Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong - KPMG

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong CEO and Consumer Perspectives

In association with

gs1hk.org kpmg.com/cn

Table of contents

P. 4 P. 6 P. 20

Executive Summary

Hong Kong consumers set to buy into online shopping

Are Hong Kong’s CEOs ready and able to meet their e-commerce demands?

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Case Studies

Page

Neil Galloway, Dairy Farm International Holdings

14

Luke Grana, GRANA

15

Roger Staeheli, Nespresso

16

CK Pak, Convenience Retail Asia

17

Kent Wong, Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group

18

Samuel Lau, Kerry Logistics

19

Dr Guy Look, Sa Sa International Holdings

30

Steve Suh, Floship

31

Joseph Phi, LF Logistics

32

Malina Ngai, A.S. Watson Group

33

Jessie Ting, Hong Kong Post

34

Simon Wong Ka Wo, Kampery Group

35

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

About the surveys: KPMG China and GS1 Hong Kong commissioned YouGov to conduct two surveys. The first was a survey of 500 consumers in Hong Kong and 500 consumers in mainland China to understand their current and future shopping attitudes and habits, and to pinpoint, from their perspective, the challenges and opportunities in Hong Kong and China for e-commerce and omnichannel business. The second was a survey of 225 CEOs in Hong Kong to understand their views on the challenges and opportunities in Hong Kong around the adoption of e-commerce and omnichannel business models. The surveys were conducted during the third quarter of 2016.

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Executive Summary Compared to their counterparts across the border, to date, shoppers in Hong Kong have been less keen to go online to buy what they want. Given the city’s high-population density, its large number of easily accessible outlets and malls, and its fast, reliable transport infrastructure, it’s hardly surprising that going to the shops is seen as a convenient option. But while Hong Kong consumers’ love affair with the mall and physical stores doesn’t look set to end, it could increasingly be tempered by their equally strong affection for mobile and other technology. Almost half of Hong Kong consumers now say they plan to make more purchases in the next two years via their mobile phones than they have previously. With storage and distribution costs relatively high in Hong Kong and, until recently, a ready supply of tourists eager to visit their shops, local retailers haven’t been under great pressure to diversify their sales channels.

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However, in the last couple of years there has been a significant fall in demand, from both local and nonlocal shoppers. Combined with rising costs and increased competition, this has resulted in over two-fifths of Hong Kong CEOs reporting a decline in business in the last year, with some sectors, such as fashion, particularly hard hit. When eyeing opportunities in the field of e-commerce, among the biggest doubts CEOs harbour are whether they can find staff with the right skill sets and whether they can successfully integrate offline and online operations without cannibalising existing channels. But pushed by the economic downturn, and pulled by the awareness that, in an age of digital disruption, if they don’t meet the online demands of new and existing customers someone else will, more CEOs seem to see the development of e-commerce and omnichannel capacities as essential to the survival of their business.

While the top three growth strategies CEOs plan to use in the coming 12 months are still the tried-and-tested favourites – develop new business opportunities, launch new products and cut costs – the development of their e-commerce capability now rates just behind these. Only one fifth of companies expect to earn nothing from e-commerce in the coming year and one tenth expect 30 percent or more of their revenue to come from online sales. When it came to pinpointing a digital strategy that would play a key role in their business, the most popular choice, selected by a quarter of the CEOs questioned, was the use of popular social media and messaging platforms for consumer engagement. But, in what is possibly a blindspot for many Hong Kong bosses implementing an omnichannel strategy, surprisingly few of them – around one tenth – saw these social media and messaging platforms as sales channels.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

5

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Hong Kong consumers set to buy into online shopping Despite being so digitally well-connected, it seems that Hong Kong consumers have embraced the possibilities of e-commerce less enthusiastically than their counterparts in mainland China. There are some differences in terms of geography and, in some places, infrastructure development. But do the trends, and the intentions of Hong Kong’s shoppers, point to a narrowing of this gap and an accelerating engagement with e-commerce in the SAR?

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

The consumer purchasing landscape Let’s first look back at the overall shopping habits of consumers in Hong Kong during the past 12 months, and forward to their intentions for the next two years. Their current and anticipated relative spending patterns look to be broadly similar, with variations in a few shopping categories. Considerably more consumers in Hong Kong than mainland China spent money on travel last year – 63 percent compared to 35 percent. Furthermore, travel was the only category in which more consumers in Hong Kong said they intended to spend more in the coming two years than in the previous 12 months. Compared to last year, significantly fewer consumers in Hong Kong plan to buy fashion and lifestyle items in the next two years and the numbers shopping for premium products also looks set to drop. Whereas, in almost every category, the number of mainland Chinese shoppers planning to spend is on the rise.

What was in last year’s shopping basket? 61

Fashion

71 66 68

Lifestyle 30

Sporting goods

41 54

Food & beverage 40

Entertainment

63 48

Home appliances Premium products

53

35

Travel

14

68

61

25 46

Beauty & wellness 39

Books mainland China

49

46

Hong Kong

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

What’s on your shopping list for the next two years? 64 65

Fashion

62 61

Lifestyle 33

Sporting goods

37 53

Food & beverage 42

Entertainment

53

41

Travel

71 52

Home appliances Premium products

64

17

56

21 46 45

Beauty & wellness 41 39

Books mainland China

Hong Kong

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016 Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

7

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Which channels are consumers currently using Currently online shopping, via e-commerce platforms and mobile apps, is considerably more popular in mainland China than in Hong Kong.

