Syllabus for MCA (Under Science Faculty ) in - Pune University

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Syllabus for M.C.A. (Under Science Faculty ) in affiliated colleges to University of Pune (To be implemented from Academic year 2013-2014) Credit Based System •

Course Structure – Duration: The entire Programme is a Three year and Six semester full time Programme. No. of Courses: For first five semesters there will be Six courses. The last semester will be Industrial training/Institutional project and two theory courses.



Salient Features – 1. Each Theory course will be of 4 credits and each Lab. Course (Practical) of 5 credits. 2. Each semester is of 6 courses and 25 credits (This is not applicable for Industrial training in VI semester of M.C.A.). 3. Each regular student will have to appear for all the 25 credits of the respective semester. 4. Student who wishes to take admission to the second year M.C.A should have obtained at least 25 credits out of 50 credits of the First year M.C.A. 5. A student will have to complete at least 75% credits (other than for IT – SemVI) from M.C.A. (Under Science Faculty) syllabus. The remaining 25% credits (other than for IT–SemVI) can be chosen from the courses offered by the other Departments/subjects (other than Computer Science courses) with credits system structure.



Evaluation Rules – Pattern of Examination Evaluation of Students: 1) 2)

3) 4)

5)

The In-semester and End-Semester examinations will be of 50 marks each. Student has to obtain 40% marks in the combined examination of In-Semester and End-Semester assessment with minimum passing of 30% passing in both assessments separately. A student cannot register for third semester/fourth semester if s/he fails to complete the minimum of 50% credits of the total credits of two semesters of the first year. Internal marks will not change. Student cannot repeat internal assessment. If student misses internal assessment examination, s/he will have second chance with the permission of the concerned teacher. But it will not be right of the student. It will be the discretion of the concerned teacher and internal departmental assessment committee. There shall be revaluation of answer script of end semester examination, but not of internal assessment papers.

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6)

Internal assessment (IA) answer scripts may be shown to the concerned student but not end semester answer script.

Internal Assessment (Continuous Assessment): Internal assessment for each course would be continuous and dates for each tutorials/practical tests will be pre-notified in the time table for teaching or placed separately as a part of time table. Department / College Internal Assessment Committee will coordinate this activity Theory Courses: Conducting written tests should not be encouraged. More focus should be on non-written tests. Students should be encouraged to conduct various academic activities. A teacher must select a variety of the procedures for internal assessment suggested as follows. a) Mid-term test b) On-line test c) Open book test (concerned teacher will decide the allowed books) d) Tutorial e) Surprise test f) Oral g) Theory Assignments h) Review of Research paper i) Seminar presentation j) Journal/Lecture/Library notes k) Group Discussion l) Programming Assignments Student has to preserve the documentation of the internal assessment except midterm test answer script. It is the responsibility of the student to preserve the documents. Project Courses : The Project can be platform, Language and technology independent. Project will be evaluated by project guide. Assessment will be done weekly in the respective batch. Evaluation will be on the basis of weekly progress of project work, progress report, oral, results and documentation.

University Examination (UE): End-Semester examination for 50 marks per course would be held as per the scheduled given by University of Pune. 1. If a student fails in a course of any semester then the student can appear only for the End of Semester Examination of the following semester. However he/she can improve the Internal Assessment (continuous assessment) performance in any of the forthcoming semesters in which the course is subsequently conducted and in this case, the student will have to appear for End of Semester Examination also for the said course. 2. The assessment of 17 credits towards VI th semester (Full Time Industrial Training / Institutional project) will be carried out as follows: i. A student will inform the department about the joining date of the above mentioned training. M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

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ii. The student will have to make minimum two presentations, one in the third month and the other at the end of the training programme. These presentations will be considered towards CA. iii. The student will have to submit a Dissertation/Report to the department which will be assessed towards course credits. Award of Class Grades will be awarded from grade point average (GPA) of the credits. GPA Rules: 1.

2.

3. 4.

5.

The formula for GPA will be based on Weighted Average. The final GPA will not be printed unless a student passes courses equivalent to minimum 150 credit hours (Science). Total credits hours means the sum of credit hours of the courses which a student has passed. A seven point grade system [guided by the Government of Maharashtra Resolution No. NGO – 1298 / [4619] / UNI 4 dt. December 11, 1999 and University regulations] will be followed. The corresponding grade table is attached herewith. If the GPA is higher than the indicated upper limit in the third decimal digit then the student be awarded higher final grade (e.g. a student getting GPA of 4.492 may be awarded ‘A’) For Semester I, II, III examinations, only the grade points will be awarded for each subject. Final GPA along with final grade will be awarded only at the end of IV semester. There is also a provision for verification and revaluation. In case of verification, the existing rules will be applicable. The revaluation result will be adopted if there is a change of at least 10% marks and in the grade of the course. After the declaration of result, for the improvement of Grade, the student can reappear for the examination of minimum 30 credits worth theory courses.

Grade and Grade Point Average Marks Obtained Grade 100 – 75 ‘O’ Outstanding 74 – 65 ‘A’ Very Good 64 – 55 ‘B’ Good 54 – 50 ‘C’ Average 49 – 45 ‘D’ Satisfactory 44 – 40 ‘E’ Pass 39 and less ‘F’ Fail

Grade Points 06 05 04 03 02 01 00

Final Grade Points Grade Points 5.00 – 6.00 4.50 – 4.99 3.50 – 4.49 2.50 – 3.49 1.50 – 2.49 0.50 – 1.49 0.00 – 0.49

Final Grade O A B C D E F

Common Formula for Grade Point Average (GPA):

B Grade is equivalent to at least 55% of the marks M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

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External Students: There shall be no external students. Setting of Question Paper / Pattern of Question Paper For core (compulsory) theory courses end semester question papers set by the University of Pune and centralized assessment for theory papers done as per the University guidlines. Verification / Revaluation There is also a provision for verification and revaluation. In case of verification, the existing rules will be applicable. There shall be revaluation of end semester examination, but not of internal assessment. Completion of Degree Programme •

