the expansion of water and aquifer compaction caused by changes in nuid pressure; openings in the aquifer are not dewa· teredo In unconfined aquifers, watcr released from storage is from dewatering of openings in the aquifer. SlOrativity of an unconfined aquifer is generally called specificyicld, and il is related to thecffective porosity of the aquifer. The effective porosily is the mho of the volume of inlerconnected voids per unit volume of the rock. Storativity values are dimensionless, and for confined aquifers typically range from 0.005 to 0.00005 while those for unconfined aquifers are much larger, usually between 0.0 I and O.30(Frecze and Cherry, 1979). With two aquifers with equal transmissivities but differing storativitics, the aquifer with the higher storativity will have less head change or lowering of water level in the aquifer when a given volume of water is removed.

aquifer is diffuse, and occurs as water from precipitation moves downward through the soil materials, residuum, and weathered bedrock, through fractures and beddingplane bedrock openings, until it reaches the saturated portion of the aquifer. Imes and Emmell (in press) calculate that about 25 percent of the average annual precipitation enters the subsurface and provides recharge to the Ozark aquifer. Much of this recharge, however, returns to the surface through spring systems and other means before it enters the regional now system. Only about 6 percent of the average precipitation provides recharge to the Ozark aquifer regional flow system. Annual precipitation in the Rolla area varies considerably, but averages about 38 inches. Between 1957 and 1991, annual precipitation varied from a high of 69.4 inches in 1985 to a low of 28.3 inches in 1971. Figure 1 shows average monthly precipitation at 'University of Missouri-Rolla for 1957 through 1990, deviation from monthly precipitation,and deviation from averageyearly precipitation.

Vertical hydraulic conductivity is a measure of the amount of water which will move vertically through an aquitard or confining bed. It is defined as the volume of water, in gallons per day, which will move vertically through a one square foot hori7.0ntal area oftheaquitard under a hydraulic gradient of 1 foot per fool. Aquitards with low vertical hydraulic conductivity will allow little water to pass through while those with high vertical hydraulic conductivity may have considerable leakage through them.

Based on recharge estimates by Imes and Emmett (in press), recharge to the Ozark aquifer may be as high as 9.5 in.lyr, of which about 2.3 in.lyr is enters the regional now system.

Some aquifers such as thick, uniform, sandstones have hydrologic characteristics that do nOl change greatly with respect to position or dircction in the aquifer. In such aquifers, well yield and the response of the aquifer to pumping is very predictable. However, carbonaterock aquifers such as the Ozark aquifer typically are not uniform in composition nor in hydrologic characteristics. For practical purposes, the Ozark aquifer isaseries of stacked aquifers th~t are hydraulically connected. Each formation has its own hydrologic characteristics that vary vertically through the formation, and laterally within the formal ion. Some wnes within the Ozark aquifer, such as the Upper Gasconade Dolomite, yield little water and are essentially leaky confining beds. The major water-yielding wnes in the aquifer occupy a relatively small portion of Ihe aquifer.

Water in the Ozark aquifer is not static; the aquifer is a dynamic flow system where water is continuously in motion, moving from areas of recharge where water is introduced into the aquifer to areas ofdischarge where it surfaces. Prior to significant groundwater withdrawals, theaquifer essentially was under steady-state conditions where average discharge from the aquifer equalled average recharge to the aquifer. This equilibrium changed locally with development of wells. When a well pump isstarted, water level in the aquifer surrounding Ihe well is lowered. Water level in the well is below water level in the surrounding aquifer, so water moves from thcaquifer into thewell to replace the water beingwithdrawn. Theamount that waterlevcl is lowered depends on several factors, including the pumping rate, how long the well is pumped, and transmissivity and storativityoftheaquifer. The longer the well is pumped and the higher the pumping rate, the greater the waterlevel decline, or drawdown, in the well. Water moves radially toward the well from the surrounding aquifer. As the water nears the well it must flow through successively smaller cross-sectional areas. To do so, velocity of the water must increase. The increase in velocity comes from steepening of the hydraulic gradient as water nears the well. Around the pumped well, the water-table or potentiometric surface forms a cone-shaped depression, called the cone of depression or drawdown cone, that

TheOzark aquifer is an exlremelycomplex hydrologic system that receives, stores, and transmits large volumes of water. Recharge to the aquifer is from precipitation Ihat may enter the aquifer a variety of ways. Spring systems, which are supplied from the aquifer, receive considerable recharge through karst features such as sinkholes and losing streams. Thiswater travels through relatively large bedrock openings, following the conduit syStems which channel water to the springs. This type or recharge remains underground a relatively short time before it emerges at a spring. Much of the recharge to the 3

QUIrk Aquifer in the Rolla Area

extends radially from the pumped well into the surrounding aquifer. The distance from the well to the edge of the cone of depression is called the radius of influence. [fthe well is pumped indefinitely, water-level in the well will continue to lower and the cone of depression will continue to expand until it reaches a point where aquifer recharge within the radius of influence equals the amount of water produced from the well, or until the natural discharge moving through the aquifer intercepted by the drawdown cone equals the amount of pumping. At this point, the aquifer reaches steady state conditions.

Specific capacities for wells fully penetrating the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area show considerable variation, ranging from as little as I gpm/ft to more than 27 gpm/ft (figure 2). Wide variations in specific capacities such as these arc common in carbonate aquifers. Since waterproductivity in carbonate units depends mostly on secondary hydraulic conductivity from solution~enlarged openings, wells intercepting few openings will often yield poorly, while wells intercepting numerous solution~enlarged openings will yield several times as much water with the samc amount of drawdown. In the Rolla area, data indicate the highest yielding areas of the Ozark aquifer are east, nonheast, and nonh of the center of town. However, even in these areas, low yields are still possible. Specific capacity is not necessarily a constant, since it is a function of both the well and the aquifer. Specific capacity of several of the older wells in Rolla has decreased while it has increased slightly for other wells. For example, whcn drilled in 1934, well #2 had a specific capacity of 14.6 gpmlft. In 1988, specific capacity was 4.0 gpm/ft. The well was capable of producing about 440 gpm when first drilled, but in 1988, the last year of extensive production from the well, it averaged 187 gpm. Decrease in specific capacity of the wells may be due to calcite or other mineral deposition in bedrock openings in or near the well, which decreases the amount of water which can enter the well bore. It does not necessary indicate a decrease in productivity of the aquifer in the area of the well. Acidizing the well will often result in a significant increase in specific capacity and yield.

Aquifer coefficients such as transmissivity, storativity, and vertical hydraulic conductivity are normally obtained by performing carefully controlled pumping tests. Ideally, a pumping test should be conducted by pumping a well at a constant rate for an extended length of time, and measuring the response of the aquifer to pumping by measuring water-Icvel changes at one or more observation wells a distance from the pumped well. Unfortunately, because of their expense, observation wells are seldom drilled for pumping tests in the Oark aquifer, so the only drawdown data that is collected is from the pumped well. Transmissivity values can be calculated from these data, but are less accurate than those calculated from separate observation wells. Storativity calculations require drawdown measurements taken a known radial distance from the pumped well, so without an observation well storativity cannot be calculated. Most pumping tests in the Ozark aquifer are simply performance tests conducted on newly drilled wells. They provide valuable information about the performance of the well, but provide little information about the response of the aquifer to the pumping. The pumped wells are often tested for only a few hours, and seldom more than 24 hours, but the information is still valuable, especially when sizing the pump for a new well. Typically, new wells are test-pumped long enough for drawdown in the well to stabilize. Drawdown is greatest when the pump is first started, and decreases exponentially with time. When the pump is stopped, water-level in the well rises. Like drawdown, recovery is fastest immediately after the pump is stopped and decreases with time.

Specific capacities shown in figure 2 indicate transmissivity of the Ozark aquifer is higher in the areas adjacent to Rolla to the east, northeast, and nonh. Little data are available for areas adjacent to Rolla in other directions. However, not every well drilled in the more favorable areas will have good water-yielding characteristics. The variability of the carbonate aquifer is such that there is always a chance, even in favorable areas, of encountering low-permeability zones and having a well with poor yield. Transmissivity values have not been determined for all of the fully penetrating Ozark aquifer wells in the area. Pumping tests performed on several area wells show transmissivities ranging from less than 4,000 gpd/ft to more than 12,000 gpd/ft. Based on estimates from specific capacity data, transmissivities may be as high as 25,000 gpdJft in some areas. Imes and Emmett (in press) estimate lateral hydraulic conductivity in the Ozark aquifer to range from about 0.0008 fVsec (517 gpd/ft 2) to 0.00001 ft/sec (6.5 gpd/ftl). Using a saturated thickness of 700 ft, transmissivity would range from about 362,000 gpdlft to 4,550 gpd/ft. Transmissivity of the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area probably varies from about 4,000 gpdlft to about 25,000 gpd/ft.

Drawdown data collected from a pumped well arc not always adequate to accurately calculate transmissivity, but the specific capacity of the well can be determined. Specific capacity is simply pumping rate (gallons per minute) divided by the number of feet of drawdown in the well. For example, a well producing 300 gallons per minute with 15 feet of drawdown has a specific capacity of 20 gpmlft. Transmissivities can be estimated from specific conductivity data. For a pumping period of 24 hours, transmissivity (gpdlft) is approximately 1000 times the specific capacity for unconfined aquifers, and 2000 times specific capacity for confined aquifers (Walton, 1962. p. 12·13). 4

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Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

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GroundwaJer Supply

Depending on location, the 07..ark aquifer may be under confined (artesian) or unconfined (walCr table) conditions. In the Springfield Plateau and other places where it is overlain by confining beds, it is a confined aquifer and generally under artesian conditions. There is generally no effective upper confining unit in the Rolla area, so here the aquifer is not confined, and is under water table conditions (Imes, 1990). Locally, the aquifer

may be semi-confined and under leaky artesian conditions where low-permeability units such as the Jefferson City Dolomite or Upper Gasconade Dolomite act as leaky confining units. The storativitiy of the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area has not been determined under field conditions. Where unconfined, 1mcs and Emmett (in press) estimate thestorativity, orspccific yield, to be 0.1. Where confined, it is estimated to be 0.004.

GROUNDWATER SUPPLY IN THE ROLLA AREA INTRODucnON

about 130 ft. Yields of wells producing from the Roubidoux: in the Rolla area are generally 10 gpm to 40 gpm. However, because of its high permeability, where the Roubidoux is exposed to the surface it can easily become contaminated. Thus, manyshallowprivatewells open to the Roubidouxproduce water containing bacteria and excessive nitrate. Water quality problems are less likely to occur where the Roubidoux: is overlain by 50 ft to 100 ft of Jefferson City Dolomite. Nearly all of the public water supply wells in the area, including those serving Rolla and Phelps County PWSD #2, are cased through the Roubidoux Formation.

The 07..ark aquifer in the Rolla area includes the rock sequence between the base of the Pennsylvanian System, and the top of the Upper Cambrian Derby-Doerun Dolomite. This aquifer is a sequence of mostly dolomite formations with lesser units of sandstone. Dolomite is a calcium-magnesium carbonate. It and limestone, which is calcium carbonate, comprise most of the sedimentary rock in the Ozarks. Chert, commonly called flint, is a very resistant silicate mineral that is interspersed in varying amounts in the dolomite formations. Geologic formations included in this sequence, in descending order, are the Coner Dolomite, Jefferson City Dolomite, Roubidoux Formation, Gasconade Dolomite, Eminence DOlomite, and Potosi Dolomite. Depending on surface elevation, these units have a combined thickness of 1,000 to 1,200 feet (ft) in the Rolla area.

The Roubidoux Formation is underlain by the Gasconade Dolomite, which is subdivided into three units. The Upper Gasconade, 45 to 85 ft thick and averaging 65 ft thick, is a dolomite with low chen COntent. This unit has has relatively low permeability, and is typically the zone into which Rolla city wells are cased. The Lower Gasconade Dolomite is from about 175 to 220 ft thick, and consists of cherty dolomite. The basal unit in the Gasconade is the Gunter Sandstone member whose thickness averages about 20 ft in the area. In some parts of the 07.arks, the Gunter is entirely sandstone. However, in the Rolla area, sand content in the Gunter is typically less than about 20 percent. Total thickness of the Gasconade Dolomite at Rolla averages about 300 ft, and the unit has a relatively high yield. Wells fully penetrating the Gasconade typically yield 75 gpm to 125 gpm. The Gasconade Dolomite is the basal Ordovician formation in the Ozarks.

Although these formations are all part of the Ozark aquifer, they have individual characteristics that to a great extent control their water·yielding characteristics. The Jefferson CilY and Cotter dolomites, which form the uppermost part of the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area, are exposed at land surface in Rolla and much of the surrounding area. Due to its high stratigraphic position, the Cotter Dolomite is present only at higher elevations around Rolla. The Jefferson City Dolomite has a much wider areal extent. Combined, these units have a maximum thickness of about 275 ft in the area, but at lower elevations along major streams may absent due to erosion. Since the Cotter is thin in the Rolla area it is not an important aquifer zone. The Jefferson City Dolomite yields modes I amounts of water, typically less than 10 gallons per minute (gpm); many older wells in the upland areas around Rolla bottomed in this unit.

The Eminence Dolomite, which consists of about 275 ft of dolomitc with minor chert, is the uppermost Cambrian formation in the 01..arks. It is underlain by about 240 ft of Potosi Dolomite, which consists of dolomite, chen, and drusy quanz. The Potosi is typically the most productive aquifer zone in the area, but, because wells seldom produce only from the Potosi, its yield is difficult to estimate. Wells producing from the Gasconade, Eminence, and Potosi dolomiles in the Rolla area typically yield 350 gpm to as much as 1,000 gpm.

The Roubidoux Formation in the Rolla area is probably the most widely used zone in the Ozark aquifer for private water supply. The Roubidoux underlies the Jeffcrson City Dolomite, and consists of interbedded cherty dolomite, sandstone, and sandy dolomite. Its thickness varies from about 115 ft to 145 ft, averaging

7

Ozark Aquifer in 'he Rolla Area

All of the City wells penetrate the Potosi Dolomite, and are open through the Lower Gasconade, Eminence, and Potosi dolomites. Prior to construction of City of Rolla, well #3, it was commonly thought that large volumes of water could not be obtained from dolomite units. Thus, City wells # 1 and #2 were drilled through the Ozark aquifer into the Lamotte Sandstone, the basal unit of the deeper St. Francois aquifer. The SI. Francois aquifer typically yields much less water than the 07..ark aquifer, and is the deepest aquifer in the Ozarks. Precambrian rocks underlying the SI. Francois aquifer are not permeable, and yield little or no water. The top of the Lamotte is about 550 ft below the base of the Potosi Dolomite; geologic formations between them are, in descending order, the Derby-Doerun Dolomite, Davis Formation, and Bonneterre Formation. It was later found that the Lamotte did not yield enough water to warrant the additional cost ofdrilling, and installation of liner through shales in the Davis Formation. Beginning with well #3, City wells were drilled through the Potosi Dolomite into the upper part of the Derby-Doerun Dolomite, and cased through the upper Gasconade Dolomite. The only exception is well #8. Because of the low yield of the Potosi at this well, it wa<; drilled through the Bonneterre Formation. Unfortunately, yield did not increase with deeper drilling.

but much of the drilling today uses hammer bits that operate from the high pressure air much like a largc jackhammer to quickly drill the hole. Regardless of the drilling technique employed, all rock wells such as those drilled in the Rolla area have similar construction characteristics. However, there are numerous differences between construction techniques used for private domestic wells designed to supply an individual household or farm, and those used for public water supply wells. Private wells in the Rolla area are usually 6-in. diameter, and 250 ft to 400 ft deep; they are typicallyconmucted to supply 15 t02D gpm. Private well construction standards today require a minimum of80 ft of casing in most places in the Ozarks, but older wells typically contain much less casing. Casing is pipe placed in the well to prcvcnt soil and residual materials from collapsing into the well bore, and to protect the well from conlamination. In a private well, the6..-in. diameter casing is set into an 8-in. diameter hole, leaving about 1 in. of annular space between the outside of the casing and the drill hole that is typically filled with rock cuttings from the well, or a cement slurry poured around the outside of the casing from the lOp. Since the casing may not be adequately sealed using these techniques, many private wells become contaminated with bacteria. Public water-supply wells, such as those constructed for cities, larger subdivisions, and public water supply districts, arc constructed to more stringent specifications. They are cased much deeper than most private domestic wells. The casing is heavier weight, and is placed into a drill hole 4 in. larger in diameter than the casing. The casing is sealed by forcing neal cementgrout (a mixture of cement and water) down the inside of the casing, and up to thesurfaceon the outsideofthecasing. Thiscompletelyfills the space between the drill hole and the casing with cement. Wells scaled in this manner rarely become contaminated. Of the few that do, most receive the contaminants from a nearby abandoned well that is contaminated. These wells are also drilled much deeper than private domestic wells. The additional depth is necessary to provide the higher yield that is required. They are also typically larger india meter than private wells for two reasons. In general, larger diameter wells will yield more water than smaller wells. Also, the larger diameter is necessary to accommodate the highcapacitypumps that are necessary to produce large quantities of water.

WATER WELL CONSTRUe.ION

Simply defined, a water well is a vertical hole drilled into the earth materials 10 a point below the water table, that is constructed for the purposes ofproducing groundwaler. Over theyears, drilling techniques have changed. For many years, the cable-tool or percussion method was used for most well drilling. This method uses a severalfeet long cylindrical steel bit suspended at the end of a cable to drill the hole. The lower cuning end of the bit is either hardened steel that is sharpened, or the end of the bit may contain tungsten carbide bUllons. The bit is raised and lowered, allowing it to sharply strike the bottom of the hole, breaking a small amount of rock with each impact. Each few feet of drilling, the bit is removed from the hole and the rock cUllings bailed from the hole. All City of Rolla wells prior to well #11 were drilled by cable tool. Subsequent wells werc construcled using airrotary drills. Most wells today are drilled using air-rotary techniques. Here, a bit is attached to the lower end of hollow drill pipe. The pipe and bit slowly rotate to grind rock at the base of the drill hole. High-pressure air is pumped down theinsideofthedrill pipe and through the bit. The air cools the bil and blows the rock cUllings to the surface. There arc many types of bits that may be used,

Another major difference between private domestic wells and public water supply wells is, of course, their cost. The cost of a high-yield public water-supply well is likely to be 20 to 50 times the cost of a private domestic well.

8

Groundwater Supply

CITY OF ROLLA WELLS

City of Rolla, Well #2

Since Rolla began supplying water to the public, the City has used a total of 18 wells, 15 of which are still in production. The two earliest wells drilled for the City, the first in 1906-1907 and the second in 1929-1930, have been abandoned and plugged. The third well, now designated well #2, was drilled in 1934 and 1935. It and all successive City wells are still in production.

Well #2 was drilled in 1934 and 1935, and at a total depth of 1,745 ft is the deepest of the City wells. The well was completed with 395 feet of 12-in. diameter casing, but was recased in 1956 with 494 ft of lO-in. diameter casing set into the LowerGasconade Dolomite. Because the well was drilled through the Davis Formation, 8-in. diameter liner was installed from 1,250 ft to 1,450 ft to prevent shale from caving into the well bore.

Currently, these wells arc capable of producing approximately 8,500 gpm, which is about 5 times the current average daily water use. The following section summarizes the physical and hydrologic characteristics of each well, and the production histol)'of the City wells currently in usc. The wells are discussed in chronological order of their addition into the water-supply system. Locations of the city wells and other selected high-yield wells in the Rolla area are shown on figure 3. Tables I through JOshow monthly and yearly production amounts and production percentages for City wells #2 through #13, UMR well #2, and Hypoint wells #1 and #2.

When drilled, well #2 had a production of 415 gpm, a static water level of 235 ft below land surface, and a specific capacity of 14.6 gpm/ft. Production has decreased substantially since 1935. It currently produces about ]80 gpm, has a static water level ofaboU1400fcct, and a speeificcapacity of4.0 gpm/f1. In the 34 year period between March, 1957, and January, 1992, well #2 has produced about 714 million gallons, and has provided 3.71 percent of the watcr used by City of Rolla (tables 1 and 2). Water level declined an average of 2.9 ftlyear since 1935, and 3.5 ftlyear since 1957.

Old City Well and City of Rolla, Well #1

City of Rolla, Well #3

Rolla's first public water supplywcll was completed in 1907. It was drilled to a total depth of 930 ft, and contained several strings of casing including 39 ft of lOin. diameter, 185 ft of 6-in. diameter, 195 ft of 5-in. diameter, and 465 ft of 4.5-in. diameter. The well produced about 200 gpm without benefit of a pump. Compressed air was used to force water to the surface. It was Rolla's sole well for more than 20 years, but tended to produce sediment and declined in yield in lateryears. It was apparently plugged and abandoned sometime during the late 1930s or early 1940s, the exact date is unknown. Some City reoords indicate the well was plugged in 1937, but letters on file at DG LS indicate the well was plugged sometime after 1941.

Well #3, constructed in 1942, is 1,175 feet deep and contains 392 ft of lO-in. diameter casing sct through the UpperGasconadeDolomitc. It prodoces from the Lower Gasconade, Eminencc, and Potosi dolomites. The well currently produces about 470 gpm. Specific capacity of the well when it was drilled was 10.7 gpm/ft, somewhat less than that of well #2. However, specific capacity of well #3 in 1990 was 12.3 gpm/ft, and unlike well #2 specific capacity has increased slightly. From 1957 to 1991, well #3 produced about 1,872 million gallons, and supplied about 9.7 perccnt of the water produced by the City during that period. From 1957 to 1960, it supplied between 21 percent and 26 percent of the total production (tables 3 and 4).

Rolla's next well, designated well #1, was completed in 1931 at a total depth of 1,710 ft, into the Lamotte Sandstone. It contained only about 105 ft of 12-in. diameter casing, and was not pressure-grouted. Liner, which is smaller diameter, light-weight casing, was installed through the Davis Formation to prevent shale from caving into the well. It produced about 420 gpm when first drilled, but production eventually dropped to about350 gpm. The well was abandoned and plugged in 1966. When drilled, static water level was 228 ft, and in 1966, prior to plugging, was 237 ft.

When drilled, static water level in well #3 was 245 f1. 1nJuly, 1992, static water level was 420 feet. Total waterlevel decline at the well since 1942 has been about 175 ft, an average of 3.5 ftlyr. Static water level data arc not available for the years 1957 to 1967, but average waterlevel decline since 1967 has averaged 3.13 ftlyr.

City of Rolla, Well #4 Construction of wells #4 and #5 in 1946 and 1947 more than doubled waler-prod uction capability for Rolla. Well #4was drilled in 1946 and 1947 to a depth of 1,078

9

Ozark Aquifer in Ihe Rolla Area

ft and contains 232 ft of 12-in. diameter casingsel into

water produced by the City during that period (tables 5 and 6). In 1958and 1959, it provided aboul20 perccntof the City's supply, but in 1990 accounted for only 5.1 percent of the water produced by the City.

the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. When new, the well produced abouI510 gpm and had a specific capacity of 6.8 gpm/fl. Production has nOl decreased substantially over the years; in 1990 the well produced 535 gpm. Specific capacity, however, has decreased to 3.9 gpm/ft.

Water level in well #4 has declined about 160 ft since 1947. In July, 1992, static water level was 325 ft; static water level in 1947 was 165 ft. Yearly water-level decline has averaged about 3.6 fttyr.

From 1957 to 1991, well #4 produced 1,896 million gallons, supplying 9.85 percent of the total volume of

WATER WEU5

• G1y of iloilo ...,11 • Un"e"';!) of Misoouri·llo1lo ....n ... """Ipo. Co. PWSD "'2...,rr •

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Figure 3: Location and construction information, City of Rolla, University of Missouri-Rolla, and Phelps County PWSD #2 wells.

10

Groundwaler Supply

after acid trealment increased 10 550 gpm, and 4.2 gpml ft, respectively. Currenlly, the well produces aboul 400 gpm, and specific capacity has decreased to 3.1 gpm/ft.

City of Rolla, Well #S Drilled in 1947, well #5 is 1,150 ft deep and contains 280 ft of 12-inch diameter casing set inlo Ihe Upper Gasconade Dolomite. Thewell was originally capableof producing about 580 gpm with about 50 ft of drawdown; specific capacily was 11.6 gpm/ft. In 1990, average pro· duct ion was 590 gpm, bUI specific capacity had decreased to 5.5 gpm/ft.

From 1957 to 1991, well #7 produced about 1,557 million gal10ns of water, and supplied about 8.1 percent of Ihe waler used by Rolla during that period (tables II and 12). At most, it supplied 17.4 percent of Ihe water needs, bUI in 19900nly provided 4.7 percent of the lotal production.

From 1957 to 1990, well #5 produced a totalof2,369 million gallons, supplying about 12.3 percent of the water produced by the City during that period (tables 7 and 8). From 1957 through 1964 it supplied about 20 percentofthewateruscd by Rolla, but in 1990itsupplied less than 7 percent of the total production.

Staticwaler level when the well was drilled was 240 ft. In July, 1992, slatic water level had declined to 355 ft. Water level decline at the well has averaged about3 fttyr.

City of Rolla, Well #8 Static water level inwell #5 has lowered from 245 ft in 1947 to 380 ft below land surface in July, 1992, a decline of 135 ft and an average annual decline of about 3 ft/yr.

Well #8, drilled in 1960, has the unfortunate distinction of being the City'S poorest producing well. Production from the Lower Gasconade, Eminence, and Potosi Dolomites was low, so drilling continued through the Bonneterre Formalion in hopes of increasing the yield. The well was compleled to a lotal deplh of 1,595 ft, and casedinlo the Upper Gasconade Dolomitewilh 280 ft of 12-in. diameter casing. About 233 ft of 8·in. diameter liner was Sci through caving shales in the Davis Formation from a deplh of 1, 192 ft to 1,425 ft. The well initially produced about 150 gpm with a specific capacity of less than I gpm/ft. The well was acidizcd using about 4,000 gallons of 15 percent hydrochloric acid introduced inlo the well near the base of the Potosi Dolomile. After acid trealment, yield increased somewhat to 210 gpm with 130 ft of drawdown. Specific capacity increased to 1.6 gpm/ft. Well #8 is currently pumped at aboul 240 gpm and has a specific capacity of 1.3 gpm/fl.

City or Rolla, Well #6 Well #6, constructed in 1951, is 1,215 ft deep, and contains 378 ft of 12-in. diameter casing set into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. When drilled, the well produced about 585 gpm with a specific capacity of7.3 gpm/ft. By 1962, specific capacity had decreased to 5.7 gpm/ftand thewell was producing483 gpm. Thewell was acidized with 4,000 gallons of 15 percenl hydrochloric acid in two stages. Afterwards, production increased 10 524 gpm, and speciCiccapacity to 7.5 gpm/ft. In 1990, it produced aboul 500 gpm, and had a specific capacity of 9.7 gpm/fl. From 1957 to 1992, well #6 produced a total of 1,781 million gallons and for that period supplied 9.3 percent ofthe water used in Rolla (Iables 9 and 10). From 1957 through 1960 it supplied about 20 percent of the total supply, but in 1990 accounted for only about 7.2 percent of the water produced. When drillcd,staticwaterlevel in well #6was 315 ft below land surface. InJuly, 1992,stalic water level was 435 fl, a decline of 120 ft and average yearly decline of 2.9 fttyr.

From 1960 to 1991, lotal production of well #8 was 753 million gallons, and through that period supplied on1y4.1 percentoflhewater used by Rolla (tables Band 14). In 1960, static water level at well #8 was 250 ft. In July, 1992, slaticwaler level was 280 ft, a decline of only 30 fect and an average annualdeclineoflcss than I ft/yr.

City of Rolla, Well #9 City of Rolla, Well #7

Well #9wasdrilled in 1966toa tOlal deplh of 1,135 fl, and is cased into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite with 317 ft of 12·in. diameter casing. When new, the well was tesledat SOOgpm and had aspccificcapacityof 12.5 gpm/ ft. Currently, the well is pumped at about 500 gpm, and specific capacity is to.7 gpm/ft.

Drilled in 1954, well #7 is 1,125 ft deep and was cased into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite with 292 ft of 12-in. diameter casing. In 1958, the well was recased to 509 ft with IO-inch diameter casing, possibly due to water· qualily problems. When drilled, its specific capacity was 2.8 gpm/ft and it yielded about 360 gpm. The well was acidized to increase production using 6,000 gallons of 15 percent hydrochloric acid. Yield and specific capacity

From August,1966, through 1990, the well produced 1,815 million gallons, supplying about 11.1 percent of Rolla's total waler supply Ihrough Ihe period (tables IS 11

OUlrkAquifer in 'he Rolla Area

and 16). In 1990. it accounted for 6.2 percent of Rolla's production.

yielded 524 gpm with a specific capacily of 6.0 gpm/ft. In 1990, the well was pumped at an average 610 gpm and had a specific capacity of 9.4 gpm/ft.

The log of well #9 shows a static water level of 348 ft. However, that value may not accurately reneet water level of the well when it was drilled. Records kept by RMU show static water level when drilled 10 be aboul 305 fl. In July, 1992,slatic water level was measured at 504 ft, indicating a water-level decline of 199 ft, and an average yearly decline of7.6 ftlyr. However, waler-Ievel data for well #9 is poor due to problems with Iheair line in the well. Data arc missing for much of the period between 1970 and 1980, and after 1988, so the above values may not be accurate.

Belween July, 1967, and 1991, well #10 produced about 1,669 million gallons, supplying 10.5 percent of Rolla's produclion (Iables 19 and 20). In 1990, it provided about 8 percent of the waler used. When il was drilled, slatic water level was 295 ft. In July, 1992, Sialic water level was 470 fl, a decline of 175 ft. Average yearly decline is about 7 ftlyr.

