SYLLABUS

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SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

SYLLABUS Batch 2008-2009 & 2009-2010 (Revised after BOS 2010)

Batch 2008-2009

Batch 2009-2010

I Semester Examination November 2008 II Semester Examination April 2009 III Semester Examination November 2009 IV Semester Examination April 2010 V Semester Examination November 2010 VI Semester Examination April 2011

I Semester Examination November 2009 II Semester Examination April 2010 III Semester Examination November 2010 IV Semester Examination April 2011 V Semester Examination November 2011 VI Semester Examination April 2012

Syllabus applicable for the students admitted to the B.A. /B.Sc. (Pass Course), B.A.(Hons.) Subsidiary and B.A. (Hons.) courses in the academic years 2008-09 & 2009-10.

1

ICG CAMPUS, SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

INDEX

S. No.

Contents

Page No.

1

Credit Templates ( UG )

3 to 8

2

Scheme of Examination ( UG)

9 to 12

3

Syllabus (B.A. /B. Sc.)

13 to 37

4

Syllabus (B.A. Honours)

38 to 74

2

SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

CREDIT TEMPLATES FOR B.A./B.Sc. /B.A.(Hons.) Subsi./ B.A. (Hons.) EXAMINATION

3

B.A. / B.Sc. / B.A.(Honours) Eco. subsi. Semester- I Paper code

Title

ECO 101 ECO 102 ECO 103

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Introduction to Economics Indian Economy I

Theory Theory

45

Project

Project

30

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

3

3

100

36

2

2

100

36

Semester- II Paper code

ECO 201 ECO 202 ECO 203

Title

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Money & Banking

Theory

Indian Economy II

Theory

45

Project

Project

30

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

3

3

100

36

2

2

100

36

Semester- III Paper code

ECO 301 ECO 302 ECO 303

Title

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Micro Economics I

Theory

Quantitative Techniques Project

Theory

45

Project

30

4

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

3

3

100

36

2

2

100

36

Semester- IV Paper code

ECO 401 ECO 402 ECO 403

Title

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Micro Economics II Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

Statistical methods

Theory

45

3

3

100

36

Project

Project

30

2

2

100

36

Semester- V Paper code

ECO 501 ECO 502(a)

Title

Macro Economics Mathematical Economics -I

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

Theory

45

3

3

100

36

Project

30

2

2

100

36

Or ECO 502(b) ECO 503

History of Economic Thought Project

Semester- VI Paper code

ECO 601 ECO 602(a)

Title

Public Finance Mathematical Economics -II

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

36

Theory

45

3

3

100

36

Project

30

2

2

100

36

Or ECO 602(b) ECO 603

Economy of Rajasthan Project

5

B.A. (Honours) Sem. I Paper code

ECO 111 ECO 112

ECO 113 ECO 114 ECO 115

Title

Micro Economics-I Mathematical Methods for Economics -I History of Economic Thought Indian Economy-I Project

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 60 4 60 4

Theory Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

4 4

100 100

40 40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Theory Project

45 30

3 2

3 2

100 100

40 40

Sem. II Paper code

ECO 211 ECO 212

ECO 213 ECO 214 ECO 215

Title

Micro Economics II Mathematical Methods for Economics II Economy of Rajasthan Indian Economy II Project

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 60 4 60 4

Theory Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

4 4

100 100

40 40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Theory Project

45 30

3 2

3 2

100 100

40 40

6

Sem. III Paper code

Title

ECO 311 ECO 312

Macro Economics I Statistical Methods I ECO 313 International Economics I ECO 314 Development Economics ECO 315 Project

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3 60 4

Theory Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3 4

100 100

40 40

Theory

60

4

4

100

40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Project

30

2

2

100

40

Sem. IV Paper code

ECO 411 ECO 412 ECO 413 ECO 414 ECO 415

Title

Macro Economics II Statistical Methods II International Economics II Environmental Economics Project

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 45 3

Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

3

100

40

Theory

60

4

4

100

40

Theory

60

4

4

100

40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Project

30

2

2

100

40

7

Sem. V Paper code

Title

ECO 511 ECO 512 ECO 513

Public Finance I Money & Banking Mathematical Economics I ECO 514 Business Organization and Management ECO 515 Project

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 60 4 45 3 60 4

Theory Theory Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

4 3 4

100 100 100

40 40 40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Project

30

2

2

100

40

Sem. VI Paper code

ECO 611 ECO 612

Title

Public Finance II Banking & Financial System ECO 613 Mathematical Economics II ECO 614 Computer & its Application (Theory) ECO 615 Computer & its Application (Practical)

Theory/Practical/ Projects/Seminar

Contact Hours Per Per Semester Week 60 4 45 3

Theory Theory

Credits Max. marks

Min Marks

4 3

100 100

40 40

Theory

60

4

4

100

40

Theory

45

3

3

100

40

Practical

60

4

2

100

40

*-----------------------------*

8

SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

SCHEME OF EXAMINATION

9

INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE FOR GIRLS Department of Economics B.A. /B.Sc. (Pass Course)/B.A.(Hons.)Subsi. Scheme of Examination

Sem ester

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

Note: • • •



Paper code

ECO – 101 ECO – 102 ECO – 103 ECO – 201 ECO – 202 ECO – 203 ECO – 301 ECO – 302 ECO – 303 ECO – 401 ECO – 402 ECO – 403 ECO – 501 ECO – 502 (a) or (b) ECO – 503 ECO – 601 ECO – 602 (a) or (b) ECO – 603

C r Contact e hrs per d semester i per week t s

Max. Marks

Mini. Pass Marks

Scheme of Evaluation Continuous Assessment Sem. End Exam (30 %) (70 %)

30 mks

70 mks

3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3

3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36 36

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70

2 3 3

2 3 3

100 100 100

36 36 36

30 30 30

70 70 70

2

2

100

36

30

70

Time duration of internal tests will be forty five minutes. Home assignments shall be given on descriptive questions. Time duration of SEE will be three hours. Pass percentage in continuous assessment and semester end exam is 36 % individually.

10

INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE FOR GIRLS Department of Economics B.A.(Honours) Scheme of Examination

Semester

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

Paper code

ECO – 111 ECO – 112 ECO – 113 ECO – 114 ECO – 115 ECO – 211 ECO – 212 ECO – 213 ECO – 214 ECO – 215 ECO – 311 ECO – 312 ECO – 313 ECO – 314 ECO – 315 ECO – 411 ECO – 412 ECO – 413 ECO – 414 ECO – 415 ECO – 511 ECO – 512 ECO – 513 ECO – 514 ECO – 515 ECO – 611 ECO – 612 ECO – 613 ECO – 614 ECO – 615

Credits

4 4 3 3 2 4 4 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 4 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 2

Time Contact hrs per semeste r per week 4 4 3 3 2 4 4 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 4 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 4

Max. Marks

Minimum Pass Marks

Continuous Assessment (30 %)

Semester End Exam (70 %)

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70

(Pr.)

Note: • • • • •

Time duration of internal tests will be forty five minutes. Home assignments shall be given on descriptive questions. Time duration of SEE will be three hours. Pass percentage in continuous assessment and semester end exam is 40 % individually. Pr. Indicates Practical

11

70 70 70 70 70

INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE FOR GIRLS Department of Economics UG ( Pass & Honours)

Scheme of Evaluation Scheme of Evaluation for Continuous Assessment (Theory) Test I 15 mks

Teacher Interaction II 5 mks

Home Assignment III

Attendance IV

5 mks

5 mks

Total 30 mks

Scheme of Evaluation for Continuous Assessment for Project Data/ Literature collection 10 mks

Regularity 10 mks

Analysis of data/ Innovativeness 10 mks

Total 30 mks

Scheme of Evaluation for SEE in Projects (Project) Project Report/Presentations 40 mks

Test 15 mks

Viva Voce

Total

30 mks

70 mks

Scheme of Evaluation for Continuous Assessment (Practical) Attendance File Submission Assignment 5 mks

(5 mks )

5 mks

Total 30 mks

Scheme of Evaluation for SEE in Practical (Practical) On Line Practical Exam 50 mks

Submission

Viva Voce

Total

10 mks

10 mks

70 mks

*-----------------------------* 12

ICG CAMPUS, SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

COURSES OF STUDY FOR B.A. /B.Sc. (Pass Course)/B.A. (Hons.) Subsidiary

13

ECO 301: Micro Economics –I B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: III Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact Hours per week: 3 hrs Credit: 3

Objectives: 1. To acquaint the students with the methodology and approach of Microeconomics; and 2. To understand the behaviour of an economic agent, namely a consumer and a producer in a comparative static and partial equilibrium framework.