1) As soon as a student obtains 150 credits (completion of Industrial training (IT) and 75% of the credits from the syllabus excluding IT is essential ), the student will be deemed to have completed the requirements of the M.C.A.(Science) degree programme. 2) If a student has failed in a course then the said course will not be taken into account for calculating GPA and overall grade. In fact, all the courses in which a student has passed will be taken into account for calculating the GPA and overall grade. 3) The policies and procedures determined by University will be followed for the conduct of examinations and declaration of the result of a candidate

Course Structure MCA (Science) for Affiliated Colleges Year/ Semester

Subject

Paper

Title of Paper

Credit

% of Assessment IA UE Total

CA-101 Programming with C 4 50 50 100 CA-102 DBMS 4 50 50 100 CA-103 Mathematical 4 50 50 100 Foundation Core CA-104 Concrete Mathematics 4 4 50 50 100 Graph Theory Core CA-105 Computer Organisation 4 4 50 50 100 Core CA-106 Lab on CA-101 & CA4 5 50 50 100 102 Minimum Credit : 25, Core Subject is compulsory IA- Internal Assessment, UE –University Examination.

I Year Sem-I

Core Core Core

Hours / Week 4 4 4

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Year/ Semester I Year Sem-II

Subject

Paper

Core Core Core Core

CA-201 CA-202 CA-203 CA-204

Year/ Semester

Subject

Paper

Title of Paper

Hours/ Week 4 4 4 4

Credit

% of Assessment IA UE Total 50 50 100 50 50 100 50 50 100 50 50 100

Data Structures 4 TCS 4 OOP- C++ 4 Computer 4 Networks Core CA-205 ADBMS 4 4 50 50 100 Core CA-206 Lab. on CA4 5 50 50 100 201,CA-203 & CA205 Minimum Credit : 25 , Core Subject is compulsory. IA- Internal Assessment, UE –University Examination. Title of Paper

Hours Credit % of Assessment / IA UE Total Week Core CA-301 DAA 4 4 50 50 100 II Year Sem-III Core CA-302 Operating System 4 4 50 50 100 Core CA-303 Software Engineering 4 4 50 50 100 Core CA-304 Java 4 4 50 50 100 Core CA-305 Lab. on 302 & 304 4 5 50 50 100 Elective CA-306 Project 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-307 Numerical Methods 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-308 Multimedia Systems 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-309 Dot Net 4 4 50 50 100 Minimum Credit : 25 , Maximum Credit 29 . Core Subject is compulsory, From elective courses student can select one course for Minimum credit and Two for Maximum Credit. IA- Internal Assessment, UE –University Examination.

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Year/ Semester

Subject

Paper

Core Core Core Core

CA-401 CA-402 CA-403 CA-404

Title of Paper

Hours / Week 4 4 4 4

Credi t

% of Assessment IA UE Total

Computer Graphics 4 50 50 100 SDK 4 50 50 100 Advance Java 4 50 50 100 Object oriented 4 50 50 100 Software Engineering Core CA-405 Lab. on 401,402 4 5 50 50 100 &403 Elective CA-406 Project 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-407 Cyber Law 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-408 Soft Computing 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-409 Artificial Intelligence 4 4 50 50 100 Minimum Credit : 25 , Maximum Credit 33 . Core Subject is compulsory, From elective courses student can select one course for Minimum credit and Three for Maximum Credit. IA- Internal Assessment, UE –University Examination.

II Year Sem-IV

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Year/ Semester

Subject

Paper

Title of Paper

II IYear Sem-V

Core Core

Year/ Semester

Subject

Paper

Title of Paper

III Year Sem-VI

Core

CA-601

Elective

CA-602

Industrial Training /Institutional project Software Testing & Quality Assurance Embedded Systems Information Security And Audit Cloud Computing

Hours / Week 4 4

Credit

% of Assessment IA UE Total

Hours / Week --

Credit

17

25

75

100

4

4

50

50

100

4 4

4 4

50 50

50 50

100 100

4

4

50

50

100

CA-501 Internet Programming 4 50 50 100 CA-502 Principle of 4 50 50 100 Programming Langauges Core CA-503 Data Mining & 4 4 50 50 100 Warehousing Core CA-504 Software Project 4 4 50 50 100 Management Core CA-505 Lab. on 501,502 &505 4 5 50 50 100 Elective CA-506 Project 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-507 Image Processing 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-508 E-Commerce 4 4 50 50 100 Elective CA-509 Mobile Computing 4 4 50 50 100 Minimum Credit : 25 , Maximum Credit 33 . Core Subject is compulsory, From elective courses student can select one course for Minimum credit and Three for Maximum Credit. IA- Internal Assessment, UE –University Examination.

CA-603 CA-604 CA-605

% of Assessment IA UE Total

Core Subject is compulsory. If student had completed 133 credit within Five semesters then no need to select any elective course. Otherwise student should select required elective courses to complete 150 credit.

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M.C.A. (Science) –I Semester-I CA101: Programming with C Objectives :i) To develop Problem Solving abilities using computers ii) To teach basic principles of programming iii) To develop skills for writing programs using ‘C’ 1. Introduction to Programming [3-5] 1.1 Problem Solving - Algorithms, Flowcharts 1.2Programming Languages Machine language, Assembly language, Assembler, Higher level language, Compiler and Interpreter 2. Introduction to C 2.1 Structure of a C program 2.2 Functions as building blocks 2.3 C Program development life cycle

[1-2]

3. C tokens [2-3] 3.1 Keywords 3.2 Identifiers 3.3 Variables 3.4 Constants – character, numeric, string, escape sequences 3.5Data types – built-in and user defined 3.6 Operators and expressions - types (arithmetic, relational, logical, assignment, bitwise, Conditional, other operators) , precedence and associativity rules. 4. Input and Output 4.1 Character input and output 4.2 String input and output 4.3 Formatted input and output

[2-3]

5. Control Structures 5.1 Decision making structures: if, if-else, switch 5.2 Loop Control structures:while, do-while, for 5.3 Nested structures 5.4 break and continue