With its small geographical area, large number of shopping malls, and well-developed transport infrastructure, shopping in physical stores in Hong Kong is not only a convenient option, it may also negate any possible advantages of convenience connected with online shopping.

Again, the travel category stands out, with consumers in Hong Kong equally willing to make travel purchases from e-commerce platforms, mobile apps or physical stores.

Where did you shop last year? Online e-commerce platforms Fashion

21

Sporting goods Food & beverage

20

Travel

Premium products Beauty & wellness Books

mainland China

57 41

14

28 16

13 22

7

Sporting goods

7

Food & beverage

8

Entertainment

50

Travel

56

11

Lifestyle

50

Premium products

6

49

Beauty & wellness

7

49

Books

mainland China

26

Fashion

25

Lifestyle

30

Sporting goods

29

Food & beverage

25 8

Hong Kong

Physical stores

19

Home appliances

25

10

Fashion

51

24

Entertainment

Home appliances

59

30

Lifestyle

Mobile apps

10

45 39

28 22

Entertainment Travel Home appliances Premium products

50 54 46

28

75 81

50

21 27 43 52

Beauty & wellness

47

26

Books

45

mainland China

80

60

26

Hong Kong

74

75 77 77 77

Hong Kong

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

8

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Pointers to an omnichannel future In every category, though sometimes from a low base, Hong Kong shoppers indicate their intention to increasingly use online retail websites and mobile apps over the next two years. More consumers in the city are already making their travel purchases through online retailers and mobile apps combined, than via physical stores, and this trend will only intensify.

Hong Kong consumers have indicated that in future they plan to use e-commerce more across all categories, with strongest growth in sporting goods, beauty and wellness, home appliances and lifestyle. However, it doesn’t seem like the city’s consumers are planning to abandon their trips to malls. The percentage of Hong Kongers who say they are intending to buy from physical stores over this period looks to be holding fairly steady across nearly every category.

Research work undertaken by KPMG Boxwood, the KPMG consultancy team specialising in the delivery of business transformation, envisages the penetration of e-commerce levelling out at 25 percent around the globe, ensuring the continuing importance of brick-and-mortar stores in some form. However, together these results underline the growing importance to retailers of adopting an omnichannel approach. When there is a growing appetite among consumers for e-commerce, retailers who rely only on physical stores risk missing out on opportunities.

Where did Hong Kong consumers shop for these categories last year and where will they buy in the next 2 years? Online e-commerce platforms Fashion Lifestyle Sporting goods Food & beverage Entertainment

Mobile apps

31 25

Fashion

14 11

Fashion

Lifestyle

14 7

Lifestyle

Sporting goods

13 7

Sporting goods

Food & beverage

13 8

Food & beverage

26 18 20

34

25 18 32 27

27 19

Entertainment

43 42

Travel

Physical stores

32 25

Travel

75 74 79 80 72 75 78 81 53 50

Entertainment Travel

36 27

Home appliances

27 17

Home appliances

Premium products

24 18

Premium products

8 6

Premium products

72 77

Beauty & wellness

30 20

Beauty & wellness

11 7

Beauty & wellness

78 77

Books

74 77

Books

Next 2 years

26 21

Past 12 months

Books

Next 2 years

8

13

15 10

Past 12 months

79 75

Home appliances

Next 2 years

Past 12 months

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

9

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Hong Kong consumers warm to online engagement Hong Kong retailers who haven’t yet developed a sophisticated online customer engagement and e-commerce strategy probably need to take note of the ways in which local consumers plan to use digital technology in the future. Sixty-one percent of them say, in the next two years, they intend to make more online purchases and use the internet to research brands and products, while 31 percent say they will be looking for greater interaction with brands through the use of social media and messaging platforms. Despite the high level of penetration of mobile technology in Hong Kong, overall purchases through mobile channels have lagged behind those made via online retail websites. However, it seems that figure is set to grow, with 45 percent of local consumers saying they intend to buy more via their mobile phone in the next two years.

10

What technology do you plan to use when researching and buying in the next two years? More online purchase and research for brands / products via the internet

61

More purchases via my mobile phone

45

More customised product and information More interaction with brand through the use of social media / messaging platforms More personal usage of cloud services

33

31

28

Hong Kong

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Ordering online and collecting themselves In the next two years, almost a third of surveyed consumers in Hong Kong are still planning on shopping in stores and carrying home their purchases, while 22 percent intend to order online for home delivery. However, up to a quarter of Hong Kong shoppers say, in the same period, they will ‘click and collect’ – i.e. order online and pick up their purchases in the store, or order online and pick up their goods at a fulfilment point, such as a convenience store. These types of services are being offered by a growing number of retailers globally and, if this model is widely adopted in Hong Kong in the future, the ‘click and collect’ option may be attractive to e-commerce retailers with no brick-and-mortar operation. Given the accessibility of shops in Hong Kong, many time-poor consumers may assume it’s more efficient to collect the products they’ve bought rather than wait in for a delivery. They may also want to ensure they get, first time, what they ordered, and have the opportunity to save on delivery charges.