Hypoint InduSlriallJark Wells #1 and #2

University of Missouri-Rolla, Well #2

In 1968and 1970, three water-supply wells were drilled to supply the Hypoint Industrial Park. Ultimately, two of the wells, Hypoint #1 and #2 ,were completed as water-supply wells. The third, Hypoint well #3, was completed, but has been used since as a groundwaterlevel observation well. Hypoint wells #1 and #2 have excellent yields and specificcapacilics. Hypoint well #1 is 1,155 ft deep and is cased into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite with 400 ft of 12-in. diameter casing. It currently produces aboul 980 gpm, and when drilled had a specific capacity of 27.8 gpm/ft. Hypoint well #2 was drilled 10 a depth of650ft through theLower Gasconade Dolomite in 1968, and cased with 400 ft of 12-in. diameler casing into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. Yield was low, 88 gpm with ZOO fl of drawdown and a specific capacityofO.44 gpm/ft. It was acidized to bring produc· lion up 10 125 gpm wilh 80.6 ftofdrawdown, andspecific capacity increased 10 1.5 gpm/fl. Finally, the well was deepened in 1971 to 1,127 ft, through Ihe Potosi Dolomite, which increased the yield 10500 gpm with 78 ft of drawdown. Specific capacily after deepening was 6.4

Prior to 1967, University of Missouri-Rolla operated their own water-supply system, with cross-connections 10 the City'S supply. In 1963, UMR contracted for drilling of their third water-supply well. Completed to a depth of 1,205 ft and containing309 ft of 12-in. diameler casing, this well,designaled UMR well #Z,yielded about 520 gpm and had a specific capacily of 6.0 gpm/ft. In 1967, the universily and the CityofRolla entered intoan agreemenl whereby the Cily would supply water 10 Ihe university. University of Missouri-Rolla well #2 was leased by Rolla Municipal Utililies in 1970, and its produclion added 10 the City's system. In 1990, the well yielded about 570 gpm, and had a specific capacily of aboul 5.8 gpm/ft. Produclion dala are not available for the period prior 10 June, 1970, bUI between then and 1991, UMR well #2 produced 1,018 million gallons and supplied about 7.2 percent of Rolla's production (tables 17 and 18). The City still supplies UMR, but returned control of UMR well #2 to the universily in July, 1990. Sinec then, Rolla Municipal Utilities has removed their pump from the well. Presently, the U.S. Geological Survey uses the well as a groundwater-level observation well and has equipped il with a digital water-level recorder.

gpm/ft.

From 1975 through 1990, Hypoint well #1 produced aboull,063 million gallons of water, about 9.2 perecntof Rolla's total production (tables 21 and 22). During the same periods, Hypoint well #2 produced 1,005 miJIion gallons, about 8.7 percent of Ihe lOla Iproduction (tables 23 and 24).

In 1964, UMR well #2 had astaticwaterlevcl of361 fl. In July, 1992, staticwaler level was 421 ft. Waler-Ievel decline allhe well is 60 feet, or about 2.1 ftlyr.

Static water-level data are nol sufficient 10 develop long-term hydrographs for Hypoinl wells #1 and #2. Both wells are equipped with air lines and gages, and water levels are measured at bolh wells. However, unlike the other city wells where pumps arc started and stopped manually, the Hypoint well pumps start and stop automalically, depending on pressure in the system. Thus, some water-level measuremenls are made while the

City of Rolla, Well # 1O Well #lO,completed in 1967, hasa total depthof 1,140 ft and bottoms in the Derby-Doerun Dolomite. It contains 323 ft of 12-in. diameter casing sci into the Upper

Gasconade Dolomite. Initial production was apparently

pumps are running, and some when the pumps are off.

inadequate, so Ihe well was acidized using 1000 gallons of hydrochloric acid. After acid Ireatment, the well

SliII, Ihcrearcadequatedata toshowwater-Ievcl decline characteristics for the wells. When bolh wells were 12

GroWldwuler Supply

drilled, static watcr Icvcls were about 250 ft bclow land surface. In August, 1992, static water levels at Hypoint wells # 1 and #2 were 300 ft and 250 ft, respectively, showing thcre has been relatively minor water-level de.cline in the 07..ark aquifer in the Hypoint Industrial Park area betwecn about 1970 and the present.

10.4 percent of Rolla's water in 1990, and well #13 provided 12.4 percent. Static water levels for wells # lZand #13 in July, 1992, were 375 ft and 235 ft, respectively. When drilled, static water level at well # 12 was330 ft; at well # J3 it was about 210 ft.

Hypoint well #3, drilled in 1968, is 800 ft deep and contains 400 ft of 8-in. diameter casing set into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. The well may have been used brieny for water supply, but since 1975 has been used as a groundwater-level observation well operated by DGLS. Water-level data from it shows that pumping from the other Hypoint wells causes temporary water· level declines, but recovery is rapid, and the net decline in water level in theareasinccthecarly 1970sisminimal.

City or Rolla Well #14 Well #14was drilled in 1982 by a private developer to supply Oak Knolls subdivision, and was then known as Oak Knolls well #2. Thewell was purchased by the City when the subdivision was annexed. Well #14 is 1,020 ft deep and contains 352 ft of 8-in. diameter casing set through the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. The log ofthe well shows a yield of 450 gpm; specific capacity data are notavailable. When drilled,staticwater level at the well was about 250 ft. In July, 1992,staticwater level was 349 f1. The well is not currently used by the City.

City or Rolla, Well # II Well # II was drilled in 1972. It was the last production well constructed by the City untill989,and isoneof the City's highest producing wells. Well #11 is pumped at about 950 gpm, and has a specificcapacityof 12.3 gprnJ ft. When drilled, it was pump-tested at 868 gpm and had a specific capacity of 11.2 gpm/ft. Its total depth is 1,150 ft and it contains 325 ft of 12-in. diameter casing set into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite.

PHELPS COUNTY PWSD #2 WELLS

From November, 1972, through 1990, well #11 produced 1,571 million gallons accounting for 12.2 percent of the City's production during that time period (tables 25 and 26). In 1989, it provided 17.5 percent of water produced by the City.

Phelps County PWSD #2 constructed its first two wells in 1974, and began supplying water in 1975. Wells #3 and #4wereadded in 1987 and 1988, respectively. In July, 1992, the district had 496 active customers including 15 to 20 businesses. Most of the produced water is used for domestic water supply, and annual production currently is about 40 million gallons. Figure 4 shows monthly production for 1982 to 1991 fOrlhe District's 4 wells.

When drilled, well # II had a static water level of 294 ft.lnJuly,l992,staticwaterlevelwas350fl. Water·level decline is about 56 fI since 1972, an average of about 2.8 ftlyr.

The water district wells arc quite similar in depth and construction to Rolla's wells. All are cased into the Upper Gasconade Dolomite,and produce from the Lower Gasconade, Eminence, and Potosi dolomites. Well #1 is 1,050 ft deep and contains 425 ft of 8-in. diameter casing. Static water level at the limeofdrilling was 298 ft. In July, 1992, static water level was 332 ft, a decline of about 34 feet in 18 years or an average decline of about 1.9 fllyr. Specific capacity of the well is about 14.6 gpmlft. From 1982 through 1990, well # I produced 171 million gallons, and has been the District's most heavily pumped well. It has produced aboul 53 percent of the District's water during the period of record. Cur· rently, the well is pumped at about 180 gpm.

Cit)' or Rolla Wells #12 and #13 Wells:# IZand # 13werecompleted in 1989. Well #12 was drilled toadepth of 1,370ft and contains430 ftof 14in. diameter casing set a few fcct below the base of the Upper Gasconade Dolomite. Well #13 is 1,200 ft deep and cased with 350 ft of 14-in. diameter casing into the Lower Gasconade Dolomite. There are significant differences in production characteristics between the tWO \\.'Clls. Well #12 currently produces about 580 gpm and has a specific capacity of2.8 gpm/ft. Well # 13 yields 990 gpm, and its specific capacity when drilled was 9.1 gprnJ ft. Production from both wells was added to Rolla's water-supply system beginning early 1900. Production information is shown in tables 27 and 28 for well #12, and tables 29 and 30 for well #13. Well # 12 provided

Well #2 is 1,075 ft dccp and contains 500 ft of Io.in. diameter casing. Water level at the time of drilling was 301.5 ft, and in July, 1992, was 340 ft. Water-level decline over the 18 years was about 38.5 ft, or an a\'Crage of about 2.1 rtIyr. The well was tested ata pumpingrateof250gpm, and had 12.4 ft ofdrawdown;specificcapacityofthewell is

13

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, WELL '2 WELL

"'"

J"

FEB

"'"

APR

PROOUCTlO~

""

JU"

(lHlllO~ GALLO~S)

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

YEARLY TOTAL

1951

0.00

0.00

0.31

0.51

0.50

0.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.42

1.2.4

0.93

5.23

1958

0.59

1.35

1-06

1.29

0.81

0.81

0.12

0.00

1.24

2.50

2.28

1.51

13.63

1959

1.04

1.62

2.00

2.71

1.57

1.55

1.21

0.10

1.92

0.49

0.19

1.29

17 .00

1960

0.11

1.88

1.29

2.29

1.19

1.82

2.14

1.61

2.18

2.00

1.53

1.60

21.55

1961

0.83

1.66

1-08

1.62

2.04

1.15

2.56

4.25

2.72

2.69

3.01

2.011

26.28

1962

2.93

1.57

2.28

2.16

3.41

1.29

2.08

1.06

2.04

2.10

1.49

l.16

23.52

1963

0.18

1.33

2.02

2.52

2.30

1.10

3.25

1.2.4

2.08

2.55

1.16

0.85

22.38

1964

1.38

1.8.4

2.83

2.5.4

2.43

2.21

1-92

2.30

1.95

2.05

1-16

1.66

24.27

1965

1.85

2.8.4

2.38

1.31

2.34

2.34

1.89

2.42

2.52

2 •.45

4.30

3.86

30.52

1966

3.89

2.66

2.21

1.73

2.26

1.91

3.12

(US

1.09

0.18

2. 7<1

2.92

26.01

1967

0.52

1.73

1.62

2.95

2.30

1.81

2.07

1.39

2.12

1.53

1.43

2.61

22.0.4

1968

1.15

0.63

1.13

0.34

1.92

2.13

2.09

1.33

1.41

2.26

2.14

1.50

Hl.Ol 28 •.46

1969

0 . .49

2.63

1-42

1.59

2.48

1.42

3.44

3.13

3.06

2.85

2•.40

3.4.4

1970

2.61

2.80

2.31

2.66

3.29

2.50

2.08

2.14

2.5a

1.9.4

3.10

2.32

30.39

1971

2.21

2.35

2.46

2.64

3.11

2.42

3•.43

3.33

3.50

2.75

2.82

2.53

33.60

2.50

2 •.42

2.88

2.56

2.93

2..42

2•.41

2.22

2.68

2.30

29.61

1.45

1.85

1.93

1.90

2.00

1.52

2.05

22.25

1912

1.66

2.48

2.37

2.22

2.29

1.08

1.60

Las

1.53

1.93

2.25

2.1a

2.00

1.89

2.14

1.99

2.13

23.24

1915

1.89 2.10

1.56 1.27

0.98

0.62

1.32

1.8a

Las

2.01

1.85

1..45

0.61

2.15

18.14

1976

1.35

1.43

1.12

1.51

0.81

2.10

1.a.4

2.09

1.91

1.66

1.67

1.71

19.91

1971

1. 75

1.72

1. 79

1.61

1.35

1.75

t.'"

L72

1.46

1.71

1.49

0.84

19.14

1918

1.53

1.11

1.54

1.11

1.8.4

1.65

2.00

1.84

2.01

1.64

2.25

2.02

21-20

1913 1914

1979

1.63

1. 78

1.99

1.60

2.01

1.98

2.1.4

l.a5

1.59

1.76

1.98

2.29

22.59

1980

3.91

3.05

3.56

3.13

1.55

1.65

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

16.90

1981

2.81

1.98

2.72

1.8a

2.63

2.55

2.51

2.89

3.01

2.46

2.22

2.89

30.51

1982

2.12

3.08

2.27

2.20

1.89

2.42

2.12

2.05

2.59

2.21

2.15

1.84

27.59

1993

2.15

1.86

2.17

1.61

2.44

1.19

1.56

2.12

1.96

1.23

1.33

2.06

21.69

1984

1.16

1.46

1.67

1.76

1.31

1.65

1.96

2.11

L19

1.86

2.20

1.39

20.92

1985

2.20

1.99

2.05

1.95

1.90

1. 72

1.64

1.56

1.52

2.55

1.09

1.55

n.72

1986

L99

1.59

1.53

0.69

1.23

1.44

1.33

1.34

1. 21

1- 74

1.52

2.15

17 .15

1981

1.02

2.02

0.90

1.81

1.57

1.40

1.98

1-59

1-75

1.36

1.66

1.23

18.19

1989

1.81

2.38

2.39

1.82

2.55

1.46

1.61

2.03

1.22

1.91

0.00

0.00

19.29

1999

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.60

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.60

1990

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

59.96

60.36

51.99

63.48

57.33

63.45

51.24

61.13

60.35

59.10

58.88

TOTAl 110NTHL V 55.19 PRODUCTION

TOTAL PROOUCTION 1951-1990, C[TV OF ROLLA, WELL '2: 114.33511 ImllON liALLONS

Table L Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #2, 1957-1991. 14

Groundwater Supply

PERCENT OF TOTAl CITT PROOUCTJOlf SUPPlIEO BY Cill Of ROtLA. 'l£LL 12

....

..,

"All

JAIl

1951 1959 1959 1950

0.00 3.02 4.95 3.54

'.00 6.05 1.15 9.52

1.12 5.39 !U5 6.14

2.41 6.01 11.99 9.63

2.39 3.92 5.39 1.63

1.24 3.56 5.35 1.06

'.00 0.56 4.29 1.59

'.00 0.00 2.'22 6.54

'.00 4.911 1.14 10.26

6.35 10.32 1.90 1.92

5.11 9.94 3.14 6.30

4.59 1.26 5.15 1.32

5.12 5.63 1.43

1951 1962 1963

3.69 12.09 3.29 5.49

6.99 6.13 4.96 1.31

6.92 9.05

1.12

10.51

8.13 11.13 9.13 9.15 6.95

9.D 4.10 6.15 1.90 1.99

10.55 6.15 11. 19 5.91 5.52

15.90 3.22 4.43 6.31 1.32

10.23 1.01 1.30 5.91 9.12

10.29 9.04 1.16

1965

5.12 10.09 9.13 11.12 9.64

6.12 1.14

12.26 6.00 6.39 3.91 13.49

9.66 4.91 3.59 6.51 13.41

9.36 1.29 6.91 1.04 9.56

'966

13.51 1.64

9.51 5. '22 1.56

1.09 6.99 4.36 5.44 6.14

5.59 5.61 4.98 3.16 5.19

'.96 3.62 4.18 6.22 3.81

1.81 3.50 4.64 5.11 6.34

9.92 6.04 '.02 '.05 5.05

6.18 4.91 3.42 5.33 5.13

4.14 4.10 3.06 5.19 3.39

5.33 4.93 3.25 3.59 2.16

5.42

5.11 5.39

5.66 5.00

'.95

.."

0'1.1/1

3.69 2.91

'.BO 2.39

'.00 4.01

'.04 5.11 3.86

2.14 3.22 2.83

2.60 2.39 2.99 2.43

'.00

Q.OO

2.49 3.05 2.11 2.52 0.00

5.0!l 2.16 2.25 2.83 2.41

4.40 3.26 2.16 2.69 2.12

3.85 3.51 1.92 3.16 US

2.03 2.25 2.81

1.13

2.59 1.04

'.BO 2." 3.28

'.00 0.00

3.39

..

"

'96' 1968 '96' 1910

2." 1.28 6.23

fEB

'.58 5.21

....""

4.99

.. " 5.33

....

0.83

5.91

1.99

'.GO

5."

'.05 2.85 6.29 3.18

4.43

....

6." 6.08

4.10 5.40 4.91 3.91 2.54

5.60 5.J] 0'1.82 4.35 l.88

1.38

6.05 6.08 3.49 4.53 2.63

2.66 2.60 2.18

3.02 2.99 3.04 3.25 6.26

2.94 2.16 3.11 2.93 5.59

1.59 2.16 3.52 3.11 2.80'1

3.64 2.14 2.99 3.50 2.18

2.98 3.42 3.05 3. .013 0.00

0'1.35 3.83 3.n 2.02 3.66

3.46 3.11 3.01 3.01

.01.10 2.91 3.98 2.19

II. III

4.15 3.41 2.10

J."

'.28

1.22 3.01 J.26

'.90

'.22 4.43

1916 1911 1918 1919 1990

2." 2.11 3.01 2.92 1.04

1991 1982 1993

4.85

'.58

3.69 J.BO

"" '''5

2." 3.92

4.52 3.31 2.66 3.11

"" '''' ""

3.69 2.01 3.51

3.12 3.1l 4.08

3.n

'.00 '.00

'.00 '.00

'.22 '.00 '.00

2.31 2.08 1.81

'.00 '.00

'.00 '.00

'.00 0.00

'.00

'.00 '.00

3.96

4.01

4.01

3.99

4.03

J.56

3.51

3.12

1999

'990

].21

5.65

2.66 1.41

5.23

6.95 3.62

1911 1911 1913 1914 1915

5.98 4.52 4.95

5." US

'.58

2.15

OCT

OCt

3.82 1.91 2.18 3.32

2." 2.18 1.90 2." 2.02 0.85

5.63 '.29 3.33 3.36 3.12

3.n

2.19 6.12 4.43 5.68 4.60

1.11 2.65 2.48 3.80 ).35

P~OOUCTIOH

5.43

3.15 4.15 2.11

'.00 3.10 4.04 2.25 3.91 l.9d

4.54 3.21 3.53 2.64 2.11

'.56 2.82 2.89 3.01

2.86

3.18 2.21

'.00 0.00

2." '.00 '.00 '.00

'.00 '.00 '.00

3.60

3.13

3.95

FRO" 1951 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED BY CITY OF ROlLA. WELL 12: ].11 P£RCENT

Table 2: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by Cily of Rolla, well #2. 15

....

3.10 2.28

P~OOUCTION

PERCENTAGE Of TOTAL

2.09

3.01 1.60 3.61 3.63 0.00

.. TOTAl. Il0NTtI,.Y

YEARLY

PERCENTAGE

2." 3.60 5.48

5.14

SE.

JI'-

JUN

2.11 2.64 ].10

4.19

2•.0111 2.52 2.55 0.08

'.00

Omrk Aquifer in the Rolla Area

WELL

VE"

JAA

FEB

C!TV OF ROLLA, 'oInL 13 P~OOUCT!O~ (M!LLION GAlLONS)

'"

""

""

JUN

JUl

AUG

SEP

OCT

""

0"

VEAR!. v

TOTAL

1951

0.00

01.31

4.32

5.012

5.56

6.21\

6.53

6.59

9.50

5.25

01.06

4.03

60.99

1958

4.51

5.11

01.23

01.18

4.55

4.45

4.43

6.2!!

5.61

6.35

6.001

5.23

62.29

1959

5.16

6.14

5.03

5.02

6.59

6.55

8.20

B.93

6.96

6.68

6.58

6.36

18.19

4.15

5.96

01.81

5.89

01.65

4.26

3.95

60.33 50.99

1960

5.51

Ui6

5.03

01.24

1961

4.22

01.91

3.14

1\.31

3.96

4.67

3.91

A.d4

4.02

1\.80

01.31

4.21

1962

01.99

4.19

4.41

4.09

6.41

5.62

6.40

1.11

5.03

4.40

4.19

63.53

1963

4.31

5.11

4.28

4.55

4.42

4.98

4.B4

5.l7

,. '"

5.43 1.00

A.18

4.20

58.84

1964

4.12

5.H

4.32

5.29

01.45

6.03

7.62

1.54

5.11

6.22

5.13

5.15

67.35

1965

5.12

4.34

4.13

4.11

6.08

6.81

6.32

8.001

7.65

6.26

1.99

8.03

16.08

6.62

1966

6.25

6.92

4.21

6.50

6.27

6.56

10.52

9.28

5.50

1.80

8.20

5.36

93.311

U61

5.02

5.12

6.02

6.43

5.U

01.96

5.15

1.20

5.13

1.01

4.29

4.13

60.21

1968

5.51

7.0a

6.01

5.51

5.96

4.80

6.45

3.012

1. 76

6.52

11.09

5.H

72.70

1969

6.34

5.32

6.62

1.40

5.92

5.55

6.81

1.90

5.90

6.98

1.21

6.30

18.31

1910

5.98

1.82

6.23

6.65

6.51

5.23

5.61

6.24

5.31

5.l3

4.14

4.39

69.49

1911

4.19

1\.48

4.37

01.26

4.24

4.06

6.d9

6.46

5.53

d.27

4.24

3.69

56.21

1912

2.60

4.22

4.30

4.49

4.41

4.88

5.82

5.14

4.50

4.16

3.59

4.09

52.18

1973

4.81

4.41

4.31

4.34

3.91

3.69

01.29

4.6.4

4.65

4.43

4.901

3.68

52.34

1914

4.08

3.01

3.51

4.81

3.11

01.29

4.21

5.60

4.21

3.65

4.41

3.90

49.58

1915

4.80

3.011

5.51

4.30

3.86

5.62

1.18

2.35

01.13

4.56

4.91

4.04

019.31

1916

4.03

01.90

4.50

3.15

3.15

0.63

1.11

l.50

3.10

5.36

3.24

3.12

012.24

1911

3.87

4.19

3.91

4.14

4.111

01.31

3.57

6.26

4.29

4.06

3.41

4.54

51.33

1918

l.e4

3.49

3.88

3.82

3.21

0.00

0.00

5.53

1.29

4.33

4.01

3.9!!

41.45

1919

01.80

4.49

3.98

3.12

4.112

4.51

4.45

A.51

4.69

01.02

4.20

4.15

52.35

1980

4.02

3.44

3.111

3.81

3.25

4.03

4.05

3.61

5.26

5.34

4.42

4.8d

49.99

1981

3.80

3.42

3.32

3.32

2.08

3.62

4.49

l.6A

4.25

3.36

3.95

3.57

42.92

1982

3.39

3.111

2.11

3.18

3. IS

1.11

1.49

3.04

3.21

3.94

3.41

2.89

34.11

1983

3.61

3.3J

3.12

3.92

4.10

4.93

4.69

4.51

4.54

2.16

4.36

3.52

41.98

1994

3.14

2.15

5.49

5.13

4.96

4.90

4.83

4.64

2.18

2.83

2.04

2.54

016.63

1985

3.95

3.28

3.10

1\.51

4.34

4.64

3.14

4.13

3.98

2.03

0.00

3.61

42.03

1996

4.10

4.51

5.23

4.09

4.02

4.14

5.11

4.45

4.98

4.45

2.50

3.68

51.92

1981

2.22

2.10

3.03

3.02

3.52

3.91

2.89

3.35

4.28

2.99

2.59

2.69

31.13

19811

2.11

3.28

3.62

3.23

3.56

2.19

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

18.58

1989

0.00

4.05

4.31

4.68

6.90

e.39

e.76

6.69

6.91

6.13

5.21

1.15

63.23

1990

5.19

3.7J

3.
3.58

01.55

3.93

3.016

5.22

01.99

3.56

3.84

l.d8

<16.99

152.31

148.96

155.62

156.52

151.39

164.10

114.53

112.20

162.5!

149.66

131.41

TOTAL 1t0NTHlV 140.19 PRODUCTION TOTAl PRODUCTION 1951·1990, CITV OF ROllA, WELL '3: 1912.H3

ItllllON GAllONS

Table 3: Monthly and yearly produclion, City of Rolla, well #3, 1957·1991. 16

Groundwater Supply

PERCENT OF TOTAL CITY

PRODUCTIO~

SUPPLIED 8Y CITY Of ROLLA. WEll fJ

YEAR

'M

FE,

I!All

""

m

JUN

JUL

....UG

SEP

OCT

,o.

DEC

YEARLY PERCENTAGE

19~1

0.00

21.98

23.9J

25.39

26.16

25.00

24.89

23.55

32.49

23.49

HI.86

19.80

24.39

1958

23.38

25.66

21.42

22.38

22.04

19.41

19.96

26.34

22.53

26.22

26.33

24.19

23.39

1959

21.31

27.19

24.33

21.70

26.95

22.51

27.50

2!l.52

25.86

26.15

26.31

28.45

26.10

1960

25.44

21.09

23.93

17.88

20.21

25.62

21.13

19.90

21.14

18.15

11.61

19.02

20.19

1961

19.85

20.50

16.60

19.43

16.52

24.21

16.14

16.50

15.10

111.40

11.83

19.99

19.11

1962

21.31

18.15

19.79

15.27

21.66

20.41

20.15

21.69

11.29

20.82

11.69

19.94

19.66

1963

19.19

19.35

1!l.52

17.11

16.14

18.00

16.61

19.11

H.34

21.26

17.39

17.55

18.16

1964

19.13

20.30

17.91

19.88

16.02

21.58

23.11

20.91

15.56

20.39

18.75

20.15

19.53

1965

21.96

16.02

16.12

11.55

17.11

23.23

18.45

24.31

26.49

19.78

25.06

27.90

21.33

1966

21.81

22.26

14.43

19.99

19.65

19.96

19.8!

24.52

15.39

19.59

23.38

16.98

19.80

1967

!5.81

!5.51

19.55

18.51

15.~3

15.02

13.31

2.72

11.91

16.58

10.52

10.91

13.41

1968

14.26

11.48

15.35

13.45

13.S4

11.19

12.53

7.34

15.33

!J.18

17.49

13.92

13.15

1969

16.39

12.84

16.75

16.98

13.01

12.30

13.77

15.86

12.96

15.25

15.45

14.74

14.66

1970

14.27

16.98

14.43

14.37

13.49

10.83

9.79

11.01

9.11

10.61

8.47

9.55

11.74

1911

9.92

9.96

9.97

8.45

8.24

7.91

10.011

10.94

11.96

8.41

8.6!

9.26

9.09

1972

1.11

9.19

9.17

9.118

9.30

8.61

9.80

9.09

9.39

8.24

7.20

8.88

8.18

1913

9.94

9.81

9.19

9.61

8.62

7.80

1.54

8.02

8.20

9.16

9.19

8.11

8.83

1974

9.11

7.56

8.41

11.25

8.83

9.98

6.94

9.42

8.19

8.21

9.62

9.45

8.96

1915

10.12

6.82

10.68

9.~2

7.11

10.10

2.66

3.64

6.48

7.53

9.59

1.27

7.38

1976

7.45

9.11

1.93

7.02

5.11

1.09

2.77

5.36

5.05

8.05

5.14

6.34

5.86

7.26

6.53

7.08

6.71

6.14

6.2B

9.94

6.99

1.25

5.61

8.69

7.011

7.68

6.12

6.12

0.00

0.00

9.68

10.50

1.19

6.118

7.25

6.06

1971

5.99

1918

3.64

1919

'.58

6." B.23

6.50

6.113

1.47

1.98

1.14

6.9El

7.20

6.01

1.10

6.58

1. 18

1990

1.13

6.36

6.80

6.92

5.95

6.19

4.96

4.98

7.93

1.91

1.42

8.11

6.14 5.86

1981

6.51

6.18

5.36

6.11

3.24

5.81

7.24

6.36

6.21

5.25

6.51

5.62

1982

5.92

<1.66

4.59

5.41

4.85

1.16

2.43

4.10

4.05

6.19

5.11

5.05

4.49

1983

6.39

5.92

6.18

7.13

6.66

9.20

6.31

4.19

6.38

4.32

1.43

1984

5.15

5.03

9.27

9.99

'.30

8.25

1.34

6.24

4.20

4.82

3.69

6.02 4.90

6.23 6.43

1985

7.03

6. !3

6.63

7.13

1.41

8.96

4.91

6.55

5.55

3.09

0.00

6.54

5.B2

1996

1.59

B.89

9.08

1.23

1.04

1.80

7.41

6.13

1.13

1.19

4.12

6.46

1.27

!991

4.37

4.97

4.91

5.11

6.5!

5.15

4.44

4.16

6.34

4.92

4.41


5.13

1988

5.19

5.63

6.39

5.19

5.04

2.79

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.55

1989

0.00

8.09

1.95

9.10

10.32

14.38

12.41

9.49

10.95

9.11

9.59

1.91

8.59

1990

B.21

1.27

5.43

6.33

7.91

6.33

5.41

1.14

1.15

5.66

1.03

2.61

6.44

" TOTAl 1l0HTHLY 9.80 PRODUCTION

10.36

10.04

10.44

9.94

9.19

9.10

9.53

9.55

9.11

9.45

9.23

PERCfNTAC£ Of TOTAL PRODUCTION ~RO" 1957 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED BY CITY Of ROLLA. WElt '3:

9.13 PERCENT

Table 4: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #3. 17

Ozo.rkAqui!er in the Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, 'JELL III WELL PRODUCTION (MILLION GAlLONS)

YEAR

'"

APR

FEB

'"

JUR

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

'"

DEC

YEARLY TOTAl

1951

0.00

d.95

4.62

4.88

5.21

5.61

6.38

6.26

1.12

2.08

3.57

4.21

!lB.95

1958

d.16

d.92

3.12

3.61

3.69

3.8!!

4.89

5.78

5.84

4.35

4.13

4.13

53.12

1959

ll.12

ll.77

4.16

d.15

5.43

6.90

6.23

5.B6

5.20

4.90

5.32

3.711

62.03

1960

4.16

3.56

3.15

3.67

2.66

0.00

5.11

4.51

3.76

3.69

3.46

3.B3

41.58

1961

4.29

3.64

2.91

3.51

3.05

0.00

3.65

3.99

4.12

4.15

3.28

3.11

39.70

1962

3.09

3.80

3.74

3.91

4.27

d.65

4.92

5.4!!

5.61

3.511

3.76

3.13

50.60

1963

3.54

3.96

3.61

4.21

3.65

5.21

1I.02

4.11

4.B4

6.01

4.36

3.30

50.90

196d

3.62

4.01

3.91

3.63

4.51

4.00

4.46

5.68

6.19

4.19

4.55

4.15

53.56

1965

3.79

3.93

3.116.