[7-8]

6. Functions in C 6.1 Functions, advantages 6.2 Standard library functions

[6-7]

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6.3 User defined functions: declaration, definition, function call, parameter passing, return Keyword, 6.4 Scope of variables, storage classes 6.5 Recursion 7. Arrays 7.1 Declaration, initialization 7.2 One, two and multidimensional arrays 7.3 Passing arrays to functions

[4-5]

8. Pointers [5-6] 8.1 Declaration, initialization 8.2 Dereferencing pointers 8.3 Pointer arithmetic 8.4 Pointer to pointer 8.5 Arrays and pointers 8.6 Functions and pointers – passing pointers tofunctions, functions returning pointers. 8.7 Dynamic memory allocation 9. Strings 9.1 Declaration and initialization 9.2 Standard library functions for String handling 9.3 Strings and pointers 9.4 Array of strings. 9.5Command line Arguments

[4-5]

10. Structures and Unions 10.1 Creating structures 10.2 Accessing structure members (dot Operator) 10.3 Structure initialization 10.4 Array of structures 10.5 Passing structures to functions 10.6 Nested structures 10.7 Pointers and structures 10.8 Self referencing structure 10.9 Unions 10.10 Difference between structures and unions

[5-6]

11. C Preprocessor 11.1 Format of Preprocessor directive 11.2 File Inclusion directive 11.3 Macro substitution, nested macro, augmented macro

[1-2]

12. File Handling 12.1 Streams

[4-5]

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12.2 Types of Files 12.3 Operations on files 12.4 Random access to files 12.5 Programing using command line arguments 13. Introduction to Graphics [2-3] 13.1 Initialization graphics 13.2 Graphics Library function – putpixel, getpixel, functions to draw simple geometrical figures. References 1. How to Solve it by Computer, R.G. Dromey, ISBN:9788131705629, Pearson Education 2. Problem Solving with C, Harrow , ISBN:9788131734391, Pearson Education 3. Programming in ANSI C, E. Balaguruswamy,ISBN:9781259004612,Tata Mc-Graw Hill Publishing Co.Ltd.-New Delhi 4. The C Programming Language, Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie, ISBN:9788120305960, PHI Learning 5. A Structured Programming Approach Using C, Behrouz A. Forouzan, Richard F. Gilberg ISBN:9788131500941, Cengage Learning India 6. Programming in C (2nd Edition) by Ashok Kamthane, Pearson 7. C Programming by YashwantKanitkar,BPB Publication 8. “Simplifying C”, Harshal A. Arolkar and Sonal Jain, Wiley IndiaDreamtech Press, August 2010. (ISBN: 978-93-5004-049-2) 9. Using the GNU Compiler Collection, Richard M. Stallman, GCC Developer community ISBN:9781441412768,Createspace

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CA102: Database Management System Sr. No. 1

Chapter Name of Chapter and Contents No. 1 Introduction to Database Systems 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Basic Concepts and Definition 1.2.1 Data 1.2.2 Information 1.2.3 Data Versus Information 1.2.4 Data warehouse 1.2.5 Metadata 1.2.6 Data Item or Field 1.2.7 Records 1.2.8 Data Dictionary 1.2.9 Database 1.2.10 Database System 1.3 Database Users and Database Administrator 1.4 Functions and Responsibilities of DBA 1.5 File-oriented System versus Database System 1.6 View of Data 1.7 Database Languages 1.8 Schemas, Sub-schemas and Instances 1.9 3-Level Architecture 1.9.1 Internal Level 1.9.2 Conceptual Level 1.9.3 External Level 1.10 Data Independence 1.10.1 Physical Data Independence 1.10.2 Logical Data Independence 1.11 Structure of a DBMS 1.12 Functions of DBMS 1.13 Data Models

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

No. of Lect. 3-5

Reference 1,2

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2

2

3

3

5

5

4

4

Physical Data Organization 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Physical Storage Media 2.3 RAID Technology 2.4 Basic concepts of File 2.4.1 File Types 2.4.2 Buffer Management 2.4.3 File organization 2.5 Indexing Relational model 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Structure of Relational Database 3.3 Relational Algebra 3.3.1 Selection Operation 3.3.2 Projection Operation 3.3.3 Union Operation 3.3.4 Cartesian Product Operation 3.3.5 Difference Operation 3.3.6 Intersection Operation 3.3.7 Division Operation 3.3.8 Rename Operation 3.3.9 Join operation SQL 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Basic Structure 4.3 Aggregate Functions 4.4 Null Values 4.5 Nested Subqueries 4.6 Views 4.7 Complex Queries 4.8 Modification of Database 4.10 Integrity and Security Constraints 4.11 Security and Authorization Database and Relational Database Design 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Basic E-R Concepts 5.3 keys 5.4 Constraints 5.5 Entity Set

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

2-4

1,2

5-7

1,2

7-11

2,4

8-10

1,2

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6

6

7

7

5.5.1 Strong Entity Set 5.5.2 Week Entity Set 5.6 E-R Diagram Symbol 5.7 E-R Diagram 5.8 Extended E-R Features 5.9 Conversion of E-R Model into Relations 5.10 Functional Dependency 5.11 Full Functional Dependency 5.12 Armstrong’s Axioms 5.13 Redundant Functional Dependencies 5.14 Closures of a set of Functional Dependencies 5.15 Decomposition 5.16 Normalization 5.17 Normal forms 5.17.1 First Normal Form 5.17.2 Second Normal Form 5.17.3 Third Normal Form 5.17.4 Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF) 5.17.5 Fourth Normal Form 5.17.6 Fifth Normal Form Transaction Management 6.1 Transaction Concepts 6.2 Transaction Properties 6.3 Transaction States 6.4 Concurrent Execution 6.5 Serializability 6.6 Recoverability Concurrency Control & Database Recovery System 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Lock based Protocols 7.2.1 Locks 7.2.2 Granting of locks 7.2.3 Two Phase Locking Protocol 7.2.4 Time Stamp-Based protocol 7.2.5 Thomas Write Rule 7.2.7 Multiple Granularity 7.2.8 Deadlock Handling 7.3 Database Recovery Concepts 7.4 Types of Database Recovery 7.5 Recovery Technique