How will you shop in the coming two years? 32

Shop and pick up in-store

10

22

Order online and deliver to home

44

13

Order online and pick up in store

16

13 10

Click and collect

Online search, check out item quality and outfit in-store, purchase in-store or on-line whichever has best offering

12 13

8

Shop in-store and deliver to home

Hong Kong

8

mainland China

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

In mainland China, with the distance to stores often greater, twice as many consumers intend to order online for home delivery.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

11

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Trust and consistency issues around online shopping

The possibility of disappointment when the delivery is opened was the issue that troubled those surveyed, more than any other. Forty-seven percent of consumers in Hong Kong, and 56 percent in mainland China, said potential discrepancies in sizing and colour bothered them. A lack of international standards in the sizing of some items of apparel may be the cause of some of this sentiment, and, particularly on the mainland, inaccurate or inconsistent product information.

The challenges consumers see in shopping online are similar on both sides of the border. Nevertheless, online shoppers in Hong Kong are more concerned than their counterparts in mainland China about complicated or unsatisfactory return and refund policies, and they also worry more about the security of online payments. This may reflect the fact that Hong Kong e-commerce is at an earlier stage of development and shoppers here are not as experienced when it comes to buying online.

GS1 is working with industry participants to address this issue. Anna Lin, the CEO explains – “Inconsistent or incorrect product information makes finding and buying products online difficult for consumers. It confuses and frustrates consumers,

and even erodes their trust in the products, brands and virtual stores, who ultimately lose a sale. The GS1 standards of global unique product identification (GTIN) allow products to be accurately identified, listed by standard categories, described by trusted information, and accessed by any device and channel. With the GTIN, retailers and brands can move product smoothly and quickly throughout the supply chain via more interoperable, efficient data handling processes. GTIN is now a must-have for major online marketplaces like Alibaba, Amazon, eBay, Google, and leading retailers like Walmart.”

Challenges of Shopping Online 47

Potential discrepancy of size and colour Online payment security

33

Insufficient product information

29

Inconsistent search results for information about products

20

Unstable product stock

13

Technical problems

13

34

31

20 19

Too many product sources

27

19

9 9

Too much information from brand through social media

Hong Kong

32

29

Bad / unresponsive customer service

43

35

30

Late delivery / no suitable delivery option

Lack of interaction with brand through social media

45

31

Complicated / lack of return and refund policy

56

7

12

mainland China

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

The appeal of cheap and convenient e-commerce Key attractions of e-commerce for Hong Kong consumers are: it’s potential cost savings, convenience, and the access offered to overseas brands and stores.

delivery fees waived. Another draw for the cost conscious are the special discounts that may be offered online. The second most cited reason for buying online by Hong Kongers, is the ability to shop anytime and anywhere. This correlates with the above mentioned growth expectation in the mobile-commerce market.

The most popular feature is the possibility of having shipping and

Attractions of Shopping Online Waiver of shipping / delivery fee Convenience / ability to shop anytime and anywhere

47

50

36 36

Special discounts offered online Ability to purchase from brands / shops overseas

36

20

Online payments are more secure and convenient

30

Simpler return / refund process

21

Better after-sales service / customer support

21

Availability of product tracking information

19 20

Delivery time estimate is more accurate

38

29 25

14 13

Limited or special edition products are available online

9

Overnight shipping / delivery is available Hong Kong

50

37

13 12

18

mainland China

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

How much more convenient can Hong Kong get? Neil Galloway, Dairy Farm International Holdings “As local consumers evolve, we need to be responsive to their changing requirements and continue to explore opportunities for reimagining our sales outlets,” he says.

Neil Galloway is Group Finance Director with Dairy Farm International Holdings. Dairy Farm operates some 6,500 stores across Asia, and employs over 180,000 people in its four divisions - Food, Health and Beauty, Home Furnishings and Restaurants. The company’s sales revenue in 2015 exceeded US$17 billion. Market conditions in Hong Kong Galloway senses a downturn in the less tangible, overall mood in Hong Kong, with a fall in tourist arrivals and a downturn in overall retail sales along with a lack of world class events hosted in the city, other than the annual Rugby Sevens. However, he also believes Hong Kongers are resilient and he still thinks Hong Kong’s entrepreneurial spirit allows it the ability to reinvent itself. “We can see some increasing activity in the start-up community getting more involved in the areas of Fintech, e-commerce and logistics, and we have the benefit of being next to the Pearl River Delta Economic Zone.” Challenges to be tackled Galloway identifies the imbalance between sales growth and cost inflation in Hong Kong as a significant challenge, and says property costs are a major challenge for all retailers. He suggests consumers in Hong Kong are very well informed on a real time basis, more empowered than before, and are very responsive to promotional activity. While looking for value for money, they are also looking for product innovation and increasingly concerned about quality and food safety.