Unit I: Introduction • • • •

[7 Periods]

Basic Economic Problems; Micro & Macro Economics; Equilibrium – Partial & General, Stable & Unstable; Static, Comparative static & Dynamic analysis.

Unit II: Cardinal Utility Analysis • • • •

[9 Periods]

Demand – Meaning, , Demand schedule & Demand curve, Law of Demand, Changes in demand, Market demand; Total and Marginal utility; Law of diminishing marginal utility; Consumer’s equilibrium – law of equi-marginal utility.

Unit III: Ordinal Utility Analysis • • •

[9 Periods]

Indifference curves; Budget line; Consumer’s equilibrium.

Unit IV: Topics on Consumer Behaviour • • • •

Price, substitution and income effect: Normal, Inferior and Giffen Goods (Hicksian Approach); Engel’s Curve; Elasticity of demand: Price, Income and Cross – meaning & measurement; Consumer’s surplus – Marshallian Concept.

Unit V: Theory of Production •

[11 Periods]

[9 Periods]

Production with one variable input: Total, average and marginal product curves;

14

• • • • • •

Law of returns to variable factor-Stages of Production. Production with two variable inputs: Isoquants and Iso-cost; Producer’s equilibrium; Expansion Path; Ridge Lines; Law of Returns to scale.

Essential Readings: 1. H.L. Ahuja, Micro Economic Theory, S. Chand & Company, New Delhi. 2. Seth, M.L., Micro Economics, Laxmi Narayan Agarwal, Agra.

Reference Books: 1. Gould J.P. and C.F. Ferguson, Micro Economic Theory, All India Traveler Book Sellers, Delhi. 2. Koutsoyiannis, A. (1999), Modern Microeconomics, Macmillan. 3. Varian, H.R. (2000), Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, Eastwest Press, New Delhi. 4. Lipsey, R.G. (Latest edition), An Introduction to positive Economics. 5. Stonier, A.W. and D.C. Hague (1972), A Textbook of Economics Theory, ELBS and Longman Group, London.

15

ECO 302: Quantitative Techniques B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: III Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. Per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To introduce the basic concepts of mathematics; 2. To apply mathematics as a tool to study economics

Unit I: Basic Concepts • • • • •

[7 Periods]

Exponents; Polynomials; Linear Equations – slopes, intercepts & slope-intercept form; Solving the Equations- Linear and Quadratic ; Solving the system of Equations -Elimination and Substitution methods (Up to 3 variables).

Unit II: Differential Calculus • •

[10 Periods]

Simple Differentiation (Polynomial, Rational, Logarithmic & Exponential functions); Optimization of a function - Maxima and Minima.

Unit III: Application of Differential Calculus • •

Relationship between Total, Marginal & Average functions; Optimizing economic functions.

Unit IV: Matrices • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Types of Matrices, Operations on Matrices; Matrix expression of a system of linear equations; Adjoint and Inverse of Matrix; Solving linear equations with an inverse matrix.

Unit V: Determinants • • • •

[10 Periods]

[9 Periods]

Calculation of determinants (up to third-order determinants); Minors and cofactors; Properties of determinants; Solving linear equations by determinants-Cramer’s rule.

Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

16

Essential Readings: 1. Dowling,E.T.(1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Mathematical Methods for Business And Economics, McGraw Hill. 2. Mehta, B.C., and G.M.K. Madnani, Mathematics for Economists, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Croxton, F.E., D.J.Cowden and S. Klein (1973), Applied General Statistics, Prentice Hall, New Delhi. 2. Chiang,A.C. (1986), Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics (3 rd Edition),McGraw Hill, New Delhi

17

ECO 303: Project B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: III Paper: III Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project report requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

18

ECO 401: Micro Economics -II B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: IV Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To illustrate the process of determination of equilibrium price and output in different market situations; and 2. To understand the concept used in factor pricing.

Unit I: Cost and Revenue • • • • •

[7 Periods]

Short- run cost curves and their relationship; Cost in the long- run: LAC and LMC; Economies and diseconomies of scale; Revenue: Total, average and marginal revenue and their relationships; Relationship between TR, MR, AR and elasticity.

Unit II: Theory of Firm I • • •

[9 Periods]

Equilibrium of the firm: TR - TC approach and MR - MC approach; Perfect competition: Determination of price and output in the short and long run; Monopoly: Determination of price and output in the short and long run.

Unit III: Theory of Firm II • • •

[9 Periods]

Monopoly: Price discrimination, measure of monopoly power; Monopolistic competition: determination of price and output in the short- and long- run, excess capacity; Oligopoly: Basic concept of non-collusive and collusive oligopoly, Paul M. Sweezy model.

Unit IV: Factor Pricing I • • •

[10 Periods]

Marginal Productivity Theory of Distribution: Factor pricing in perfectly competitive markets; Factor pricing in imperfectly competitive markets. Interest : Classical & Keynesian Theories.

Unit V: Factor Pricing II • • • •

[10 Periods]

Rent: Ricardian theory of rent; Modern theory of rent; Quasi rent. Profit: Innovation, risk and uncertainty theories.

19

Essential Readings: 1. H.L. Ahuja, Micro Economic Theory, S. Chand & Company, New Delhi. 2. Seth, M.L., Micro Economics, Laxmi Narayan Agarwal, Agra.

Reference Books: 1. Gould J.P. and C.F. Ferguson, Micro Economic Theory, All India Traveler Book Sellers, Delhi. 2. Koutsoyiannis, A. (1999), Modern Microeconomics, Macmillan. 3. Varian, H.R. (2000), Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, Eastwest Press, New Delhi. 4. Lipsey, R.G. (Latest edition), An Introduction to positive Economics. 5. Stonier, A.W. and D.C. Hague (1972), A Textbook of Economics Theory, ELBS and Longman Group, London.

20

ECO 402: Statistical Methods B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: IV Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To introduce basic concepts in statistics to the students; and 2. To help solving problems in statistics and interpreting results obtained.

Unit I: Data Analysis • • •

[9 Periods]

Basic concepts: Population and Sample, Census and Sample survey, Primary and Secondary data; Diagrammatic representation of data-Bar Diagram and Pie Diagram; Graphic representation of data-Line Graph, Histogram, Frequency Polygon, frequency curves and Ogives;

Unit II: Measures of Central Tendency •

Mean, Median, Mode-Calculations, their relative merits and demerits.

Unit III: Dispersion & Skewness • •

[9 Periods]

Absolute and Relative Measures of Dispersion-Range, Quartile Deviation, Mean Deviation, Standard Deviation; Skewness – concept and measures (Karl Pearson’s and Bowley’s measure).

Unit IV: Correlation Analysis • •

[9 Periods]

Simple Correlation - Karl Pearson’s coefficient of correlation; Spearman’s Rank Correlation Coefficient.

Unit V: Regression Analysis • • • •

[9 Periods]

[9 Periods]

Simple Regression with one independent variable Concept, Regression Coefficients – Calculation, Fitting of regression lines (method of least squares).

Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

21

Essential Readings: 1. Gupta, S.P., Statistical Methods (Recent Edition), S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi. 2. Nagar, A.L. and R.K. Das, Basic Statistics, Oxford University Press, Bombay.

Reference Books: 1. Gupta, S.C. and V.K. Kapoor (1993), Fundamentals of Applied Statistics, S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi 2. Croxton, F.E., D.J.Cowden and S. Klein (1973), Applied General Statistics, Prentice Hall, New Delhi. 3. Speigel, M.R. (1992),Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Statistics, McGraw Hill Book, London.

22

ECO 403: Project B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: I Paper: II Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

23

ECO 501: Macro Economics B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: V Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objective: To make the students aware of the basic theoretical framework underlying the field of macroeconomics.

Unit I: National Income • • • • •

[8 Periods]

Circular flow of Income. Concepts and methods of measuring the National Income; Concept of Real and Nominal income; Problems in measuring National Income; National Income and welfare.

Unit II: Classical Economics • • • •

[10 Periods]

Say’s Law; Determination of Equilibrium output and employment in simple Classical Model; Classical model involving Savings and Investment; Keynes’ attack on the Classical Model.