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

4-6

1,2

10-12

1,2

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7.5.1 Deferred Update 7.5.2 Immediate Update 7.6 Buffer Management Recommended Books: • Database Systems: Concepts, Design and Applications, Singh, ISBN:9788131760925, Pearson • Database Management Systems, Raghu Ramakrishnan, Johannes Gehrke, ISBN: 9780072465631, TMH • Database Systems Concepts, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth, S. Sudarshan, ISBN: 9780071244763, TMH • Database Systems, Connolly, ISBN:9788131720257, Pearson • A Guided Tour of Relational Databases and Beyond, Levene, ISBN:9788181280510, Springer • Fundamentals of Database Management Systems, Gillenson, ISBN:9788126517930, Wiley India • Database Design and Relational Theory C.J. Date, ISBN:9789350237298,O'Reilly • An Introduction to Database Systems, Date/Kanna, ISBN, 9788177585568 , Pearson • Fundamentals of Database Systems, Elmasri, ISBN:9788131716250 , Pearson • Database-Principles, Programming and Performance, O'Neil, ISBN:9789380501284, Elsevier • Database System Implementation, Garcia-Molina, ISBN:9788131704134, Pearson

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CA 103- Mathematical Foundation 1. SET THEORY 1.1 Sets, Subsets 1.2 Operations on Sets 1.3 De Morgan’s Laws 1.4 Power Set of a Set 1.5 Cartesian Product 1.6 Equivalence relation 1.7 Partition of a Set 1.8 Partial order on a set

[5To 7 Lectures]

2 PROPOSITIONAL CALCULUS 2.1 Propositions 2.2 Logical connections 2.3 Truth tables 2.4 Logical equivalence 2.5 Tautology and contradiction

[4 To 5Lectures]

3PREDICATE CALCULUS 3.1 Predicates 3.2 Valid arguments and proofs. 3.2.1 Proofs using truth tables 3.2.2 Direct proof 3.2.3 Indirect proof 3.3 Quantifiers(up to two variables)

[5To 6 Lectures]

4. INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA Relations and Functions [7 To 8 Lectures] 4.1 Ordered Pairs, Cartesian product of Sets. 4.2 Relations, types of relations, equivalence relations, Partial Ordering. 4.3 Equivalence Class, Properties of Equivalence Class.(without proof) 4.4 Definition of function as relation 4.5 Injective, Surjectivefunction ,Bijective function 4.6Composition of two functions, Inverse Function

5. INTEGERS 5.1 Divisibility of Integers 5.2 Definition and Properties 5.3.Division Algorithm 5.4 Divisibility and its properties 5.5 GCD, Euclidean Algorithm 5.6 Properties of GCD 5.7 Modular Arithmetic M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

[12To 14 Lectures]

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5.7.1 Congruence relation 5.7.2 Euler’s theorem statement and examples 5.7.3 Definition of binary operation 5.7.4 Composition table 6POLYNOMIALS [5 To 6 Lectures] 6.1 Definition of polynomial, Equality, addition, multiplication of two polynomials 6.2 Divisibility in Polynomials, Properties of divisibility 6.3 GCD of two polynomials using Euclidean Algorithm 6.4 Roots of a polynomial(by A.P,G.P) 7PERMUTATION 7.1 Definition of permutation 7.2 Multiplication of two permutations 7.3 Cycle, transposition 7.4 Even and odd permutation 8. Matrices 8.1 Definition of matrix 8.2 Matrix operations 8.3 Transpose and powers of matrices 8.4 Symmetric matrix 8.5 Inverse of a matrix(by adjoint method) 8.6Echelon form of the matrix 8.7 Solving system of linear equations using • Cramer’s rule • Inverse • Guass elimination method

[4To 5 Lectures]

[6 To 9Lectures]

Reference Books : 1. 2. Discrete Mathematical Structures : Bernard Kolman, Robert C. Busby, Sharon Cutler Ross, Nadeen-Ur-Rehman. 3. Discrete Mathematics And Its Applications: Rosen 4. M Artin, Algebra,prentice hall of India , New Delhi(1994) 5. Elementary linear algebra : Howard Anton 6. Discrete Mathematics Rajendra Akerkar , Rupali Akerkar Pearson Publication 7. Discrete Mathematics with Applications, Thomas Koshy, Elsevier Academic Press, ISBN: 9788181478870 8. Discrete Structures, Logic, and Computability, James Hein, Jones & Barlett Student Edition, ISBN:9789380108391

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CA -104 Concrete Mathematics and Graph Theory Graph Theory 1. Graphs Definition and examples of graphs, Incidence and degree, Handshaking lemma, Isomorphism, Sub-graphs, Walks, Path, Circuits, Connected and disconnected graphs, Euler graphs, Operations on graphs. Hamiltonian Graphs, Traveling Salesman problem (Reference Book No.1. Chapter 1, 2) Algorithms: Connectedness algorithm, Shortest Path Algorithm ( Reference Book No. 1., Chapter 11) ,Fleury's Algorithm, Chinese Postman problem, Product of two graphs, Complement of a graph, Self Complement of a graph( Reference Book No.5) ( 8-10 Lectures ) 2. Trees Definition and properties of trees, Pendent vertices, centre of a tree, Rooted and binary tree, spanning trees, minimum spanning tree algorithms, Fundamental circuits, cutsets and cut vertices, fundamental cutsets, connectivity and separativity, max-flow min-cut theorem (Reference Book No. 1. Chapter 3, 4 for max-flow, min-cut theorem, Chapter 14) ( 8-10 Lectures ) 3. Planar Graphs Planar Graphs, Kuratowski's graphs,

(Reference Book No.1. Chapter 5) ( 2 Lectures )

4. Matrix Representation of Graphs Incidence, Adjacency Matrices and their properties (Reference Book No.1. Chapter 7)

( 2 Lectures )