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He adds, Dairy Farm is always looking at innovation around its product ranges and the consumer experience within its stores. Another growing challenge is the recruitment of the next generation of young, talented people for all local retailers. Millennials have different expectations from employers and the workplace than previous generations and businesses have to adapt to remain attractive. Growth of e-commerce in Hong Kong Galloway notes how the new and the traditional coexist in the Hong Kong retail landscape: while mobile phone penetration is ‘very high’ here, so is wet market penetration. “There’s so much retail convenience in Hong Kong already,” he says “Perhaps this is a reason why e-commerce has taken off more slowly than in other developed markets.” Galloway says that when it comes to e-commerce it is important for Dairy Farm to find the right balance between meeting consumer needs and ensuring a path to profitability. He points to grocery retailers in the UK and other markets which are believed to be losing money on every home delivery, as a warning on this count. That said, Dairy Farm is still accelerating its investments in e-commerce. “Sometimes there is a time lag on developments but we recognise consumers are increasingly looking for an e-commerce channel, particularly mobile – we are definitely aware we are living in a mobile world.” “But we must remember that consumers want the ability to shop how, what, when and where they want,

so we need to rise to that challenge,” Galloway points out. “However, while there is a lot of excitement around e-commerce, our view is that physical stores will still be here for a long time to come, and so we have to continue to execute well in this area. The experiences online and in-store are very different.” Sifting the useful data from the noise Galloway says a big question for the retail industry is how it can develop a more tailored, personalised shopping experience for its customers? “We need to focus on understanding how consumers engage with our businesses and brands,” he explains. “As retailers, we must engage with the consumer and deliver on their expectations — so CRM and loyalty will be increasingly important.” In the future, he says, Dairy Farm needs to make better use of the volume of data it has, to build up a more complete picture of its customers in order to serve them better — this will be critical to the company’s future success. “But the challenge is to filter the useful data from the noise. You can get lost in the information.” He believes the development of better data visualisation tools could be a growth area. One thing is clear — today’s technology allows retailers to build a highly personalised, informed, one- to-one relationship with their customers, which has raised the bar significantly on service expectations. It offers a great opportunity to build stronger brand relationships but flawless execution will be even more critical for success.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Online retailing with a personal twist Luke Grana, GRANA grana.com. Crucially, he also managed to reach an agreement for DHL Express to be their global shipping partner – an important step in securing two-day international shipping on all online sales.

Luke Grana is the CEO and Founder of innovative online fashion retailer, GRANA. He, along with Pieter Paul Wittgen (COO and Co-Founder), launched the company in October 2014, and have overseen its growth from a small startup to an international brand that ships to twelve countries. GRANA’s core aim is to manufacture and sell highquality clothing at affordable prices, by cutting costs encountered by traditional marketing and distribution chains. Personal Journey Entrepreneurship has always been in Luke Grana’s blood. In the years before he set up GRANA, he was the owner of a small chain of coffee shops in his native Sydney, but a trip to Peru, where he encountered the premium qualities of Peruvian pima cotton, changed the direction of his career. Why, he wondered, were products made of this fabric so expensive? He decided to devise an online sales strategy, which aims to cut out the distribution and retail middlemen that drive up the cost of most luxury fashion items. It was from this idea, that GRANA was born. Having no fashion experience, Luke spent some time working in high street fashion chains, as well as researching possible locations for his startup. Hong Kong turned out to be the ideal choice, given its business-friendly environment, global connectivity, reputation as a logistics and shipping hub, and its taxfree port status, so he moved there in October 2013, with his life savings of US $200,000. He quickly joined forces with Wittgen, and with his help, and with advice from InvestHK, soon found more strategic investors to support the launch of

Modest launch and swift growth The brand had its beta launch in April 2014 – where they debuted a crew neck t-shirt made of Peruvian pima cotton. With mostly word-of-mouth and a minimal digital marketing push, the duo sold out of their inventory of 2,000 t-shirts in three weeks. Following this success, GRANA was fully launched in October 2014. In the two years since, they have grown from three people in a 500 sq/ft office, to having 50 employees and a 18,000 sq/ ft warehouse. Their month-on-month sales growth is running at 15%, and their stock has expanded to include a wide range of items from swimwear, minimalist garments, to clothes for smarter occasions. Fabric choices have similarly grown, and now also include: Chinese Silk and Silk Georgette Satin, Japanese Denim and Chambray, French Poplin, Irish Linen, Mongolian Cashmere, Italian Merino and Italian Sensitive. The public face of GRANA GRANA has built a ‘fun and cheeky’ social media presence to boost rapport with their customers and thus, brand loyalty. They boast over 23,000 ‘Likes’ on Facebook, as well as over 24,000 followers on Instagram, where they interact with their core market of millennials, in the 25-35 year-old age bracket, in a way that goes beyond just showcasing their fashion. GRANA has never used traditional marketing e.g. advertising campaigns, but has relied on social media, digital marketing and word-of-mouth recommendations to increase brand awareness to drive conversion. They have also created over twelve popups to date, in Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore and the USA, with one flagship showroom called ‘The Fitting

Room by GRANA’ located in Sheung Wan, Hong Kong. These Fitting Rooms have a twofold purpose: they introduce the brand to those who have not already encountered it online; and allow both new and existing customers to feel the fabrics and try on clothes to find the right fit. Although The Fitting Room and pop-ups carry no inventory, the buying experience is easy for those unaccustomed to online shopping, as staff are at hand to help customers order the goods online, on the spot. Returning customers comprise 50% of their sales. Luke attributes this to quality, pricing, swift delivery and attention to customer service – e.g. a personalised handwritten thank you card is included with each delivery and live chat is available on the website

Looking at the future

Initially, GRANA experienced most sales in Hong Kong where it is still strategically headquartered. However, its highest growth market is now in the USA. The company is planning to open their next pop-up showroom experience in NYC, in an effort to increase their US customer base. The startup recently attracted Alibaba’s Entrepreneur Fund as a new investor, and with their support, plan to enter the mainland China market in 2017. GRANA plans to launch a Chinese language website next year. “We’re really excited to have lead investment support from Alibaba and looking forward to working closely with their team to enter the mainland market,” says Luke Grana. “China consumers have already matured when it comes to online shopping adoption and we see a lot of potential for the medium-tolong-term there.”