4.14

6.09

4.61

5.09

4.59

3.65

5.13

5.54

3.93

54.96

1966

6.15

6.37

4.311

4.15

6.86

1. 41

11.20

12.8B

6.76

5.14

119.48

7.13

1I.92

d.43

5.48

5.12

6.42

6.39

1.21

6.111

8.53 1.2]

9.06

1961

5.46

6.63

13.91

1968

5.91

6.49

1.21

1.49

6.03

8.36

9.25

8.02

9.56

B.80

8.77

8.07

94.08

1969

B.70

9.00

9.49

8.0<1

9.34

9.25

8.52

6.13

6.08

6.79

1.84

6.04

95.22

1970

6.68

6.09

6.29

1.05

6.flO

6.31

5.83

5.3B

5.44

5.lId

5.44

5.4d

12.N

1971

6.09

5.21

4.59

6.37

5.711

6.51

1.211

7.53

7.711

6.51

5.99

5.11

1d.n

1912

4.61

5.46

5.65

6.00

5.28

6.78

5.76

6.02

6.211

5.61

5.12

5.10

69.28

1913

4.91

3.86

2.28

4.24

2.19

1.74

5.22

4.50

4.58

3.02

3.35

2.50

43.01

191d

5.32

3.6<1

2.01

2.13

2.11

2.91

5.111

5.112

4.01

d.51

3.04

2.44

45.06

1915

2.44

3.95

6.22

4.96

4.92

4.15

6.71

5.14

5.93

4.78

4.85

3.89

59.14

1916

4.38

3.35

3.36

3.31

2.10

3.36

4.71

4.64

6.48

5.06

2.80

2.97

46.58

1977

5.47

4.10

3.11

2.90

3.98

5.91

5.59

1I.65

6.31

5.63

2.82

4.09

56.16

1918

5.12

2.18

3.92

3.39

2.14

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

5.96

5.02

3.35

31.68

1979

2.10

4.24

4.37

4.511

4.11

3.46

4.37

5.02

3.42

6.116

4.06

2.89

49.48

19BO

2.50

2.95

d.08

3•.,<1

3.85

d.82

1.18

10.53

6.d9

5.98

d.83

2.B2

60.01

1981

2.111

1.06

1.72

3.69

5.69

4.52

5.59

d.16

4.99

3.76

2.11

1.60

1I1.11

1982

1.66

3.86

2.09

2.25

1.58

3.11

1.99

4.28

4.06

4.51

3.51

3.36

36.211

1983

2.30

3.02

2.34

2.54

<1.08

3.31

4.86

5.111

6.02

4.18

3.30

2.63

411.51

198d

4.92

1.64

1.64

2.57

2.99

3.50

3.10

6.32

6.19

3.30

2.68

2.23

<11.68

1985

1.09

2.55

2.25

2.12

2.57

5.50

6.57

6.lI6

1.97

8.66

3.85

4.22

54.d3

19116

3.87

3.26

5.41

3.34

<1.69

a.94

6.08

4.92

5.81

a.50

3.35

3.60

53.114

1987

2.20

0.13

3.40

3.32

3.91

5.30

5.29

1.99

3.30

5.45

4.1!l

4.29

48.74

1988

3.69

5.12

5.35

5.50

5.77

6.5!

<1.14

1.86

6.39

5.19

5.23

5.21

66.53

1989

4.50

0.00

0.00

0.00

!l.47

4.39

7.d3

7.56

7.43

7.37

5.30

6.24

54.10

1990

1.06

3.21

4.91

3.H

4.30

<1.60

3.74

2.91

0.00

0.00

0.00

3.01

37.49

133.83

134.92

140.23

151.22

1511.69

198.53

198.81

178.46

178.91

150.48

138.30

TOTAL 110NTHLV 143.12 PRODUCTION TOTAl PROOUCTION U51-1990, CITY Of ROLLA, WELL 14; IB96.15Z

/lILLlON !>ALLoNS

TableS: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #4, 1957-1991. 18

Groundwater Supply

CIT~

PERCENT Of TOTAL SUPPlIED

"AA

J"

FEB

""

8~ CIT~

""

JU'

PRODUCTION

OF ROLLA, Io'ELL 14

JUL

'"'

OCT

SEe

'"

DEC

YEARL~

PERCENTAGE

1951

0.00

24.91

25.62

22.81

25.31

22.45

24.33

22.35

4.21

9.29

16.62

20.61

1958

21.26

22.13

18.84

16.91

11.99

11.(14

22.03

24.21

23.19

11.99

20.62

19.09

19.61 20.11

1959

22.44

2l.12

20.11

20.54

22.12

23.19

20.91

18.12

19.33

19.18

21.21

16.91

20.54

1960

19.19

16.14

14.99

15.49

1l.34

0.00

18.12

11.14

13.91

14.42

1-4.29

11.46

14.33

1961

19.19

15.3)

15.<13

1.4.99

13.02

0.00

15.06

14.113

15•.41

15.91

13.36

14.46

14.13

1962

13.20

14.1111

16.54

14.110

14.43

16.90

15.94

16.16

19.28

13.12

15.09

15.53

15.li6

1963

14.98

14.80

15.62

15.90

n.B3

IB.92

13.84

14.BII

11.00

18.28

15.Bl

13.82

15.11

19li4

14.35

15.95

16.19

13.63

lli.45

14.33

n.8!!

15.14

18.65

15.69

1.1.88

16.24

15.53

1965

1.4.55

14.51

15.6<1

15.43

11.82

15.11

14.86

13.88

12.63

18.12

11.31

13.66

15.41

19li6

2l.46

20.<18

15.00

12.18

21.49

21.41

21.09

34.01

18.93

21.41

25.92

19.11

21.25

1961

22.5ti

14.89

14.40

15.15

11.39

19.46

16.52

15.93

14.11

11.19

13.39

11.62

16.46

19611

15.28

16.04

18.56

18.09

13.10

19.50

11.95

11.23

111.1I8

18.60

18.98

20.52

11.90

1969

22.49

21.13

24.01

18.44

20.52

20.<19

11.23

12.31

13.36

14.82

16.61

14.12

11.82

1910

15.95

13.23

14.51

15.24

ll.94

13.20

10.111

9.49

9.34

10.84

1l.12

1l.1I3

12.21

1911

14.45

10.42

10.41

12.64

11.24

12.11

11.24

12.16

12.61

12.112

12.14

11.511

12.09

1912

12.60

11.n

12.01

13.23

1l.14

11.91

9.69

10.64

11.li9

13.10

10.29

12.42

11.65

1913

10.04

8.52

4.110

9.39

6.01

3.68

9.18

1.11

8.08

6.26

6.63

5.92

1.25

1914

11.811

9.13

4.13

6.39

6.49

6.11

'.sa

9.19

1.92

10.14

5.91

8.05

1915

5.15

1.92

11.93

10.91

9.113

'.54

10.03

8.92

9.31

1.89

6.52 8.48

1.00

8.85

1916

8.09

6.23

5.91

6.31

6.46

1911

8.46

6.23

6.20

1918

11.21

4.28

1.11

1919

3.76

1.19

19110

4.44

5.45

1991

4.95

1.92

2.11

6.90

9.B9

1982

2.90

5.61

3.54

3.86

2.43

1993

4.06

5.31

3.89

4.14

6.63

1984

9.01

4.49

1.94

3.00 4.11

2.11

1995

4.03

4.61

1996

1.16

6.43

9.50

5.91

8.21

8.14

19117

4.34

0.25

5.56

5.63

7.24

1.911

1999

1.05

9.91

9.45

9.BS

9.16

B.34

7.26

11.10

l(l.20

1989

1.99

0.00

0.00

0.00

6.68

1.52

10.59

10.14

11.111

1990

11.11

6.19

1.91

6.62

1.39

1.41

5.91

4.n

0.00

MONTHLY 10.05

9.10

9.10

9.41

9.60

9.81

10.42

10.95

9.90

3.86

5.84

1.38

1.11

8.85

l.lil

4.44

5.06

6.4(1

9.25

9.83

1.31

1(1.26

11.82

4.58

1.B2

1.15

5.96

4.09

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

9.B9

8.<18

4.63

1.13

8.41

6.31

6.11

7.03

1.69

5.25

10.24

6.86

6.10 4.51

6.19

1.18

6.16

1.05

8.12

9.51

14.26

9.80

8.95

9.12

5.01

8.10

7."

9.02

1.21

1.29

5.118

3.51

2.52

5.12

4.92

3.26

5.18

5.12

1.09

5.16

5.61

5.53

6.23

11.45

6.55

5.00

5.99

5.62

9.50

9.33

5.62

5.63 4.93

5.98 4.50 4.23

5.19 5.15

4.43

10.li4

9.74

10.n

11.10

13.18

6.91

1.54

1.53

9.11

1.45

9.n

1.26

6.33

6.33

1.54

8.ll

11.33

4.99

8.99

1.06

1.92

6.14

9.63

9.16

10.08

9.15

10.4B

9.14

10.40

1.43

0.00

0.00

5.30

5.14

10.69

9.50

9.29

,. "

\ TOTAL PRODUCTION PERC£NTA'E OF TOTAl PROOUCTION

fRon

1'~1 THROU6~

1"0 SUPPLIED BY ([IV

OF ROLLA, WHL

I~:

9.95 ?[R(£NT

Table 6: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #4. 19

4.68

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, WELL IS WELL PRODUCTION

¥EM

'"

FEB

'"

'"

""

JU'

(~ILL!ON

JUl

GALLONS)

,"G

SEe

NO'

OCT

DEC

YEARLY TOTAL

1951

0.00

4.11

4.24

5.06

6.35

7.29

2.58

2.93

5.58

'I. 51

4.35

3.65

49.72

1958

3.04

5.28

3.12

3.10

3.56

4.29

3.11

5.99

5.19

4.19

4.99

5.22

52.46

1959

4.47

5.23

A.A5

5.09

4.98

6.41

6.13

6.86

5.65

6.01

5.18

5.20

65.65

1960

3.61

3.11

3.36

3.68

5.79

5.81

5.51

5.52

5.92

4.69

4.74

4.58

56.98

1961

4.39

4.H

4.82

3.91

4.25

4.75

5.12

4.35

5.91

5.11

5.08

3.96

56.40

1962

4.81

5.96

5.13

5.75

6.95

7.03

6.32

6.43

5.16

5.16

5.32

4.94

69.62

1963

5.62

6.32

5.24

5.14

5.18

5.25

5.23

4.80

6.13

5.64

5.46

"5.90

65.91

1964

5.22

4.31

5.30

5.12

6.38

5.60

6.29

1.83

6.84

5.38

5.53

4.91

70.36

1965

5.05

5.24

5.14

5.21

5.14

5.43

9.93

5.30

4.58

4.28

3.21

LID

60.21

1956

Leo

3.91

6.61

1.20

6.30

7.12

12.31

5.e2

6.65

5.01

4.32

4.25

11.43

3.49

4.56

6A.54

1961

5.13

6.27

3.64

4.68

4.26

A.58

5.74

1.68

1.31

1.20

1968

6.40

3.41

5.06

5.10

6.37

5.82

6.62

6.48

6.49

4.23

2.41

5.32

64.32

0.00

0.00

52.01

6.11

62.JJ

1959

4.63

1.58

3.95

6.96

5.24

5.03

5.54

5.11

5.80

4.11

1910

II. 05

4.46

4.16

4.36

5.61

4.93

5.96

5.65

5.26

6.19

5.58

1911

4.12

1.56

6."

8.96

1.28

6.95

9.24

8.16

1.49

7.02

6.19

6.17

81.47

8.09

9.26

8.05

1.55

4.93

5.93

83.55

1972

4.84

8.25

1.18

5.95

6.39

1.13

6.99

1.48

6.11

1.95

6.25

6.01

6.11

5.70

13.49

5.80

5.31

3.39

5.01

1914

6.13

4.70

4.95

6.48

4.58

5.33

1.66

1.02

4.13

5.24

6.38

4.80

61.40

1915

5.13

5.33

5.62

5.37

5.09

1.01

4.62

6.95

6.46

5.31

6.2.6

5.24

69.46

1976

5.19

6.14

6.34

5.94

4.81

5.51

7.25

6.27

6.67

7.68

5.40

5.81

13.61

1911

5.89

6.91

5.95

5.01

4.82

6.99

5.98

9.67

8.12

6.61

8.49

6.81

91-38 71.46

1973

1978

4.15

6.18

5.24

5.52

6.30

6.91

1.46

5.94

6.34

5.83

5.38

5.24

1919

5.99

5.48

5.69

4.84

5.18

5.20

5.64

6.10

8.52

6.54

5.79

5.55

71.13

1980

0.76

0.00

0.00

5.19

11. 21

11.21

15.46

11. 37

8.55

8.03

6.07

6.34

84.19

1981

5.82

6.28

5.81

6.41

6.18

6.43

9.31

9.97

9.62

7.49

8.97

5.60

88.03

1982

5.25

8.12

4.63

4.81

6.12

3.98

4.82

1.14

1.25

5.99

6.99

6.52

12.B9

1983

6.41

5.25

5.35

6.34

1i.62

1. 78

1i.26

8.31

5.69

5.42

5.15

5.00

73.li4

1984

5.05

4.51

5.51

5.97

5.03

6.59

6.8B

5.84

7.62

6.03

5.41

4.85

li9.31

1995

5.91

4.29

5.12

5.55

5.09

5.21

1.89

7.32

IUD

3.90

1.92

5.89

72.13

1986

1i.03

5.94

5.43

4.76

5.22

5.08

2.50

5.61

6.47

8.04

5.93

8.01

59.15

1987

5.12

5.20

6.81i

5.90

5.95

B.55

7.26

9.00

9.24

B.7J

7.21

5.60

85.21

1988

5.93

6.10

1.21

6.21

7.14

8.25

6.liO

9.30

6.78

6.51

1i.42

5.85

82.96

1989

6.58

5.86

1i.45

6.57

8.38

6.32

7.45

1.43

7.35

1.00

5.n

6.00

80.12

1990

6.34

5.91

4.79

3.26

6.12

4.21

6.14

1.03

5.55

0.611

0.00

0.00

50.02

195.25

173.00

184.39

200.113

211. 56

229.111

231.00

228.93

191.49

183.23

110.75

TOTAL 110NTHLV 165.59 PRODUCTION TOTAL PRODUCTION 1951-1990, CITY OF ROLLA, WELL '5: 1368.841

!'IILLION IiALLONS

Table 7: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #5, 1957-1991.

20

GroundwaJer Supply

PERC[NT Of TOTAl CITY PRODUCTION SIHPlI[O BY CITY Of ROlLA, \/Ell IS

.

"

J'"

",

Il.DD 15.53 21.16

10.9/1 13.13 13.18

16.93

16.81

'86' '86' 19fi3

19.59 20.81 23.16

1964

20.11

'86' '86' 1961

19.38

19.9S 23.32 13.66 11.13 19.)6

1951 1958 195' 1960

196B 1969 1910

'.28 16.23 16.39 11.91

12.51 18.98 9.42

...

SEP

OCT

.av

'l"

15.15 n.90

15.11 :10.63 20.98

<'0.19 11.](1 23.51

:10.16 11.13 :10.11

11.96 14.1' 23.26

19.53

21.69

21.90

18.31

19.56

:10.89

24.12 :15.52 18.96 20.04 18.53

n.13 18.02 19.58 28.98

16.16 19.61 11.12 21.11 16.04

22.22 19.81 21.50 2O.S9 15.84

19.$6 19.18 11.13 11.63 13.53

20.11 21.3B 19.84 21.31 10.06

1B.43 20.$6 24.10

19.16 12.95 14.46 11.52 11.51

20.58

15.31 16.B3 13.92 10.31 9.91

18.&1 15.21 12.83 12.14

12.14 11.03 8.9.1 B.91

12.31 B.56 5.22

13.46 12.12 13.53

Il.DD

Il.DD

10.22

23.29 14.Sf 12.B6 11.21 10.41

9.02

12.33

11.d1

13.19

12.11 9.14 10.53

11.18 13.12 11.09 15. IS 11.89

14.15 13.49 IS.19 10.13 10.18

13.62 12.59 15.81 11.16 12.59

14.35 13.62 11.91 11.63 6.91

14.84 16.31 13.14

12.14 14.98 11.02 8.03 10.15

13.82 14.95 12.44 11.11 8.IIB

13.18

13.40 13.12 10.94

13.81 11.91 13.49 11.63 9.43

14.14 14.05 12.39 12.04 10.14

B.94 1.14

11.3S 10.51 11.39 9.06 18.91

9.61 15.34

1<'. 02 8.95 20.49

9.56 10.93 12.50 9.20 18.90

10.22 9.34 15.40

9.11 13.20 9.13 13.09 12.91

11.54 11.111 9.68 9.16 11.811

B.56 14.11 10.18 9.19 10.20

9.B9 13.04 9.53 B.80 11.42

10.22 11.13 10.45 9.15

8.81 11.40

""

""

J""

JI"

13.49 18.84 21.5! 15.91

23.61 11.35 22.01 15.52

n.oo 11.11 10.21

19.19 18.11 21.12

9.83 14.11 20.56

24.68

22.48

:15.52

16.14 21.4S 19.43 21.SO 19.38

18.18 23.48 19.61 22.94 16.18

22.16 13.45 13.11 11.38 9.43

22.11 22.68 21.96

20.82 22.64 11.82 12.91 10.00 9.63

20.50

13.B6 13.51 11.14

10.48

9.68

18.30 9.61

1911 1912 1913 1914 1915

11.111 13.21 11.85 13.69 10.83

15.12 11.96 11.85 11.80 10.611

14.92 15.31 1.11

1916 1911 1918 1919 1980

10.10 9.13 8.11

11.11 9.94

10.11 1.34

11.42 10.511 12.10 10.05 0.00

10.39 9.29 0.00

11. 13 8.69 9.10 8.89 9.28

1981 19112 1983 1994 19B5

10.05 9.15 11.45 9.29 10.44

1l.33 12.80 9.33 8.23 8.02

9.43 1.83 9.B9 9.40 9.16

11.92 8.36 11.113 10.41 9.39

9.65 10.34 10.76· 9.42 8.15

10.43 6.30 12.95 11.11 10.08

15.03 1.90 8.<11 10.4S 10.dll

11.42 9.63 B.83 1.86 11.58

14.05 9.14 8.00 11.48 12.12

11.14 9.41 B.d9 10.26

14.94 10.2B 8.18 9.18 14.13

""

11.15 11.24 11.34 11.68

11.11 9.60 1l.49 11.10

9.d] 11.24 11.14 11.59

8.42 9.99 ! 1.13 12.22

9.15 11.01 10.11 12.53

8.31 12.10 10.51 10.8<1

10.02

11 ••2

1.62

5.11

10.~0

6.11

8.51 12.16 13.14 10.55 10.42

9.21 13.69 10.84 11.66 1.95

11.98 14.39 10.94 9.9d

''''

3.59 11.16 11.59 10.60 9.11

!!ONllI.Y 11.65 PROOUCTIOH

12.60

11.66

12.31

11.15

13.15

11.10

12.94

12.10

19111 1998 1989

11.61 10.11

11.81 10.80

....

19.43 3.U

19.91 19.6l!: 11-" 19.63 10.08 21.54 20.35 20.40 16.88 16.96 14.31

11.35

9.19 10.51

12.05 9.41 9.58 9.51 10.01

14.11 10.33 11.33 10.00

9.68 11.19 11.41 10.91

1.01

11.20 12.29 11.96 8.18 1l.1lll

Il.DD

6.96

lL80

I1.S1

11.41

,."

e."

\ TOTAl

KRaNTAG[ or TOTAl. P!lOOUCTlON rROf! 1951 TllRQI"'-1l 1990 SUPPlI[O 9Y eTTl Of ROLLA, \/ELL IS: 12.31 f'£RC£Nl

Table 8: Percentage of 10tal monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #5. 21

YEARLY PERCENTAGE

OmrkAquifer in the Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, WELL 16 WELL ?ROOUCTlOM

,,,.

'"

FEB

."

""

."

JUN

(ImLlO~

JUl

GALLONS)

'"'

SEP

on

'"

OEC

VEARL Y TOTAl

1951

0.00

4.73

4.55

5.49

5.08

5.53

4.5S

4.84

4.62

4.36

4.50

4.33

52.61

1958

4.49

11.99

4.56

4.11

4.16

5.70

4.Ul

5.18

1.22

6.S2

4.90

5.48

62.38

1959

5.05

4.82

5.05

5.50

5.98

1.59

7.97

8.97

7.19

1.48

1.14

5.12

79.46

1960

4.08

4.81

4.09

<1.26

4.22

6.86

5.29

<1.95


3.86

3.90

3.63

54.75

1961

3.61

3.78

3.38

3.27

3.60

3.06

4.03

3.76

3.03

3.73

3.74

3.27

42.26

1962

3.59

3.60

1.88

3.08

0.00

2.65

4.82

6.69

5.34

4.18

4.21

4.22

44.88

1963 1964

3.91

11.46

3.57

4.27

<1.08

5.02

4.9.1

6.30

4.31

5.40

5.40

4.17

55.110

4.44

<1.43

5.11

5.52

3.91

5.59

5.25

6.92

6.8S

6.28

6.01

5.02

65.32

1965

<1.39

5.27

3.98

5.65

1.06

5.11

6.88

1.59

4.75

6.04

5.47

1.52

69.12 12.52

1966

6.114

6.65

5.39

6.711

5.30

6.60

8.99

5.00

5.66

6.26

4.05

5.00

1967

4.36

5.25

3.91

Jl.96

Jl.39

4.97

3.211

6.82

6.49

5.25

5.03

3.49

5!l.18

1968

4.12

5.29

4.99

4.11

4.42

5.115

4.69

5.37

5.83

6.97

6.75

4.59

63.19

1969

4.411

3.67

5.13

6.15

4.92

5.34

7.1tl

6.38

5.64

5.43

0.00

0.00

54.98

1910

6.84

6.91

6.8ll

6.66

6.67

5.21

4.30

4.53

5.32

3.23

5.26

4.14

65.96

1911

3.65

11.62

4.06

4.1B

3.94

11.17

3.92

4.70

4.30

3.89

4.16

3.22

411.11

1912

3.05

3.33

3.51

3.61

3.61

4.62

3.79

3.51

4.18

3.67

3.10

2.51

<12.61

1973

1.36

3.19

4.30

2.99

3.42

3.91

4.24

3.28

4.02

3.41

2.89

2.53

39.54

1974

0.00

1.10

3.24

2.19

I. 91

1.12

<1.24

11.90

2.77

1.33

2.01

1.42

27.43

1975

5.63

2.74

2.98

2.47

2.15

2.16

4.92

3.51

3.93

2.95

4.46

3.39

41.89

1916

2.10

2.14

1.85

1.B3

2.<19

2.46

3.25

3.59

4.23

4.44

4.20

3.94

31.10

1971

5.83

4.04

Jl.62

3.61

3.12

3.92

1.96

5.10

4.01

3.49

<1.09

1.12

45.49

1979

1.47

2.43

2.40

3.29

4.26

<1.53

5.
6.52

9.26

4.12

2.63

2.45

48.17

1979

2.66

2.19

2.611

2.29

2.10

2.09

3.<14

3.70

2.96

3.93

2.30

2.85

33.51

1980

1.61

2.51

1.96

2.55

3.00

3.10

5.66

6.62

5.59

5.22

4.06

3.60

45.53

1981

1.54

2.50

3.51

0.00

0.17

0.00

0.00

4.62

4.46

3.46

4.05

4.16

28.46

4.10

2.19

39.20

2.60

51.02

19!12

1.95

3.55

1.63

1.01

2.16

3.27

3.59

1.14

2.89

4.47

1993

1.97

3.65

3.21

4.32

3.17

4.61

5.19

1.45

6.55

4.09

3.62

1984

3.31

2.70

4.10

2.93

3.45

4.26

4.39

6.98

6.24

4.23

4.12

2.96

49.68

1985

2.11

2.34

3.25

2.34

3.25

4.93

1.19

4.17

6.51

1.72

6.43

4.81

56.20

1986

6.04

3.99

5.29

4.94

6.16

4.49

1.43

5.16

6.22

5.59

5.13

5.11

66.14

1981

4.09

4.53

<1.02

3.86

Jl.91

5.64

6.82

6.42

5.41

3.14

4.56

4.96

511.95

1988

4.41

6.02

2.35

5.00

5.78

1.90

5.15

1.41

5.31

4.01

3.62

3.23

60.26

1999

4.56

3.70

.4.41

4.55

1.45

5.88

6.96

6.85

5.51

5.92

4.85

5.39

65.99

1990

4.36

3.41

3.50

4.00

3.39

4.12

4.55

5.45

4.59

5.80

4.09

<1.39

52.30

135.28

129.40

132.51

134.12

153.55

169.86

191. 02

111.11

159.14

145.20

129.27

TOTAL P10NTHLV 123.20 PROOUCTlON

TOIAL PRODUCTION 1951-1990, CITV OF ROLLA,

~Ll

'6: 1180.92 !lIlllON liALLONS

Table 9: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #6, 1957-1991.

22

Groundwmer Supply

PERCENT OF TOTAL CITV PRODUCTION SUPPLIED IIV CITV OF ROLLA, WELL '6

MY

JUN

'"'

'UG

25.72

24.47

22.12

17 .46

19.54

20.16

24.911

111.411

24.40

23.76

24.37

26.16

19.45

17.97

111.00

26.53

15.93

17.91

13.97

15.40

15.92

16.61

14.11

11.34

11.50

0.00

9.63

15.63

16.69

15.46

16.11

15.46

18.15

16.68

21.41

20.11

13.71

20.00

16.11

21.05

20.66

11.42

16.61

19.08

16.93

13.31

15.07

8.48

12.10

9.10

11.113

15.66

10.79

1.51

7.65

8.17

1.75

8.16

Jm

FEB

M'

1957

0.00

23.77

25.24

19511

22.95

22.44

23.08

1959

23.99

21.36

1960

111.116

22.05

1961

16.12

1962

15.32

1963

16.78

1964

11.61

17 .63

U65

16.115

19.48

1966

13.114

21.40

18.45

20.97

1967

13.79

15.1111

12.69

14.211

1968

12.10

13.06

12.15

11.38

10.03

1969

11.511

11.116

12.911

14.12

10.112

1910

16.33

15.00

15.96

14.40

13.68

1971

11.65

9.24

9.27

!I.JO

1972

11.32

7.24

7.49

7.96

YEAR

'"

SEe

OCT

'"

DEC

17 .211

17.65

19.50

20.92

21.26

21.07

24.24

211.70

211.17

21.37

25.32

13.42

26.76

29.65

26.10

29.25

211.57

25.62

25.99

111.75

19.46

17 .50

15.06

16.09

16.51

111.116

13.98

11.40

14.28

15.25

15.22

15.04

20.41

111.35

18.33

16.93

17.57

13.119

22.46

15.11

16.42

19.66

17.46

17 .23

16.32

19.18

20.73

20.51

19.611

19.62

18.94

20.01

22.96

16.44

19.10

11.16

26.14

19.55

13.21

15.113

15.72

11.56

15.113

11.22

14.96

13.55

12.42

12.32

9.26

12.%

11.54

11.53

14.72

14.61

11.69

12.07

12.110

12.37

11.116

0.00

0.00

10.27

1.99

9.14

6.43

10.75

9.01

11.15

5.94

7.95

6.97

, .66

9.44

7.22

7.117

6.36

6.32

7.79

7.28

6.23

5.60

7.11 6.67

VEAIlL Y PERCENTAGE

1973

2.77

7.05

9.02

6.62

1.45

11.26

1.46

5.67

7.011

1.06

5.72

5.99

1974

0.00

4.27

/.62

5.12

4.411

3.96

6.99

11.24

5.39

3.00

4.31

3.44

4.90

1975

11.117

5.411

5.72

5.47

,.J<)

4.96

7.35

5.45

6.17

4.117

7.110

5.11

6.21

1916

3.1111

5.10

3.25

3.43

4.56

4.27

5.08

5.50

5.71

6.61

6.65

6.11

5.15

1977

9.02

6.13

1.71

6.18

5.01

6.13

3.45

11.09

6.51

6.22

5.110

3.29

6.28

1978

2.90

4.16

4.15

5.78

11.12

11.12

11.211

11. 41

13.33

6.114

4.44

4.45

1.13

1979

4.75

5.12

4.37

4.20

3.25

3.70

5.52

5.66

4.39

5.71

3.1111

4.52

4.60

19110

2.96

4.64

J."

4.51

5.48

5.23

6.92

11.97

lI.n

7.73

6.112

6.48

6.14

19111

2.56

4.51

5.63

0.00

0.26

0.00

0.00

11.06

6.51

5.42

6.74

6.54

3.119

1982

3.40

5.21

2.75

1.83

3.32

5.11

5.1111

9.63

5.92

4.55

6.51

4-.118

5.06

!983

3.49

6.48

5.34

9.06

5.16

7.67

7.77

7.91

9.19

6.40

6.17

4.45

6.64

19114

5.43

4.92

6.92

5.11

5.77

7.17

6.61

9.39

9.40

1.21

7.45

5.61

6.115

19115

4.91

4.311

5.82

3.97

5.59

9.33

10.35

6.61

9.15

11.75

11. 41

11.58

1.711

19116

11.17

7.96

9.19

8.14

11.84

1.311

10.54

1.1I!

8.91

9.02

9.10

10.04

9.34

19111

11.03

11.36

6.59

5.53

11.90

11.38

10.49

9.10

11.02

6.17

1.17

9.14

8.14

191111

11.45

10.33

4.15

8.96

11.111

10.12

9.04

10.46

13.50

5.711

6.74

6.26

11.28

19119

11.10

7.39

7.92

8.46

11.13

10.09

9.76

9.72

11.113

11.111

11.00

11.98

11.91

1990

6.90

6.11

5.57

1.011

5.110

7.59

1.19

11.09

6.51

9.24

1.49

1.11

7.17

It TOTAL MONTHL V 11.61 PRODUCT I ON

9.20

11.72

11.119

11.51

9.55

9.39

10.43

9.96

9.54

9.11

11.69

PERCENTAGE Of TOTAL PRODUCTION FROM 1951 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED By (lTV OF ROLLA, 'll'Ell

'6~

9.25 PE!lWlT

Table 10: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #6. 23

Owrk Aqllijer in the Rolla Area

elfY OF ROLLA, WHl 17 WEll PROOt/UION ("Ill ION IW.LONSJ

""

'''''

FEB

""


"'''

JUN

Jut

"

...

1951

0.00

1.68

0.00

0.00

'.00

'.00

6.16

1.31

19sa

2.11

0.00

2.46

3.19

3.17

3.69

5.49

'.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

'.00

'.00

0.00

'.00

1960

3.41

3.40

4.10

5.59

4.24

4.14

1961

3.95

4.25

3.56

3.39

4.02

3.56

19" 19"

3.50

4.15

4.46

5.01

5.18

4.14

,."

4.14

3.15

3.36

3.81

3.81

3.14

4.11

""

""

''" ,."

OCT

NOV

OEe

YEARLY TOTAl..

4.1d

3.19

3.20

32.21

'.00 '.00

0.00

'.00 '.00

21.91

0.00

0.'" 0.00

4.19

3.99

3.91

4. Ie

3.93

50.43

3.49

3.59

4.18

4.03

4.09

3.55

45.65

4.12

4.11

3.32

3.89

3.92

51.44

3.91

d.46

4.11

3.92

3.95

46.53

0.00

,."