Unit III: Keynesian Economics • • •

[11 Periods]

Consumption Function; Investment Function; Determination of equilibrium income and output in a three sector model;

Unit IV: Multiplier & Accelerator • • • • •

[8 Periods]

Multiplier – Meaning & Working; Static & Dynamic Multiplier; Concept of Tax Multiplier, Government Expenditure Multiplier & Balanced Budget Multiplier; Accelerator – Meaning & Operation; Super Multiplier.

Unit V: Trade Cycles • • •

[8 Periods]

Trade Cycles – Definition & Phases; Theories of Trade Cycles – Hicks, Samuelson and Kaldor; Measures to control trade cycles.

24

Essential Readings: 1. Shapiro, E. (1996), Macroeconomic Analysis, Galgotia Publications, New Delhi. 2. Vaish, M.C., Macro Economics, Wishwa Prakashan. 3. Ahuja, H.L., Macro Economic Analysis, S. Chand.

Reference Books: 1. Ackley, G. (1976), Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York. 2. Keynes, J.M. (1936), The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London. 3. Rastogi, S. and S. Aiyar (1997), National Income and Accounting, Lotus Books. 4. Froyen R., Macro Economics, Pearson Education. 5. Schaum’s Outlines, Macro Economics, Tata McGraw Hill. 6. Dornbush, Fischer and Startz, Macro Economics,Tata McGraw Hill.

25

ECO 502(a): Mathematical Economics-I B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: V Paper: II (a) Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs. Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: To understand the microeconomic concepts and theories through mathematical methods so as to refine the verbal logic.

Unit I: Review • •



[9 Periods]

(The purpose of this unit is to review the mathematical techniques. Their applications in economics shall be discussed in the subsequent units) Differential Calculus (Functions with one independent variable)-Increasing and decreasing functions, Concavity and convexity, optimization of functions; Differential Calculus (Multivariable Functions)-First-and second-order partial derivatives, total differentials, optimization of multivariable functions, constrained optimization with Lagrange multiplier; Matrix Algebra-Matrices and Determinants, Crammer’s rule, solving linear equations with the inverse matrix, Bordered Hessian determinant for constrained optimization.

Unit II: Theory of Consumer Behaviour-I • • •

Nature of the utility function, Indifference curves, Rate of commodity substitution; Maximization of Utility (First-and second-order conditions); Ordinary and Compensated Demand Functions.

Unit III: Theory of Consumer Behaviour-II • • •



[9 Periods]

Price and Income Elasticity of demand; Income and Leisure; The Slutsky Equation- Derivation for two commodity case, its elasticity form, Direct and Cross effects, Substitutes and Complements.

Unit IV: Theory of Firm-I • •

[9 Periods]

[9 Periods]

(All the concepts covered under unit IV and unit V shall be illustrated with the help of Cobb-Douglas production function only). Nature of the production function, isoquants and isocost line; Optimizing Behaviour- constrained output maximization, constrained cost minimization and profit maximization; Elasticity of substitution.

Unit V: Theory of Firm-II

[9 Periods]

Homogeneous Production Functions-Properties, Euler’s theorem, Linearly homogeneous production function as a special case; • Derivation of Input demand Function and Cost Function. Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted. •

26

Essential Readings: 1. Henderson, J.M. and R.E. Quandt (1980), Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach, McGraw Hill, New Delhi. 2. Mehta, B.C. and G.M.K. Madnani, Mathematics for Economists, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Chiang, A. C. (1986), Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics (3 rd Edition), McGraw Hill, New Delhi 2. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Mathematical Methods for Business and Economics, McGraw Hill. 3. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Introduction to Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill. 4. Allen, R.G.D. (1974), Mathematical Analysis for Economists, Macmillan Press, London. 5. Yamane, Taro (1975), Mathematics for Economists, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.

27

ECO 502 (b): History of Economic Thought B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: V Paper: II (b) Contact hrs per Semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To study the economic theories and ideas of great economic thinkers of the past; and 2. To understand and appreciate the development of contemporary economics.

Unit I: • •

[9 Periods]

Adam Smith: Division of labour, theory of value, distribution, economic liberty, functions of state, public finance, international trade; Thomas Robert Malthus: Theory of Population, Theory of over production.

Unit II: • •

[9 Periods]

David Ricardo: Theory of value, theory of rent, ideas on economic development and international trade; Karl Marx: Theory of Capitalist Exploitation, Labour Theory of Value, Theory of Surplus Value.

Unit III: •

[9 Periods]

Marshall: Definition of Economics, Economic laws, Method of study, Role of time in price determination, Ideas on consumer’s surplus, representative firm, theory of distribution, elasticities, Prime & supplementary costs.

Unit IV: •

[9 Periods]

Keynesian Ideas: Psychological law of consumption, Marginal efficiency of capital, liquidity preference, role of fiscal policy, deficit financing, multiplier principle, theory of trade cycles.

Unit V: • • •

[9 Periods]

Economic ideas of Naoroji; Gandhian ideas on village, khadi, trusteeship and decentralization; D. R. Gadgil.

28

Essential Readings: 1. Shrivastava, S.K., History of Economic Thought, S. Chand and Company Ltd., New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Ganguli, B.N. (1977), Indian Economic Thought: A 19th Century Perspective, Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi. 2. Gide, C. and G. Rist (1956), A History of Economic Doctrines (2nd Edition), George Warrop and Co. London. 3. Kautilya (1992), The Arthashastra, Edited, Rearranged, Translated and Introduced by L.N. Rangarajan, Penguin Books, New Delhi. 4. Roll, E. (1973), A History of Economic Thought, Faber, London. 5. Seshadri, G.B. (1997), Economic Doctrines, B.R. Publishing Corporation, Delhi. 6. Blaug, M. (1997), Economic Theory in Retrospect: A History of Economic Thought from Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes, (5th Edition), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 7. Gandhi, M.K. (1947), India of My Dreams, Navjivan Publishing House, Ahmedabad. 8. Shumpeter, J.A. (1951), Ten Great Economists, Oxford University Press, New York.

29

ECO 503: Project B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: V Paper: III Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project report requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

30

ECO 601: Public Finance B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester VI Paper: I Contact hrs per Semester: 45 hrs. Contact hrs per week: 3 Credit: 3

Objectives: 1. To understand the various aspects of Public Finance; and 2. To determine the role and objectives of Fiscal Policy. .

Unit I: Nature and Scope of Public Finance • • • •

Meaning and Scope of Public Finance; Distinction between private & public finance; Public goods versus private goods; The principle of maximum social advantage.

Unit II: Public Expenditure • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Meaning; Comparison between private & public expenditure; Classification of Public Expenditure – productive & unproductive, transfer & non transfer, current & capital; Reasons for the growth of Public Expenditure; Effects of Public Expenditure.

Unit III: Taxation • • •

[9 Periods]

Meaning & Canons; Classification –( Proportional, Progressive, Regressive, Degressive, Direct & Indirect, Specific & Ad Valorem;) and their merits and demerits Effects of Taxation.

Unit IV: Public Debt • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Objective of public debt; Comparison between private & public debt Classification of public debt – internal & external, marketable & non-marketable, productive & non productive, redeemable & irredeemable, funded & unfunded; Effects of public debt; Methods of debt redemption.

Unit V: Fiscal Policy • • •

[9 Periods]

[9 Periods]

Fiscal Policy- Meaning & objectives; Instruments of fiscal policy; Limitations of fiscal policy.

31

Essential Readings: 1. Tyagi, B.P., Public Finance, Latest edition, Jain Praksash Nath & Company, Meerut. 2. Bhatia, H. L., Public Finance, Recent Edition, Vikas Publication, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Musgrave, Richard A. (1959), Theory of Public Finane, McGraw Hill, Kognakhusa, Tokyo. 2. Musgrave, R. A. and P. B. Musgrave, 1980, Public Finance in Theory and Practice, McGraw Hill, Kogakusha, Tokyo. 3. Dalton, Huge, Principles of Public Finance, 1971, Rontledge and Hegan Paul Limited, London. 4. Herber, B. P., Modern Public Finance, 1976, Richard D Iruin, Homewood. 5. Datt., Ruddar and K.P.M. Sundaram, Indian Economy, 2001, S. Chand & Company Limited, New Delhi. 6. Ganguly S., Public Finance, 1999, The World Press Private Ltd. Calcutta. 7. Andley and Sundaram, Public Finance, Latest edition, Ratan Prakashan, Agra. 8. Mithani, D. M.; (1998), Modern Public Finance, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai.