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Building relationships over coffee Roger Staeheli, Nespresso

Nespresso was founded in Switzerland 30 years ago and has had a presence in Hong Kong since 1997. Initially, the company sold only to businesses, before expanding sales of machines and roasted and ground coffee capsules to the home consumer as well. Nespresso’s first boutique in Hong Kong opened in the ifc mall in 2006. Roger Staeheli has been the Country Manager of Nespresso Hong Kong and Macau for the past two and a half years. He says while retail is more important for Nespresso in Hong Kong than it is in other countries, e-commerce is the company’s fastest growing sales channel here. Nespresso’s omnichannel evolution Though Nespresso, with its global network of 450 outlets, is part of the Nestlé Group, Staeheli says it operates independently because of its unique business model. “We have a direct-toconsumer business model – coffee is sold through our own channels.” The company has four B2C channels: retail, e-commerce, coffee machine trade points, and its Customer Relationship Centre – a form of call centre. The B2B division sells to hotels restaurants, cafes and offices. Nespresso’s sales channel evolution has been in the opposite direction to that of many retailers of similar longstanding. After initially selling through its Customer Relationship Centre, Nespresso launched its e-commerce channel in 1998, before opening its first boutique in Paris in 2000. This progression, though, was born out of necessity rather than choice, Staeheli explains. “Thirty years ago,

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coffee that was sold at retailers was instant coffee. So we decided to retail our own products ourselves. We first established the call centre – the Customer Relationship Centre – and then evolved into different channels.” Staeheli says the aim today is to offer a consistent experience to the customer, whether it’s offline or online. “It’s about consistency in the product, price and promotion.” Integrated channels and customer relationships The company is very clear on the role of each of its channels, he says. “Retail is very much about delivering the brand experience. E-commerce is about Nespresso ‘anytime, anywhere’. Trade is focussed on machine sales and is a channel through which we can recruit new members. The Customer Relationship Centre used to be a transactional channel, and today it’s about building relationships.” Staeheli says if there was such a thing as an ‘ideal’ customer relationship development process, it would see the customer initially recruited through Nespresso’s boutique or trade channel then transformed into an e-commerce customer. Subsequently, these customers would be regularly invited back into the boutique to try new coffee innovations and allow Nespresso to engage directly with them. Staeheli says that because, in most cases, customers join the Nespresso Club to buy coffee , the company is able to gain a good understanding of the consumer, and therefore tailor its marketing campaigns and offer personalised experiences.

Offline vs. online in Hong Kong Despite Nespresso’s online channel showing the fastest sales growth, Staeheli highlights two main challenges to the development of e-commerce in Hong Kong. The first is convenience. “You want to offer convenience with e-commerce but the retail landscape in Hong Kong is already very convenient. Most households are within five to ten minutes travel time to a mall. So we offer same-day delivery for online purchases made within a particular time frame of the day. The other challenge for Hong Kong is the high cost of distribution.” Prospects for Nespresso and for Hong Kong Staeheli points out that despite the downturn in Hong Kong, retail sales in general are still at historically high levels. But while he believes Hong Kong is a city of opportunity with the potential to adapt to new circumstances, it is also a city with some resistance to change. “And it may benefit some brands to get back to basics when it comes to focussing on customer experience and telling the story of the brand.” Staeheli says he remains optimistic about Nespresso’s prospects.The company has new strategies and launch plans in place as the popularity and demand for coffee continues to grow in Hong Kong and Macau.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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The convenience of ‘bricks and clicks’ CK Pak, Convenience Retail Asia

CK Pak is the COO of Convenience Retail Asia, a member of the Fung Group. Circle K operates over 400 convenience stores in Hong Kong, Macau, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Zhuhai. The first Circle K store was opened in 1985. Pak says major consumers among its target customers are the working class and students. Members of these groupings shop at convenience stores more than three times a week, on average. He says the businesses most affected by the decrease in the number of individual visitors from China in recent years, are jewellery, luxury and cosmetics shops. The retail businesses least affected have been fast food restaurants, supermarkets and convenience stores, which all provide daily necessities to local people. Apart from selling daily consumables, convenience stores also provide services like bill payment and the add-value service for Octopus cards. Serving these needs requires an adequate number of stores throughout Hong Kong. Due to the increasing number of vacant commercial properties, rental prices have dropped in recent years and Pak says Circle K has grasped this opportunity to open more shops. The “bricks and clicks” route to gradual growth Despite planning to open more shops, Pak says this has not stopped Circle K from developing its online retail business. FingerShopping.com was established in 2013 as a way of combining online to offline advantages in a “bricks and clicks”