0.00

4.11

3.89

1.94

2.11

4.7!

3.11

4.93

4.16

5.U

'.02

5.20

4.29

d9.26

4.20

d.41

4.28

11.41

5.03

4.21

2.24

2.89

2.10

4.11

1.19

1.21>

41.53

1966

1.65

3.11

4.68

4.50

3.66

3.18

5.32

2.31

3.45

4.59

4.41

2.54

0.51

1961

2.59

2.59

7.69

2.93

3.31

2.54

3.39

3.99

4.86

2.39

4.96

3.51

39.14

1969

3.31

3.35

2.54

4.44

3.41

4.13

4.22

4.20

3.14

2.19

2.59

41.8a

1969

3.41

0.00

1.09

2.92

,."

3.11 4.12

2.15

5.11

11.90

5.35

5.83

1.28

111.00

1910

4.55

5.55

4.36

4.94

4.55

5.96

1.89

8.91

B.33

1.81

6.45

5.24

14.55

1911

4.32

5.90

4.58

5.21

d.16

6.04

5.36

5.60

6.12

5.36

5.35

5.11

63.16

3.B9

2.38

4.21

5.11

5.15

6.49

5.19

5.35

5.53

4.61

5.62

3.59

58.3.4

1912 }g13

4.93

4.02

5.05

4.9.<1

1.1]

0.00

5.03

4.96

4.19

5.33

4.45

3.29

48.12

1914

3.88

3.25

4.21

3.81

4.24

4.39

4.15

5.41

5.09

4.52

4.64

4.22

52.52

1915

4.10

4.19

il.14

3.94

2.B3

1.21

4.91

4.15

II.BI

4.44

4.35

5.23

49.40

1916

4.05

3.91

4.0S

4.21

5.33

4.49

4.19

4.30

5.19

4.46

S5.99

4.45

4.91

4.31

5.05

5.39

4.93

4.49

,."

6.14

1911

6.26

9.29

9.45

!l.ll

3.40

69.06

19111

4.42

4.10

4.81

4.69

4.15

4.38

5.09

3.98

5.13

3.38

3.96

4.05

52.14

1919

4.05

4.15

4.64

4.42

4.31

11.11

4.34

4.92

3.il5

11.03

4.50

4.48

51.99

!980

4.10

4.01

5.29

0.66

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.29

5.12

2.60

5.51

5.04

31.34

1981

4.59

11.41

5.59

11.44

4. ]3

4.15

3.21

lo23

0.00

0.00

1.29

5.01

39.30

1982

5.09

5.47

4.13

3.99

3.68

4.11

4.69

6.52

6.21

2.95

4.0!

54.56

1983

2.06

,."

3.12 4.47

3.64

5.12

4.11

6.95

3.02

0.00

3.50

2.64

3.92

43.52

1984

2.59

3.33

1.16

0.00

1.16

1.45

2.89

3.8!

3.00

2.36

3. !!

2.53

1985

3.10

3.21

3.12

2.78

3.611

2.99

5.20

4.12

4.46

2.56

2.19

3.96

21.99 41.98

1986

4.23

2.78

4.29

3.36

3.71

3.40

4.34

5.20

5.45

4.05

3.55

3.31

41.111

1981

2.03

J.BI

3.21

3.32

4.03

3.50

4.45

2.10

5.31

2.96

3.22

3.85

42.45

1988

3.34

1.80

2.21

1.66

J.84

U,

5.50

5.63

5.10

4.69

3.99

4.56

49.ll!

1999

4.60

4.00

11.69

3.92

4.99

1.41

5.04

5.04

5.15

5.04

4.18

'.09

1990

4.43

3.31

1.55

2.90

2.03

2.90

1.19

3.31

2.13

J.le

,."

52.12

4.03

3~.59

111.39

119.43

120.60

126.21

111.95

146.31

Id5.10

141.91

134.)2

133.67

TOTAL /!OHnl.Y 120.53 PROOUCTIOH TOTAL PROOOCTlOH 19S1-19911, CITY Of ROLLA, W£ll 17: 1556.961

PHLLlOH GALLONS

Table 11: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #7, 1957-1991. 24

127.49

Groundwaur Supply

PERCE~T

OF TOTAL CITY PRODUCTION

SUPPLIED BV CITY OF ROLLA, WELL 17

YEAR

JM

FEB

'"

APR

'"

JU'

JUe

'UG

SEe

on

NOV

OEC

VEARL V PERCENTAGE

1957

0.00

8.M

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

23.4!1

26.34

20.42

21.18

17 .58

15.72

1958

13.85

0.00

12.44

17.75

1!1.28

16.17

U.70

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

12.93 B.22

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

16.04

15.39

19.51

23.50

18.08

19.32

14.91

15.68

14.69

16.32

19.16

17.94

17.38

1961

11.63

11.91

18.e3

14.50

11.16

18.50

VI. 3e

13.36

15.71

15.43

16.6e

16.52

16.25

1962

14.93

16.24

19.13

18.10

11 .50

11.21

14.22

14.40

14.34

12.13

15.M

16.30

15.92

1963

11.41

14.01

14.55

14.40

14.44

11.36

14.11

14.16

15.66

12.49

14.25

16.51

14.36

1964

16.55

15.46

1.61

10.41

16.95

11.35

15.34

11.53

15.41

16.44

11.03

16.76

14.29

1965

16.!J

16.28

11.36

16.43

14.72

14.57

6.53

B.13

9.33

12.99

5.58

4.18

11.64

196' 1961

5.15

10.33

16.01

!J.85

11.48

9.19

10.02

6.26

9.66

11.54

12.58

8.06

l(l.35

8.20

1.83

8.15

9.42

10.23

1.68

9.11

9.13

10.14

5.62

11.90

9.49

8.95

1969

9.62

9.29

6.50

10.72

1.15

1.26

9.19

9.06

9.29

6.64

6.03

6.56

1.92

1969

B.91

0.00

2.16

6.10

8.00

10.45

5.56

10.21

10.17

11.67

12.40

11.03

9.80

1910

IO.el

12.04

10.11

10.68

9.34

12.35

13.16

15.12

14.30

15.55

13.19

11.41

12.60

1971

10.U

11.81

10.45

10.34

8.08

11.94

8.32

9.49

9.92

10.55

10.84

11.58

10.21

1972

10.62

5.19

8.98

11.78

12.15

11.45

9.75

9.46

10.30

9.14

11.79

1.82

9.81

1913

10.01

8.88

10.61

10.7!

5.90

0.00

B.95

8.40

1.39

11.04

9.83

1.11

8.22

1914

8.61

8.15

10.05

9.92

9.93

10.09

1.B3

9.2a

9.90

10.15

9.91

10.74

9.38

1915

8.65

8.40

9.09

B.72

5.66

2.11

1.18

1.39

1.55

1.33

1.61

9.40

1.39

1916

1.48

1.21

1.14

7.89

9.18

1.79

6.55

B.56

8.51

6.46

9.71

1.60

1.11

1917

6.88

1.40

7.20

B.65

8.66

1.11

7.B9

9.93

13.48

15.08

13.51

6.51

9.39

1918

8.11

8.03

9.52

8.23

1.
7.86

1.16

6.1I6

7.39

5.60

6.69

1.31

1.62

1979

1.U

8.10

1.51

8.12

6.61

7.26

6.91

1.52

5.31

6.02

1.60

7.10

7.13

1980

9.34

7.53

9.31

1.18

0.00

0.00

0.00

5.81

1.72

3.85

9.35

9.aB

5.03 5.38

1981

1.91

8.01

8.95

8.18

1.38

1.70

0.00

0.00

2.14

1.8B

8.88

8.02

6.29

7.08

6.14

5.Bl

5.19 6.13

2.15

1992

6.33

8.22

9.16

4.34

7.01

1.04

1983

3.M

5.30

7.42

5.80

8.33

7.94

9.21

3.21

0.00

5.48

4.50

6.69

5.66

2.44

4.40

5.12

4.52

6.52

6.21

5.53 1l.9B

3.96

6.91

4.01 3.9iJ

4.80

5.19

1.01

5.81

1984

4.25

6.0B

1.95

0.00

1985

5.51

6.0a

5.60

4.70

2.95 6.>1

1986

7.B2

5.47

7.45

5.9.<1

6.60

5.60

6.22

7.86

7.81

5.53

6.11

5.92

6.69

19B1

3.99

1.02

5.36

5.63

7.45

5.20

6.B4

3.84

1.97

4.B8

5.50

1.10

5.81

1988

6.39

3.09

3.91

2.98

5.44

8.14

9.66

1.95

9. !l

1.19

1.4.4

8.83

6.11

1989

8.17

1.98

8.43

1.30

1.45

2.41

1.11

7.15

8.11

1.16

6.8B

6.11

7.0El

1990

1.01

6.39

2.47

5.12

3.49

4.50

2.El2

4.91

3.92

5.01

4.64

1.10

4.1.<1

1l0NTHL V B.U

7.98

8.05

8.09

8.01

1.33

8.09

1.92

B.21

8.02

El.41l

8.56

-'I; TOTAL

PRODUCTION PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL PRODUCTION FROIl 11157 THROUGH 1990 5UPPLIEO 8Y CITY OF ROLLA, WHL 11:

9.09 PERCENT

Table 12: Percentage of total mombly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #7.

25

Ozark Aquifer in the Rol/a Area

ClTV OF ROLLA. WELL 18 WELL PRODUCTION {Hlllfm~ GALLONS)

Yf'"

'"

FE,

liAR

""

I!AV

JUN

JUL

'"

'EP

ocr

'"

DEC

VEARL v TOTAL

1951

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.5"

1.69

0.J9

4.6J

1961

1.11

0.81

0.00

3.38

2.51

1.<14

1.49

2.53

2.62

1.60

0.96

1.25

19.15

1962

0.55

1.68

0.6d

2.1n

3.31

1.55

1.91

1.28

LId

1.12

1.81

1.21

19.60

1963

1.31

1.14

1.03

1.98

2.95

2.31

2.14

2.18

1.14

2.20

1. 81

1.53

23.51

1964

1.65

1.51

0.11

1.13

1.44

1.34

1. 61

1.65

1.06

0.18

1.31

0.33

14.16

1965

1.05

1.04

0.91

1.42

1.85

0.15

1.92

2.24

3.05

2.11

3.60

3.13

23.11

1966

2.09

1.36

1.12

1.63

1.26

1.16

1.59

1.11

1.30

1."

1.36

0.62

11.34

1961

0.95

1.21

1.07

0.95

0.65

1.56

0.16

1.20

0.95

1.21

1.09

0.65

12.32

1968

0.93

0.61

0.83

0.32

0.81

0.60

1.10

0.99

1.03

1.30

0.15

1.26

10.60

1969

0.32

1.23

1.31

1.12

1.60

0.93

2.61

2.56

2.92

2.no

3.89

2.96

2"'.45

1910

1.51

1.19

2.19

2.510

3.15

2.16

2.46

2.09

2.84

2.06

2.91

2.45

29.86

1971

,."

2.61

2.55

2.51

2.53

2.31

2.510

0.00

3.42

2.ne

2.91

2.03

7.46

2.43

2.45

0.00

2.08

2.12

2.54

2.43

2.19

2.42

2.<11 2.11

29.91

1912 1913

2.31

2.18

1.90

1.29

1.50

1."

1.52

2.14

2.42

2.03

1.14

2.12

22.49

1914

2.53

1.96

1.84

1.68

1.85

1.86

1.102

1. 21

2.61

0.98

1.25

1.60

21.32

1915

2.20

0.95

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.40

1.93

2.39

2.68

1.98

0.00

0.13

15.25

1916

1.71

1.15

2.04

2.40

1.96

2.81

2.49

2.89

3.09

2.58

2.30

2.65

28.13

2.51

2.30

1."

28.66

25.93

1971

2.29

2.36

2.43

3.35

1.89

1.93

2.61

2.58

2.35

1918

2.26

1.84

2.18

2.69

2.21

2.32

2.66

2.39

2.61

2.31

2.18

2.43

28.86

1919

2.35

2.48

2.41

2.16

2.25

2.44

2.53

2.24

2.06

2.68

2.13

3.38

29.10

1980

5.41

5.53

5.00

3.92

2.21

2.28

2.11

3.40

2.41

'.S<

2.34

2.12

40.62

1981

3.23

2.02

2.87

2.13

2.41

2.10

2.18

3.21

3.14

2.73

2.15

3.02

33.06

1982

2.30

3.12

2.03

2.14

1.83

2.53

2.67

2.15

3.06

2.12

2.96

2.42

30.51

1983

2.61

2.55

2.18

2.58

3.79

2.83

2.16

4.18

2.96

2.81

2.40

2.33

34.11

1984

2.16

2.<15

2.61

3.24

2.81

3.33

3.24

2.11

2.88

2.18

2.42

2.25

32.34

1985

2.40

2.20

2.27

2.53

2.36

2.07

2.61

1.99

2.62

3.13

2.08

1.66

27.91

1986

1.94

2.20

1.56

1.32

1.34

1.15

2.67

1. 74

1.66

1.71

1.04

1.82

20.15

1987

0.33

1.86

0.95

1.49

1.36

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.31

2.14

2.08

2.36

13.49

1988

1.34

2.81

2.49

3.92

3./6

3.43

2.23

3.111

2.94

2.11

2.12

2.43

34.61

19119

2.65

2.52

2.119

2.42

3.32

2.61

2.56

3.42

2.48

3.29

1.91

2.36

32.49

1990

2.40

1.53

1.50

1.14

1.85

1.97

0.98

1.46

3.25

2.60

1.13

2.13

23.11

59.95

55.95

63.112

61.04

60.C4

64.36

64.93

10.15

69.20

64.16

60.82

TOTAL HO!olTHl V 58.69 PRODUCTION

TllTAL PROIlUCTIOH 1951·1990. CITV OF ROLLA, WELL '8: 153.0161

IlItLlON GALLONS

Table 13: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #8, 1960-1991. 26

Groundwater Supply

PERCEHT OF TOTAL CITV PRODUCTION SUPPLIEO 8V ClTV OF ROLLA, WELL '8

VEA.ll

J'"

FE,

""

MY

JU,

JU'

'U,

SEP

OCT

'"

OfC

VEAllL V PERCENTAGE

1951

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

196a

0.00

o.oa

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

9.93

6.98

1.19

1.59 1.03

1961

4.94

3.40

0.00

lA.45

10.99

1.41

6.14

9.39

9.86

6.13

3.91

5.9~

1962

2.36

6.56

2.92

10.22

11.20

5.64

6.21

3.91

3.92

6.51

1.21

5.30

6.01

1963

5.52

6.52

A.45

1.48

11.19

8.55

9.43

1.19

6.09

6.61

6.60

6.39

1.29

1964

6.56

6.23

3.20

4.26

5.11

4.19

5.19

4.56

4.28

3.M

3.70

5.21

5.40

2.55

5.59

6.76

2.56 8.1A

1.30

4.02

3.19 10.54

4.49

1965

11.29

10.81

6.65

1966

1.29

4.38

5.119

5.02

3.94

5.08

2.99

2.93

3.63

3.81

3.111

1.91

4.12

1961

3.00

3.115

3.48

2.14

1.99

4.74

1.96

2.62

1.99

2.86

2.66

1.74

2.74

1968

2.37

1.51

2.12

0.11

1.99

1.41

2.14

2.13

2.03

2.16

1.62

3.20

2.01

1969

0.84

2.91

3.31

3.95

3.52

2.07

5.29

5.13

6.41

5.23

8.21

6.92

4.58

1910

3.74

2.58

6.46

5.58

6.47

5.11

4.30

3.69

4.99

4.11

5.95

5.34

4.99 <1.61

1911

6.03

5.21

5.81

4.99

<1.92

4.52

<1.00

0.00

5.55

4.88

5.91

5.54

1912

5.55

5.35

5.19

5.40

0.00

3.69

A.511

4.49

4.53

'.34

4.81

4.12

4.36

1913

4.11

4.82

3.99

2.96

3.21

2.83

2.61

3.10

A.21

4.20

3.4<1

5.02

3.19

1914

5.66

4.91

4.34

3.94

4.33

4.29

3.00

2.14

5.20

2.21

2.69

3.88

3.81

1915

4.64

1.90

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.31

2.88

3.11

4.21

3.21

0.00

1.31

2.29:

1916

3.29:

3.26

3.59

4.49

3.59

4.9:8

3.90

4.42

4.22

3.9:8

3.65

4.51

3.99

1911

3.55

3.58

4.06

5.74

3.04

3.01

4.10

4.10

3.81

4.59

3.92

3.10

3.9S

1978

4.45

3.61

4.31

4.11

4.3<\

4.16

4.01

4.18

J.95

3.94

4.69

4.43

4.22

1919

4.20

4.55

3.93

3.96

3.49

4.31

4.06

3.43

3.11

3.99

4.61

5.36

4.01

1990

9.69

10.24

9.80

1.00

<\.16

3.84

3.32

4.61

3.64

3.1l0

3.93

4.90

5.49

1991

5.59

3.65

4.61

3.93

3.11

4.39

4.49

5.11

4.59

4.21

4.511

4.74

4.52

1992

4.00

4.57

3.4J

3.61

2.82

3.99

4.31

3.11

3.96

4.21

4.35

4.22

3.94

1993

4.73

4.54

11.61

4.81

3.11

4.43

il.16

4.49

4.10

3.54

4.47

4.50

5.65

6.17 4.11

4.72

198il

5.62

4.92

3.64

<\.34

3.11

4.38

3.99 4.21

4.46

1985

4.21

4.12

4.01

4.28

4.01

A.OO

3.46

3.13

3.64

4.16

3.12

2.96

3.86

1996

3.59

4.34

2.ll

2.34

2.35

2.89

3.93

2.64

2.31

2.16

1.96

3.19

2.90

19111

0.65

3.44

1.55

2.53

2.52

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.46

4.52

3.55

4.35

1.87

1989

2.56

4.92

4.4a

1.02

5.32

4.40

3.91

5.34

4.10

4.51

5.06

4.70

4.76

1989

4.11

5.02

5.20

4.51

4.96

4.Al

3.65

4.1l5

J.94

4.68

3.25

3.93

4.42

1990

3.19

2.96

2.39

3.07

U6

3.16

1.5<\

2.16

4.66

4.13

3.16

3.75

3.11

i'tQNTHl V 4.10

4.09

3.11

4.28

3.81

3.13

3.56

3.54

3.89

4.13

4.05

4.08

,. TOTAL PRODUCTION PERCENTAGE OF TOTAl PROOUCTION FROM 19$7 THROU6H 1990 SUP~LIED BY CITY Of ROLLA, WELL tB;

3.91 PERCENT

Table 14: Percentage ortOlal monthly and yearly production provided by City or Rolla, well #8. 27

4.51

Dlllrk Aquifer in tile Rolla Area

(!TY OF ROLLA, WELL '9 WELL PRODUCTION (!lILLloN GALLONS)

YEAR.

19~7 19~8 19~9

1960 1961 1962

"., ""

196'

1966 196> 1968 1969 1970

""

'E8

0.00 D.DO D.OO D.DO

0.'"

O.DO

D.'" O.DO D.DO O.DO

D.DO D.DO 0.00 D.DO 0.00

0.00 D.DO 0.00 0.00 0.00

O.DO D.DO D.DO O.DO 0.00

D.'" D.'" '.DO D.DO

D.DO 5.92 6.11

D.DO 5.90 9.56 6.92 4.23

O.DO 1.4(l

D.DO 6•.49

6.n 6.76

5.3~

4.01

""

D.DO D.OO

..."

Jill

JUN

'"

SEP

D.DO 0.00

D.DO D.DO O.DO

D.'" D.DO D.DO D.DO

D.DO O.DO O.DO

D.DO D.DO D.DO

D.DO

0.00

D.'" O.DO

O.DO O.DO

D.DO D.DO

'.DO D.DO D.DO

'.DO O.DO

D.DO D.DO D.DO D.DO D.DO

D.DO D.DO D.DO 0.00 D.oo

D.DO 6.11 1.01 4.53

D.'" 7.43 8.94 5.11 5.43

0.65

1.!J 6.46 4.48

D.DO 7.11 1.99 6.62 6.26

8.11 6.19 1.31

5.23 5.33 6.69 5.13 4.62

8.93 6.99 7.10 6.75 1.89

6.94 1.99 10.!!3 6.49 1.40

9.25 B.94 6.81 11.36 !L8B

1.31 1.32

7.85 3.61 8.00 7.27 11.56

'.09

0.'" O.DO D.DO

'.DO

~.2~

'.DO 8.59 5.3~

4.49

.."

"OV

DEC

D.'" O.DO D.DO D.DO

0.00 D.DO 0.00

D.DO D.OO 0.00

D.DO

D.oo

D.DO D.DO D.DO

D.DO D.DO

D.DO D.DO O.DO

'.DO D.DO

'.DO 0.00

D.DO D.DO 0.00 D.oo O.DO

5.33 6.54 1.40 4.36 4.79

5.24 9.78

9.28 1.91 8.99 9.19 6.68

1.111 1.13

O.DO

D.DO

6.59 5.24 3.91

0.94 8•.40 9.59 11.14

'.DO D.DO ~.24

1.36 ~.33

~.26

6.18 6.12

6.3<

4.86

0.00 9.13 7.52 8.36

1.41 0.011 7.04 9.40 12.91

1.50 11.89 6.37 6.92 7.04

6.21 1.11 6.26 7.41 6.60

84.99 59.76 83.19 19.56 112.99

7.09 5.27 5.41 5.26 5.62

91. 79 13.311 82.40

4.52

64.59 40.69 49.11 13.50 45.34

6.91 6.65 6.05 6.011 9.4.4

6.33 6.25 6.13 4.96 10.86

5.1B 7.51 5.55 6.42 8.36

6.12 5.69 10.21

9.08 6.15 9.63 6.11 15.94

1981 1992 1993 19911 1985

5.60 4.99 6.S1 6.00 3.98

5.25 4.07 5.10 5.11 3.35

6.50 6.23 6.46 4.10 4.18

6.16 5.35 5.64 4.19 5.53

1.39 7.19 7.05 5.09 4.19

6.32 6.04 /l.55 4.51 6.13

5.82 5.11 B.50 6.09 6.11

6.69 6.92 9.64 5.45 6.\5

14.17 6.49 9.57 $.14 6.40

11. 98 B.Ol 1.83 $.04 6.85

9.82 6.95 6.49 5.13 5.19

1986 1997

5.48

5.38 5.24 0.38 5.22 3.40

O.DO 6.97

2.13 9.04

5.26

5.16 5.22 5.95 8.76 2....

4.411

4.10

6.94 0.00 1.93 1.25 5.91

5.26 0.00 6.66 1.01 2.57

5.19 0.00 5.23 3.32

1990

II. I!! 5.65 5.02 6.13 2.92

5.40 5.09

5.68 2.84

5.14 5.99 $.16 5.4B 4.15

6.11 4.88

1999

5.18 4.63 0.00 6.66

3.20

0.00 5.11 2.98 3.02

KONllt. Y 121.11 PRODUCTION

134.32

148.10

131.84

159.18

146.38

112.65

16!!.32

H2.1]

162.41

1&1.14

131.!!6

TOTAl !"RQ!)L!CTlOtC

!'51'19~,

8.48

TOTAl..

CITY Of !\OllA, WELl. 19: 11114.692 n!LUOlI

6f,LL~S

Table 15: Monthly and yearly produclion, City of Rolla, well #9, 1966-1991. 28

SIl.92 11.46 51.33

6.40 1.71

6.98 6.46 6.59 6.02 7.24

I'"

11.41 @6.112

95.01 93.29 89.40 82.26 18.15

6.06 1.21 6.31 6.06 5.2.4

'.DO 4.33

D.'" D.DO 0.00

5.63 4.20 1.02

1976 1911 1919 1979 1990

8.29 1.29

0.00 D.DO

6.19 6.0 1.BB

6.60 4.28

1.93

D.'" D.DO

5.33

5.8e 9.59 5.29 5.14 lI.08

!!.l8

D.DO O.DO

1.65 5.12

5.80 4.83

6."

YEARLY

TOTAL

19n 1972 1913 1914 1975

~.09

5.53

D.'" D.DO

OCT

61-11 65.53

GroundwaUr Supply

PERCENT Of TOTAl CITY

~QOOCTlc!t

S1JPf'LIEO 8Y C!TY OF ROU.. A, 'lIEU 19

"'" ".

FE,

"'"

MY

O.DO D.OO D.DO

0.00 D.OO

1959

D.OO 0.00 0.00

0.00

O.DO D.DO 0.00

1960

0_00

0_00

0.00

0.00

19!17 1958

SEP

""

J"

O.DO D.OO D.OO

0.00

0.00 O.co

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.DO D.OO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

DE,

OCT

YEA.~Y

PERCENTAGE

0.00

0.00

0.00

'.DO

D.OO

0_00

D.OO D.OO

O.DO D.OO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.CO

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0_00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

D.DO

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0_00

0.00

O.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

D.OO

O.DO

D.DO

D.DO

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.7!

la.92

13.11

2.68

16.62

4.13

196' 1968

18_7!

17.84

24.04

19.66

21.61

18.51

19.22

19.73

13.66

20.16

20.59

19.5<'

15.63

21.14

11.19

11.22

18.14

16.49

11.16

18.45

14.62

13.92

18.59

13_55

19.25 16_82

1969

13.83

16.69

11.11

14.83

14.55

11.63

11. 61

10_14

9.51

11.43

24.94

11.90

14.50

1910

'.58

9.18

9.48

9.6B

12.95

9.39

9.41

1.93

'.12

1.91

10.91

12.44

9.69

1911

13.16

11. 11

12.60

10.39

11.16

13.61

14.37

15_30

15.05

14.11

12.56

12_60

13_15

1912

13.20

18.68

14.16

11.15

la.55

13.91

15.06

14.02

14.14

15.31

12.91

9.14

14.01

1913

10.40

11.69

19.42

14.11

16.15

22.99

11.98

15.B6

15.611

10.90

15.60

16.59

15.09

1914

14.15

14.42

14.59

13_40

15.81

14.'"

13.18

13.94

I1.Bl

14.39

13.21

15.36

14_10

1915

9.03

8.16

14.13

10.23

l:i.14

13.19

14.16

!1.32

10.49

12.14

IUS

8.15

11.111

1916

11.20

12.99

12.16

11.86

10.60

12.611

12.66

!2.M

11. 51

11.13

11.89

10.51

11.19

1911

11.16

9.111

H.12

10.10

12.06

11.117

5.14

0.00

0.00

1.49

13.60

8.15

!918

12_44

12.90

12.00

10.1&

10.59

11.4" 10.ge

!d.69

14.01

13.15

11.68

10.17

11.39

12.16

1919

10.83

8.91

9.94

10.04

9.Bl

1<1.02

11.52

11.16

10.91

14.85

19.<12

15.29

11.31

19.50

11.13 15_66

11.55

9.30

11.05 13.41

9_19

1980

12.62

19.21

11.82

11.88

15_12 12.56

1981

9.61

9.48

10.43

11.34

11_52

10.2&

9.39

11.&7

20.69

18.76

14.70

11.15

1982

8.69

S."

10.53

9.11

11_06

9.5&

9_45

9.34

B.III

12.70

10.22

9.21

9.41

1983

11.62

10.12

10.73

10.52

11.48

1.51

11_43

10.23

12.04

12.21

11.04

9.25

10.12

1984

9."

9.33

8.53

1.60

9.24

1.33

1.14

B.59

9_21

9.9&

9_51

7.07

6.21

1.93 1.49

1.29

1985

9.36

8.24

I1.B5

B.99

9.13

e.92

10.43

10.33

10_03

9_01

.."

8.49

9.81

1.93

9.04

D.DO

D.DO

D.DO

D.DO

5_63

....

9.45

9_03

B.85

8_84

B.11

'.SO

9.67

1.19

'.SO

1.12

B.43

0.49

D.DO

3_01

12_68

11.01

9.15

11.11

9.85

9.00 11_42

8.95

9.92

9.95

5.411

4.96

6.60

4.98

5.47

1.09

11.41 6_91

11.50

5.48

13.09 5.04

8.56

'.DO

5.86

5.33

9.13

9.98

9.25

10_11

9.10

!l.S4

!l.19

9.58

9_10

9_29

9.26

1986

•• SO

10.82

1991

9.10

1.58

1989

O.DO

1.43

10_11

1999

11.83

11_34

1990

8_32

III TOTAl K(lNTHt. Y 8.93 PRODUCTION

B.93

PERCENTAGE Of TOTAl PRODUCTION fRO" 1951 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED 8v CITY OF ROLLA. \l'£LL 19:

9.43 PERCENT

Table 16: Percentage of Iota I monthly and yearly produclion provided by City of Rolla, well #9.

29

.."

6_16

6.22

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, UI!R 12 IrI!:Ll WELL PRODUCTION (MILLION GALLONS)

JUN

JUL

AUG

SfP

OCT

NOV

DEC

YEARLY

'"

!'lAY

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.ao

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

c.oo

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1967

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1968

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

YEAR

""

FEe

1957

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

1960

TOTA!..

196<:1

0.00

0.0{}

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1970

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.78

6.71

6.35

6.55

5.98

5.13

4.91

3lU1

1971

4.08

4.19

4.63

.4.70

5.13

4.45

8.16

5.0.4

6 . .45

.4.99

5.3.4

5.14

62.90

4.99

2.84

59.11 46.05

1912

3.82

4.06

4.81

5.28

4.59

5.63

6.10

6.59

5.10

5.31

1973

'.54

3.08

3.15

3.75

3.26

2.16

5.65

4.21

5.37

3.40

4.17

3.0.4

3.88

5.23

4.23

3.88

4. 01

3.18

45.31

.4.59

4 . .43

4.59

4.23

3.95

52.26

1914

3.54

3.20

3.37

3.01

3.71

3.55

1915

2.91

4.35

4.1.4

3.02

5.06

5.29

5."

1916

4.28

4.18

4.12

3.95

3.91

4.19

3.70

3.14

4.39

3.72

3.13

3.54

.48.05

4.37

4.41

.4. 36

.4.16

48.60

1911 1918 1919

4.24 3.74 .4.12

3.93

3.82 3.61

3.9!!

.4.10

3.90

.4.06

3.91

3.34

4.45

3.67

4.21

4.83

5.85

8.24

5.2E1

3.96

4.12

56.06

3.96

4.04

4.20

4.67

3.71

3.91

4.01

50.19

4.33

4.18

3.31

4.96

3.112

4.02

4.00

6.15

5.12

4.96

5.01

5.11

4.36

55.34 48.88

19110

4.43

4.13

4.16

19111

3.13

3.62

.4.34

2.14

3.68

4.90

4.08

3.91

3.42

5.02

3.35

3.54

3.88

'.M

3.14

.."