32

ECO 602(a): Mathematical Economics-II B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: VI Paper: II (a) Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: To understand the economic concepts and theories through mathematical methods so as to refine the verbal logic.

Unit I: Review • •

[9 Periods]

(The purpose of this unit is to review the mathematical techniques. Their applications in economics shall be discussed in the subsequent units) Integral Calculus –Integration and its rules, integration by substitution and by parts, Definite Integral and area under a curve. First-order Difference Equations –Definition, General formula for first-order linear difference equations, stability conditions.

Unit II: Cobweb Model, Consumer’s and Producer’s Surplus [9 Periods] • • •

Cobweb Model: Dynamic equilibrium with lagged adjustment Consumers’ Surplus Producers’ Surplus

Unit III: Game Theory • • • •

[9 Periods]

Basic Concepts of Game Theory Classification of Games Payoff Matrix and Saddle point solution Saddle point solution for a two person, zero sum game

Unit IV: Input-Output Analysis • • •

[9 Periods]

Concept of ‘Open & Closed’, ‘Static & Dynamic’ Model; Determination of gross output in an open model. Hawkins-Simon conditions of viability;

Unit V: Linear Programming • • •

[9 Periods]

Formulation of Problem and its Graphical solution; Simplex Method (for maximization only); Concept of Primal and Dual.

Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

33

Essential Readings: 1. Henderson, J.M. and R.E. Quandt (1980), Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach, McGraw Hill, New Delhi. 2. Mehta, B.C. and G.M.K. Madnani, Mathematics for Economists, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Chiang, A. C. (1986), Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics (3 rd Edition), McGraw Hill, New Delhi 2. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Mathematical Methods for Business and Economics, McGraw Hill. 3. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Introduction to Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill. 4. Allen, R.G.D. (1974), Mathematical Analysis for Economists, Macmillan Press,

London.

5. Yamane, Taro (1975), Mathematics for Economists, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.

34

ECO 602(b): Economy of Rajasthan B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: VI Paper: II (b) Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To study the important aspects of the economy of Rajasthan; and 2. To understand and evaluate the position of Rajasthan with respect to other states and nation as a whole.

Unit I: Population • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Size and growth; Causes of over population; Importance of demographic indicators-Sex ratio, Density, Literacy Rate, Rural Urban Population; Occupational Structure of Population; Population Policy of Rajasthan.

Unit II: Agriculture & Animal Husbandry • • • • • •

Land Utilization; Cropping Pattern and Major Crops; Major Irrigation projects; Importance of Animal Husbandry; Dairy development Programmes; Constraints in Agricultural Development.

Unit III: Industry & Natural Resources • • • • •



[9 Periods]

Minerals, Forests, land and Water resources- a brief review; Growth and Location of Industries; Small Scale and Cottage Industries- importance and problems; Role of RFC, RIICO, RAJSICO in the industrial development of the State; Constraints in Industrial Development.

Unit IV: Important Areas of Concern • • •

[9 Periods]

[9 Periods]

Poverty-Magnitude and Poverty Alleviation Programmes; Unemployment-Nature and Employment Generation Progammes; Droughts and Famines- Short Term and Long Term Drought Management Strategies; Tourism-Problems and Prospects.

35

Unit V: Economic Planning and Position of Rajasthan in Indian Economy [9 Periods] • • •

Planning -Objectives and Achievements; Tenth Five Year Plan of Rajasthan; Position of Rajasthan in Indian Economy with respect to - Size of Population, Area, Agriculture, Industry, Infrastructure- social and economic.

Essential Readings: 1. Nathuramka, L.N., Economy of Rajasthan (latest edition), College Book House, Jaipur.

Reference Books: 1. Bhalla, L.R., Geography of Rajasthan (latest edition), Kuldeep publication, Jaipur. 2. India Development Report. (latest) 3. Some facts about Rajasthan, Deptt. Of Economics & Statistics, Govt. of Raj. 4. Census Report 2001.

36

ECO 603: Project B.A. /B.Sc./B.A. (H) Subsi. Semester: VI Paper: III Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

*---------------------------*

37

SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR

COURSES OF STUDY FOR B.A. HONOURS ECONOMICS

38

ECO 311: Macro Economics-I B.A. (Hons.), Semester: III Paper: I Contact Hours per semester: 45 hrs Contact Hours per week: 3 hrs Credit: 3

Objectives: To make the students aware of the basic theoretical framework underlying the field of macroeconomics, inclusive of recent developments.

Unit I: Introduction and Measurement • • • • •

Stock and flow variables; Ex-post and ex-ante; Circular flow of income; Concept and measurement of national income; Problems in measuring National Income;

Unit II: Classical Macroeconomics (I) • • •

• •

[9 Periods]

Shape of aggregate supply and demand curve in simple Keynesian Model; The Simple Keynesian Model: Conditions for Equilibrium Output; The Components of Aggregate Demand; Determining Equilibrium Income; Changes in Equilibrium Income- the multiplier.

Unit V: The Keynesian System (II) • •

[9 Periods]

The Quantity Theory of Money -Equation of exchange, and Cambridge approach to the quantity theory, The Classical Theory of Interest Rate, Policy Implications of the Classical Equilibrium Model -fiscal policy, and monetary policy.

Unit IV: The Keynesian System (I) • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Shape of aggregate supply and demand curve in the Classical Model; Production and Employment; Equilibrium Output and Employment.

Unit III: Classical Macroeconomics (II) •

[9 Periods]

[9 Periods]

The Keynesian Theory of Money Demand and Interest Rate determination; The IS-LM Curve Model-Graphical and algebraic derivation of IS and LM curves.

39

Essential Readings: 1. Froyen, R.T. (2001), Macroeconomics- Theories and Policies, Addison Wesley Longman, Singapore. 2. Mankiw, N.G. (1992), Macro Economics, Macmillan Worth Publishers. 3. Rastogi,S. and S. Aiyar (1997),National Income Accounting, Lotus Books.

Reference Books: 1. Shapiro, E. (1996), Macroeconomic Analysis, Galgotia Publications, New Delhi. 2. Ahuja, H.L., Macro Economic Analysis, S. Chand. 3. Keynes, J.M. (1936), The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London. 4. Diulio,

Eugene

A.,

Schaum’s

Outline

of

Theory

and

Problems

Macroeconomics, McGraw-Hill. 5. United Nations (1974), Year Book of National Accounts Statistics. 6. Ackley, G. (1976), Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.

7. Dornbush, R., Stanley Fischer and Richard Startz, 7th or later edition, Macroeconomics, McGraw Hill.

40

of

ECO 312: Statistical Methods – I B.A. (Hons.), Semester: III Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 4 Credit: 4 Objectives: 1. To introduce the basic concepts in statistics to the students and the way in which these concepts are applied in Economics; and 2. To help solving problems in statistics and interpreting the results obtained. Unit I: Introduction to Statistics [12 Periods] • Basic concepts: Population and Sample, Census and Sample survey, Primary and Secondary data; • Frequency Distribution-Exclusive and Inclusive series, • Diagrammatic representation of data-Bar Diagram and Pie Diagram, • Graphic representation of data-Line Graph, Histogram, Frequency Polygon, and Ogives. Unit II: Central Tendency [12 Periods] • Measures of Central Tendency-Arithmetic Mean, Geometric Mean, Harmonic Mean, Median and Mode; their relative merits and demerits. Unit III: Dispersion [12 Periods] • Absolute and Relative Measures of Dispersion-Range, Quartile Deviation, Mean Deviation and Standard Deviation; • Skewness-Definition and its measures (Karl Pearson’s and Bowley’s coefficient of skewness). Unit IV: Correlation Analysis [12 Periods] • Simple Correlation - Karl Pearson’s and Rank Correlation Coefficient. Unit V: Regression Analysis [12 Periods] • Linear Regression –Concept, fitting of regression lines (method of least squares) and properties of regression coefficients. Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

41

Essential Readings: 1. Gupta, S.P., Statistical Methods (Recent Edition), S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Gupta, S.C. and V.K. Kapoor (1993), Fundamentals of Applied Statistics, S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi 2. Croxton , F.E., D.J.Cowden and S. Klein(1973), Applied General Statistics, Prentice Hall ,New Delhi. 3. Speigel, M.R. (1992),Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Statistics, McGraw Hill Book, London. 4. Nagar, A.L. and R.K. Das, Basic Statistics, Oxford University Press, Bombay.