concept, he explains. This shopping platform offers products online while also providing a safe payment channel through its brick-and-mortar retail network, along with delivery and aftersales services. This helps to reduce the risks from online shopping, he believes. Though FingerShopping.com has grown in an encouraging way in the three years of its existence, given Convenience Retail Asia’s total sales revenue of nearly HK$4 billion, the contribution from the online business is still insignificant, Pak adds. While he advises companies not to dream of online platforms generating instant profits, he also warns that companies which do not adopt an e-commerce strategy, will regret it in 10 years’ time. Online platform targeting young consumers “Although shopping in Hong Kong is very convenient in terms of the number of shops and locations, consumers have different characteristics across different age ranges,” Pak notes. “The younger segment tends to enjoy the online world more. This has obviously changed their shopping habits, too.” He says Circle K’s vision for its online shopping business grew from a desire to meet their changing needs, and convenience stores in Japan and Korea which established their online platforms long ago, were an inspiration for this development. FingerShopping.com does not offer mainstream products, Pak explains, and what he categorises as fast-growing, high-potential health and skincare products, make up about 80 percent of the platform’s total product value.

Initially, also, it was female customers who were the biggest spenders on FingerShopping.com. In the first six months of this year, the platform sold more than 21,000 units of stock from about 1,500 brands, Pak says, and the total value of the merchandise sold has doubled from the same period last year, as have the number of members. Online shopping, offline delivery Pak points out that on FingerShopping.com, even when customers choose products from different online shops, they can still combine all their delivery needs and choose door-to-door service or selfpickup from the convenience stores. This drives the development of O2O business. As customers can choose COD (cash on delivery) and pay the bill at the convenience store, they can skip the online payment process and enjoy peace of mind and hassle-free shopping. “Nowadays, retailers should no longer use their old experience to run their business,” Pak says. In particular, he adds, Hong Kong needs to keep pace with the new trend towards the digitalisation of the entire logistics and payment systems, along with marketing services, and not lag behind other countries and, especially, mainland cities. Industry and government need to keep abreast of the e-commerce trend and help companies to survive, he believes.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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A glittering future for e-commerce? Kent Wong, Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group

Kent Wong is the Managing Director of Hong Kong-listed company Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group. The group was founded in mainland China in 1929 and the first Hong Kong Chow Tai Fook jewellery point-of-sale (POS) was set up in 1939. Currently, the group has more than 2,300 POS in over 500 cities, spanning Greater China, Singapore, Malaysia, Korea and the US. Wong said the group has its own Chow Tai Fook e-Shop and has opened Chow Tai Fook e-tail accounts on various online shopping platforms. The group also collaborates with social platforms to increase its exposure through promotions and publicity that enhance customer engagement. Patience with online growth According to the group’s results for the year ending March 2016, the number of unique daily visitors to the Chow Tai Fook e-Shop, along with those accessing its official accounts on online shopping platforms, exceeded 260,000. Its official accounts on social media platforms show that Chow Tai Fook has more than 2.3 million followers. Though the value of Chow Tai Fook’s retail sales from its e-commerce business in mainland China has grown by 51 percent in FY 2016, it contributed only a 2.3 percent share of the retail sales value of Chow Tai Fook’s Mainland China jewellery business. Wong, though, is optimistic about its prospects, and his target is to reach a 5 percent contribution gradually. Meeting the demands of younger consumers Wong said Chow Tai Fook’s target customers, whether in Mainland China

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or Hong Kong, are the millennials, i.e. the younger generation born in the 2000s.

synergies between online and offline businesses in the next three to five years.

“It is necessary to understand their habits and preferences. For example, young people tend to obtain product information via the Internet, and opinions are shared by word of mouth on social media,” he said.

“Smart+ represents different development ideas: ‘S’ stands for sustainability, which means continuous improvements in infrastructure and staff training; ‘M’ stands for men, which means caring for all stakeholders including customers, suppliers and staff; ‘Art’ represents craftsmanship and heredity; ‘+’ means added value through creative sales platforms and innovative customer services to enhance the brand image,” he explained.

“As a jeweller, Chow Tai Fook also needs to keep pace with changes, adjust our sales strategies, enhance personalised services and offer uniquely designed products to suit the customers.” Chow Tai Fook is developing a new mobile app which allows threedimensional pictures of products to be downloaded, so customers can choose their favourite design. This not only enhances service efficiency but also strengthens communication with customers. Alternatively, customers can send their own jewellery designs to Chow Tai Fook for professional mounting. Online and offline synergies For the online purchases of customers in tier one cities in mainland China, Chow Tai Fook employs specialists to provide a direct delivery service. Wong said, this helps to convey a sense of respect to customers who have ordered valuable products. Wong reiterated the importance of customer care during the entire process from packaging to after-sales service. In fact, these new developments are part of Chow Tai Fook’s mid-term strategy called ‘Smart+’ initiatives. This strategy aims to leverage on the internet and technology to achieve

The group will continue to use this scheme to provide personalised shopping experiences, and collaborate with business partners to develop more effective marketing and promotional activities. Smart+ initiatives also make use of smart devices. The group has adopted new technologies, such as RFIDembedded smart trays, to help understand customer preferences and optimise business strategies in areas such as product life cycles and transaction cycles. “Whether in e-commerce or physical shops, trust is always the most important core value in the jewellery business,” Wong said. In light of this, the group considers social media platforms as important complementary partners with whom Chow Tai Fook can collaborate and share ideas in promoting e-commerce.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Online route to future growth Samuel Lau, Kerry Logistics