.4.63

2.57

3.10

3.13

4.98

2.56

31.52

5.41

7.01

6.21

4.94

5.44

4.89

60.47

1982

2.64

0.00

,."

1983

3.80

3.48

4.95

1984

4.63

4.54

3.72

5.23 3.44

5.11 4.88

4.39

3.65

5.16

3.29

5.52

4.39

4.23

52.45

1985

5.10

4.30

4.31

4.83

4.52

5.211

5.Bl

4.18

4.60

6.65

4.63

4.59

59.46

1986

4.15

5.25

5.02

4.90

5.21

1.20

1.10

4.10

4.91

3.62

3.54

0.64

56.22

3.19

2.13

3.80

3.54

4.0.4

5.45

3.60

5.78

5.00

4.91

41.67

0.41

LBO

0.14

0.00

0.00

0.00

24.71

6.01

6.15

5.24

4.49

36.94 30.95

1991

2.31

3.04

1988

4.64

3.99

2.91

3.48

3.32

3.95

1989

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.96

1990

6.60

4.34

4.91

3.35

4.14

4.12

.."

5.16

2.83

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

12.59

18.61

12.06

80.40

91.60

100.10

96.60

95.54

91.49

86.54

15.21

TOTAL MOHTHLY 16.91 PRODUCTION TOTAl PRODUCTION

13~1'1990,

CITY Of ROLLA, UlIR IZ WELL; lOll.1Z

1IILL!ON GALLONS

Table 17: Monthly and yearly production, UMR well #2, 1970-1991. 30

Groundwaur Supply

PERCENT Of TOTAl ClTY PRODUCTION SUPPLIED BY CITY Of ROLLA. UI!R 12 'WfLl

"'"

J'"

1951

0.00

195B 1959

0.00 0.00

FEB

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

""

."

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

'"

JOL

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

'"'

SEP

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

OCT

rn:,

'"

YEARlY PERCENTAGE

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962 1963

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01l

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

1968

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1l.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

11.83

11.21

11.24

11.91

10.49

10.68

6.50

1910

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

5.16

1911

9.6B

9.51

10.56

9.n

9.96

8.13

12.6B

S."

10.45

9.83

10.83

11.52

10.11

11.64

9.69

9.94

10.2B

11.65

9.49

10.63

11l.02

6.19

9.95

1.88

8.30

1.09

5.84

9.93

1.311

9.4B

1.04

11.25

1.19

1.11

8.69

8.16

6.39

B.80

8.22

8.12

8.61

9.16

B.ll

10.11

9.>0

1.53

1.14

6.95

1.59

1.39

1.11

1.112

1912 1913

10.43 1.24

8.B3 6.80

10.25

1914

1.91

9.02

1.93

1.03

1915

6.28

8.12

9.09

6.68

1916

1.91

1.11

8.31

1.40

1.11

1.21

5.80

5.14

5.98

5.59

5.91

6.04

6.61

1911

6."

5.91

6.38

1.02

6.21

6.35

6.81

5.30

1.11

1.86

1.25

1.96

6.10

19111

1.31

1.19

1.21

1.82

1.00

1.66

1.31

10.23

11.81

8.11

6.68

1.50

8.20

7.94

6.82

6.08

1.68

1.01

6.49

6•.43

1.11

5.63

6.12

6.45

6.118

1.65

1.33

6.113

1.35

6.14

1.52

6.94

1.4B

1.51

8.59

1.115

1.46

6.91

5.04

5.13

1.19

6.59

6.16

1.22

1.25

5.10

1.89

6.69

4.60

.. "

0.00

5.66

4.42

5.45

6.14

5.63

5.05

3.90

5.81

1.33

4.47

4.85

6.19

11.23

9.11

8.31

6.56

1.35

1.4.4

9.12

1.14

9.28

B.35

1.B6

1919

9.44

1980

1.85

1981

6.45

1982 1983

6.12

1984

1.60

8.19

6.28

5.99

8.18

1.39

5.55

1.14

4.96

9.40

1.93

8.02

7.23

1985

9.06

8.0J

7.12

8.18

7.18

10.20

7.81

1.56

6.41

10.13

8.26

8.20

8.23

1986

7.68

10.35

8.12

8.66

9.12

11.85

10.11

1.11

1.03

5.83

6.69

1.13

1.81

1981

4.55

5.60

5.23

3.62

1.03

5.26

6.21

1.13

5.3.4

9.53

10.06

8.98

6.59

1988

B.8B

6.84

5.14

6.24

4.10

5.01

0.82

2.54

0.22

0.00

0.00

0.00

3.40

1989

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

8.50

7.03

1.32

9.53

8.74

8.63

1.49

5.02

1990

10.44

8.38

1.92

5.92

1.09

1.61

4.41

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.24

5.38

4.9<1

5.JO

4.84

5.10

5.10

5.53

5.21

5.30

5.41

5.46

5.05

", TOTAl "ONTHlY

PRODUCTION PERCENTAGE OF TOTAl PROOOCTION FROM 1951 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED BY CITY OF ~Oll"l U~R 12 WEll;

S.l9

pERWIT

Table 18: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by UMR well #2. 31

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

Cl TV OF ROLLA, WELL 110 WELL PRllOUCTlON (MILLION GALLONS)

YEAR

Jm

FEe

PlAR

>P'


JUN

JUl

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

YEARL Y TOTAL

1957

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.01l

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

11. 00

0.00

0.00

1967

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.47

7.04

7.10

1.65

6.76

4.61

31.66

1968

4.93

5.06

4.5e

5.70

7.06

5.53

7.15

8.14

6.93

7.51

5.93

5.19

14.22

1969

4.96

5.0B

3.74

J'I.23

5.74

7.64

6.26

8.0B

6.88

6.61

8.01

9.08

16.43

1970

5.60

7.02

6.00

6.88

5.85

7.99

10.96

10.911

11.84

8.26

5.S4

5.25

92.09

1971

1.51

6.60

4.54

6.32

6.46

7.16

8.82

I!. 60

7.82

6.05

5.52

5.46

17.8t1

1972

5.28

4.13

5.66

4.11

7.50

8.50

9.46

7.15

1.24

6.37

5.68

5.37

18.25

1913

5.94

11.49

5.36

5.42

5.51

4.38

8.00

7.72

5.83

5.18

5.33

3.81

61.M

1914

4.75

4.18

5.01

4.74

5.19

4.85

8."16

1.38

6.14

5.11

5.06

4.90

66.41

1975

3.64

4.52

6.U

4.69

2.19

0.00

1.21

9.63

6.72

6.64

5.32

5.85

63.17

1976

5.30

5.46

4.24

5.44

6.11

9.10

9.12

1.18

7.8"1

1.24

6.64

5.98

78.12

1917

6.24

6.21

5.43

5.56

7.71

6.54

6.35

1.64

6.11

6.90

7.38

4.44

76.43

1978

5.44

5.39

6.02

5.12

5.43

10.16

13.51

0.94

0.00

0.00

4.15

5.74

63.09

1979

5.50 5.41

"I.oe

6.57

5.81

6.02

5.J'l7

6.30

6.76

8.41

6.26

6.41

6.86

14.45

1980

4.57

5.49

5.31

5.36

6.13

11.0e

10.50

1.47

1.23

7.20

7.10

82.86

1981

5.50

5.21

4.99

5.39

9.03

5.Bl

1.53

6.42

9.69

6.48

6.41

6.67

77.20

1982

5.96

6.96

4.63

4.57

5.76

4.13

4.72

5.63

6.89

7.22

4.42

6.55

61.46 68.29

1983

5.73

4.92

5.23

4.65

6.27

5.20

6.98

6.95

6.11

6.19

5.01

5.14

19B4

6.10

5.20

5.14

5.78

6.88

6.16

5.61

61.19

5.08

5.25

6.81

11.25

B.77

8.53

6.87

5.31 9.94

5.25

5.21

4.A7 4.54

5.91

1985

5.31 4.87

1.11

84.23

1986

5.12

5.01

6.69

5.55

5.56

6.lll

1.59

1.34

7.55

5.08

5.B8

5.22

7:3.30

1987

5.50

5.04

5.22

5.35

5.41

5.76

6.74

1.57

8.59

4.84

6.31

1l.91l

71.22

1988

5.81

0.00

0.00

1l.00

0.00

9.30

8.23

9.85

6.89

1. .d!!

4.95

5.73

58.23

1989

5.63

4.74

5.61

5.23

3.64

0.16

0.02

1.22

0.1l0

3.16

5.35

4.95

40.31

1990

3.19

4.58

3.00

2.88

3.7f

4.64

6.48

5.99

5.64

6.80

5.60

5.68

58.24

114.19

114.41

114.53

127.82

133.14

183.16

174.!l1

161.31

141.30

1411.84

136.94

TOTAL I'!ONTHL V 121. 77 PRODUCTION fOTAl PROOUCT!ON 1957-1990, ClTY OF ROLLA, WELL no: 1668.933

!'IlLLlON GALLONS

Table 19: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #10, 1967-1991. 32

Groundwater Supply

PERCENT OF TOTAl CllY PRODUCTION SUPPL!EO 8Y CITY OF ROLLA. WELL 110

YEA-II.

J'"

FE,

'"

M'

JUL

JU'

>U,

OCT

SEP

'"

DEC

YEARLY PERCENTAGE

1951

0.00

0.00

D.DO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

D.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19&0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19&1

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19&4

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19&5

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

19&&

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19&7

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

11.55

15.43

14.83

3.91

1&.56

11.32

7.05

1968

12.37

12.50

11.71

n.7&

1&.04

15.04

17.48

13.70

15.87

12.82

13.21

14.04

19&9

12.81

12.21

9.47

9.71

12.&2

12.90 1&.94

12.&7

1&.22

15.10

14.55

11.1&

21.24

14.31

1910

n.)8

15.24

13.89

1<1.81

11.99

lli.5&

19.14

19.2)

20.3)

lli.44

11. )4

11.42

15.5&

1911

10.10

13.20

10.)1i

12.55

12.55

14.0)

13.10

1.4.51i

12.lil

11. 91

11.19

12.22

12.59

1912

14.42

10.28

12.01i

10.40

15.84

14.99

15.92

13.10

13.49

12.62

11.42

11.69

1).16

1913

12.ld

9.90

11.26

11.99

11.98

9.26

14.08

13.34

10.28

11.96

10.55

9.16

11. 41

1914

10.62

11.99

11.93

11.01

11.11

1l.16

lJ.95

12.42

11.93

11.48

10.81

11.81

11.81

1915

1.61

9.06

11.12

10.31

5.51

0.00

10.81i

14.96

10.56

10.91

9.31

10.53

9.45

1916

9.80

10.16

7.46

10.20

11.32

14.06

14.29

11.01

10./0

10.53

10.19

10.92

9.66

9.44

9.08

9.51

12.38

10.23

11.11

12.13

12.13

12.21

8.50

10.54

1918

10.13

10.55

11.92

10.04

10.36

19.21

20.62

1.64

.. "

10.88

1911

0.00

0.00

8.02

10.45

9.22

1979

9.83

1.48

10.13

10.66

9.33

9.61

10.13

10.34

12.92

9.34

10.83

10.88

10.21

1980

9.59

8.46

9.67

9.50

9.81

10.33

13.55

14.22

11.27

10.11

12.09

12.18

11.17 10.56

1991

9.50

9.40

8.00

9.93

12.52

9.42

12.16

11.22

12.69

10.16

10.18

10.49

1982

10.41

10.21

7.83

7.84

8.87

6.54

1.72

7.60

8.69

11.36

6.50

11.44

9.11

1983

10.14

8.15

8.10

8.li8

10.21

9.65

9.24

7.38

8.58

9.69

9.54

9.79

8.8B

1984

10.01

9.50

9.06

8.96

9.611

7.54

B.98

9.25

9.28

9.56

9.59

9.95

9.21

1985

9.26

9.49

8.13

8.89

11.7J

9.111

111.95

13.88

11.88

10.46

11.15

12.69

11.66

1986

10.58

10.00

11.59

9.81

9.14

9.99

10.e!!

11.11

10.91

9.20

11.11

9.16

10.26

1981

10.82

9.29

9.55

9.06

10.01

8.51

10.31

10.73

12.72

7.99

10.15

9.04

9.8S

1988

11.12

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

11.92

14.44

13.92

11.02

12.44

9.22

11.09

8.01

1999

9.99

9.46

10.09

9.7J

5.44

1.30

0.0)

1.14

0.00

4.49

9.82

9.25

5.48

1990

5.04

8.94

4.71

5.09

6.41

1.41

10.24

9.91

8.07

10.82

10.25

10.01

1.99

1l0NTHt Y 8.51

1.80

1.11

1.69

8.11

8.28

10.12

9.54

9.95

8.44

9.14

9.20

,. lOlAL PROOUCTION PERCENTAGE Of TOTAL PRODUCTION FROIl 1957 THRotJGH 1990 SU!'I'UEO 8Y (!TV OF ROLLA. WELL 110:

8.61 PERCENT

Table 20: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well # 10 33

Gmrk Aquifer in the Rolla Area

C!TV OF ROLLA, WELL

'fAA

1957

JAA

0.00

FE!l

'AA

0.00

0.00

APR

0.00

P!l.!lDUCT!O~

MY

0.00

HVPOIMT WELl II (M!LLIOM GAlLOMS)

JUN

JUL

0.00

'"

SEP

OCT

"'"

DEC

YEARLY TOTAL

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1967

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1910

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

1911

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1912

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1973

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1974

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1915

1.55

4.94

4.70

'2.69

3.91

0.00

0.00

6.29

9.37

9.24

!l.19

9.04

59.91

1916

4.65

3.75

0.01

4.91

1.14

5.29

4.50

3.51

6.25

5.31

!l.19

5.10

59.22

1917

!l.12

12.96

10.49

9.95

9.17

1.12

6.39

2.61

4.58

4.04

4.93

4.89

19.25

1919

2.14

3.06

3.39

3.53

3.75

3.05

3.97

3.99

3.81

1.11

4.33

3.36

40.65

1979

4.69

4.16

6.41

5.39

6.25

6.66

9.18

5.90

4.19

5.02

3.69

5.07

67.10

1980

4.25

4.60

2.03

2.16

3.11

'2.59

1.96

2.51

5.64

4.10

6.17

4.29

44.09

1981

10.31

4.41

5.44

6.01

1.95

11.49

5.62

0.03

4.17

5.86

8.36

10.41

90.12

8.98

3.91

12.14

4.54

111. 79

1992

6.69

6.99

9.15

11.06

10.93

18.02

9.85

9.39

1983

5.33

5.15

8.90

5.69

6.79

4.56

5.85

3.13

1. '22

6.14

7.45

6.43

73.24

5.04

5.01

6.66

4.40

80.62

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

39.06 52.4!!

1984

8.94

6.60

6.63

5.98

6.M

5.10

7.81

11.91

1995

4.51

5.09

6.52

5.03

10.62

2.96

2.32

0.00

1986

2.02

1.15

2.15

5.91

3.65

4.55

5.G8

9.46

3.49

6.69

3.44

4.30

8.66

4.10

9.68

6.91

5.15

3.98

6.38

7.23

6.19

2.95

8.85

9.45

91.21

1999

6.09

6.61

1.92

5.59

9.64

16.32

17.30

10.58

8.28

12.14

5.84

4.94

11 1. 09

1989

5.39

6.08

5.19

5.12

3.99

5.50

2.37

2.19

1.99

2.14

4.94

3.10

48.58

1990

4.41

3.48

3.32

3.12

2.02

4.14

2.12

6.09

5.31

0.10

0.16

1.16

36.09

84.ee

91.8'2

99.98

101.30

95.22

91.28

84.91

94.16

74.49

94.52

91.70

1987

TOTAL MDNTHL V 99.32 PRoDUCTloM TOTAl PRODUCTION 1951-1990, CITY OF ROLLA. HYPOINT WELL '1: 1062.975

IHLUON GALLGMS

Table21: Monthly and yearly production. Hypoint well #1, 1975-1991. 34

GroUlldwaJer Supply

PERCENT or TOTAl ClTY PRODUCT!ON SUPPLIED 8Y CITY OF

RO~LA,

.".

J'"

1951

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1968

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

""

MY

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1l.00

FE'

DE,

'"

SEP

0.01l

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

JUl

JU'

HYPOINT WELL #1

OCT

'OV

YEARLY PERCENTAGE

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1910

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

19H

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01l

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1912 1913 191d 1915

0.1l0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01l

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

9.69

9.02

5.93

1.82

0.00

0.00

9.16

13.1d

15.21

14.33

16.26

8.80

8.01

13.94

8.68

8.22

9.36

111.93

,. "

1916

8.59

6.91

0.02

9.01

13.lt

9.11

1.05

5.41

'.53

1911

12.56

19.69

11.53

11.03

1.15

11.22

4.15

1.45

5.39

5."

6.69

1.15

5.d6

6.06

6.96

5.49

1."

8.19

1918

2.84

1.32

6.12

5.9<1

1979

8.39

1.63

10.41

,."

14.13

9.89

9.68

11.78

15.10

8.81

6.dd

1.d9

6.24

8.03

g."

1980

1."

8.51

3.57

3.86

5.69

4.35

2.39

3.48

8.52

6.09

H.39

1.73

5.94

1981

11.92

1.91

8.13

11.06

12.40

19.65

9.01

0.04

6.96

9.11

13.92

16.31

11.04

1982

11.68

10.24

15.41

18.91

16.82

28.49

16.13

12.61

6.24

17.85

8.11

14.n

1983

9.44

10.24

14.19

10.60

11.03

1.58

1. 81

3.33

11. 31 10.14

9.62

12.10

11.00

9.53

1984

14.50

12.04

1l.18

10.43

11.11

8.60

11.86

16.02

1.59

8.54

'.34

11.12

1985

9.02

9.51

11.69

10.22

18.28

5.17

3.09

0.00

0.00

0.00

12.02 0.(1)

0.(1)

5.21

1986

3.13

3.4d

3.13

11).45

6.40

7.49

7.28

14.31

5.00

10.79

6.49

1.56

7.35

1981

11.04

8.67

15.87

11.65

10.6-4

5.17

9.81

10.25

10.01

4.86

15.08

11.43

1l.23

1998

11.63

11.43

13.83

10.00

13.64

20.92

30.37

14.95

13.24

20.19

9.37

15.21

9.51

12.12

9.32

9.53

5.94

9.43

3.38

3.ll

3.15

9.14

6.J}

6.60

1990

6.97

6.72

5.19

5.52

3.46

6.61

3.35

9.01

1. 10

,."

10.88

1989

0.16

0.29

3.10

4.95

Il0NTHL V 6.18

5.11

6.19

6.03

6.43

5.9l

5.05

4.63

4.70

4.45

5.91

5.49

,. TOTAL PRODUCTION PERCENTAGE or TOTAl PRODUCTION FROll 1957 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIEO 8Y C1TV OF ROLLA, HYPOINT WELL 11:

5.52 PERCENT

Table 22: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by Hypoint well # 1. 35

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

CITY Of ROLLA,

HYPOINT WELL 12

WELL PRODt/(T10N ("Ill ION 6Al.LONS)

"'" '" 1951 1958 1959

'''0

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1911

0.00

1912

0.00

191J

1964

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

1965

'''' ''''

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

1914

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1915

2.60

4.19

3.11

2.51

1968 1969 1910

0.00

Sf'

OCT

'OV

,){C

YEARLY TOTAL

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1961

,U<

J""

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

Jill

"'"

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1961

"'.

FEB

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01l

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.56

8.05

B."

0.15

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.15

32.31 61.11

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1916

2.81

5.12

9.42

4.35

3.08

5.10

5.09

5.90

4.42

5.71

4.14

5.95

1971

1.30

0.49

o.oa

0.00

0.04

1.65

1.69

4.12

11.16

4.19

5.38

1.15

31.31

1918

3.71

3.40

0.3d

4.91

2.14

4.48

3.14

2.80

3.ll

5.11

3.01

4.14

.011.51

1919

3.19

3.92

5.10

4.36

8.31

4.00

1.45

3.86

5.32

5.00

6.80

6.20

51.51

1980

6.28

5.03

6.11

4.88

2.10

2.49

3.90

3.59

6.42

8.43

6.12

1.19

63.13

1981

3.96

9.05

9.70

1.65

7.95

5.99

10.94

10.46

6.44

11.65

7.29

1.29

98.25

1982

1.28

11. 61

10.40

8.16

9.69

3.93

10.26

10.61

15.18

5.41

5.80

1.59

106.51 91.36

1983

6.68

5.41

3.61

1.19

6.94

6.21

10.41

23.15

8.61

6.52

4.16

7.09

1984

5.56

1.31

8.45

9.53

7.28

6.69

5.10

1.38

7.01

5.60

8.44

18.60

1985

9.11

8.31

6.54

7.19

0.00

0.00

0.11

4.06

7.26 4.24

4.92

4.63

4.20

53.97

1986

1.96

2.04

3.15

6.00

2.11

'.R2

6.91

2.24

1.15

3.66

6.21

6.31

53.26

6.B4

B."

11.99

5.26

3.59

87.52

19B1 1988

6.11 5.49

10.29

7.01

9.03

1.09

11.5.01

5.82

5.05

6.49

9.64

0.00

6.63 0.00

0.00

0.00

1.43

B.04

5.19

41.15

1.58

4.08

6.15

3.BB

2.05

3.95

58.05 31.42

1989

6.01

6.12

1.51

6.11

'.n

5.13

"00

4.35

2.68

4.18

3.12

4.83

3.36

3.21

1.13

0.01

4.64

3.13

1.51

91.44

89.69

'10.91

69.93

le.55

83.42

85.86

83.03

90.40

81.05

93.56

TOTAL

"OHnt.' 11.22 PRODUCT IOM

TOTAl. PROOVCTJOH 1951·1990, CITY OF ROlLA, H'fPO!NT WELL 12: 1005.125

"ILL ION 6Al.lOMS

Table 23: Monthly and yearly production, Hypoint well :#2, 1975-1991. 36

Groundwaler Supply

PERCENT OF !OTAL CITY PROOUCTION SUPPLIEO BY CITY OF ROLLA, HYPOINT WELL '2

"'"

J'"

FEB

APR

""

JU'

,ue

Jut

SE'

OCT

'"

DEC

YEARLY PERCENTAGE

1951

O.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.CO

C.OO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

195B

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

C.oC

O.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.co

O.OC

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

a.oo

o.oc

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

(l.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

o.ao

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

196d

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

196B

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.ao

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1970

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1911

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1972

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.OD

197J

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1974

0.00

,. '"

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

B.39

5.91

,.'"

0.00

1975

5.13

Id.dl

12.52

1.11

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.27

d.93

1976

5.31

9.53

16.59

9.15

5.65

9.Bd

1.91

B.90

6.03

9.61

6.51

10.13

9.d9

9.5<1

B."

3.3d

d.33 6.G9

I!Ul

2.02

1919

7.dd

1919

5.H

1990

11. 14

0.75

0.00

0.00

0.06

11.95

2.9B

6.5.01

6.71

6.65

0.61

8.d5

5.22

9.0d

d.19

d.l!9

d.49

9.59

1.19

9.33

9.00

12.91

7.09

2.32

5.90

9.11

7.46

5.19 11.49

9.63 9.93

1.89

9.30

to.76

9.12

3.B3

4.20

4.71

4.96

9.69

12.49

10.28

14.02

B.51

1991

6.66

16.33

15.56

14.09

12.40

9.n

11.61

19.21

9.40

19.24

12.12

11..016

13..014

1992

12.1C

17 .03

11.57

15.04

14.92

6.21

16.80

Id.31

19.13

8.60

9.53

13.25

13.76

1993

H.93

9.12

6.01

13.42

11.29

10.42

14.01

25.22

12.10

10.21

9.12

12.12

12.66

199d

9.11

13.34

14.26

14.91

12.18

11.27

7.14

1.86

10.~

10.12

11.31

15.52

11. 72

11.18

0.00

0.00

0.1.01

6.n

5.91

9.V

15.98 7.50

10.9<1

1985

11.93 1.49

7 • .011

1986

3.62

4.02

5.47

10.61

l.lO

9.11

9.90

3.3rJ

11.09

'.90

11. 74

11.08

7.46

1987

11.14

19.98

11.49

15.31

1.01

17.15

10.19

9.10

11.96

19.17

B.97

6.62

11.10

6.4B

1988

10.51

9.97

9.91

11.64

13.6-<1

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.3e

14.99

10.0d

1989

10.71

D.40

lJ.d9

11.31

2.36

6.99

9.75

5.51

3.25

5.62

6.97

9.55

1.99

1990

6.89

5.17

6.66

5.51

9.19

5.41

5.08

2.56

0.01

7.39

6.83

2.7J

5.13

'- TOTAL 1I0i'(THLY

5.dO

6.21

6.05

6.10

4.44

4.99

4.61

4.69

,I. 61

5.40

5.11

5.61

PROOUCT!ON PERCENTAGE OF TOTAl PRODUCTION FROII 1951 THROUGH 1990 SuPPLlEO 9Y CITY Of

ROLL~,

HYPO!Nr WELL 11:

5.n

PERCENT

Table 24: Percentage or total monthly and yearly production provided by Hypoint Well #2. 37

Ozark Aquifer in the RolliJ Area

CITV OF ROLLA, WELL 111 WELL PRODUCTION (MILLION GALLONS)

J>N

VEAR

fEB

MAR

APR

"'AV

JON

JOl

'"'

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

VEARL V TOTAL

1957

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1960

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

O.ao

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

(1.00

0.00

1963

0.00

O.OD

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

flo 00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1967

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1968

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

(1.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

a.oo

0.00

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1970

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1971

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1972

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

(I.ll0

0.00

5.22

7.18

12.40 81.99

1973

7.82

7.12

6.14

5.56

6.53

9.75

7.47

7.40

8.60

7.64

7.47

6.48

1914

6.04

6.31

6.11

6.05

5.98

5.81

9.29

6.46

7.03

6.74

1.60

5.73

79.15

1975

5.95

6.12

0.00

6.00

7.66

9.28

9.13

8.12

1.70

6.82

1.22

1.06

81.61

1976

7.411

4.04

7.64

5.42

7.66

6.28

7.87

8.52

9.57

5.96

1.48

6.62

84.53

1971

7.95

6.95

6.13

6.83

9.19

1.53

5.58

5.44

7.44

2.51

6.45

6.58

79.19

1978

7.35

7.3]

7.05

7.13

1.11

1.82

1.81

9.48

12.45

13.42

9.63

7.20

103.79

1919

8.18

6.01

1.24

1.15

1.22

6.99

7.68

9.12

8.40

7.85

5.92

7.811

89.65

1980

1.69

6.91

6.114

6.19

6.60

6.78

7.06

0.61

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.04

48.12

1981

4.18

6.12

5.14

4.44

5.22

2.63

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.36

1.26

29.95

1982

8.lll

7.57

6.31

6.13

6.54

7.14

6.25

6.14

1.31

6.60

6.61

6.79

82.02

1983

1.11

1.72

6.98

a.34

0.00

6.10

4.48

8.24

6.15

8.19

6.12

7.41

70.11

1984

6.90

7.19

8.09

7.90

1.14

8.97

7.15

6.29

6.45

95.15

6.36

7.53

1.65

1. 78

8.17

9.38 13.48

10.51

1985

8.53 5.87

!!.66

12.21

9.86

6.89

8.74

10.4.19 86.52

1986

6.84

6.86

6.65

6.92

8.38

6.19

1.41

8.47

7.39

7.62

5.65

1.54

19117

5.96

6.90

7.51

7.24

7.62

9.07

7.80

7.27

10.8.4

7.13

6.88

6.45

90.68

1988

6.94

8.13

9.44

1.88

9.70

11.99

5.75

10.40

10.91

7.21

1.62

8.84

lQ5.4!l

1989

9.68

6.16

9.04

9.01

13.44

8.82

11.10

12.96

10.86

13.22

10.16

12.94

128.58

1990

9.65

6.136

6.119

6.34

6.15

8.25

8.81

9.26

12.02

12.81

10.66

12.56

110.93

123.03

122.01

114.31

131.51

135.44

136.96

138.14

148.52

131-40

125.41

133.83

TOTAL I'!ONTHLY 130.15 PRODUCTiON TOTAl PROOUCTlllN !951-199ll, CITV OF ROLLA, WELL Ill: 1511.358

MILLION GALLONS

Table 25: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #11, 1972-1991. 38

Groundwater Supply

PERCENT OF TOTAL CITY PRODUCTION SUPPLIEO BV CITV OF ROLLA, WfLL III

YEAR

1957

JAN

0.00

FEB

0.00

"" 0.00

'" 0.00

M' 0.00

JUN

0.00

JUL

0.00

'U'

SE'

0.00

0.00

on

VEARlY

'"

OEC

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

PERCENTAGE

1958

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1960

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.OD

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1964

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1965

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1966

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1968

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.ao

0.00

0.00

1969

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1970

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00 0.00

1962

1971

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1912

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.oa

0.00

0.00

10.49

15.63

2.08

1973

15.98

15.12

12.90

12.29

Id.19

20.59

13.ld

12.79

15.17

15.81

Id.BO

15.33

Id.8d

197d

13.50

15.Bd

11l.3!!

14.15

14.02

13.38

15.31

10.89

13.66

15.15

16.33

lJ.B!!