42

ECO 313: International Economics-I B.A. (Hons.), Semester: III Paper: III Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs.per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives: 1. To understand the theories governing international trade; and 2. To study the various concepts and issues related to international economics.

Unit I: • • •

[7 Periods]

Inter-regional and international trade; Theories of absolute advantage, comparative advantage and opportunity cost; Emperical tests of Ricardian Model.

Unit II: • • • • •

[10 Periods]

Offer Curves; General Equilibrium Analysis- Equilibrium Relative Commodity Prices Terms of trade: Definition & various concepts; Heckscher - Ohlin Theory; Empirical tests of H-O model & Leontief Paradox.

Unit III: • • • •

[10 Periods]

Free Trade versus Protectionism; Tariff: Classification, partial & general equilibrium analysis, Stolper Samuelson theorem; Optimum tariff; Quotas: Types and effects.

Unit IV: • • • •

[9 Periods]

Import Quota versus Import Tariff. Other non tariff barriers; New Protectionism – Strategic Trade Policy; Customs Union – Trade Creation & Trade Diversion.

Unit V: • • •

[9 Periods]

International Liquidity: Meaning, special drawing rights; IMF; World Bank.

43

Essential Readings: 1. Salvatore, D.L., 1997, International Economics, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, N.J. 2. Vaish, M.C. & S. Singh, 1995, International Economics.

Reference Books: 1. Mithani, D.M.,Money, Banking, International Trade & Public Finance, Himalaya Publisher. 2. Sundaram,K.P.M., Money, Banking, & International Trade, Sultan Chand. 3. Kindleberger, C.P., 1973, International Economics, R.D. Iruim, Homewood. 4. Sodersten, B.O. 1991, International Economics, McMillan Press Ltd. London. 5. Lindert, International Economics, All India Traveller Book Seller. 6. Chacholiades, M., International Trade- Theory & Policy, McGraw Hill, Kogabusha, Japan.

44

ECO 314: Development Economics B.A. (Hons.), Semester: III Paper: IV Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs.per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objective: To acquaint the students with the concept of economic growth and development.

Unit I: • • • •

[9 Periods]

Economic development and economic growth; Factors affecting economic growth: economic and non-economic; Capital, Labour and Technology; Human Development and the concepts of HDI, HPI, GDI and GEM.

Unit II: • • • •

[9 Periods]

Meaning and Characteristics of developing economies; Pre-requisite for economic development; Obstacles to economic development; Structural changes under development.

Unit III: • • •

[9 Periods]

Capital Output ratio: meaning, uses and limitations; Choice of techniques and appropriate technology; Need for planning: democratic & totalitarian, centralized &decentralized planning.

Unit IV: • • •

[8 Periods]

Role of agriculture and industry in economic development and the interrelationships; Role of state in economic development; Disguised unemployment as a saving potential.

Unit V: • • • •

[10 Periods]

Unlimited supply of labour; Big Push Theory; Hirshman’s Strategy; Critical minimum effort thesis.

45

Essential Readings: 1. Jhingan M.L., (Latest Edition), The Economics of Development of Planning, Vrinda Publications (P) Ltd., New Delhi. 2. Mishra and Puri (Latest Edition), Economics of Development and Planning: Theory and Practice, Himalaya Publishing House, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Kindelberger, C. P. (Latest Edition), Economic Development, McGraw Hill, New York. 2. Meier; G. M. and James E, Rauch (Latest Edition), Leading Issues in Economic Development, Oxford University Press. 3. Thirlwal, A. P. (Latest Edition), Economics Development, McMillan, New York. 4. Todaro, M. P., (Latest Edition), Economics Development, Pearson Education.

46

ECO 315: Project B.A. (Hons.)., Semester: III Paper: V Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project report requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

47

ECO 411: Macro Economics-II B.A. (Hons.), Semester: IV Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact Hours per week: 3 hrs Credit: 3 Objectives: To make the students aware of the basic theoretical framework underlying the field of macroeconomics, inclusive of recent developments. Unit I: Consumption • The Keynesian Consumption Function; • The Life Cycle Hypothesis; • The Permanent Income Hypothesis.

[9

Periods]

Unit II: Investment • The investment function; • Components of investment; • Marginal Efficiency of Capital; • Acceleration Principle.

[9

Periods]

Unit III: Trade Cycles [9 Periods] • Phases of a typical trade cycle; • Causes and control of trade cycles; • Samuelson’s Model of Multiplier and Acceleration Interaction; • Hicksian theory of trade cycle. Unit IV: Open Economy Macroeconomics [9 Periods] • Exchange Rate Determination-Flexible and Fixed Exchange Rates; • Flexible versus Fixed Exchange Rates; • Mundell-Fleming model. Unit V: Economic Policy • Public Policy –meaning; • Monetary Policy-meaning, instruments; • Fiscal Policy-meaning, instruments.

48

[9

Periods]

Essential Readings: 1. Froyen, R.T. (2001), Macroeconomics- Theories and Policies, Addison Wesley Longman, Singapore. 2. Mankiw, N.G. (1992), Macro Economics, Macmillan Worth Publishers. 3. Ahuja, H.L., Macro Economic Analysis, S. Chand.

Reference Books: 1. Shapiro, E. (1996), Macroeconomic Analysis, Galgotia Publications, New Delhi 2. Keynes, J.M. (1936), The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London. 3. Diulio, Eugene A., Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Macroeconomics, McGraw-Hill. 4. United Nations (1974), Year Book of National Accounts Statistics. 5. Ackley, G. (1976), Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.

6. Dornbush, R., Stanley Fischer and Richard Startz, 7th or later edition, Macroeconomics, McGraw Hill. 7. Todaro, M. P., 2004, Economics Development, Pearson Education.

49

ECO 412: Statistical Methods – II B.A. (Hons.), Semester: IV Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives: 1. To introduce the basic concepts in statistics to the students and the way in which these concepts are applied in Economics; and 2. To help solving problems in statistics and interpreting the results obtained.

Unit I: Index Numbers • • • • •

[12 Periods]

Concept of an index number; Laspeyer’s, Paasche’s, and Fisher’s index numbers; Time reversal, factor reversal, and circular tests; Consumer Price Index Number; Problems in the construction of index numbers.

Unit II: Time Series Analysis • Components of a time series; • •

[12

Measurement of trend by moving averages and least square method; Measurement of seasonal variation by method of simple averages.

Unit III: Interpolation • •

[12 Periods]

Assumption of interpolation; Methods of interpolation: Binomial Expansion method, and Newton’s Advancing Difference method.

Unit IV: Elementary Probability Theory • • • • •

[12 Periods]

Random experiment, sample space and event; Permutations and combinations. The concept of probability; Theorems of probability(addition and multiplication); Conditional probability and independence of events.

Unit V: Probability Distributions • • •

Periods]

[12 Periods]

Random variable, types of random variable(discrete and continuous); Probability distribution function; Special Probability Distributions: Binomial and Normal, with their properties.

Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

50

Essential Readings: 1. Gupta, S.P., Statistical Methods (Recent Edition), S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Gupta, S.C. and V.K. Kapoor (1993), Fundamentals of Applied Statistics, S.Chand and Sons, New Delhi 2. Croxton , F.E., D.J.Cowden and S. Klein(1973), Applied General Statistics, Prentice Hall ,New Delhi. 3. Speigel, M.R. (1992),Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Statistics, McGraw Hill Book, London. 4. Nagar, A.L. and R.K. Das , Basic Statistics, Oxford University Press, Bombay.

51

ECO 413: International Economics-II B.A. (Hons.), Semester: IV Paper: III Contact hrs per semester: 60hrs Contact hrs.per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives: To acquaint the students with the trade policies and foreign trade in India.

Unit I: • • • •

[14 Periods]

Foreign exchange rate; Determination of equilibrium exchange rate; Mint Parity Theory; Purchasing Power Parity Theory.

Unit II: • • •

[12 Periods]

Balance of payments - Components; Disequilibrium in balance of payments - Causes; Measures to correct disequilibrium in the balance of payments;

Unit III: • • •

[12 Periods]

Devaluation-Elasticity Approach, Marshall Lerner condition; Absorption Approach; Foreign trade multiplier.

Unit IV: • • •

[9 Periods]

Foreign Exchange Control – Meaning & Methods; Foreign Exchange Markets; GATT & WTO.