Samuel Lau is the Executive Director of Kerry Logistics (Hong Kong). Kerry Logistics have large and comprehensive distribution and logistics hubs in the Greater China and ASEAN regions, as well as a powerful logistics services network that reaches across Asia, is one of the main industry players. Lau believes the global economic slowdown, along with sluggish demand, has led to stagnant growth in the logistics and trading sectors. These factors, coupled with the strong US dollar, have had an adverse impact on worldwide markets, and he doesn’t foresee these markets stabilising until 2018. Reasons for hope on China growth Lau thinks opportunities abound under the Belt and Road Initiative. Though many foreign companies have set up their logistics facilities in China in the past decade, he does not consider the Chinese logistics market to be saturated. He also stresses that China remains one of the company’s significant contributors of revenue. Lau expects e-commerce business to remain an important part of Kerry Logistics’ strategic plans as the global e-commerce market grows steadily. Capturing the “last mile delivery” opportunities Foreseeing stable growth in the global e-commerce market, Lau says Kerry Logistics will strengthen its express capabilities to provide cost-effective ‘last mile delivery’ services to an expanding client base.

“Kerry Logistics has acquired some express companies in Hong Kong and Asia in the past four to five years. Over the last two years, we have started to integrate them into our brand Kerry Express, according to their systems and their geographical presence, to meet our e-commerce development.” In addition, he says, the company plans to strengthen its regional express services in Asia in order to capture the growing e-commerce markets in the ASEAN region and expand its express network to Indonesia. He explains Kerry Logistics will strive to offer a range of customised logistics solutions for different partners. “The demand for ‘last mile delivery’ from our logistics partners is obviously a business opportunity”. Keen competition within the region Kerry Express provides ‘last mile delivery’ services in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Cambodia. Cross-border and local delivery for small parcels is available for B2B/B2C businesses. In Bangkok, Lau explains, Kerry Express has set up an automated sorting centre with numerous distribution stations on the streets, cooperated with a local railway company, and hired motorcyclists and a courier team to offer person-to-person (P2P) parcel delivery services.

Don’t focus on short-term P/L Lau believes companies’ operational strategies will change with the growth of omnichannel business. He advises companies to engage with e-commerce without initially focussing on making money from it. “The supply chain model adopted in the early stages might be expensive and affect the operational cost,” he says. “Companies should try to understand procedures such as payment, recalls and customer journey.” Lau sees traditional retailers seeking e-commerce opportunities even though these may contribute only a small share of overall revenue at first. Unifying supply chain visibility and standards Lau says kerrierVISION, Kerry Logistics’ proprietary supply chain visibility platform, is designed to provide end-to-end visibility to customers along supply chains. He believes a global standard must be in place to achieve interoperability and it must be more widely publicised to make sure it is extensively used.

This local service is very popular and business uptake is strong as the operating cost is relatively lower.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Are Hong Kong’s CEOs ready and able to meet their e-commerce demands? In the face of more testing market conditions, are Hong Kong companies contemplating embracing e-commerce, and an omnichannel approach, more enthusiastically?

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Current conditions With companies, particularly retailers, in Hong Kong having enjoyed several years of rapid growth they are now facing some global, and regional, economic headwinds. Despite this, well over half of the CEOs surveyed, all of whom head up companies with Hong Kong operations, reported they had seen either business growth or stability in the previous twelve months. When looked at through the prism of the role their businesses play in the supply chain, the relative performance of traditional retailers and e-commerce companies can be compared. More retailers fared worse in this period than grew or remained stable, while e-commerce companies performed better. This appears to tie in with the consumers shifting interest to engage with more e-commerce channels.

Impact of economic slowdown on Hong Kong business Up by more than 10% Up by 1% - 10% Stayed roughly the same Down by 1% - 10% Down by more than 10% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

In terms of industry sectors, it’s clear companies involved with the production and sale of apparel and accessories have had a testing year, with 60 percent of those questioned reporting a drop in business.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Falling demand in the past 12 months A drop in demand, both from Hong Kong consumers and tourists, combined with rising costs and levels of competition, were the main reasons cited by the CEOs whose businesses had suffered a decline in business. But changing consumer purchasing behaviour and disruption from e-commerce models, were also blamed by over 30 and 20 percent for the downturn, respectively. Perhaps unsurprisingly, retailers identified a decline in tourists and the decline in sentiment in Hong Kong as the top two problems affecting their business, both of which are difficult for CEOs to fix. More than other parts of the Hong Kong economy, the fashion and consumer electronics sectors were in particular hit by changing consumer purchasing behaviour and disruption from e-commerce models.

If business declined, what did the CEOs of these companies identify as the key drivers? Declining consumer sentiment in Hong Kong

Increased costs

Increased competition

Decline in tourists

Changing consumer purchase behaviours Disruption from e-commerce models

Market share loss 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Routes to continued growth The CEOs who had seen an uptick in business, or at least no fall, cited three traditional drivers as reasons for their relative success: new product launches; cost efficiencies and; by far the most common of all, new business opportunities.

If business remained stable or increased, what will the CEOs of these companies identify as the key drivers? New business opportunities

New product launches

However, e-commerce was the fourth most quoted reason. Cost efficiencies

E-commerce

Government incentives

Others

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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A mix of optimists and pessimists In terms of the way in which they viewed their future prospects, the CEOs were fairly evenly split.