5. Coloring Chromatic Number, Chromatic Polynomial, (Reference Book No. 1. Chapter 8)

( 2 Lectures )

6. Directed Graphs Types of digraphs, directed paths and connectedness, Euler digraphs, Directed trees, Arborescence, Tournaments, Acyclic digraphs, Polish notations. (Reference Book No. 1. Chapter 9)

(5-6 Lectures)

Concrete Mathematics 1. Cryptography and Number Theory Cryptography and Modular Arithmetic, Private Key Cryptography, Public-key Cryptosystems, Arithmetic modulo n, Cryptography using multiplication mod n, Inverses and GCD, Solutions to M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

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Equations and Inverses mod n, Inverses mod n, Converting Modular Equations to Normal Equations, Greatest Common Divisors(GCD), Euclid’s Division Theorem, The GCD Algorithm, Extended GCD algorithm, Computing Inverses, The RSA Cryptosystem, Exponentiation mod n, The Rules of Exponents, Fermat’s Little Theorem, The Chinese Remainder Theorem , Applications(Reference Book No.6. and No.7) (15-18 lectures) 2. Recursion Recursion, First order linear recurrences, Solving recurrences, Exponential generating functions (Reference Book 6, 7) (6-8 lectures) References: 1. Graph Theory with Applications to Engineering and Computer Science, Deo, Narsing [1974], Prentice Hall 2. Concrete Mathematics, A Foundation for Computer Science, Graham R.M., D.E.Knuth [1989], Addison Wesley. 3. Graph Theory with Applications, Bondy, J. A. & U. S. R. Murty [1976], MacMillan 4. Graph, Networks and Algorithms, Swamy, M. N. S. & K. Tulsiram [1981], John Willey 5. A First Look at Graph Theory, John Clark, D.A .Holton. 6. A Course in Number Theory and Koblitz.(Springer).

Cryptography Second

Edition

by Neal,

7. Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists-Clifford Stein, Kenneth Bogart, Robert Drysdale, Pearson Publication.

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CA- 105 Computer Organizations

1. Digital Circuits [14-15]  Gates - Basic gates , derived gates, positive and negative logic 2  Simplification of logic circuits, De-Morgans theorem, Concept of K map and simplification of sungle expressions (upto 4 variables) 2  Combinational circuits 1  Half adder, full adder, half subtractor 1  Multiplexer ( 4 to 1), Demultiplexer (1 to 4) using AND-OR gates, AND gates 2  Encoder - Decimal to BCD 1  Decoder - 3 to 8 decoder using gates 1  Sequential circuits - concept of flip flop, need for clock, concept of triggering 1  SR, JK, D and T flip flops 2  Concept of counter, types, concept of registers, types and applications 2 2. CPU Organization [4-6]  Functions of CPU 1  General registers used in CPU -PC, SP, instruction pointer, instruction register, instruction decoder, flag, general purpose registers, memory address register, memory byte register 2  General register organization of CPU 1  Concept of stack, instructions used with stack 1  Block diagram of ALU 1 3. Memory organization • Memory hierarchy • Use of cache memory, address mapping with cache • Associative memory • Virtual memory • Memory management through segmentation and paging

[8-9] 1 2 2 2 1

4. I/O Organization [13-14] • Interfacing concept and need, general structure of an interface, block diagram of parallel interface and function of blocks 2 • Concept of interrupt, IVT, size of IVT and processor response 1 • Types of I/O transfer, CPU initiated, interrupt initiated, DMA (only concept) 2 • Data convertors - DAC, ADC (flash, successive approximation and dual slope ADC) 3 • Serial communication and types 2 • Working of UART with block diagram, Serial communication standards USB 2 M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

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PCI bus standard

1

5. Architecture of Microprocessor [3-5] • Block diagram of 8086 and function of blocks 1 • 8086 Registers 2 • Numeric co-processor - Concept , block diagram and functions of blocks 2 6. Parallel Processing • Concept of parallelism • Parallel computer structures • Concept of pipelining, Pipelined computers • Instruction pipeline, Arithmetic pipeline • Concept of RISC and CISC • RISC pipelining

[9-11] 1 2 1 2 2 1

Reference Books: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Electronic Principles, Tata McGraw-Hill, 7th Edition by Albert Malvino and David Bates Modern Digital Electronics, 3 edition, R P Jain Digital Design 4e, Mano, ISBN:9788131714508, Pearson Digital Logic & Computer Design, Mano, ISBN:9788177584097, Pearson Computer Systems Organization & Architecture- John D. Carinelli Pearson publication. Digital Design and Computer Architecture 2nd Edition , Harris, Morgan Kauffman Publishers(Elesevier) ISBN:9789382291527

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M.C.A. (Science) –I Semester-II CA 201: Data Structures Objectives :i) To understand the different methods of organizing data in computer memory. ii) To efficiently implement the different data structures. iii) To efficiently implement the solutions for specific problems. 0. Prerequisites Concept of Structures and pointers 1. Introduction to Data Structure 1.1 Concepts 1.2 Data types, ADT (Abstract Data Type) 1.3 Types of data structure

[2-3]

2. Algorithm Analysis 2.1 Space complexity 2.2 Time complexity 2.3 Asymptotic Notations (Big O, Omega, Theta)

[2-3]

3. Linear data structure 3.1 Array as linear data structure 3.2 Representation of array in memory - Row major, Column major 3.3 Sorting Algorithms & their time complexity - Bubble, Insertion, Quick, Merge sort 3.4 Searching Algorithms & their time complexity - Linear Search, Binary Search

[6-8]

4. Linked List 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Types – Singly, doubly, singly circular, doubly circular 4.3 Dynamic representation. 4.4 Operations on linked list. 4.5 Generalized Linked List – Concept & representation. 4.6 Applications - Polynomial representation, addition of two polynomials

[8-10]

5. Stack 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Representation : static and dynamic 5.3 Operations on stack. 5.4 Applications

[6-8]

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- Convert expression Infix to Postfix, Infix to Prefix - Evaluation of Postfix and Prefix expression 5.5 Concept of multiple stacks 6. Queue 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Representation: static and dynamic 6.3 Operations on queue 6.4 Circular queue, priority queue, DeQue 6.5 Concept of multiple queues.