14.14

1975

12.56

12.25

0.00

13.28

15.32

16.68

14.55

12.61

12.09

11.27

12.63

12.70

12.22

1976

13.82

7.52

13.45

10.16

14.05

10.89

12.32

13.01

lJ.06

9.96

11.86

11.28

11. 73

1977

12.30

10.55

11.25

11.69

ld.76

11.11

9.92

8.64

12.10

4.d8

10.72

12.60

10.93

191B

14A9

14.35

13.91

12.52

13.56

14.03

11.93

16.59

11.94

22.27

16.27

13.10

15.18

1979

14.63

11. 01

11.92

13.12

11.1B

12.37

12.3A

13.96

12.90

11.12

10.00

12.49

12.29

1980

13.63

12.79

12.04

11. 01

12.07

11.42

8.64

0.83

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01

6.57

1981

7.22

11.0d

9.22

8.17

B.t4

d.28

0.00

a.oo

0.00

0.00

0.59

1.99

4.10

19B2

13.9B

11.la

10.67

10.52

10.01

11.29

10.24

9.10

9.21

10.39

9.12

I1.B1

10.59

1983

11.10

13.72

11.60

0.63

0.00

10.15

6.01

8.15

9.4B

12.83

11.46

12.7B

9.13

1984

11.32

13.13

13.65

13.16

12.96

14.26

14.21

13.52

13.20

11. J<1

12.22

13.21

1985

11.30

14.01

13.70

13.11

U.06

14.31 11.3d

17.92

15.30

17 .00

15.01

12.30

15.61

Id.42

19B6

12.66

13.54

11.55

12.22

ld.68

11.18

10.62

12.82

10.58

12.29

10.61

13.24

12.11

19B7

11.12

12.12

12.30

12.28

14.10

13.49

H.9B

10.31

16.07

11.76

11.74

11.90

12.54

1988

13.28

14.91

16.6B

Id.l2

13.73

15.31

10.09

14.10

17.55

12.00

14.20

11.lt

14.50

1989

17.19

13.49

16.25

16.16

20.09

15.12

15.80

19.40

11.23

18.18

17.73

21.58

17 .48

1990

15.25

13.24

10.97

11.22

11.57

13.28

13.93

13.72

11.23

20.50

19.53

22.14

15.21

"ONTHl Y 9.10 PRODUCTION

8.36

B.23

1.67

8.35

8.42

1.51

1.51

8.24

1.85

1.92

9.99

,. TOTAl.

PERCBITAGE OF TOTAL PRODUCTION FRO" 1951 THROUGH 1990 SUPPLIED 8Y CITY OF ROLLA, WELL Ill:

a.Hi PERCENT

Table 26: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well #11. 39

OZllrk Aquifer in tile Rolla Area

CITY OF ROLLA, WELL 112

"" PROOUCTIOH

("ILLIO~ GAl~O~S)

JOL

'"

SEe

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

a.ao 0.00

""

'"

JUH

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

c.OO 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1961

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.OC 0.00

0.00

1962

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1963 1964

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

1965-

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

VEAR

'"

FE'

0.00

0.00

1959

0.00 0.00

0.00

1!J60

1957 19511

1966 1967 1969

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

1969 1970

0.00 a.110

O.CO 0.00

~AR

0.00 0.1l0

0.00 0.00

OCT

YEARLY

'"

OEC

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

o.ao

0.00

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 C.OO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.aa

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 1l.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

TOTAL

0.00 0.00

O.CO

0.00

1911

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.1l0

0.00

0.00

o.ao

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

1972

0.00

O.CO

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.oa

1913 1974

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

o.ao

o.ao

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 o.oa

o.oa c.oo

1975

0.00 0.00

1976 1911

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1979

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

19110

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

C.OO 0.00

1979

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 O.CO

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 O.CO

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

1991

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1992

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 o.oa

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

1993 1994

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1999

0.00 O.ao

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

O.Dll 0.0(1

1999

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1990

0.00

~.9{\

7.91

6.32

15.55

1911519116 1997

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 a.OO

0.00 0.00

o.oc

0.00

O.llO

0.00 0.00

11.15

9.11

~.50

~.6)

0.00 o.co

o.oa

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

6.22

5.61

1.2e

7. )5-

TOTA~

4.50

4.61

6.22

TOTAL PRonUC!!OH 1951·1990, CITV or ROLLA. WELt 112: 15.549

!lILLlOH

"O~THlV 0.00 PRODUCTION

4.lIa

11.15

9.71

5.61

7.29

7.35

GALLO~5

Table 27: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #12, 1990. 40

7.91

5.32

0.00 0.00 O.OC ll.llO 0.00

GroUIJdwaJer Supply

PERCENT Of TOTAl CITY PRODUCTION SUPPLIED BY ClTY OF ROLLA, '-'ELL '12

YEA!I

J'"

fE,

1957 1959 1959 1960

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.0<1 0.00 0.00

1961 1962 1963 196A 1965

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1966 1961 1969 1969 1970

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1911

"R

'"

JllH

JUl

'"'

SEe

OCT

''''

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 O.CO

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

O.oa

a.oo

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 O.CO 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 O.OC

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 C.OO 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

o.no

o.on

0.00 0.00 0.00

O.llO

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

1973 191A 1975

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.0<1 0.0<1 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0<1 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.0<1 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.0<1 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1976 1971 1979 1979 1980

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.0<1 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.1l0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 O.Cll 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.36

1912

a.oo

0.00

o.no 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

a.oo

OfC

1981

0.00

1982 198J 1984 1985

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.1l0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1996 1997 1988 1989 1990

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9.28

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 17.15

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

17.21

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 7.71

0.00 0.00 C.OO 0.00 1.46

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9.94

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 9.Jl

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.d3

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.10

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 H.d9

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.14

1l0NTHLY 0.00 PRODUCTION

0.33

0.15

0.66

0.29

0.29

0.J4

O.Jl

0.<10

0.44

0.50

0.42

,. TOTAL

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL PROOUCT!OH FROIl 1951 TMROUGH 1990 5llPPUEO 8Y CITY Of ROLLA. W£LL 112:

0.39 PERCENT

Table 28: Percentage of total monthly and yearly production provided by City of Rolla, well # 12. 41

YEARLY PERCENTAGE 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0<1

0.00 0.00 0.00

OwrkAquifer in the Rolla Area

CITV Of RelLA, WELL '13 WELL PRODUCTION '"ILLlON GAL!.ONS)

VEAR

J'"

FEB

1951

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1958 1959 1960

"" 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

'"'

SEP

ocr

""

oce

VEARLY TOTAl.

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

'"

JUL

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.01l 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

1961

0.00

0.00

0.00

1962 1963 19M 1965

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1966 1961 1968 1969 1910

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.01l 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.1l0 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1911 1912 1913 1914 1915

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 O.OD 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 D.DD 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 O.DD 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 D.DO 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1916 1911 1918

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 O.OC 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

O.CD o.oa 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

1919 1980

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

D.DD D.Dll 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1991 1982 1983 1984 1985

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 o.aD 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1986 1991 1988 1999 199G

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.51

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.lJ

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1!.44

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 8.12

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 12.39

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 12.61

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.16

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.81

0.00 0.00 0.00 O.OG 90.52

TOTAl. "ONTHlV 0.00 PRODUCTION

0.00

0.00 1.01

1.01

5.51

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

..."

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 5.93

5.93

1.13

0.00 0.00 0.00 6.15

6.15

TOTAl. PROOUCTlON 1957,1990, CITV Of ROLLA, WELL !I'D: 90.522

8.44

0.00 0.00

9.12

12.39

12.61

11.16

IlILl!ON fiAllDNS

Table 29: Monthly and yearly production, City of Rolla, well #13, 1990. 42

0.00

10.81

Groundwaur Supply

PERCENT Of TOTAl.. CITY PRODUCTION SUPPl!ED BY CITY Of ROLLA, 'lIEU '13

",.

,,'-

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

1980

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

""

J'"

'"

""

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1966

0.00

'96' '96' 1969 1970

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1975

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

19J6 1917 19J8 1979

1958 1959 1960 }961 1962 1963

,,6< '96S

1911 1912 1973 19J4

0.00

0"

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 O.OQ 10.81

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 13.35

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 17.93

0.42

0.47

0.49

0.00

1981

0.00

1982

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

1983 1994

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

1986 1987

0.00

1988

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.96

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 8.78

10.49

0.00 12.23

0.01

0.37

0.40

0.45

1985

1989

"90

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

O.OQ O.OQ

0.00

ll£C

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.01l

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

1l.00

1l.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.11

0.00 O.OQ O.OQ

0.00 0.00

0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 11.75

0.00

0.00 20.4J

0.00 19.04

0.00 0.00 12.41

0.69

0.16

O.JO

0.13

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAl.. PROOUCTION FRO" 1951 THRl)Ul;H 1990 St!'PllfO 8' tin Of ROLLA, WEll ,t);

0.41 PERCENT

Table 30: Percentage or total monthly and yearly production provided by City or Rolla, well #13.

43

0.00

0.00

0.00

, TOTA!. IWNTMlV 0.00 PROOUCTIOH

YEA.'U-Y PERCI:NTAG[

SEe

""

0.00

Ozark Aquifer in the RoiliJArea

5.0 '.0 3.0

2.0 1.0

0.0 1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987 YEAR

1988

1989

1990

1991

PHELPS COUNTY PWSD #2, WELL #1 3.0 , - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ' - - ' - - - ' - ' - - - - - - - - ,

2.0

0.0 1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987 YEAR

1988

1989

1990

1991

1990

1991

PHELPS COUNTY PWSD #2, WELL #2 1.5

0.5

0.0

+--...,---r----,r--...,.---r---' 1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987 YEAR

1968

1969

PHELPS COUNTY PWSD #2, WELL #3 3.0 , - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . : : . . . . . . : . . . . - - . : : . . . . - - - - - - - ,

2.0 -

1.0 -

0.0 1982

I

I

I

I

1983

1984

1985

1966

I

1987 YEAR

I 1988

I 1989

1990

PHELPS COUNTY PWSD #2, WELL #4 Figure 4: Monthly production, Phelps County PWSD #2 wells #1, #2, #3, and #4. 44

1991

Water UJe

well #4. Afourth well (well #3) isapparentiyinactive,and another (weIl2A) was abandoned and plugged in 1969.

20.1 gpmlfl. From 1982 to 1991, well #2 produced 97.7 million gallons, and has supplied about 30 percent of the District's water. It is currently pumped at about 180 gpm.

St. James well #1 was drilled in 1924 to a total depth of7ooft, and contains 168ft ofS-in.diameter casing. The well was deepened in 1965 to 1,100 ft, and rccased with 302 ft of 12-in. diameter casing. After deepcning, the well yielded 300 gpm with about 115 ft of drawdown; specificcapacitywas2.6 gpmlft. Thewell was acidizcd in 1967 which improved thespccificcapacity to 3.0 gpm/f1. In 1924, static water level was 80 ft. In 1967, water level was 223.5 ft., a decrease of 143 fl and an average water· level decline of 3.3 flfyr.

Well #3wasdrilled in 1987 to a total depth ofl,250 ft, and contains 520 ft of lO·in. diameter casing. The wcll was tested at 302 gpm and 402 gpm pumping rates, and had 26 ft and 38 rt ofdrawdown, respectively. Based on the two pumping tests specific capacity is II gpm/ft. Static water level at the time ofdrilling was 374 ft In July, 1992, water level was 387 ft, indicating a water-level decline of about 13 feet over the past 5 years, or about 26 ftIyr. Production from well #3 began November, 1987, and between then and 1991 had totalled 226 million gallons. Pumping rate of the well is currently about 170 gpm.

Well2A was drilled in 1947 to a depth of 1,100 ft, and contained 295 ft of 100in. diameter casing. lIS yield was about 360 gpm, and static water level was about 198 (t. The well was plugged and abandoned in 1969. Wcll 28 wasdrilled in 1969 to replace2A; thewcllsarconlyabout 15 fect apart. Wel12B is 1,looft deep, and contains 316 ftofI2-in.diametercasing. 5taticwater level in 1969was 215 fl, and Ihe well yields about 500 gpm_

Well #4 is the District's newest well. Drilled in 1988, it has a total depth of 1,150 ft and contains 446 ft ofl0in. diameter casing. Upon completion, the well was tested at 500 gpm and had a specificcapacityof 19.6 gpmt ft. Production from well #4 was added to the system beginning March, 1989, and between then and 1991 the well produced about 30. I million gallons. Well #3 is the District's most productive well, and is presently pumped at about 320 gpm.

Well #3 was constructed in 1961, is 1,100 ft deep, and contains 303 ft of 12-in. diameter casing. It is capable of producing about 500 gpm. Well #4 was drilled in 1984. It is 1,100 ft deep and contains 300 ft of t2-in. diameter casing. Static water level when the well was drilled was 178 ft. It was pump lested at 550 gpm, and Ihere was 83 ft of drawdown; specific capacity was 6.6 gpm/ft.

CllY OF ST. JAMES WELLS The City of 51. James has had a public water supply system since about 1924. 51. James has had 5 wells, but currcntly produces from three: Well #1, well #2B, and

WATER USE FROM THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA INTRonucnON

POPULATION TRENDS

The volume of water produced each year from the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area has increased many fold since the first City well was drilled. Before the first water-supply well was drilled, residcnts supplied themselves using cisterns that stored roof runoff, and probably some shallow, hand-dug wells were available that supplied low volumcsofwater. Pcr capita water use was undoubtedly much lower then than today.

The populations of Phelps County, Rolla, and St. James have changed greatly during the last century. In 1890,Phclps County had a population of 12,636. Rolla's population was 1,592 and 51. James had a population of 467. Except from 1910 to 1920, census informalion shows Phelps County and Rolla population to have steadily increased. In 1990, Phelps County had a population of 35,248 and Rolla's population was 14,090. 51. James population has increased each census except for between 1980 and 1990. 5t. James 1990 population was 3,256, slightly below the 1980 population Of3,328 (table 31 and figure 5).

Watersupply in the rural area was not much different. Cisterns, shallow wells, streams, and springs wcre common sourccsofwater. There were fcwwater.welldrilling rigs in operation at that time, and most people simply could not afford a well. Drilling records on file at the

Division

or Geology and

Census data are collected and tabulated for each po-

Land Survey show a sharp

Iiticallownship. The IOwnships adjacent to Rolla are Rolla township (f. 37 N., R. 8 W.) which includes most of the City of Rolla, Dillon township (f. 37 N_, R.7 W.

increase in the numbcrofprivatewells drilled beginning about 1950.

45

0ziuIc Aquifer ill tm Rolla Ana

In 1890, the rural Rolla population was 3,623. Between 1890 and 1950, rural population fluctuated but had a slight net loss. Rural population began increasio! berween 1950and 1960,and nearly tripled in the40years between 1950 and 1990 to 9,271 in 1990.

and T. 38 N., R. 7 W.) which includes the eastern pan of Rolla, and Miller township (f. 38 N., R. 8 W. and portions ofT. 38 N., R. 9 W. and T. 38 N., R. 10 W.) which includes the nonhern part of Rolla. Census data lists the total population within each of these townShips, and also the population in each township within the City of Rolla. For the purposes of this study, the combined populations of Rolla, Dillon, and Miller townships, less the population in each township within Rolla and 51. James, is considered the rural Rolla population.

In 1990, the population of Rolla and rural Rolla totalled 23,361, representing 66.3 percent of the Phelps County population. It is the water use within this area that has had the greatest impact on groundwater levels in the Rolla area.

POPULATION (upper number) PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN POPULATION FROM PREVIOUS CENSUS (lower number)

Rural Rolla

Phelps County

Year

Rolla

51. James

1890

1,592

467

3,623

12,636

1900

1,600 (+0.5)

575 (+23.1)

3,899 (+7.6)

14,194 (+ 12.3)

1910

2,261 ( +41.3)

1,100 (+91.3)

3,599 (-7.7)

15,786 (+11.2)

1920

2,077 (·8.1)

1,117 (+ 1.6)

3,291 (·8.6)

14,941 (·5.4)

1930

3,670 (+76.7)

1,294 (+ 15.9)

3,183 (.3.3)

15,308 (+2.5)

1940

5,141 (+40.1)

1,812 (+40.0)

3,177 (-0.2)

17,437 (+ 13.9)

1950

9,354 (+82.0)

1,996 (+ 10.2)

3,608 (+ 13.6)

21,504 (+23.3)

1960

11,132 (+19.0)

2,384 (+ 19.4)

5,012 (+38.9)

25,396 (+18.1)

1970

13,245 (+ 19.0)

2,787 (+ 16.9)

6,613 (+31.9)

29,481 (+16.1)

1980

13,303 (+0.4)

3,328 (+19.4)

8,903 (+34.6)

33,633 (+14.1)

1990

J4,09O (+5.9)

3,256 (-2.2)

9,271 (+4.1)

35,248 (+4.8)

Table 31: Population and percentage change in population, 1980·1990, Rolla, 51. James, rural Rolla, and Phelps County. (Source: U.S. Census data) 46

WaurUse

Z 0

;:: j

" 0.. 0 0..

'"<'"

',..;" ~

'"

3500

~--

,-

3000 -: 2500 -: 2000 -:

~--

1500 -:

-- ... -

-'-

_... ---- ....... ---_ ... -

1000

---- .......

500 0

1890

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

YEAR

z ;:: 0

j

16000 14000 12000

10000 0.. 8000 0

" 0..

:l '" 0

---

*-

6000 4000 -: 2000 -:

- - - - +- - - - - *- - - -- Ije--

0 1890

-- *--

--*"

-*-

_.-----

.... ----

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

YEAR Z 0

;:: j

" ...< "'"'"j 0.. 0 0..

... 0

10000 6000 7000 -

-*

6000 4000

-----+-----'1Ijo;- ----

--

--*

,,j,..

3000

1890

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

40000 35000

"

U

20000 -:

'"

15000 -:

'"'"

10000

~

0..

1990

YEAR

0.. 30000 -: 0 0.. 25000 ..:

0

---

-*-

5000

'"

z 0 ;:: j

*-----

9000 -

-*-

-*-

-*- - ---

-* -

----

1890

-*" - - - - ....... - - - -

lIje- - - -

-:.to - - - -

-*,-

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

YEAR Figure 5: Population trends for Rolla, rural Rolla, St. James, and Phelps County.

47

1990

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area WATER USE

Annual water-usedata were supplied by the CityofS1. James for 1962 through 1990. Water use in 51. James has increased from 68.9 million gallons in 1%2 to 128.1 million gallons in 1990. Water use peaked in 1980when it reached 150.0 million gallons. Total water use for the CityofS1. James for 1962 through 1990 was 3.329 billion gallons (table 34 and figure 7). St. James per capita water use is somewhat lower than that for Rolla_ Per capita water use in St.James in 1970 was 93gpd/c. In 1980 and 1990 it was 124 gpd/c and 108 gpd/c, respectively.

The City of Rolla has kept water-use records since it purchased the water system in 1945. In 1945, the City used about 120 million gallons of water. Water use increased nearly steadily until about 1976 when yearly water use was 721 million gallons. Since 1976, water use has fluctuated between 684 million gallons and 774 million gallons. Water usein 1990was about 730 million gallons. The City has produced an estimated 23 billion gallons since 1907 when its first well was constructed. From 1945 to 1991, the City produced 21.5 billion gallons. Between 1957 and 1991 production was 19.2biIlion gallons. Monthly and yearly water use information for 1957 through 1990 for Rolla is shown in tables 32 and 33, and on figure 6. Yearly water use for Rolla, SI. James, and Phelps County PWSD #2 is shown on table 34.

The amount of water that has been used in the rural Rolla arca can only be estimatcd from population data and by usingan assumed per capita usc rate. A relatively small ponionofthe rural Rolla area issuppliedwatcr by Phelps County PWSD #2. From 1982 through 1990, PWSD #2 usedabout321.6million gallons (tablc34and figureS). In 1990, the district produced about 40 million gallons. Currently, PWSD #2 has about 496 active customers, but the total number of people served by the district is not known. About 15 to 20 of their service connects are businesses, but most of the water is used for residential supply (Betty Harris, 1992; personal communication). Based on an estimated 3 people per service connection, per capita use for the district is about 75 gpd/c. Using this per capita use rate and a population of9,271, current rural Rolla water use is estimated to be 254 million gallons per year.

Per capita water use is commonly calculated by dividing the average daily volume of water used by a city, by the population of the city. It is typically reported as gallons per day per capita (gpd/c). However, reported water use generally includes water consumed by businesses and industries, so per capita water use includes more than just domestic supply. Cities with businesses or industries that use considerable water typically have much higher per capita use rates than those with little industry. Pcr capita water use in Rolla has increased substantially since 1950when it was about 52 gpd/c. In 1960 and 1970, per capita use was 71 gpd/c and 122 gpd/c, respectively. Per capita use peaked about 1980when it reached about 153 gpd/c, and it decreased in 1990 to 142 gpdlc.

Combined water use in 1990 for the City of Rolla and rural Rolla is estimated to be 983.5 million gallons, of which 74 percent is water produced and used by the City of Rolla.

WATER-LEVEL CHANGES IN THE OZARK AQUIFER IN THE ROLLA AREA Water wclls producing from the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area during the last 90 years have produced an estimated 32.6 billion gallons of water. Current yearly production from the aquifer in Rolla and rural Rolla (not includingSt.James) is nearly 1billion gallons. Prior to significant groundwater withdrawals, the Ozark aquifer was under steady-state conditions where discharge balanced recharge with no long-term change in groundwater levels. Recharge to the Ozark aquifer is from precipitation. Rechargeestimatcs by Imcsand Emmett (in press) indicate that yearly recharge to the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area may range from 40 million gallons per square mile to as much as 165 million gallons per square mile.

level values. These hydrographs are shown in figures 9 through 19. Along with water·level information, each figure also shows monthly water production for the well.

Rolla Municipal Utilities has been collecting water-

The Division of Geology and Land Survey has maintained groundwater-level observation wells in the Rolla area for many years. A continuously operatingwaler-level recorder was installed in the Rolla Holiday Inn (now Rolla Inn) well in 1968. This well is 974 ft deep, oontains 420 ft of casing, and bottoms in the Eminence Dolomite. It is on the extreme west edge oftheCity,and is about 3,500 ft from the nearest City well (well #9). When drilled, static water level in this well was 145 ft. In July, 1992,staticwater level was 179ft,adeclineof34 ft and an average dcelineofl.l fli year (figure 20). The hydrograph of this well shows sea-

level data for the City of Rolla wells since 1957.

sonal drawdown and rccovcry. Watcr-lcvcllowcrs during

Hydrographs of City wells #2 through #12, and UMR #2 were prepared using average monthly static water·

the summer, due to increased pumping from the Ozark aquifer and little groundwater recharge, then recovers

48

Summary and Conclusions

during the fall and winter when pumping rates are lowest and recharge is grcatest.

The potentiometric maps show that from 1960 to 1990, the Ozark aquifer potentiometric surface at Rolla has lowered each of the 10-year periods examined. In 1960, water levels in the Cilywere generally between 760 ft and 850 ft above sea level. In 1990, static water levels were from about 633 ft to 825 ft above sea level.

The Division of Geology and Land Survey has maintained another groundwater-level observation well at Hypoint Industrial Park since 1975. This well, which is 800 ft deep and contains 400 ft of casing, is about 1,300 cast of Hypoint well #1, and 2,000 ft north of Hypoint well #2. Its proximity to these two wells cause major short-term Ouctuations in water level, thus average monthly water-level data were used in constructing the hydrograph for the well (figure 21). When Hypoint well #3 was drilled in 1968, static water level was about 250 ft. Water level was about 300 ft in July, 1992, indicating a water-level decline of 50 ft, or an average yearly decline of 2.1 ft/ycar during the period.

A potentiometric map to show current water-level conditions was constructed from data collected during July and August, 1992, from Rolla wells, Phelps Co. PWSD #2 wells, and DGLS-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) observation wells, and a few privately owned wells in the area (figure 27). This potentiometric map shows groundwater levels to be deepest along a northeast-trending zone between 1-44 and the Burlington Northern Railroad. Pumping cones developed around City wells #9 and #10 had minimum water-surface e1evationsof613 ft and 606 ft abovesea level, respectively.

Imes (1990), using historic water-level data, constructed a prcdevelopment potentiometric map for the Ozark aquifer. A potentiometric map is a contour map that connects points of equal groundwater-level elevation. The map shows water levels in the aquifer prior to the development ofhigh-yield wells and before therewas significant groundwater withdrawals from the aquifer. This map shows predevelopment water levels in the Ozark aquifer to have varied from about &X) ft above sea level southwest of Rolla, to about 1000 ft above sea level in the Hypoint Industrial Park area northeast of Rolla (figure 22).

Two maps were prepared showing water-level decline in the Rolla area. The first (figure 28) shows water-level decline between predevelopment and 1992. The second (figure 29) shows water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area between 1960 and 1992. Figure 28 shows that water-level decline may be as much as 275 ft near heavily pumped wells. The greatest water-level decline is within the City. Water-level decline in the rural Rolla area is thought to be less than 100 ft in most areas, to as much as 150 ft near parts of the City corporate boundaries. The predevelopment potentiometric map was based on relatively few data, and water levels may actually have been somewhat lower than what is indicated on the predevelopment potentiometric map. Most ofthe water production from the Ozark aquifer has taken place since 1960, and it is likely that the greatest amount of drawdown has also been during the 1%0 to 1992 period. The 1960-1992 water-level decline map (figure 28) shows the greatest water-level decline to be along a line paralleling 1-44. Maximum water-level decline during this period is about 200 ft ncar City wells #9 and #10. Water-level decline is mueh less in the eastern and southern parts of Rolla where it was generally 70 ft to 100 ft. Water-level decline in most of the rural area around Rolla appears to be less than 75 ft.

Potentiometric maps were constructed for the Rolla area using City of Rolla water-level data, and water-level measurements from well logs at Division ofGeologyand Land Survey. Maps were constructed to show the configuration of the potentiometric surface in August 1960 (figure23), August 1970(figure24), August 1980 (figure 25), and August 1990 (figure 26). Data from August were used because drawdown effects from seasonal pumpageare typicallygreatcstat that time. Thequantity of water-level data was not great for the 1960 and 1970 potentiometric maps. Data availability increased with the drilling of additional wells to supply the City, PWSD #2,and others. Water-level data from relatively shallow private wells in the area were used as a guide ifno other nearby data were available.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Groundwater withdrawals in and ncar Rolla have caused local but significant water-level declines in the Ozark aquifer. Since 1900, the CityofRolla has pumped an estimated 23.5 billion gallons from the Ozark aquifer. The rural Rolla area, which includes the unincorporated parts of Miller, Rolla, and Dillon townShips, has produced an estimated 9.1 billion gallons. Combined, water use from the Ozark aquifer from 1900 to present in the Rolla area is conservatively estimated at 32.6 billion

gallons. Current production from the aquifer in Rolla and rural Rolla is about 1 billion gallons per year, not including production by the City of S1. James. About 74 percent of the water is produced by the City of Rolla. Because of the distance between the two towns, pumping in St. James probably has little or no effect on Ozark aquifer water levels at Rolla, and production in Rolla likely has no effect on SI. James. 49

Ozark Aquifer in llle Rolla Area

COM91H~0

YEAR

PRODUCTIOH, CITY OF ROlLA WELLS (~ILL!O~ GALLONS)

JAJ<

FEB

PIAR

APR

IlA'

JUN

JUl

AI"

SfP

ocr

NOV

O~C

VEAllL V TOTAl

0.00 19.56 21.04

19.90 22.24

21.33 21.34

20.78 20.64 24.56 2J.45

24.911 22.93 29.00 25.86

26.24 22.21 29.80 29.n

21.911 23.84

22.36 24.21

31.31 25.45

26.11 25.11 26.93 21.05

21.50 22.95 25.01 24.22

20.37 21.63 22.34 21.91

249.66 266.37 301.93 290.25

2J.40

19.23 21.54

24.24 30.83 29.03 32.14 34.28

26.91 32.79 28.03 36.01 33.07

26.61 29.09 28.49

24.54 24.89

21.49 24.04

33.20 28.90

26.10 26.09 32.91 313.51 31.63

21.50 30.55 31.89

23.91 25.51 2B.78

290.92 323.19 32J.92 344.88 356.12

1957 1959 1959 1960

21.65

22.59 22.09

18.05 19.75 20.68 21.04

1961 1962 1963 1964 1965

22.38 23.42 23.61 25.21 26.135

23.14 25.54 26.13 25.15 21.01

18.90 22.59 23.11 24.15 24.69

23.39 26.81 26.49 26.59 26.ll6

2!J.58 26.40 27.80 34.19

1966 1967 1961l 1969 1970

28.61 31.62 39.06 38.69 41.89

31.08 33.05 40.48 41.43 46.06

29.21 313.18 39.15 39.51 43.17

32.49 34.16 41.41 43.59 46.26

31.91 32.89 44.04 45.>19 48.16

33.01 42.8!! 115.13 48.27

53.12 38.67 51.52 49.411 57.28

37.81 45.62 46.56 49.81 56.69

35.14 47.88 50.62 45.55 59.21

39.92 42.2ll 47.32 115.80 50.22

35.0ll 40.81 116.23 M.05 49.81

31.57 37.64 39.31 42.74 45.98

591.11

<12.18

49.99 45.95 45.30 39.83 <19.95

43.8<1 >16.90 41.59 42.47

50.38 45.33 45.21 42.19

51.41 41.34 45.98 42.61

51.00 56.61 47.35 43.46

6<1.39 59.39 56.85 611.65

61.61 53.69 56.11 51.44

50.19 50.49 48.30 44.51

49.32 49.18 50.51 46.53

411.64 45.91 42.29 41.24

618.11 594.68 592.92 559.14

52.14

45.19

50.03

55.65

66.90

59.05 56.60 51.B8 59.42 64.35

63.10

60.53

57.16

55.58

668.51

56.80 59.115 50.46

56.39

53.75 65.8/1 51.10 54.53 54.1>3

53.37 511.43 56.92 54.49 55.92

54.50 62.24 52.43 64.56 54.69

51.63 63.96 55.77 56.55 59.34

63.116 56.96 65.52 62.27 81.15

65.19 63.01 57.14 65.35 73.94

73.25 61.49 69.44 65.0B 66.25

66.54 56.09 60.25 61.02 61.54

63.06 61>.11 59.19 59.16 59.55

58.7J 52.27 54.95 63.09 55.54

720.19 724.90 6113.90 729.28 741.61

62.30 59.16 60.17 59.21 55.84

54.32

61l.12

59.29 53.60 57.3e 59.05

6<1.99 61.47 59.72 59.11

61.62 63.23 60.10 59.37 5l.14

61.92 61.08 71l.d3

68.50 19.34 11.19

63.85 63.59 63.94

65.81 75.23

51.2/1 74.12 94.18 14.37 63.16

66.35 71.81

58.7J 65.69

60.(14 69.00 58.65 55.36 56.03

63.61 57.23 58.51 52.BO 56.03

730.83 774.49 768.91 724.93 722.44

58.32 50.12 51.81

57.58 61.02 56.60 55.63 62.83

56.51 59.99 55.81 53.73 56.56

57.11 54.04 10.65 66.90 59.30

58.32 62.13

69. HI 65.07 56.97 70.25 63.24

66.10 70.53 70.79 70.45 61.46

69.93 61.46 62.51 63.06 69.90

62.00 60.66 60.12 70.38 62.90

52.91 58.66 53.65 60.66 54.61

56.91 54.24 51.66 59.91 56.16

714.30 723.04 721.35 735.ll1 729.53

1470.77

1483.29

1490.44

1575.19

1609.22

1809.25

1832.11

1902.25

1614.15

1584.05

1489.21

1971 1!!12 19n

1974 1915 1976 1911 1978 1979 1981)

36.62 48.95 44.15 47.39 54.11 64.59 50.74 55.9<1

1981 1982 1993 19114 1985

51.91)

55.41

51.32 56.51 60.97 56.24

611.18 56.26 54.80 53.52

1996 19111 1998 1999 1990

54.06 50.95 52.26 56.33 63.23

50.10 54.23

TOTAL MONTHLf 1430.23 PRODUCTIOH (O"BIN~O

61.26 56.93

23.14 23.72

PRODUCTION 1957-1990, (ITl or ROLLA WELLS:

21.69 21.94 29.J3 34.58

60.75 61.29 78.01

19249.21

PlIUION

nd6 25.62

GALlD~S

Table 32: Combined production, City of Rolla wells, 1957-1991.