Unit V: • • • • • • •

[10 Periods]

European Union (EU); European Free Trade Association (EFTA); Latin American Free Trade Association (LAFTA); South Asian Association for Regional Co-operation (SAARC); SAARC Preferential Trade Agreement (SAPTA); Economic and Social Commission for Asia and Pacific (ESCAP). Role of New Groupings - G 4, G5, G 7, G 10.

52

Essential Readings: 1. Salvatore, D.L., 1997, International Economics, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, N.J. 2. Vaish, M.C. & S. Singh, 1995, International Economics.

Reference Books: 1. Mithani, D.M.,Money, Banking, International Trade & Public Finance, Himalaya Publisher. 2. Sundaram,K.P.M., Money, Banking, & International Trade, Sultan Chand. 3. Kindleberger, C.P., 1973, International Economics, R.D. Iruim, Homewood. 4. Sodersten, B.O. 1991, International Economics, McMillan Press Ltd. London. 5. Lindert, International Economics, All India Traveller Book Seller. 6. Chacholiades, M., International Trade- Theory & Policy, McGraw Hill, Kogabusha, Japan.

53

ECO 414: Environmental Economics B.A. (Hons.), Semester: IV Paper: IV Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs.per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To understand the issues relating to environmental protection and pollution control.

Unit I: Environment, Ecology, and Economy • •

• •

• •

[9 Periods]

Environmental Economics: Definition & Scope Ecosystem - Meaning - Structure: Abiotic Group & Biotic Group Ecology: Meaning Environment Meaning Segments: Lithosphere, Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, & Biosphere Importance Environment- Economy Interaction Development & Environment

Unit II: Market Failure, Externalities and Public Good [9 Periods] • • • •

Market Failure: Meaning Externalities: Meaning, External economies and diseconomies Public Goods: Meaning and Characteristics Public Goods and Pareto Efficiency

[9 Periods]

Unit III: Sustainable Development • • •

Meaning Sustainable Development Rules: Safe Minimum Standards, Hartwick Approach, London School Approach, Daly’s Operational Principles. Indicators of Sustainable Development: Pressure Indicators, Impact Indicators And Sustainable Indicators.

Unit IV: Conservation of Resources & Environment Protection [9 Periods] •





Conservation of Resources : Preservation & Conservation, Methods of Conservation-Material Conservation, Product Life Extension, Recycling, Pollution Tax, Waste Reduction Policy Instruments for Environmental Protection: The Polluter Pays Principle (PPP), The User Pays Principle (UPP) & The Precautionary Pays Principle (PP) Policy Measures to Control Environmental Pollution

54

Unit V: Population and Environment • • •

[9 Periods]

Theories of Population: The Malthusian Theory of Population, Theory of Demographic Transition Population and Environment Linkages: Effects of Population Growth on Environment, Impact of Environment on Population Policy Measures

NOTE: Non-mathematical treatment of the subject is recommended.

Suggested Readings: 1. Eugine. T., Environmental economics, Vrinda Publications (P) Ltd, 2004. 2. Bhattacharya, Rabindra N., (Edited): Environmental Economics- An Indian Perspective, Oxford University Press, 2001. 3. Dingra I.C., The Indian Economy: Environment and Policy. 4. Our Common Future, Oxford University Press, 1987. 5. Prasad, Lallan and Aggarwal Rashmi: Economics of Environment and National Resource Management. 6. Hemple, Lamont, C. 1998, Environmental Economics: The Global Challenge, First East West Press, and Edinburgh. 7. Welford, J.: Environmental Management System. 8. Markandya and Richardson:Environmental Economics, 1992. 9. Todaro, M.P. and Stephen, C. Smith 2004, Economic Development, Person Education. 10 H.L. Ahuja, Advanced Micro Economic Theory, S. Chand & Company, New Delhi

55

ECO 415: Project B.A. (Hons.), Semester: IV Paper: V Credits: 2

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

*---------------------------*

56

ECO 511: Public Finance-I B.A. (Hons.), Semester: V Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 60hrs Contact hrs.per week: 4 Credits:4

Objectives: 1. To understand the functioning of the state; and 2. To understand the importance of taxes

Unit I: • • • •

[12 Periods]

Nature and Scope of Public Finance; Comparison between Private and Public Finance; Concept of Private, Public and Merit goods; Major Fiscal Functions-The Allocation Function, the Distribution Function, and the Stabilization Function.

Unit II: • • •

[12 Periods]

The Theory of Optimal Budget; Principle of Maximum Social Advantage; Sources and Classification of Public Revenue.

Unit III: • • • • •

[12Periods]

Meaning and canons of Taxation; Base of a tax; Buoyancy and Elasticity of a tax; Tax Ratio; Classification of Taxes: (Single Vs Multiple Taxes, Proportional Vs Progressive Taxes, Direct Vs Indirect Taxes) and their merits and demerits.

Unit IV: • • • • •

[12 Periods]

Impact, Shifting and Incidence of a tax; Forward and Backward shifting; Shifting of a tax through Tax Capitalization; Theories of Tax Shifting; Incidence and shifting of commodity taxes under different cost conditions

Unit V • • • •

[12 Periods]

Justice in taxation: Benefit Approach and Ability to Pay Approach; Taxable capacity; Effects of Taxation; Major trends in tax revenue of the central government in India.

57

Essential Readings: 1. Tyagi, B.P., Public Finance, Latest edition, Jain Praksash Nath & Company, Meerut. 2. Bhatia, H. L., Public Finance, Recent Edition, Vikas Publication, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Musgrave, Richard A. (1959), Theory of Public Finane, McGraw Hill, Kognakhusa, Tokyo. 2. Musgrave, R. A. and P. B. Musgrave, 1980, Public Finance in Theory and Practice, McGraw Hill, Kogakusha, Tokyo. 3. Dalton, Huge, Principles of Public Finance, 1971, Rontledge and Hegan Paul Limited, London. 4. Herber, B. P., Modern Public Finance, 1976, Richard D Iruin, Homewood. 5. Datt., Ruddar and K.P.M. Sundaram, Indian Economy, 2001, S. Chand & Company Limited, New Delhi. 6. Ganguly S., Public Finance, 1999, The World Press Private Ltd. Calcutta. 7. Andley and Sundaram, Public Finance, Latest edition, Ratan Prakashan, Agra. 8. Mithani, D. M.; (1998), Modern Public Finance, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai.

58

ECO 512: Money and Banking B.A. (Hons.), Semester: V Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs. Contact hrs.per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: 1. To grasp the concept of money and the foundation of monetary theory; and 2. To understand the nature, types and control of inflation.

Unit I: Money • • • •

[8 Periods]

Meaning, functions and classification of money; Demand for and supply of money; Theory of Money supply and Money Multiplier Process; The concept of Plastic Money.

Unit II: Quantity Theory of Money • • •

[9 Periods]

Transactions and Cash Balance Approach; Keynesian Theory; Friedman’s reformulation.

Unit III: Value of Money & its Changes • • • • • •

Inflation - Definition, causes and effects; Demand-pull and cost-push inflation & concept of inflationary gap; Trade – off between inflation and unemployment; Measures to control inflation; Deflation; Inflation versus Deflation.

Unit IV: Commercial Banks • • • •

[9 Periods]

Commercial banks - functions; Balance sheet of Banks- assets and liabilities; Credit Creation: Mechanism, purpose and limitations; Introduction to the concept of Universal Bank and e - banking.

Unit V: Co-operative Banks • • • •

[9 Periods]

[10 Periods]

Co-operative Banks – Characteristic Features; Types & Structure; Weaknesses of Co-operative Banks; Government’s initiatives and Co-operative Banking Reforms since 1991.

59

Essential Readings: 1. Gupta, S.B. (1983), Monetary Economics, S. Chand & Co., New Delhi. 2. Mitra, S. (1970), Money and Banking, Random House, New York. 3. Mithani, D.M.,Money, Banking, International Trade & Public Finance, Himalaya Publisher. 4. Sundaram,K.P.M., Money, Banking, & International Trade, Sultan Chand.

Reference Books: 1. Rangarajan, C. (1999), Indian Economics: Essays on Money and Finance, UBS Publisher, New Delhi. 2. RBI (1983), Functions and Working of RBI, Bombay. 3. RBI (2000), Report on Trend and Progress of Banking in India (Annual), Mumbai. 4. Reddy, Y.V. (2000), A Review of Monetary and Financial Sector Reforms in India-A Central Banker’s Perspective, UBSPD, New Delhi.