[6-7]

7. Tree [10-11] 7.1 Concept & terminologies 7.2 Binary tree - Representation: static and dynamic - Types: full, complete, skewed. - Traversal: inorder, preorder, postorder. 7.3 Binary Search Tree - Concept & Operations: create, insert, delete. 7.4 Height balanced tree – AVL tree, rotations(No programming implementation) 7.5 Application - Heap Sort, Expression tree 8. Graph [6-7] 8.1 Concept & terminologies 8.2 Representation: Adjacency matrix, Adjacency list. 8.3 Traversal: DFS, BFS 8.4 Spanning tree, minimum cost spanning tree, Prim’s Algorithm and Kruskals Algorithm (No programming implementation) 8.5 Applications - AOV network, topological sort - AOE network, critical path - Shortest path: Dijkstra’s algorithm . 9. Hashing [2-3] 9.1 Hash table concepts 9.2 Hash functions 9.3. Overflow handling techniques (No programming implementation) References: 1. Data Structures Using C, ISBN:9788131722381,Bandyopadhyay,Pearson 2. Introduction to Data Structures in C, ISBN:9788131713921,Kamthane,Pearson 3. Data Structures and Program Design in C , ISBN:9788177584233,Kruse,Pearson\ 4. Data Structures Using C, ISBN:9788131702291,Tenenbaum,Pearson 5. Data structures and Algorithm Analysis in C, 2e, ISBN:9788177583588,Weiss,Pearson 6. Fundamentals of data structures – Ellis Horowitz and Sartaj Sahani (Galgotia) 7. Data Structures and Algorithms, ISBN: 9788177588262, Aho, Pearson 8. Data Structure and Algorithm, Maria S. Rukadikar, ISBN:9789350235553, Shroff M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page22 of 35

CA- 202: Theoretical Computer Science 1) Preliminaries [2-3 Lectures] - Symbol, Alphabet, String, Prefix& & Suffix of Strings, Sets, Operations on sets, Finite & infinite sets, Russell’s Paradox, Cator’s Diagonal Argument, Formal Language - Relation, Equivalence Relation,(reflexive, transitive and symmetric closures) - Principle of Induction 2) Regular Languages [14-16 Lectures] - Regular Expression: Definition, Examples, & Identities - Finite Automata: Concept - DFA: Definition & examples - - NFA: Definition, examples, Language accepted By FA, NFA with ∈- moves - Regular Expression to FA: Method and Problems - NFA with ∈- moves to NFA, - NFA to DFA: Method Problems - Minimization of DFA: Problem using Table Method - FA with output: Moore & Mealy Machines: - Definition and their equivalence - Application of FA: Pumping Lemma & Examples - Closure Properties: Union, Intersection, - Concatenation, Complement, & Kleene Closure 3) Context Free Languages [15-17 Lectures] - Chomsky Hierarchy - CFG : Definition & examples - Ambiguous Grammar : Concept & Examples - Simplification of CFG : Removing Useless - Symbols, removing unit productions and removing Nullable symbols : Methods & Problems - Normal Forms : CNF & GNF : Method & Problems - Regular Grammar : Definition ,Equivalence of FA & Regular Grammar - PDA : Basic Concept , Definition (DPDA & NPDA) - Construction of PDA using empty stack and final - State method : Examples using stack method - Equivalence between acceptance by final state - And Empty stack method & examples - Equivalence between PDA & CFG (in GNF): Method and examples 4) Properties of Context Free Languages [1-2 Lectures] - Pumping Lemma for CFL : methods & problems - Closure Properties of CFL’s(Union, - Concatenation, & Kleene Closure) : Method & Examples) 5) Turing Machine [9-11 Lectures] - Recursive & recursively enumerable language - Introduction to LBA (Basic Model) & CSG. - Definition Of TM, - Design of TM for language recognition M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page23 of 35

-

Types of Turing Machine (Multitape TM, NonDeterministic TM,Universal TM, Restricted TM) Undecidable Problem, Halting Problem of TM Simple Arithmetic Problems on Unary Numbers using TM

References: 1. Introduction to Automata Theory , Languages ,And Computation (2nd Edition Pearson education) By –John E. Hopcroft , Rajeev Motwani, Jeffrey D. Ullman 2. An Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata, Peter Linz, Jones & Barlett Student Edition, ISBN: 9789380853284 3. Fundamentals of Theory of Computation, Principals and Practice, Greenlaw, Hoover, Elsevier, ISBN:9781558604742 4. Introduction to Computer Theory By - Daniel I.A. Cohen (John Wiley & Sons (ASIA) Pre Ltd. 2nd Edition) 5. An Introduction to the Theory of Computer Science Languages & Machine (3rd Edition Pearson education) By Thomas A. Sudkamp 6. Introduction to Languages and the theory of Computation By – John C.Martin (Tata McGraw –Hill Edition, 2nd Edition) 7. Theory of Computer Science (Automata Languages And Computation By – K.L.P.Mishra & N. Chandrasekaran (Prentice –Hall India 2nd Edition ) 8.

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page24 of 35

CA-203 Object Oriented Programming (C++) Prerequisites To study object oriented programming concepts and programming it is important to students must have knowledge of C programming language. The object oriented features include the base of programming language. C++ is the extension of C language. It will be beneficial with the background of C language. Mathematical foundation is an additional advantage.

General Description This course provides an introduction to object oriented programming concepts using the C++ programming language. The course assumes knowledge in C Language. The course emphasis is on the object orientated facilities of C++ and how they can be used to create structured, modular and re-usable code. C++ is an extension of C language which is widely used all over. It is powerful programming language that combines power, elegance and flexibility of C and the features of object oriented programming. With its object oriented capabilities like data abstraction, inheritance, operator overloading, polymorphism, stream handling. It supports software engineering benefits over C language.