50

421.13 4119.02 529.58 53./J.23

Summary and Conclusions

~OHTHlY

PERCENTAGE OF YEARlY

WAT£R USE, CITY OF ROlLA

YEAR

'M

rE.

"'"

""

MY

JlIN

JlI.

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

llH

11.<'1

.."

8.61

8.16

g.",

B.61

8.12

1951

0.00

1.91

1.13

8.55

B.n

10.01

10.51

1.34

8.35

1.41

8.01

1.15

8.51

8.34

1959

6.91

1.48

'.85

1.66

8.11

9.60

9.91

.. "

10.48

J!58

10.31

B.92

8.46

g."

1.40

1960

1.46

1.61

7.25

8.11

•. ll9

8.91

9.12

B.11

9.32

8.93

B.3~

1.55 1.65

g."

J!61

1.91

B.45

6.7]

g."

9.ll

'.85

B.63

9.58

9.41

g."

9.13

1962

1.25

1.90

6.99

8.29

9.15

8.52

g."

10.14

9.DO

B.Ol

7.70

I ....

I'"~

,,,.

7.31

B.25

7.14

8.11

8.15

8.55

B.96

B.65

•.eo

10.16

11.49

1.311

1.31

I."

1.00

7.11

g.",

8.10

9.32

10.46

9.63

8.115

8.116

1.42

1965

I. Jll

1.59

6.92

1.53

9.511

'.2J

9.61

9.21

11.10

8.111

9.94

B.Ol

1966

6.81

1.38

1.5!!

8.21

12.61

8.49

9.45

8.33

1.50

1.04

1.36

1.74

I."

to.16

10.66

9.41

9.09

8.38

1.39

1.66

7.41

I.B3

8.33

9.15

8.Bl

9.58

8.95

8.15

,,,g

1.24

1.16

7.40

B.16

9.26

9.32

8.53

8.51

B.91

1." B.OO

1970

7.0B

1.711

1.30

1.82

8.51 8.24

1." 8.11 8.45

11.61

1968

.."

1.71

1961

8.16

9.69

9.58

9.95

B.49

B.26

1.11

1971

6.82

1.09

9.14

8.12

8.24

10.41

9.54

9.91

8.21

1.91

7.21

B.31

7.12

6.94

....

1972

6.16

'.ll9 1.11

1.89

1.62

1.96

9.53

9.99

9.51

9.01

8.49

1913

B.26

7.64

8.03

1.63

7.15

1.99

9.59

9.76

9.56

9.15

8.52

7.13

1974

B.OO

1.12

1.59

1.64

1.62

7.76

10.84

10.62

9.19

1.95

8.11

7.37

1915

7.09

1.41

7.90

6.16

1.49

9.32

10.01

9.63

9.53

9.05

8.55

9.31 8.15

1976

7.51

7.46

1.88

1.40

7.56

1.99

9.86

9.04

10.16

9.23

8.75

1911

B.91

9.08

9.26

9.06

9.59

9.92

1.95

9.69

8.49

7.14

9.30

1.11

1918

1.42

7.47

7.39

B.J2

1.61

B.15

9.5B

9.36

10.15

9.91

9.65

8.03

1979

1.67

1.49

9.40

1.47

9.95

1.75

11.54

9.96

B.92

9.19

9.11

B.65

1990

7.60

1.29

1.66

1.54

1.11

9.00

11.02

9.96

B.93

9.11

B.03

7."9

19B1

1.92

1.59

9.52

1.43

8.11

H.43

9.41

1.Bl

9.31

IU4

B.22

9.70

1992

7.40

1.6~

7.52

9.39

9.57

10.24

9.21

8.79

1.39

1.35

7.93

6.97

7.99

9.16 7.82

1.89

1993

9.90 1.32

9.68

12.25

9.26

9.30

1.63

7.61

1994

9.41

7.56

9.18

1.92

8.24

8.19

9.08

10.26

9.15

8.10

7.64

7.28

1985

7.78

7.41

1.13

8.11

8.04

7.16

10.41

8.74

9.94

9.09

7.76

7.16

1996

1.57

1.10

1.99

8.50

9.11

9.25

9.7B

B.68

1.41

1.91

1.03

1.50

..'"

1.92

'981 1988 1989

8.44

8.16

1.41

9.n

9.00

9.75

9.3]

8.39

8.11

1.50

7.J!

8.02

1.19

7.61

9.71

10.7]

7.B3

9.13

8.59

8.21

1.38

7.10

7.66

6.81

7.56

7.30

g.",

1.91

9.55

9.57

9.57

9.51

8.24

8.15

1990

9.61

7.10

B.61

7.15

7.99

9.52

8.61

9.15

9.57

8.61

1.49

7.78

"""'..Y 7.43 PERCENTAGE

7.64

7.71

7.74

B.IB

.."

9.40

9.52

9.16

9.70

8.11

7.74

AYE""

Table 33: Monthly percentage of total yearly water use, 1957-1991, City of Rolla. 51

~~700~"']----------------------~=;:::;:~:;=;=1=={"l==i=~:::;::;:::::::;:~= r-r-J

BOO z l1: 0 600

I

i

L-J

i

I

I

I

iii

i

i

I

~~ 500 II: Z 400

~

~:.

~§ 300 r:3 g 200 ,.~

100

o

-=l---+--l--J1-t-+++-H-;+++-+---+-+-+-t--J--l----t4+-W----I--+-U-W-+-U

12

,,~

Z" "'"' "< ~,. u~

~

§~

Z 0,-

,"0

11

10 9 8 7 6

90

"' Z ,,0 ",j

~~ ,,~

~<

;:" ,.Z

~o

1':3 z-

0"

,,~

'"S· ~

",j

"'"' ~"

~

:. 'i!

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

a , 1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

YEAR Figure 6: Monthly and yearly water production. City of Rolla.

1963

1985

1987

1989

1991

~

Summary and ConcJu.sions

YEARLY PRODUCTION (MILLION GALLONS) Phelps Co. PWSD #2

Year

Rolla

St. James

1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

119.98 135.92 154.98 164.68 170.12 177.67 194.64 214.44 230.57 246.93 233.14 243.97 249.66 266.37 301.93 290.25 280.92 323.19 323.92 344.88 356.72 421.13 449.02 528.58 534.23 591.71 618.71 594.68 592.92 559.74 668.57 720.79 724.80 683.90 729.28 741.67 730.83 774.49 768.91 724.93 722.44 714.30 723.04 727.35 735.81 729.53

68.89 48.48 84.48 74.37 93.20 107.05 83.05 94.19 94.68 110.47 104.00 109.07 114.50 113.72 123.40 129.21 132.64 133.83 150.00 137.44 126.73 133.71 142-70 141.07 133.90 136.86 144.96 134.14 128.19

28.19 31.11 30.69 35.16 35.12 37.57 41.63 42.24 39.88

Total

21,536.24

3,328.93

321.59

Table 34: Yearly water production for Rolla, 51. James, and Phelps County PWSD #2.

53

160

140 130 120 -

~

150

~

en

Z

0

~

100

~ ::l

90

.. "" ~

en

=0

...'"""<

•~ ':l ~

-

-

-

-

-

--

-

~

f----

-

-

110

Z

0

-

-

~

60

f----

I-

70 60

-

50

-

I-

40 30 20 10 -

o 1962

1964

1966

1968

19'70

1972

1974

1976

1978

19ao

YEAR Figure 7: Yearly water production: City of St. James

1982

1984

1986

1988

1990

Summary and COIIC/usiollJ

50""""--------------------------, 45 Oz

40 35

>oz

25 20

w_ ~~

~~ :0

... 0

ei3

!:!a

30

i----li---l

15 10

5-;

04--~1__-+--1_-+----:1__-+--1_-+-___1 1982

1983

1984

1985

1988

1987

1988

1969

1990

1991

YEAR

14

.,.,

,,~

f' .,'" ui'!

.......

13 12

11

Ci~

10

...ei ~!:!

8

• ?

0 ..

,,"0

8 5

1982

1963

196.

1985

1966

1987 YEAR

8.0

-r-----------------------...,

5.0 4.0

3.0 2.0 1.0

0.0 1982

1983

196.

1965

1966

1987

1986

1989

YEAR

Figure 8: Monthly and yearly production, Phelps County PWSD #2.

55

1990

1991

200 -=r---------------------------------------",.004 ~

to..

CITY OF ROLLA. WELL #2 (drilled 1935) Surface elevation: 1083.5 Ft. msl Total depth: 1745.5 Ft. (Lamotte Fm.) Casing: 493.6 Ft., lO-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 235 Ft.

250

.; u

~

" Co']

NO DATA

834

"

~

300

764 ...

350

734 ~

Q

~

j ~

~

.. o

z

~

t:l ~

400

••4

1;;

~

500 5

--------------------------------------------------------.----------------------------------------------.---.-.-----------... ----------------------------------------------- .. ------- .. -------------------------------.----------------------------------

o~

(::"

uz "0 §~

g;" ~§

z-

4 3

2

0" ,.o 1

1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1ge9

1971

1973

1915

1977

1979

1961

1963

1965

YEAR Figure 9: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1990, City of Rolla well #2.

1987

1989

1991

584

200 -=r----------------------------------r909 City of Rolla, Well #3 (drilled 1942)

t E:

Surface elevation: 1108.6 Ft. msl Total depth: 1175 Ft. (Derby-Doerun Dol.) Casing: 392 Ft., lO-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 245 Ft.

250

~

~

::J m

300

859

~

809 :u

'"

Q

j :::II

o

NO DATA

350

759

e: 400

~

.'2:

..,

709 ~

NO DATA

~ Go1

~

o

S ,.

0:

~

~

o-l

n

i'i

450

659

Q

§ ~

500 10

... --------------------------------._----------.------ .. --------------- .. ---------------------------_._----.------- .. ------._----------.---._---------------- -------- •• --------- •••• --- ••••• ----------------------.---------------.- ••• ---------_

z 2_ 9 t;~ 8

§~ ~

11:"

~~

5 4-

z~ ~1

0_

"

o 1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1ge9

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1983

1985

YEAR Figure 10: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957·1991, City of Rolla well #3.

1987

1989

1991

609

150

..'"

'"o..
..

'" " "j

CITY OF ROLLA. WELL #4 (drilled 1947)

~

Surface elevation: 1037.4 Ft. msl Total depth: 1076 Ft. (Derby-Doerun 001.) Casing: 231.6 Ft., 12-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 165 Ft.

200

250

837

787

'"''""''

'"

350

887

."

...''""'' ~

837

0

i:

"

~

737 ~ ::! 0 ;<

S 400 ~

.....

300

'"'"

00

~

n

:a 0

. ..'"

~

",

:::>

e:

~

887

'"0< '"' "'"' ~

450

587

500

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- .. -----------

14

------------.--------------------------------.--.--------------------------------.---------------------_._----------------.-

12 10 8 8 4

2

o 1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1961

1983

1985

1987

YEAR Figure 11: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #4.

1989

1991

537

,.'<'""'

'";' ~

~

.." S",

•~

200 - = r - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - r 8 8 3

...

r:

r&I

CITY OF ROlLA. WELL

_

(drilled 1947) 833

Surface elevation: 1082.7 Ft. msl Total depth: 1150 Ft. (Derby-Doerun DoL) Casing: 280 Fl., 12-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 245 Ft.

"'

~

#5

250

300

g

"

~

"j ~

e: ~

: g ~

w

NO DATA

350

I

I NO DATA

I

;;J

I

~

400

683

450

833

" 500 16

------------------------.---_.------------------------------.

.

---------.--.---- •• ------------- •• ------.-.--------------_.------------------.



.

. •

_ _

14 12

10 8 8 4

2

o 1957

1959

1961

1M3

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1961

1983

1985

YEAR Figure 12: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #5

19B7

1989

1991

583

r;; ~ ~

~

250..".-------------------------------------.::-902

CITY OF ROLLA. WElL #6 (drilled 1951)

~ ti

Surface elevation: 1152.1 Ft. msl Totel depth: 1215 Ft. (Derby-Doerun Dol. Casing: 378 Ft.. 12.75-ln. diameter Static water level when drilled: 315 Ft.

300

~

§

852

~ ~

'"

350

802

:::I

400

752 !"

.~-

450

'"c j

~

~

~

o

~

t c

852

SOD

550

--._.--------.-------------------- ..------------------------------------------------------------------------------.--.-.----

10

-----------------------------------------------------------------------.---------------------------.----._-- •• --------------

• 8 7 8 5

• 3 2 I

o 1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1963

1985

YEAR Figure 13: Water-level cbanges and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #6.

1987

1969

1991

802

§...

200

BBO

CITY OF ROILA. WELL #7 (drilled 1954)

ti

~ 250 .;

NO DATA I I

Surface elevation: 1060.4 Ft. msl Total depth: II25 Ft. (Derby-Doerun Dol.) Casing: 509 Ft.. 10-ln. diameter Static water level when drilled: 240 Ft.

u

~

'" "j

:> ~

." 0

'00

350

NO DATA

S 400 "'"

7BO

... '"' '"

730

21 z

BBO

.."

li:'"

"'~ il

'f;;"' ~

'" '"'"

'"

B'O

450

B'O

..,

...''""'' ;; 0

"'~ f;;

;; ~

500

.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.

10 9

.

-----------.----------------------------- .. ---------_.------------------------------.----------------------.

.

.

_ _

B

7 B

5

, 4

2 1

o 1957

1959

t961

1963

t965

1967

1969

t971

1973

1975

1977

1979

t961

1983

19B5

YEAR Figure 14: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #7.

1967

1989

1'191

5BO

150

-:::r----------------------------------.".••

O

CITY OF ROILA, WELL #8 (drilled 1960)

E 200

I

Surface elevation: 1030 Ft. msl Total depth: 1595 Ft. (Bonneterre Fm.) Casing: 280 Ft., 12-ln. diameter Static water level when drilled: 250 Ft.

.30

;!::t'"

"

~

::

250

780 :::0

~

300

730

o

e: 0:

S

350

g

~

400

.50

z o~ ;::'" uz



0:"

.



~~

~~

2

§~

5

3

0_

"

0+,..-,.....-,1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1983

1985

YEAR Figure 15: Water-level changes and monthly prOduction, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #8.

1987

1989

1991

~

~

250 -::r-------------------------------------",.14 t; ~

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-ROlLA, WELL

300 350

::II

400

o

(drilled 1963) .64

Surface elevation: 1164.5 Ft. ms! Tolal deplh: 1205 Fl. (Derby-Doerun 001.) Casing: 411 Flo Static water level when drilled: 361 Ft.

g ~

H2

~:l~ n

S

814 ;a

'" NO DATA

784

~

o

?=

g:

~~o:_

450

:= ~

500

:!J

6.4

550

-----------------------------------------------.--.-...--_._-------..----.-.---------------------------.---.-----------...-

10

---------------------- •••--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

• 6 1 6 5

4 3 2 1

o+-,-,.-,.-,-,...,...,.....,,.-,.-,-,.-,. 1957

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1983

YEAR

Figure 16: Water-level changes and monthly production. 1957-1991. UMR well #2.

1985

1987

1989

1991

614

~

CITY OF ROLLA. WELL !;;

f::

Surface elevation: 1118 Ft. mol Total depth: 1135 Ft. (Derby-Doerun Dol.) Casing: 317 Ft.. 12-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 346 Ft.

250

,.; u

~

""'" "j 'e:" "'". 0

:

..

H9 (drilled 1966) 888

818

..'"

~ n

:0

..,

§

I NO DATA

g

350

788 !"

NO DATA.

I

..,.., ..,

.

I

.00

NO

DATA

I

I

I NO DATA 718

r; 0

;:j

0

i:

..'" :;;J

300

.50

668

"

...,'"r;; ,..;:j

500

..

16 14

~

...

.

-------0_-------------------..----------------------------------------

--------------------------.-------------.--.-.--------------------------------------- ---.--------------------------._-.-.--

12

10 8 8

• 2

o +-r--r-....,.......,.......,.....,......,......,.....,... 1957

1959

1981

1963

1965

1967

1ge9

1971

1973

1975

19n

1979

1961

1963

1965

YEAR Figure 17: Water-level cbanges and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #9.

1967

1ge9

1001

616

..,.

~

.,8

200

"l!

'"s· ~

if

,.'~" ~

Q

200

"3-------------------------------------r

676

CITY OF ROLLA. WELL #10 (drilled 1967) I;;

1: rj

~

:l ~

Surface elevation: 1075.7 Ft. msl Tolal deplh: 1140 Fl. (Derby-Doerun DoL) Casing: 323 Ft.. 12-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 295 Fl.

250

BZ6

~

'"'"

:

~

"

300

776

350

726

"j :I

~

~ '" ~z

"

400

g 0:

~

626

450

§ ~

500

.---.. -----------_.---------------------------------------------------------- .. -----------_._.---... _----------------_.----.

14

---------------- •• ---- •• -------------.- ••• ----------_ ••••• -.- •• ----- •• --------- •• -- ••• --.-- •• ------- •••• --------------------

12 10 6 6

• 2

o

+...,..,.....,.....,....,.....,.,-,.,....,..

1957

1959

1961

1963

19a5

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1983

19B5

YEAR Figure 18: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla weD 1110.

19S7

1989

1991

576

'60

-:r------------------------------------.,.9BB CITY OF ROLLA, WELL #11 (drilled 1972)

E 200 r.i

5 ::;,

g

Surface elevation: 1117.6 Flo IDsl Total depth: 1150 Ft. (Derby-Doerun 001.) Casing: 325 Ft., 12-ln. diameter Static water level when drilled: 294 Flo

918 :2

n

250

BBB

" Q

j

NO

DATA I

:a 300 o

e:

818

;:J

!:l

0:

S

~ '"' ~ ~

768

~

:=

~

~

400

7.B

'"'

,.

BBB

350

~

450

'2

1959

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

1971

1973

1975

1977

1979

1981

1983

1985

YEAR Figure 19: Water-level changes and monthly production, 1957-1991, City of Rolla well #11.

1987

1989

1991

~

~

140 7 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -__-,-635 ROLLA INN OBSERVATION WELL (drilled 1962)

145

Surface elevation: 974 Flo msl Total depth: 650 Ft (Eminence Dol.) Casing: 420 Ft., 6-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 145 Ft.

150

630

625 ~

820

~

815

~

., ~

~

160

~

~

~

165

610

~

170

o 605 ?'

!

175

'"'"""

180

795

....

165

790

~

~

§ ~

190

765

195

760

200 ~-.,.........1968

1970

......-,.........,..-.,.........1972

1974

-"T'"-r_....,..-.,.........- ......-,.....+ 775

.......-,.......,.-.,.........,_.......-.,......... 1976

1978

1980

1982

1984

YEAR Figure 20: Hydrograph, 1969-1991, Rolla Inn observation well.

19S6

1988

1990

a 250

CITY OF ROLLA INDUSTRIAL PARK HYPOINT #3 OBSERVATION WELL (drilled 1968)

250

....,

.,. '"

NO DATA

~ :!

.0.

u

""'

2.0

B••

Q

~

"..'" 0

.,...'"

~

... ...'.,"

."

.,!;" " "~ ~

::l

0

I NO DA.TA

300

I

BB.

.z

.."" ."

310

B7•

1:; 0

OJ

0

.

'"s· ~

Surface elevation: 1189 Flo msl Total depth: 800 Ft. (Eminence Dolomite) Casing: 400 Ft., B-In. diameter Static water level when drilled: 250 Flo

270

""i!

.2.

~ 2BO roi

~

~

.3.

320

BB•

"'~ [;; <

Q

"

~

330

B5.

340

B4.

350

+--,---r--...,..-....,--r--.,--....,--r--...,..-...,.--r--...,..-...,.--r---r-+ B3. t975

1976

1917

1978

1979

19BO

1981

19B2

1983

1964

1965

1986

YEAR Figure 21: Hydrograph, 1975-1991, Hypoint #3 observation well.

1967

1986

1969

1990

1991

So

"S'c "-

" •

Summary and Conclusions

__ --_.-

_ .. _----.-_

_ _ _ 1'lnDIT1QMt:nUCC
_ 0.0 ...... _ _ __ _ ..-.-v ._

-'

....

-------

" ~-

'1"S7 XI'

o.

. '"~;...

"

-

t'~

-

/ ,/

{

I

--

..

I

I

/

/

\

,I

/

,I

I

C'a1W"

;-- .... , ' .... -

I

/

I I

••'.7 XI'

/

/

,J

\

I

/

'\

\ J

/

/

/

/

/

/.

-

'1" sS'

0

/

••• ¢

,

1,_

Figure 22: Predcvclopment potentiomelric map of the Ozark aquifer (after Imcs, 1990).

69

Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

-_., __ .......,.--_.e-_",_,_

-"75- 1'OT1:I'm0ME1'1lK COI'iTOlI.

9'"42'JIT

<----_.. . . 0 - . ; . V _ 0.0.. 0I1t:>.

ISl.

Ory"'~_.

_Goo,)