60

ECO 513: Mathematical Economics-I B.A. (Hons.), Semester: V Paper: III Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives: To understand the microeconomic concepts and theories through mathematical methods so as to refine the verbal logic.

Unit I: Review • •



[12 Periods]

(The purpose of this unit is to review the mathematical techniques. Their applications in economics shall be discussed in the subsequent units) Differential Calculus (Functions with one independent variable)-Increasing and decreasing functions, Concavity and convexity, optimization of functions; Differential Calculus (Multivariable Functions)-First-and second-order partial derivatives, total differentials, optimization of multivariable functions, constrained optimization with Lagrange multiplier; Matrix Algebra-Matrices and Determinants, Crammer’s rule, solving linear equations with the inverse matrix, Bordered Hessian determinant for constrained optimization.

Unit II: Theory of Consumer Behaviour-I • • •

Nature of the utility function, Indifference curves, Rate of commodity substitution; Maximization of Utility (First-and second-order conditions); Ordinary and Compensated Demand Functions.

Unit III: Theory of Consumer Behaviour-II • • •



[12 Periods]

Price and Income Elasticity of demand; Income and Leisure; The Slutsky Equation- Derivation for two commodity case, its elasticity form, Direct and Cross effects, Substitutes and Complements.

Unit IV: Theory of Firm-I • •

[12 Periods]

[12 Periods]

(All the concepts covered under unit IV and unit V shall be illustrated with the help of Cobb-Douglas production function only). Nature of the production function, isoquants and isocost line; Optimizing Behaviour- constrained output maximization, constrained cost minimization and profit maximization; Elasticity of substitution.

Unit V: Theory of Firm-II

[12 Periods]

Homogeneous Production Functions-Properties, Euler’s theorem, Linearly homogeneous production function as a special case; • Derivation of Input demand Function and Cost Function. Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted. •

61

Essential Readings: 1. Henderson, J.M. and R.E. Quandt (1980), Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach, McGraw Hill, New Delhi. 2. Mehta, B.C. and G.M.K. Madnani, Mathematics for Economists, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 1. Chiang, A. C. (1986), Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics (3 rd Edition), McGraw Hill, New Delhi 2. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Mathematical Methods for Business and Economics, McGraw Hill. 3. Dowling, E. T. (1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Introduction to Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill. 4. Allen, R.G.D. (1974), Mathematical Analysis for Economists, Macmillan Press, London. 5. Yamane, Taro (1975), Mathematics for Economists, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.

62

ECO 514: Business Organisation and Management B.A. (Hons.), Semester: V Paper: IV Contact hrs per semester: 45hrs Contact hrs. per week:3 Credits:3

Objectives: This paper is designed to familiarize the students with the basic concepts of commerce and management.

Unit I:

Unit II:

Unit III:

Unit IV:

Unit V:

Concept of Business Organisation: • Meaning of business, classification of business. • Distinction between trade, commerce and industry. • Meaning and significance of business organization. • Steps in establishing a business organization. Source of Business Finance: • Classification of business finance (Short, Medium, Long term). • Methods- Shares, Debentures, Underwriting, Public deposits, Trade credit. • Money Market Instruments. Stock Exchange Market: • Meaning, features, objects, functions and significance of Stock exchange. • Role of Stock exchange, functions of New Issue Market and Secondary Market. • Terminologies used in Stock exchange market. Indian Stock Exchange: • Stock exchanges in India- BSE, NSE, OTCEI. • Members of Stock exchange, listing of securities, Methods of Trading. • Speculation, Types of speculators. • Causes of price fluctuations on the Stock exchange. • SEBI- a brief history. Management: • Meaning and Definition of Management, • Functions of Management (Meaning and features)Planning, Organising, Staffing, Directing, Controlling, Leadership and Motivation. • Fayol’s General Principles of Management.

63

[09 Periods]

[09 Periods]

[09 Periods]

[09 Periods]

[09 Periods]

Essential Reading: 1. Business Organisation and Management, C.B.Gupta, Sultan Chandra Publication, Delhi. 2. Business Organisation, M.J.Mathew, RBSA Publishers, Jaipur. 3. Indian Financial System, M.Y.Khan, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi. 4. Management, G.S.Sudha, RBD, Jaipur.

ECO 515: Project B.A. (Hons.)., Semester: IV Paper: V Credits: 2 64

Objectives: •

To provide an introduction to research methodology.



To orient the student to the techniques of documentation.

The student will be required to prepare & submit a project requiring two hours of self study outside the class. There will be an evaluation by an external expert & an internal member at the end of each semester.

ECO 611: Public Finance- II B.A. (Hons.), Semester: VI Paper: I Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs.per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives: 1. To understand the various aspects of Public Finance. 2. To determine the role and objectives of Fiscal Policy.

65

Unit I: • • • •

[12 Periods]

Meaning and classification of Public Expenditure; Reasons for the growth of Public Expenditure; Effects of Public Expenditure; Trends in Public Expenditure in India.

Unit II: • • • •

[12 Periods]

Objectives of Public Debt; Classification of Public Debt; Burden of Public Debt; Ricardo Pigou Thesis, Buchanan Thesis, BDK Thesis, Musgrave Thesis of Inter Generation Equality.

Unit III: • • • •

[12 Periods]

Effects of Public debt; Methods of debt redemption; Loans versus Taxes; Trends in internal and external debt in India.

Unit IV:

[12 Periods]

Government budget : Meaning & Purpose Types of Government Budget :Legislative & Executive; Multiple & unified; Conventional & Cash; Revenue & Capital; Incremental & Zero base; Plan & Non Plan; Development & Non Development ; Economic and Functional classification of the Budget; Concept of budget deficit; Introduction to the concepts of – Gender Budgeting and Outcome Budgeting.

• •

• •

Unit V: • • •

[12 Periods]

Fiscal Policy – meaning, objectives and instruments; Limitations of Fiscal Policy; Deficit Financing-Meaning, Role and Effects.

Essential Readings: 1. Tyagi, B.P., Public Finance, Latest edition, Jain Praksash Nath & Company, Meerut. 2. Bhatia, H. L., Public Finance, Recent Edition, Vikas Publication, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

66

1. Musgrave, Richard A. (1959), Theory of Public Finane, McGraw Hill, Kognakhusa, Tokyo. 2. Musgrave, R. A. and P. B. Musgrave, 1980, Public Finance in Theory and Practice, McGraw Hill, Kogakusha, Tokyo. 3. Dalton, Huge, Principles of Public Finance, 1971, Rontledge and Hegan Paul Limited, London. 4. Herber, B. P., Modern Public Finance, 1976, Richard D Iruin, Homewood. 5. Datt., Ruddar and K.P.M. Sundaram, Indian Economy, 2001, S. Chand & Company Limited, New Delhi. 6. Ganguly S., Public Finance, 1999, The World Press Private Ltd. Calcutta. 7. Andley and Sundaram, Public Finance, Latest edition, Ratan Prakashan, Agra. 8. Mithani, D. M.; (1998), Modern Public Finance, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai.

ECO 612: Banking and Financial System B.A. (Hons.), Semester: VI Paper: II Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs.per week: 3 Credits: 3 .

Objectives: 1. To study the role, nature, functioning and issues related to banks and non-bank financial institutions.

67

2. To understand the working of financial markets with special references to banking and financial sector reforms in India.

[7 Periods]

Unit I: Reserve Bank of India • • • •

Organization & Management; Functions and Role; Monetary Policy – Objectives; Techniques of Credit Control by the RBI.

Unit II: Development Banks in India • • • • • •

[9 Periods]

Development Banks – Structure; Industrial Development Banks for large industries (All India) –IDBI, IFCI, ICICI; State level Industrial Development Banks – SFCs and SIDCs; Export-Import (Exim) Bank of India; National Bank for Agricultural & Rural Development (NABARD); Land Development Banks.

Unit III: Investment Banks & Non-Banking Financial Intermediaries [9 Periods] • Organization & Working of: UTI, LIC and GIC • Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) – loan companies, investment companies, hire purchase finance, lease finance, housing finance.