Objectives To understand the fundamental Object Oriented Concepts. To solve simple and moderately complex problems using C++. To understand the implementation of various data structures and algorithms. To Understand and modify Open Source software written in C and C++. After completing this course, student will be able to identify the benefits of using C++ and objectoriented programming techniques for application development.

1. Introduction to C++ Starting with C++ How C++ evolved from C? Features of C++ Procedure-oriented programming OOP vs. procedure-oriented programming The basic anatomy of a C++ program Starting with a simple “Hello World” program Compiling, linking and running a C++ program

2-4 lectures

2. Object-Oriented Programming Concepts Abstraction Inheritance Polymorphism

3-4 lectures

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page25 of 35

Data Binding Encapsulation Classes and Objects 3. Introduction to C++ programming Data Types, new operators and keywords, Type casting in C++, reference variables, arrays etc. Classes and Objects Classes and Access Specifiers Defining data members and member functions Array of objects Usage of namespace Managing Console I/O Usage of Manipulators Static Members Call by reference, return by reference Inline Function Friend Function Function overloading

10-11 lectures

4. Constructer & Destructor Introduction Types of constructor Destructor

2-4 lectures

5. Operator Overloading Overloading unary and binary operators Usage of this pointer Overloading using friend functions Overloading “<<” and “>>” operator Type Conversion

8 -9 lectures

6. Inheritance Introduction Types of Inheritance Base class and derived class examples Virtual base class Abstract class Polymorphism Virtual functions and pure virtual functions Overriding

6-8 lectures

7. Files Classes for file stream operations1 Opening and closing a file M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

6-8 lectures

Page26 of 35

Detecting end of file File pointers and their manipulations File updation with random access 8. Templates Defining templates Function templates Derivations and templates Examples of templates

2-4 lectures

9. Exception Handling Introduction Exception handling mechanism

1-2 lectures

Reference Books : [1] Object Oriented Programming (C++) – Balaguruswamy [2] The C++ Programming Language - Bjarne Stroustrup [3] Thinking in C++ - Bruce Eckel [4] C++ Programming Today – Barbara Johnstron [5] Problem Solving with C++ - Walter Savitch [6] Object Oriented Programming with C++, Mahesh Bhave, Sunil Patekar Pearson Publication

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page27 of 35

CA-204: Computer Networks Total no. of lectures- 50 Title

Ch no

1

Introduction to Computer Networks

Total Lectures

Reference Books

5-6

Data Communication

Forouzan Ch.1

characteristics of data communication, components, data representation, data flow. Computer Networks Distributed processing, Physical structure-Point to Point, Broadcast, Categories of topology (mesh,star,ring,bus,etc.) Categories of network LAN,WAN,MAN,INTERNET etc. Protocols and Standards Definition of protocol, key elements , Defacto & Dejure standard, Standards organizations. Network Software

2

Protocol Hierarchies layers, protocols, peers, interfaces, network architecture, protocol stack design issues of the layers – addressing, error control, flow control, multiplexing and demultiplexing, routing Connection-oriented and connectionless service Service Primitives – listen, connect, receive, send, disconnect The relationships of services to protocol Network Models OSI Reference model Functionality of each layer TCP/IP model

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Tanenbaum Ch. 1

3-4 Forouzan Ch.2

Page28 of 35

3

Introduction to IP,TCP & UDP TCP/IP Protocol Suite Addressing Physical, Logical & Port addresses The Physical Layer

7-8 Forouzan Ch.3,

The Basic Concepts of analog & digital signals Bit rate, bit length, base band transmission Transmission Impairments – attenuation, distortion and noise Data Rate Limits – Nyquist’s bit rate formula for noiseless channel and Shannon’s law Problems on above concepts Performance of the Network Bandwidth, Throughput, Latency(Delay), Bandwidth –Delay Product, Jitter Problems on above concepts Line Coding digital to digital conversion Characteristics, Line Coding Schemes Unipolar, NRZ, RZ, Manchester and Differential Manchester Transmission Modes Parallel Transmission Serial Transmission – Asynchronous and Synchronous Multiplexing FDM, TDM, WDM. Switching Circuit Switching, Message Switching and Packet Switching 4

5

Forouzan Ch.3

Forouzan Ch.4

Forouzan Ch.4

Forouzan Ch.6 Tenenbum ch 2

The Data Link Layer Framing Character Count, Byte Stuffing, Bit Stuffing and Physical Layer Coding Violations Error Control Hamming Code and CRC Elementary data link protocols Simplex stop & wait protocol, Simplex protocol for noisy channel. Sliding Window Protocols 1-bit sliding window protocols, Pipelining – Go-Back N and Selective Repeat

3-5

The Medium Access Sub layer Random Access Protocols ALOHA – pure and slotted

3-5

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Tanenbaum ch 3

Forouzan Ch.12 Page29 of 35

6

7

CSMA – 1-persistent, p-persistent and nonpersistent CSMA/CD, CSMA/CA Controlled Access Reservation, Polling and Token Passing Channelization FDMA, TDMA and CDMA 2-4 Wired & wireless Lans Ethernet Standard Frame Format, Access Method and Physical Layer Changes In The Standard – Bridged Ethernet, Switched Ethernet, Full Duplex Ethernet Fast Ethernet – Goals and MAC Sub layer Specifications Gigabit Ethernet – goals, MAC Sub layer Specifications Wireless Lan Architecture – BSS & ESS 9-11 The Network layer Design Issues Store-and-forward packet switching, Services Provided to the Transport Layer, Implementation of Connectionless Service, Implementation of Connection Oriented Service, Comparison of Virtual Circuit and Datagram Logical Addressing IPV4 Addresses – Address Space, Notations, Classful Addressing, Classless Addressing, Network Address Translation(NAT) IPV6 Addresses – Addressing Structure, Address Space IPV4 Protocol Datagram Format, Fragmentation, Checksum, Options IPV6 Protocol Advantages, Packet Format, Extension Headers Transition From IPV4 to IPV6 Dual Stack, Tunneling, Header Translation Routing Concepts Properties of routing algorithm, Comparison of Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Routing Algorithms Congestion Control