i.. __

~~~

)1"57JIT

,~

f ,! ~ i

,

• ~

~

,

,~



-.

, .. ,

~ .~

• N

31" SS·

.. , 91"" .10'"

Figure 23: Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1960,

70

1 ~ik

Summary and Conclusions

---_

71$- P'OTEmlOMl.TIlICCONTOUIt ~ .,. . 0<0< ,. e 1l

""""'"' v."

.

_"". ,_,

""'-or '''".

WAnltWEU.S 717.

GoJ '" Iloll. ",d

m _ OOU·USGS Obo<"",'ion_1I 8JlI... IN ""''''' Co. PWSD #hd '.-<........._



.. _

N_ ,,",,",,~ v."... ""'-or '"",,

)1" 51" J(r

)7" 17"

N

,"

'--j )7"

SS

Figure 24: Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1970.

71

l
Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

_ ..,,,_ _ .._<000oi...._.

_J:lS_ ron:tlT1OM1."1'lUC ror<......'.

e-_,,,.oc_

.---

........ v..-o.._.. 'm, WATD"u.u

lI9O.

a.,. of Rolla _

_

OGL5-VSGs~



....

Dol .. "",1poc<>',W$rUI_

, - . . _ - - ' - ._ _ .....c N..... """""'V.nKoI".... .. 'ml

..

------ ~ ~>.j.\Ill]

}1"S7)O"

"",B8

• N

J1"lS

.'

,, ,



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Figure 25: Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1980.

72

..

~.

5S

SwntnQry and Conclusions

_,--_n..._1'_.-1_._....

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-nil- P'QTVlT10101E1't.lC COf'(J'OOR GooOo",

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Figure 26: Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1990.

73

DUlrk Aquifer in the Rolla Area

_

---_ _--I"O'TV
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~ _ l $

91'~

91'41

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Figure 27: Potentiometric map of the Ozark aquifer, August, 1992,

74

Summary and Conclusions

" I " II.

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Figure 28: Water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer from predcvelopment to 1992.

75

OUlf"k Aquifer in the Rolla Area

"'S'"

w..... ..... . - . _ _ w~n:a.u:vELDU:UNt:

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Figure 29; Water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer between 1960 and 1992.

76

,~·

Swnmary and Conclusions

Water-level hydrographs were prepared for 10 City of Rolla wells, including UMR well #2, which showed a gradual but relatively steady groundwater-level decline in the Ozark aquifer at Rolla. The wells showed from less than I fl/year to more than 7.7 ftJycar watcr-Icvcl decline, and averaged about 3.0 ftlycar.

The Ozark aquifer has supplied water to nearly every resident, business, farm, and industry in the Rolla area for nearly a century, and will likcly continue to be the major water-supply source for many years. A important question is whether theaquifer is capable of continuing to supply the needed volumeofwater, or is present water use exceeding the safe yield of the aquifer. Thesafe yield of an aquifer, which is the amount of water that can be produced without causing undesired effects such as excessive water-level declines, is a function of several factors including aquifer characteristics, aquifer recharge, and rate of groundwater movement in the aquifer. Recharge estimates for the Ol.ark aquifer arc 2.3 in/year to 9.5 in/year, which equate to about 40 miIJion gallons per square mile per year to 165 million gallons per square mile per year. Assuming9.5 in. of recharge, the retharge entering the aquifer within an area of 6 mi J would provide 1 billion gallons per year, which is the current water use rate for Rolla and rural Rolla. An area of 25 mP would be needed with a recharge rate of 2.3 in./year to supply I billion gallons per year.

Potentiometric maps constructed for eaeh to-year period beginning t 960,andalsofor August, 1992,showed drawdown in the Ozark aquifer to have increased each to-year period. Two maps showing water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer were developed from potentiometric map data. The water-level decline map covcring the predevelopment to 1992periodoftime(figure28)showed that water-level declines of 100 ft to 150 fl haveoceurred in a 17 mF area in and adjacent to Rolla. Water-level declines of between 150 fl and 200 ft have occurred in a 6.1 mP area, and in excess of 200 fl in a 1 mil area. This map was developed by contouring the difference be· tween the August, 1992, potentiometric surface and the predevelopment potentiomelric surface. Based on this map, wdter-Ievel declines in and near Rolla show that about 82.3 billion ft J of aquifer has been dewalered. However, assuming a specific yield of 0.1, this volume of saturated rock would produce about 62 billiongallonsof water, about twice the estimated volume produced.

The continuing water-level decline in the Ozark aquifer in the Rolla area shows that the aquifcr is not under steady-stale conditions; outnow from the aquifer is greater than inflow, resulting in lowering of water-level within theaquifer. It is difficult to predict the magnitude of future water-level changes. Such predictions depend on accurately forecasting population changes and changes in per capila water usc. Assuming no increase in aquifer withdrawal rates, the cone of depression will conlinue to gradually expand unlil I) recharge within the radius of influence equals the volume of water being produced from the aquifer, or 2) the volume of water moving into the cone of depression from up-gradient, plus reCharge, is sutTicient to replenish the volume of water produced.

The water-level decline map for the period between August, 1960, and August, 1992 (figure 29), probably more accurately portrays the magnitude of water-level changes in lhe Ozark aquifer. Based on this map, waterlevel decline since 1960 has been 75 ft to 100 ft within a to.l mil area inand ncar Rolla,and 100 ft to 150 ft within a 4.5 mParea of Rolla. Water-level decline of more than 150 ft has occurred within a very limited area, 0.3 mil. Based on this map, about 29 billion ftJofaquifer has been dewatercd. Assuming a specific yield of 0.1, this volume of aquifer would produce 21.7 billion gallons.

Further water-level decline can hopefully be mini· mized by selectively pumping wells within Rolla where yields and specific capacities are highest, and where waler-Ievel decline has been the least. Water-level decline is greatesl in the nonhern and western pariS of lhe City in an area aboul4 mi long and 1.5 mi 10 2 mi wide, paralleling 1-44 and the Burlington Northern Railroad. Water-level decline is the least in the northeast, cast, and southeasl parts of the City. Producing more water in these areas, including the Hypoint Induslrial Park, while decreasing production from the wells in the area of greatest water-level decline,shoutd help minimizeaddi· tional drawdown.

Support for the 1960-1992 water-level decline map being more representativeofwater-Ievelchanges is found in the water usc information. Rolla and rural Rolla water use for the 6O-year period between 1900 to 1960 is estimated to be 8 billion gallons. From 1%0 to 1992, more than 3 times this volume of water, 24.5 billion gallons, was produced in slightly more than one-half the time. Because production from the Ozark aquifer was relatively low prior to 1960. water-level declines should also have been relatively small, and recharge from precipitation should have replenished most of lhe waler produced from theaquifer. Also, the predevelopment to 1992 water-level decline map shows 3 times as much aquifer dewatered as did the 1960 to 1992 map, even though only one-fourth of Ihe lotal water production occurred prior 10 1%0.

The level ofdetail and quality of records kept by RMU have proven invaluable in analyzing the01.3rk aqUifer in the Rolla area. Thedala collected by the City primarily

77

OZ/Jrk Aquiftr in lht Rolla Art'Q

consists of static water level before pumping begins, drawdown at the end of the pumping cycle, length of pumping cycle, volume of water pumped, and other information. The collection of this information will, undoubtedIy,continue. Regular (at least monthly)static water level measurements should also be taken at any

inactive wells. Ideally, the information should be examined on a regular basis 10 see what changes haveoccurred in the aquifer, and to determine ifmodifications need to be made in operation ofthe water system to minimize the effects of pumping.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This study was greatly helped by the efforts of several people. Cynthia Brookshire, DGLS, developed the romputerdata-storagesystem used by RMU for storing wcll production and water-level data. Susan Johnson, RMU, entered 34 years of mOnthly and daily water reoords for 15 wells into the computer data-storage system. John Twitty, General Manager of RMU when the project began, Dan Watkins, present RMU General Manager, and other staff members of RMU provided information

on operation of the water system, and assisted with this project in numerous ways. Appreciation is extended to Phelps County PWSD 112, particularly Betty Harris for providing water-use information, and Ron Skyles for providing water-level measurements. Appreciation is also extended to SI. James Municipal Utilities efforts in supplying historic water-usc information for their city. Sharon Krause and Susan C. Dunn, DGLS, assisted in preparing this manuscript.

REFERENCES CITED Freeze, A R., and J. A. Cherry, 1979, Groundwater; Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N. J., 604 p. Imes, J. L., 1990, Major geohydrologic units in and

Imes,J. L., and L. F. Emmett, in press, Geohydrology of the Ozark platcaus aquifer system in parts of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Kansas; U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 1414-F.

adjacent to the Ozark plateaus province, Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma-Ozark aquifer; U.S. Geological Survey, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-711-E, 3 sheets.

Walton, W. C., 1962, Selected analytical methods for well and aquifer evaluation; Illinois State Water Survcy, Bulletin 49, 81 p.

78

Elutric and Waler Systems History

THE HISTORY OF THE ELECTRIC AND WATER SYSTEMS IN ROLLA, MISSOURI 1880 TO 1975 AND OTHER WELLS IN AND AROUND ROLlA by J.B. Bronson Prepared rrom old rec:ords and the stories orold residents, and ea"'y I'"econls orthe Missouri Geological Su..-vey (Missouri Department orNatul'1l1 Resource5' Division or Geology and Land Survey) and the files orthe Rolla Municipal Utilities which have accumulated 5ince 1924.

The American Utilities CompanyofHarrisburg, Pennsylvania, a holding company, purchased a number of electric and water properties in Missouri, Arkansas, and Kentucky from 1920 to 1926. Thcyweresmall towns, not generally integrated and mostly in poor physical condi· tion. In 1924,they purchased the Rolla electric and water system from Darlene Holcomb and herson-in-lawGeorge Silvers, and known as the Ozark Public Service Company. Mrs. Holcomb bought the electric and water system from the Qty of Rolla in 1918.

located in the east end. When Mrs. Holcomb bought the property and installed the diesel engines,the cityofficcs and jail were removed. In 1930, the Missouri Electric Power Company, now Sho-Me Power Corporation, a subsidiary o(the Central States Light and Power Company of Dubuque. Iowa, built a 33,OOO·volt transmission line (rom a dam they owned on the Niangua River near Lebanon, Missouri, through Rolla to Sullivan and Cuba, Missouri, towns where thcyowned power systems. The Missouri General Utilities Company contracted to buy power (rom this line and the diesel engines were shut down and used only for emergency until 1950 when they were junked and removed. In the 1950s The Missouri General Utilities Company converted the electric system from 2400 volts Delta to 4160 volts Wye. It is still operated at this voltage.

The operation of the electric and water systems by the City of Rolla from the first plant installed in the I88Ds, until it was sold to Mrs. Holcomb in 1918, had been almost a complete failure. The management was under the Mayor and City Council with evidenceof mismanage. meRl and favoritism,so the City was very happy tosellthe property to Mrs. Holcomb. She was a very aggressive and dynamic woman and while she had no previous utility experience she was determined to improve the service. This she did by converting the old 2 wire 120 voll DC electric system to AC, and extending the lines 10 more residences who cou Id not be served by the DC lines. To accomplish this, she installed 3 Fairbanks Morse diesel oil engines and AC generators from 1919 to 1923. She installed an clcctricdriven air compressor 10 pump water from the plant well into the water system. Sheshutdown and removed the old boilers in the southside ofthe plant, and the 50 KW DC gcnerator, and installed a 50-ton ice plant in the boiler room. The icc plant was not a profitable venture. After the properly was acquired by the American Utilities. it W"d.S sold in 1931 to DevereJoslin. He moved the entire icc plant to the icc plant he was operating at 6th and Rolla Streets.

In 1949, Rolla sevcred the Power Contract with Missouri ElectricPowerCompany and contracted with Union EleclricCompany 10 serve Rolla. Union Electric brought lwO 33,OOO-volt transmission lines into Rolla from a substation aboul3 miles north of Rolla known as Phelps Substation. This has been Rolla's source of power since that date. In 1924, I came from the Dayton Power and Light Company in Dayton, Ohio, to Missouri to manage the properties that American Utilities had acquired in Missouri, Arkansas, and Kentucky. I spent a great deal of time in Rolla because both the c1ectricsYSlcm and water system needed immediate attention, but I lived (or a short time in Kentucky and Arkansas. The situations there were not so acute because the power was purchased from other utilities and there were only t\\'O small water systems. The American Utili tics incorporated all the Missouri properties as the Missouri General Utilities Company. The American Utilities Company was not well financed, and because of this, was caught in the depression in 1929 and 1930 and was unable to keep the properties they had purchased. To avoid bankruptcy,

The first power plant building in Rolla, built about 1880, was a metal structure (a picture of this building is at the Rolla Municipal Utilitics office). It was replaced by a brick structure about 1910. The new brick building at the same location was used not only for a power plant, but the north sideofthe building was partitioned offas a Council Chamber and Mayor's office, with the city jail 79

Ozark AqUIfer in the Rolla Area

8-inch, 6-inch and 4-inch, with valves, fire hydrants, and a concrete storage tank on the north side of the town at Tower Road. In 1915, this tank, which was never satisfactory because of leakage, was abandoned and replaced with a 240,000 gallon steel standpipe 30 fect in height, erected by the Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. The tank was replaced in 1954 by an 800,000 gallon steel standpipe, 30 feet higher to increase the water pressure by 12 pounds. It was also erected by the Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. The 240,000 gallon standpipe is now used for storage of electric and water supplies. The 800,000 gallon standpipe is still in use (1975). Many of the original Corey fire hydrants installed in 1905, 1906, and 1907 arestill in useandall the original cast iron, lead joint mains are also in use. The Missouri School ofMincs drilled awell in 1906 and 1907 and a4-inchcross connection was made from the city system at Twelfth and Pine into the Missouri School ofMincs system for the mutual benefit of the City of Rolla and the Missouri School of Mines. This connection was eliminated in 1968 when other larger connecting mains were installed.

they traded all the stock of the Missouri General Utilities Company to the Associated Gas and Electric Company of New York for Associated stock. It was a standingjoke at that time that they traded nothing for nothing, as Associated was also on the verge of bankruptcy. Ire· mained with Associated until they were forced by the 1938 Federal Holding Company Act to sell the properties they owned, which were not integrated, and this included all the Missouri properties. In 1945 they sold the Rolla properties and the City of Rolla purchased them for S450,OOO. So afler 27 years, the city again owned the electric and water systems in Rolla. The city had voted a bond issue to cover the purchase price and took over operation on November 1, 1945, under a Board of Public Works and called it the Rolla Municipal Utilities. The trustees of Associated offered to move me to Eric, Pennsylvania, and place me in charge ofa group of (Owns they owned, but I elected to stay in Rolla. 1operated the electric and water system for the city of Rolla from 1945 until 1970 when I retired and was succeeded by Mr. William E. O'Haver. Mr. O'Haver came to work for the Rolla Municipal Utilities as a laborer in 1952 at the age of 25.

In about 1906, the town let a contract for an 8-inch well to a Mr. H. W. Steinsick to be drilled on the south side of Eighth Street, castofthe power plant building, east of the Frisco Railroad. Heencountered many troubles drilling the well. He started two or three wells, but because of crooked holes and the loss of drilling tools, they were abandoned. Through the years, this has been verified by uncovering the old steel casings on the cast side of the power plant. Finally, in 1907, he completed a well to 800 feet and the log shows that it pumped 200 gallons per minute. The well was pumped with air using a system devised by Professor Harris at the Missouri School of Mines. This was accomplished by running a I Yz inch steel pipe air-line into the well below the water-level (water level not known), and pumping air at 150 Ibs. of pressure down this pipe. The water was forced up the casing and ran from the top of the casing into a 40,300 gallon underground concrete reservoir adjacent to the well. From this reservoir the water was pumped by a centrifugal pump, located inside the power plant, into the water system. The air compressor used for the first well was evidently operated by steam pressure. In 1924 there was an old steam engine still in the power plant, but it was replaced with deiscl oil engines in 1918, 1922, and 1923. The production from this first well was given as 200 gpm when it was drilled, but in 1924 the well was only producing about 100 gpm. At times the water was cloudy and sandy, but by letting the water settle in the underground reservoir, the sand settled out and the water could be used. It was not good quality water. There were many complaints and considerable bleeding of the fire hydrants to get out part of the sediment. This well was

In the early 1
plugged about 1935 and the underground reservoir was filled in about 1942. The old residents told many tales about the troubles the city had with this first water

80

Electric and Water Systems History

Thewell was drilled by the Alexander Company ofSpringfield, Missouri, at a contract price of approximately $8,500.00, but they were unable to complete the well because of financial problems; it was completed by the bonding company (driller not known). The first pump was a Byron-Jackson installed by Reeves and Skinner PumpCompanyofSt. Louis. Evidently the pump was too light and fragile for the 400-foot setting in the well, and never operated satisfactorily. In removing the pump from the well in 1931, the column broke and part of the pump fell to the 500 fOOl level, and lodged in the 8-inch hole. After some three months the pump was fished out in pieces, but the well had caved in badly, and had to be drilled and bailed out from 800 to 1,200 feet, and a liner installed. In 1931 a Pomona, and later a Layne-Western pump was installed, which operated until about 1965 when the well was abandoned due to low production. Originally, the well produced about 350 gpm. It was a dependable supply for about 30 years. This well was plugged in 1%6.

system. The installation of the mains were completed about 6 to 8 months before the well and there was noway to test the mains for leaks. When water was finally pumped into the mains there were leaksevel)Where. The city brought suit against the contractor who installed the mains (contractor not known), but he returned and dug up and repaired the mains and the suit was dropped. The mains did not make water available to all the houses by being installed on everystreet. The city permitted houses on side and back streets to lay their own service lines to the mains. There were many such lines installed and practically all of them were Vz and Y.l inch iron pipe laid across private property through front and back yards or alleys, and even from one basement 10 the next. There were no records ofvalves on the water system, other than a designation on the plat map that a valve was located at or near a street intersection. Neither were there any mapsofservice lines to many homes. When a service line was found on a main with no indication where it went or who it served, it was common practice toopen the gooseneck and pour in a small amount of peppermint oil. This soon brought a response from the customers that this line served. In many cases it served three or four houses, some with water meters and others not. It was not until the latc 1940's that these conditions wcreeliminated and corrected by the installation of new mains, and the use of copper service, and the completion of a map of the water system.

By 1930 there were signs that Rolla was destined to increase in population, due to the growth of Missouri School of Mines and the United States Geological Sur· vey. In 1931 and 1932 Well #2 was drilled at Fourth and Rolla Streets. The same specifications were used as for Well #1, except 375 feet of 12-inch casing wa.. installed. Thiswellwascompleted to approximately 1,715 feet, and produced about 440 gpm of fine quality water. This well is still in production, but now has a capacity of only 270 gpm.

Agreat many conferences were held in 1925, 1926and 1927 between the American Utility officials, the citizens of Rolla, and the Missouri Geological Survey on what steps should be taken to furnish an adequate water supply. The American Utility officials investigated the possibilityofbuildinga large water plant on the Piney River at Newburg and pumping the water into Rolla, but they soon recognized that the cost of this was far more than they could finance. Finally, in 1928, it was decided that a new well should be drilled al a suitable location and a new turbine type electric driven pump installed. A lot was purchased on the norlh side of Seventh and Walnut streets. The specifications for the well were prepared by the Missouri Geological Survey, who asked that the well be drilled 12 inches in diameter down 10 500 feet, and 8 inchcsin diameter through the Potosi, terminating at the baseofthe Lamotte at approximately 1,750 feet,orwhen the drilling samples showed the Lamotte had been penetrated. It was the general opinion ofmanygeologislS al that time that a big flow of water was available only from the Lamotte.

In 1942 there was a great influx of people into Rolla, due to the cstablishment of Fort Leonard Wood 35 miles south of Rolla. The federal government recognized that the towns near Fort Wood needed some financial assistance, and made funds available for improvements to the water and sewer systems in several towns. Rolla received a grant for a water well and additions to the sewersystem. Well #3 was drilled in the northeast corner of Rolla at Arkansas and Holloway streets. It was a to·inch hole down 500 feet and 8-inches down through the Potosi to 1,200 feet. This well produced 440 gpm. The well discharged into a 240,000 gallon concrete reservoir and was pumped from the reservoir by a centrifugal pump into the water system. This tank was abandoned in 1955 and converted to a storage facility for electric and water supplies. The deep well pump was rebuilt and connected directly into the water system. In 1947, Well #4 was drilled on East Tenth Street and Well #5 at Walker Avenue and the Frisco Railroad. These wells were 12 inches in diameter down to 500 feet, and a to-inch hole through the Potosi to approximately

This Well # 1 (known by Missouri Geological Survey Records as Well #2) wascompleted at 1,765 feet in 1930 and 1931. There was only about 100 feet of 12-inch steel

casing installed. This casing was sel down in concrele,

I,2IJO[eel. Each prOlluce
and concrete filled in around the casing from the top.

wells were not drilled through the Lamotte at 81

Omrk. Aquifer in tlie Rolla Area

1,700 fcct because a well drilled by Missouri School of Mines in 1936 found that the water in this locality was coming from the Potosi instead of the Lamotte (see account of Missouri School of Mines Well #2 drilled in 1936later in this report). Bccauscofthis,all wellsdrilled after 1936 were approximately 1,200 fcct in depth.

In 1936, the Missouri School of Mines (now University of Missouri at Rolla), due to their growth and the falling production of their original Well #1 drilled in t907, decided to drill their Well #2 on the nonh side of the campus at Vichy Road and 16th Street about 25 feet south of their steel storage tank. The specifications for this well were reviewed and approved by the Missouri Geological Survey, and were the same as for the city'S Wells II 1 and #2. The Virginia Drilling Company of the State of Virginia was the low bidder and drilled the well. They lost their first hole at 2oofcct, but moved over a few fcct and drilled a second hole. It was never fully understood why the Virginia Drilling Company bid a well job some 1,000 miles from their home base. Hancock, who drilled the well, was an experienced and capable driller. When thewell was down to 1.200fCCt through the Potosi, the driller insisted that he had a big supply of water. He was so insistent that it was decided to install the pump and run a tcst on the well. This was done and the test showed that the well would produce 340 gpm. State Geologist Buehler and his Associate, H.S. McQueen, decided to stop thedrillingat the baseofthe Potosi at the 1,200 feet level, and operate at that level.

In 1952, Well #6 was drilled on West Tenth Strcct,juSt wcstofPhelps County Memorial Hospital. This well was drilled by the same specifications as Wells #4 and #5, and produced approximately 545 gpm. In 1954, Well #7 was drilled on Williams Road approximately 1,200 fcct west of South Rolla Street. This well was drilled by the same specifications as #4, #5, and #6, and produced 525 gpm. There weresignsofcontamination from the first samples pumped from the well, but after the well operated for 15 or 20 minutes at 525 gpm the water tested okay. This continued for over a year. A 100,000 gallon storage tank was installed at theweU and the well was discharged into this tank, treated with chlorineand then pumped into the system with a centrifugal service pump. This eliminated all contamination. In 1960, Well #8was drilled at the site of the old sewer plant south of Highway 72 at Sharon Avenue. This well was drilled to the same specifications as all the previous wells, but never produced a supply of water comparable with the previous wells. The maximum production was approximatcly260gpm. Thewell has beendccpcned and acidized scveraltimes and the pump setting lowered, bUI production has not improved.

As a result of the water production at the base of the Potosi, as this well indicated, all wells after 1936 have been drilled through the Potosi. This well was abandoned and plugged in the early 19705.

In 1940 and 1941, the Uptown Theater asked the Missouri General Utilities Company, ownerofthe Rolla Water System, for permission to take water from theaty water system and circulate the water through a system of coils in the Uptown Theater to cool the building. There was no way, without laying considerable main, to take water and return ii, except to the same main. The State Board of Health would not approve of such a connection and the idea was abandoned. Against Ihe advice of several engineers, the Uptown Theater decided to drill their own well on the east side of the Theater Building at 11th and Pine Streets for a supply of water. They drilled a 700 foot well in 1942, which produccdapproximatclySO gpm. They soon found that 80 gpm of 55 degree water would not cool the theater, so they abandoned the well and later put in air conditioning.

In 1966, Well #9 was drilled on Bridge School Road, approximalcly 600 feet cast of 1-44 on land owned by the United States Forest Service, to the same specifications as all the previous wells. This weB produced 750 gpm of good water. In 1965, the city installed a 1,800,000 gallon steel standpipe on Lanning Lane on the south side of the city to maimain beller pressure on the city'S south and wcst side. This makes a total of 2,700,000 gallon storage capacity above ground (1,800,000 on Lanning Lane) (800,000 on Tower Road) & (100,000 at Well #8 on Williams Road).

In the carly 19505, John Schuman had built and was operating the Busy Bee Laundryat 14th and ElmStrcets. He had tried to use water from the Frisco Pond for his laundry, but he did not have the proper filtering equipment, and was not willing to finance the installation of this equipment. He thought the city water rates were excessive, so he drilled a well in 1953 at the west side of the laundry building. The well was 675 fcct deep and a turbine Iypc pump was ioslallcd. Thewell produced from SO t060gpm and is still in operation. At the prescnt time, it is producing approximately 5Y2 million gallons annu-

In 1967, Well # 10 was drilled on the north side of 1-44 east of Vichy Road to the same specifications as all previous wells. This well produced 775 gpm of good water. In 1972, Well #11 was drilled in Heritage HeightS, a new subdivision at Liberty Drive and Lincoln Lane. This

well was drilled by air rOlary with detergent additives to the same specifications as all the other VI'Clls. This well produces approximately 1,000 gpm.

82

Electric and Water Systems History

ally, but there have been a number of limes when the pump has broken down and no water used from the well for a considerable time. This well was drilled by Roy Wallace. It is not properly cased and should be plugged as il is deeper than the point where thecitywellsarecased and could become a source of conlaminalion.

and over a length of time would partially control the rust and odor problem. We installed permanenl chlorinators, but after some 19 years the rust condition is slill a serious problem; however the taste and odor has improved. Approximately 1 ppmofchlorine is added 10 Ihe system.

In 1%4, the University of Missouri al Rolla drilled their Well #3 on the west side of Rolla. The well was drilled by Clark and Son of Pacific, Missouri, 10 a lotal depth of 1,205 feel, with 390 feel of 12-inch casing, and producing 570 gpm. In 1967, the University of Missouri at Rolla and the Rolla Municipal Utilities entered into an agreement for the utility company to lake over the operation of this well,andsupplyall the water used at the University of Missouri at Rolla.

The dtizens asked for Ouoridation of the eity water system. The Board of Public Works said Ihal it would be done if there was a referendum approving it. It wasvoted in and the fluoridation equipment was installed in 1%8. When the city purchased the utilities in 1945 from the Trustees of the Associated Gas and Electric Company, they set up a Board of Public Works, as provided by state law, to operate the eleclric and water system. The original Board members were EH. Frame, H.E. Castleman, Eric Schuman, and Fred Cameron. These men are now deceased, but have always been credited with giving Rollaa sound utility background for the operation of the utilities.

In 1968, Zeno's Molel drilled a 545-foot weII at their mOlel on Highway 66 Wes. It was drilled by Roy Wallace. This well is still being used and produces approximately 3 1(2 million gallons per year.

In the early 1960s, the Missouri Inspection Bureau gave Rolla a Class VII Fire Insurance rating for all property inside the corporate limits. This was oceasioned by the continued improvemenls to the water system, improvements in the fire department equipmenl and personnel, enactment of an improved buildingcode, and inspection services covering construction.

In 1962, Holiday Inn drilled a 650-fool well at Iheir motel on Highway 66 Wes. It wasdrilled by Roy Wallace. Thecity installed an 8-ineh main along Highway 66 West in 1964 and this well was abandoned. It is now used asan observation well by DGLS. There areshallow wells al Plaza Trailer Park, and also Woodcrest Trailer Park on the west side of Rolla. Plaza Trailer Park well produces approximately 2 million gallons per year. Woodcrest Park well produces approximately 6 3/4 million gallons per year.

A11lhe wells thai have been drilled in Rolla for the city, exccptthe first weII at Ihe power plant and Well #1 on Seventh Street, were drilled and equipped by the Layne Western Company. All well locations and specifications were also approved by the Missouri Geological Survey (later by DNR) and the Stale Board of Health.

All the wells in Rolla always had iron contenl of .20 to .30 ppm. This caused a red rust deposil in the mains, and there were always complaints from CUSlomers on dead end mains, and mains with low now, of red water and an odor. This necessitated a regular program offire hydrant bleeding, and even this did not correct the trouble. As more water was pumped from the well the situation seemed to worsen.

All wells in Rolla, except Well #11, have been drilled with cable tools. This consists of using a long steel drill stem approximately 5 inches in diameter, with a sharp edged bit on the end, and lifting and dropping this stem and bit by a steel cable to cut its way through rock and dirt to the well depth. Well #11 was drilled by the air rotary method with detergent additives to wash thedrillingsout of the hole. A hollow drilling stem with a sharp edged bit on the end is rotated, and the detergent pumped down the inside of this drill stem and up and out on theoutside ofthestem. Manyadvantagesareclaimcd for Ihis method, but because of their technical nature and length, arc not included in this history.

In 1953 and 1954, Dr. W.T. SChrenk, Chairman of the Chemistry Department at Missouri School of Mines al Rolla, thought that cUltingoffmainsfrom the system and circulating a lime solution through these mains would help the problem. It did some good, but we were told by others who had the same problem that the only solution was the use of chlorine injected into the system at the pump head.

Waler samples from all the wells, and the distribulion system, are continually checked by the Missouri Division of Health, and the analyses have shown Rolla water to be pure and of high quality. Periodically, they also do a chemical analysis of the waler.

In 1956, we retained Haskins, Riddle, Ordelheide,and Sharp Consulting Engineers 10 install some temporary l;hlorinalOrs to sec what rcsullS might be achieved. We learned that the chlorine cut Ihe rust loose in the mains

83

OZilrk Aquifer in llle Rolla Area

The city wells are numbered I, 2, 3, etc., but the first well at the power plant was omitted. The Missouri Geological Survey called the old power plant well # I, so the well designated #1 by the City is #2 by the Missouri Geological Survey rcoords and #2 city is #3 Missouri Geological Survey, #3 city is #4 Missouri Geological Survey, etc. (NOTE: this disaepcncy has been rorrceted and RMUlDGLS now usc the same well numbe~).

basement fortheiropcrations. The basement is still used by the County Agent, better known as the Extension Division of the University of Missouri. Therevenue from the water system in Rolla is not now (1975),and has never been,sufficient to cover thecDSt of operation. The electric and water systems have always been operated by the same management and personnel, and subsidized by the electric operation. For this reason the water rates in Rolla have always been low. The feeling seemed to exist to "let the electric department carry the load" and this policy was in vogue for many years.

In 1945, the Board of Public Works purchased the building at 102 West Ninth Street,which thegovernment built during World War II to house the U.S.O. With a few changes, the first noorwas made into offices for the Rolla Municipal Utilities. The Rolla Public Library occupied the second or top Ooor, which had been used for U.S.O. shows and dances.

From the beginning when the first water well drilled in the 19305, there has becn a gencral feeling or opinion in Rolla that when we need more water we wiU just drill anotherwcll, but about 10 years ago, with the growth in population and increased water consumption, RMU realized that a careful survey should be made to determine where future wells should be drilled, and perhaps a systematic plan of well operation from day to day.

The Phelps County Agent and State Board of Health occupied the basement. In May 1965, the library moved to the old POSt Office building at Ninth and Pine, and the Board of Health moved to the Courthouse. Today, the Rolla Municipal Utilities use all the building but the

84

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES David A. Shorr, Director Division of Geology and Land Survey

"p'illW3

•James Hadley Williams, Ph.D., Director and State Geologist Tami Allison, Division Secretary {314-368-2101)

ADMINISTRATION AND GENERAL SUPPORT PROGRAM 'James A. Martin, M.S., Principal Geologist and Program Director

Integrated Geologic Analysis Kim E. Haas. Geological Tech. II

Michael S. Marcus. B.S., Pro}. S~ialist , Cathy Pn'mm. B.A, Prog. Analyst III 2Jacque SISCO, B.S.. D!gllizalion Mgr. 'Billy G. Ross. Project Specialist

Dwight Weaver, Public Info: Spec. II Susan C. Dunn, B.F.A., Art/stili PhlJlJp Streamer, Attist"

General Services Carolyn Ellis. Executive II Jane Williams, Clerk IV Debbie Ellion Account Clerk /I Susan Davault. Clerk-Typist /I Diana Sanders Clerk-Typist II

Education and Archives (314-368-2127) Arthur W. Hebrank, B.$., Geol. //I

'DNR/Division of Administrative Support assigned to DGLS, Rolla 'DNRIOivision of Envlronmenlal Quality assigned 10 DGLS, Rolla

'

Terry Sheffield. Clerk IV Barbara Hams.. Clerk- TypisflJ Map Sales (314-36S:2125) Luther Fryer, Maintenance Wiv. /I ElliS Humphrey, Labor SupeNisor Carl Kuelker, Laborer I

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAM Ira R. Satterfield, M.S., Program Director Eva B. Kisvarsanyi, M.S., Assistant Program Director (314-368-2150) EnvIronmental Geology (314-368-2160) 'James W. Duley. B.S., Chief 'James C. Brown. Jr.. B.S. Geol. JIJ 'Mimi Garslang. B.S.. Geol. 1/1 'David C. Smith. B.$.. Geol. 1/1 'Gary St. Ivany, B.A.. Gee/. II "Peler Price, B.$., Geol. II "Myrna Rueff. B.A., Geol. II Jim B. Fels. B.S., Geol. II Edith Statbuck. M.S.. Geol. /I Michael A Siemens, MS., Geel. II Kurt R. Hollman. B,S., Geel. II Neil Elfnhk. M$.. Geol. I Larry (Bool) Pierce, M.$., Geel. I Ben Pendleton, B.S.. Geol. T6(;h. II Danny Sherman, Geol. T6(;h. I Dwaine (Lee) Marek, Geol, Tech. I Deborrah Breuer, Clerk·Sleno III Kayla Brockman, Cleri<-Typist /I

Geologic Mapping and Resources (314·368-2155 or 368·2143)

Wellhead Protection (314-368-2165) Bruce NefZ/er, M.$., Chief Evan A Kifer. B.S.. Geol. II Manano Haensel. M$.. Geol. I Beth Marsala, Executive I Jeffrey Jaquess. M.S.. Geol. Tech. I Jerri Bixler, Geol. Tech. /I Ken Thomas, Geol. Tech. I Donna Adams, Eng. Tech. I Kalhy Ragan, Clerk IV Neomia Robinson. Clerk III Michelle Widener. Clerk II

Eva B. Kisvarsanyi, M.S.. Chief Thomas L. Thompson, PhD., Geoi. IV Charles E. Robertson, MS., Geei. IV Ardei W. Rueff. B.k Geol. 11/ John W. Whitfield. B.A., Geel. ill 'David Hoffman. P.£., M$., Geol. JIJ James R. Palmer, B.S., Geol. //I Joy L. Bostic, B,S., Geol. III Mari< A Middendorf, B.$.. Geol. 11/ James Vaughn. B.S.. Geol. JIJ Cheryl M Seeger, MS., Geol. II Lois Jaquess, Cleri<·Typisllll Sandra MiJier, Cleri<-Typist /1/

Geotechnical Services {314-368'2141) • W. Keith Wedge. PhD., Chief Bnan Martin. a.$., Chemist /I Jerry Plake, Geol. Tech. I Hair! Dayton. Jr.. Geol. Tech./

DAM AND RESERVOIR SAFETY PROGRAM Brian J. Swenty, Ph.D.. P,E., Program Director and Chief Engineer Marge Paulsmeyer, Clerk-Typist III (314-368-2175) Russell C. Adams. P.E" Civil Engineer James L. Alexander, P.£.. CiVil Engineer

Robert A Clay, P.£.. CIVil Engineer Ralph P. Hess, Eng. T6(;h. III

STATE WATER PLAN ·Jerry D. Vineyard, M.A., Director, State Water Plan and Deputy State Geologist Sharon Kraus&, C1erk·Steno III (314-368-2190) Charles R. Hays, MA, Planner III Donaid L. Dicks, B.S., Hydrologisllll

LAND SURVEY PROGRAM Robert E. Myers, R.LS.. P.E., Program Director and State Land Surveyor Glenda Cox, C1erk·Sleno III (314-368·2300 or 368-2301) Bruce Wilson, B,S., Drafter II Cadastral and Geodetic Surveys

Park Survey Unit

a.

Research & Document Dist.

Corner Restoration

J. Michael Flowers, RL$.. Chief Aict1an:iw. Reese, RLS. Proj. Surv. Dan Lashley, RLS., Project Surveyor Richard Bates, Land Surv. Tech. I Arliss V. Martin,lI, Eng. Tech.} John D. Paulsmeyer, RL$., Projecf Surv. Aobert L. Wethington, P.£., AL$., Proj. SUN. MIChael Cape, Land Surv. Tech. /I Bruce D. Carter, RLS. Project Surveyor James E Elliott, Land Surv. Tech. I Frederick W. Wissman, Eng. Tech. /

Norman L. Brown. P.£., ALS., Chief Da"ell Pralle, RLS., Project Surveyor Michael Lloyd, Land SUNey Tech. } Ruth Alien, Comer Registration Coord.

WATER RESOURCES PROGRAM Steve Mcintosh, M.S., Program Director

Diane R. Hess. Chief Debra McEnnis, Clerk-Typist III Mary Davis, Clerk -Typist /I

Document Preservation James L. Mallock, Chief Unda Miller, Clerk-Typist 11/ Ruth Ann Booker, Clerk-Typist /II Jane Pounds, Clerk-Typist II

Mary Woodland, C1erk·Steno III Leila Johnson, Clerk· Typist II (314-751-2867 [JeMerson CityJ)

Groundwater Geology (314-368-2190) Don E Miller. MS.. Chief James E. Vandike, MS., Gee/. 11/ Rex Bohm. B.S., Geol. II 3 Cynthia Brookshire. B.S., Hydrol. /I Sharon Krause. Clerk-Steno 11/

Surface Water Richard Gaffney. M.A. Planner /1/ Jane Epperson, B,$., Hydrologist II John Drew. B.S.. Hydro/ogisll/ Laura Luebbert, B.S., Clerk-Slene III Charles Du Charme, B.S., Hydroiogist /I

3Assigned to DNR Springtield Regional Office • Assigned to DNR Kansas City Regional Office

'=Registered and/or certified Prolessionai Geologist P.E.= Professional Engineer R.L.S= Registered Land Surveyor

Water Resources Planning Robert Clari<. M.A., Planner III Jeanelle Barnell, B.S.. Res.Ana. II Mary Jo Hom, Clerk-Typist II

P.O. Box 250 Rolla, MO 65401

(314) 368-2100

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The Hydrologic Analysis of the Ozark Aquifer in the Rolla Area

Water Resources Report No. 41 - Conr Photo: Test.pumping theCity ofRolla Well NO.1 at Scventhand Walnut streets about 1930, lB. Bronson,standingscc...

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