[10 Periods]

Unit IV: Money Market in India • •

• •

Indian money market – unorganized sector; Indian money market – organized sector (Call money market, Treasury Bill market, Commercial bill market, Certificate of Deposit market, Commercial Paper market, Money market mutual funds); Characteristics of Indian money market; Reform measures to strengthen the Indian money market.

[10 Periods]

Unit V: Capital Market in India • • • • •

Structure of Capital Market in India – Gilt Edged Market and Corporate Securities Market; Role of Capital Market in India’s industrial growth; Factors contributing to the growth of Capital Market in India; Problems of Indian Capital Market – the pre reform phase; Strengthening the Capital Market – the post reform phase.

Essential Readings:

68

1. Gupta, S. B. (1983), Monetary Economics, S. Chand & Co., New Delhi 2. Mishra and Puri (latest), Indian Economy, Himalaya publications. 3. Bhole, L.M., Financial Institutions & Markets-Structure : Growth & Innovations, Tata McGraw Hill. 4. Rudra dutt and Sundaram K.P.M (latest), Indian Economy, Sultan Chand & sons.

Reference Books: 1. Rangrajan, C. (1999), Indian Economics: Essays on Money and Finance, UBS Publishers, New Delhi. 2. Reddy, Y. V. (2000), A Review of Monetary and Financial Sector Reforms in India – A Central Banker’s Perspective, UBSPD, New Delhi. 3. Gupta, S. B. (1979), Monetary Planning in India, Oxford University Press, Delhi. 4. Gupta, S. B. (1995), Monetary Economics: Institutions, Theory and Policy, S. Chand & Co., New Delhi. 5. Gordon , Natrajan (2009), Financial Markets and Services, Himalaya publishing house. 5. Khan, M.Y., Indian Financial System, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw Hill. 6. RBI (1983), Functions and Working of RBI, Bombay. 7. RBI, (1985), Report of the committee to Review the working of the Monetary System. 8. RBI (2000), Report on Trend and Progress of Banking in India (Annual), Mumbai.

ECO 613: Mathematical Economics-II B.A. (Hons.), Semester: VI Paper: III Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 4 Credits: 4

Objectives:

69

To understand the economic concepts and theories through mathematical methods so as to refine the verbal logic.

Unit I: Review • •

[9 Periods]

(The purpose of this unit is to review the mathematical techniques. Their applications in economics shall be discussed in the subsequent units) Integral Calculus –Integration and its rules, integration by substitution and by parts, Definite Integral and area under a curve. First-order Difference Equations –Definition, General formula for first-order linear difference equations, stability conditions.

Unit II: Cobweb Model, Consumer’s and Producer’s Surplus [9 Periods] • • •

Cobweb Model: Dynamic equilibrium with lagged adjustment Consumers’ Surplus Producers’ Surplus

Unit III: Game Theory • • • •

[9 Periods]

Basic Concepts of Game Theory Classification of Games Payoff Matrix and Saddle point solution Saddle point solution for a two person, zero sum game

Unit IV: Input-Output Analysis • • •

[9 Periods]

Concept of ‘Open & Closed’, ‘Static & Dynamic’ Model; Determination of gross output in an open model. Hawkins-Simon conditions of viability;

Unit V: Linear Programming • • •

[9 Periods]

Formulation of Problem and its Graphical solution; Simplex Method (for maximization only); Concept of Primal and Dual.

Note: Use of non-programmable calculator is permitted.

Essential Readings: 1. Henderson, J.M. and R.E. Quandt (1980), Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach, McGraw Hill, New Delhi. 2. Mehta, B.C. and G.M.K. Madnani, Mathematics for Economists, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi.

Reference Books: 70

1. Chiang, A. C. (1986), Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics (3 rd Edition), McGraw Hill, New Delhi 2. Dowling, E. T.(1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Mathematical Methods for Business And Economics, McGraw Hill. 3. Dowling, E. T.(1993), Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Introduction to Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill. 4. Allen, R.G.D.(1974), Mathematical Analysis for Economists, Macmillan Press ,

London.

5. Yamane, Taro (1975), Mathematics for Economists, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.

ECO 614: Computer and its Application (Theory) B.A. (Hons.), Semester: VI Paper: IV Contact hrs per semester: 45 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 3 Credits: 3

Objectives: This module is designed to familiarize the students with the basic concepts of computer and its applications. 71

Unit I: Advance Spreadsheet Applications

[9 Periods]

Excel Basics, Cell Referencing (Relative, Absolute, Mixed), Cell Formatting, Functions in excel (SUM, AVERAGE, COUNT, MAX, MIN, IF), What-if analysis, Goal seek, Scenario, Pivot Table, Financial Functions (PV, NPV, IRR, Rate FV), Sorting, Data Filters(Auto & Advanced), Hyper linking, Macros.

Unit II: Data Analysis and Trend Forecasting

[9 Periods]

Elementary data handling:-Types of data, Data transformation, Summarizing data: - Graphical methods (line graph, bar graph, pie chart, histogram, scatter plot), Descriptive Statistics (mean, median, mode, standard deviation, sample variance, kurtosis, skew ness, Range) Correlation and Regression Analysis (ANOVA model)

Unit III: Introduction to Database

[9 Periods]

Database & Management concepts: Meaning, Characteristics, Advantages, Disadvantages, Data, information, Entity, Attributes, Logical & Physical Data, Schema, Sub-schema, DDL, DML, Data dictionary, File Handling concepts (Sequential, Index, Random), definition of Data Mining. Introduction to MS-Access: Tables, data types, creating tables, entering data into table, editing data, viewing records, sorting records, relationship, querying a database, Creating Forms & Generating reports.

UNIT-IV: Introduction to E-Commerce

[9 Periods]

Emerging role of E-Commerce, Meaning & Definition of Electronic Commerce, The Scope of Electronic Commerce (Electronic Markets, Electronic Data Interchange, and Internet Commerce), Electronic Commerce and the Trade Cycle, Advantages & Limitations of E-Commerce, E-Business Models (B2B, B2C, C2C, and C2B concepts), and Case Studies related to E-Commerce.

UNIT-V: Electronic Payment System & E-Security

[9 Periods]

Meaning, Components, The Payment Procedure, Types (Credit/Debit Cards, Smart Cards, E-Cash, & E-Cheque), and Benefits & Risk involved. Security threats, Techniques & Solutions for E-Commerce Security.

Essential Readings: 1. David Whiteley, “E-Commerce”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2000. 2. “E- Commerce new vistas for business” by T.N.Chhabra, R.K. Suri and Sanjiv Verma., Dhanpat Rai publications. 3. “E-Commerce”, Samata Soni, Manju Gupta, Neeraj Singh, Professional Publications. 4. “E-Commerce-An Indian Perspective”, P.T.Joseph, S.J., PHI Publications. 5. “Data Analysis using Microsoft Excel”, Ash Narayan Shah.

72

Reference Books: 1. Eframi Turban, Jae Lee, David King, K. Michale Chung, “Electronic Commerce”, Pearson Education, 2000. 2. Bott and Leonhard, Using Microsoft Office 2000,Prentice Hall of India 3. Mastering Office 2000, BPB Publications

ECO 615: Computer and its Application (Practical) B.A. (Hons.), Semester: VI Paper: V Contact hrs per semester: 60 hrs Contact hrs. per week: 4 Credits: 2

73

Objectives: This module is designed to familiarize the students with the basic concepts of computer and its applications via practical. Students will be working on following software.

MS-Excel: Excel Basics, Cell Referencing (Relative, Absolute, Mixed), Cell Formatting, Functions in excel (SUM, AVERAGE, COUNT, MAX, MIN, IF), What-if analysis, Goal seek, Scenario, Pivot Table, Financial Functions (PV, NPV, IRR, Rate FV), Sorting, Data Filters(Auto & Advanced), Hyper linking, Macros. Summarizing data: - Graphical methods (line graph, bar graph, pie chart, histogram, scatter plot), Descriptive Statistics (mean, median, mode, standard deviation, sample variance, kurtosis, skew ness, Range), Correlation and Regression Analysis (ANOVA model) MS-Access: Tables, data types, creating tables, entering data into table, editing data, viewing records, sorting records, relationship, querying a database, Creating Forms & Generating reports.

*------------------------*

74

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SYLLABUS

SFS, GURUKUL MARG, MANSAROVAR, JAIPUR SYLLABUS Batch 2008-2009 & 2009-2010 (Revised after BOS 2010) Batch 2008-2009 Batch 2009-2010 I Semester Exa...

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