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Forouzan Ch.13

Forouzan Ch.14

Tanenbaum ch 5

Forouzan Ch 19

Forouzan Ch 20

Tanenbum ch 5

Page30 of 35

8

9

General Principles of Congestion Control, Congestion Prevention Policies The Transport layer Process-to-Process Delivery Client Server Paradigm, Multiplexing and De-multiplexing, Connectionless Vs Connection-Oriented Service, Reliable Vs Unreliable User Datagram Protocol UDP Datagram Format, Checksum, UDP operations, Use of UDP Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) TCP Services, TCP Features, TCP Segment, TCP Connection, Flow Control, Error Control TCP Congestion Control Slow Start Mechanism Introduction to SCTP The Application layer Domain Name System (DNS) Name Space, Domain Name Space, Distribution of Name Space, DNS in the Internet, Name – Address Resolution TELNET Timesharing Environment, Logging, NVT, Embedding, Options, Mode of Operations E-MAIL Architecture, User Agent, Message Transfer Agent-SMTP, Message Access Agent-POP, IMAP, Web Based Mail File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Communication over control connection, Communication over Data Connection, Anonymous FTP WWW Architecture, WEB Documents HTTP

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

5-6 Forouzon ch 23

Forouzon ch 24

Forouzon ch 23

5-7 Forouzon ch 25

Forouzon ch 26

Forouzon ch 26

Forouzon ch 26

Forouzon ch 27

Forouzon ch 27 Page31 of 35

HTTP Transaction, Persistent and Non-persistent Connection, Proxy Server

Reference Books: 1. Computer Networks, Tanenbaum, ISBN:788177581652, Pearson 2. Data Communication and Networking by Behrouz Forouzan, TATA McGraw Hill.Fourth edition 3. Computer Networking and the Internet,Halsall / Kulkarni, ISBN:9788177584752, Pearson 4. Data Communications and Networks: An Engineering Approach, Irvine, Wiley India, ISBN:9788126507658 5. Elements of Network Protocol Design, Gouda, ISBN:9788126516476, Wiley India 6. Computer Networks-A Systems Approach, 5e , Peterson, ISBN :9789380501932, Elsevier

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page32 of 35

CA-205: Advance Database Concepts Chapter No. 1

2

3

Topics

No. of Lect.

Ref. Books

Object-Oriented Databases 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Object-Oriented data model Characteristics of Object-Oriented databases Comparison of an OOMD and ER model 1.3 Concepts of OODB Objects Object Identity Object Attributes Classes Relationship or Association among objects Structure, Inheritance and Generalization Operation Polymorphism Advantages of OO Concept 1.4 Object-oriented DBMS(OODBMS) Features of OODBMSs Advantages of OODBMSs Disadvantages of OODBMSs 1.5 Object Data Management Group(OMDG) and Object-oriented languages Object Model Object Definition Languages(ODL) Object Query Languages(OQL) Object-Relational Database 2.1 Introduction 2.2 History of Object-relational DBMS(ORDBMS) Weekness of RDBMS Complex Objects Emergence of ORDBMS 2.3 ORDBMS Design Challenges of ORDBMS Features of ORDBMS Comparison of ORDBMS and OODBMS Advantages of ORDBMS Disadvantages of ORDBMS Database Security 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Goals of database security Threats to database security Types of database security issues Authorisation and authentication

7-9

Book 1, 2

3-5

Book 1

6-8

Book 1

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page33 of 35

5

3.3 Discretionary Access control Granting/Revoking privileges Audit Trails 3.4 Mandatory access control 3.5 Firewalls 3.6 Statistical database Security 3.7 Data Encryption Simple substitution method Polyalphabetic substitution method Parallel Database Systems 1.1Introduction 1.2Parallel Databases Advantages , Disadvantages 1.3Architecture of parallel Databases Shared-memory Multiple CPU Parallel Database Architecture Shared-disk Multiple CPU Parallel Database Architecture Shared-nothing Multiple CPU Parallel Database Architecture 1.4 Key Elements of Parallel Database Processing Speed – up Scale- up Synchronization Locking 1.5 Query Parallelism I/o Parallelism (Data Partitioning) Intra-query Parallelism Inter –Query Parallelism Intra Operation Parallelism Inter Operation Parallelism Distributed Database Systems 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Distributed Databases Difference between Parallel and distributed databases Desired properties of Distributed Databases Types of Distributed Databases Desired function of Distributed Databases Advantages & Disadvantages of Distributed Databases 2.3 Distributed Database System Design Data Fragmentation , Data Replication, Data Allocation 2.4 Concurrency control in Distributed database M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

6-8

Book 1, 2

8-10

Book 1, 2

Page34 of 35

6

Distributed Locking, Distributed Deadlock, Timestamping 2.5 Recovery control in Distributed database 2- Phase Commit Protocol Multimedia Databases Multimedia Sources Multidatabase Queries Multidabase Applications Mobile Databases Architecture Characteristics of mobile computing Mobile DBMS Commercial MD Spatial Databases Spatial Data Spatial Database Characteristics Spatial Data Model Spatial Database Queries Introduction to Big-data and its applications

6-8

Book 1, 2

Reference Books :1) Database Systems: Concepts, Design and Applications, Singh, ISBN:9788131760925, Pearson 2) Database Systems Concepts, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth, S. Sudarshan, ISBN: 9780071244763, TMH 3) Database Management Systems, Raghu Ramakrishnan, Johannes Gehrke, ISBN: 9780072465631, TMH 4) Advanced Database Management system, Chakrabarti, ISBN: 9788177228021, Wiley India

M.C.A. (Science) for Affiliated Colleges

Page35 of 35

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Syllabus for MCA (Under Science Faculty ) in - Pune University

Syllabus for M.C.A. (Under Science Faculty ) in affiliated colleges to University of Pune (To be implemented from Academic year 2013-2014) Credit Base...

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