Again, CEOs of companies dealing in apparel and accessories were far more gloomy than those in other sectors, with just under 10 percent of them predicting growth.

Twenty-eight percent foresaw a drop in sales, 34 percent expected to sell more, and 37 percent predicted business would remain roughly the same.

How do you view your company’s prospects in the next 12 months?

Growth in sales by over 10%

Growth in sales by 1% -10%

Stay roughly the same

Decline in sales by 1% -10%

Decline in sales of over by 10%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Adding digital to the tool kit

new business opportunities, launching new products and cutting costs.

When considering ways to promote future growth, the CEOs seem to be looking first and foremost to the tried and tested strategies of exploring

Beyond these methods, though, significant numbers of the CEOs are looking to technology to give their

companies a boost. Over 30 percent said they are going to develop and apply innovative technologies to increase their competitive edge, and around a quarter said they planned to become more data-driven in order to generate real-time insights.

Hong Kong business growth strategies for the next 12 months Explore new business areas

Develop / launch new / improved products

Reduce cost structures Develop and apply innovative technologies to increase your competitive edge Become more data driven to generate more real time insights Develop more mobile first strategies, incorporating e-commerce, payments processing, games and other digital goods and services Develop more integrated O2O marketing and fulfilment strategies (online and offline channels) Geographic expansion of shops Develop a marketplace platform by directly connecting suppliers and manufacturers with the end buyer i.e. to build a supply chain Develop structural social media platforms for consumers to search for product opinions and feedback 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Looking to customercentric success The CEOs surveyed see the development of customer-centric policies and programmes as key to the future success of Hong Kong companies. Customer relationship management programmes that deepen customer loyalty, as well as improvements in the consumer journey and user experience, were each specified by over 50 percent of the respondents. The creation of a consistent brand experience – cited by around 45 percent of CEOs as a key development – is also likely to ensure a happier customer engagement. Interestingly, the establishment of a mobile platform and an m-commerce capability, is ranked next on the list. This fits well with what Hong Kong consumers are looking for in the coming two years and suggests a bright future for mobile technology in the world of Hong Kong commerce. Perhaps the important question is for those CEOs who aren’t planning to invest in m-commerce. Will they miss out on the opportunity? The KPMG Boxwood report ‘Disruptive Influences’1 challenges retailers to be relevant in one or more of three areas – namely, convenience, price and experience – or risk becoming irrelevant to customers. The development of a strong e-commerce / m-commerce platform is a key advantage to giving your customers convenience and experience.

Key Hong Kong commerce developments Deepening customer loyalty programmes Improving consumer journey and user experience Creating consistent brand experience across channels Establishing mobile platform and m-commerce Enhancing product delivery options and tactics Moving to online and e-commerce

Enhancing cyber security

Diversifying payment options 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Disruptors

Value

Convenience

Experience 1

Disruptive influences:The three key trends transforming the face of retail.

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Digital connections to customers The most important ways CEOs see digital technology being used in Hong Kong, is to better understand and engage with consumers, and also in the building of omnichannel business platforms. Engagement via social media and message platforms, understanding through the adoption of data analytics, and improvements in the customer experience with the development of an omnichannel model, were each identified by between a fifth and a quarter of CEOs as key digital innovations. The figures among traditional retailers and e-commerce companies were even higher.

Key digital innovations in Hong Kong Riding on the popular social media / messaging platform for consumer engagement

Adopting data analytics

Building omnichannel business platforms

Adopting Internet of Things, wires and sensors

Building up mobile commerce

Adopting cloud computing technologies 0%

10%

20%

30%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Missing the chance to sell via social media and messaging platforms? As shown in the above chart, CEOs in Hong Kong have a growing awareness of the importance of popular social media and messaging platforms for consumer engagement. However, it appears that few CEOs view these platforms as a sales channel in their omnichannel strategy. In China and other parts of the world, there has been a strong trend toward direct selling through social media. It works particularly well via smartphones, an integral part of the customers’ lives, and we believe that CEOs should rethink strategy if they leave this channel out.

Channels used in Hong Kong in omnichannel strategies Online – e-commerce platform Online – mobile website Mobile app Online – retail website Physical store WeChat Facebook Instagram Google Other social media apps Not applicable to my company 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Revenue from e-commerce A fifth of the businesses surveyed have no e-commerce operation, and this channel accounts for ten percent or less of the revenue earned by another two fifths of the companies. However, a smaller percentage of CEOs surveyed already have significant revenue streams from e-commerce. Based on consumer expectations, this percentage should grow in the coming few years.

Expected share of HK revenue from e-commerce None / No e-commerce

About 1% - 10% of total revenue

About 11% - 20% of total revenue

About 21% - 30% of total revenue

Over 30% of total revenue

0%

10% 20%

30% 40%

50%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016 28

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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Hesitating over a switch to an omnichannel business model Though the prospect of a profitable digital future may be alluring for businesses in Hong Kong, the CEOs surveyed see challenges in the switch to an omnichannel model

The obstacle they most frequently identified is the difficulty in finding and hiring staff with the necessary skills, and the integration of offline and online operations is seen as problematic by a similar number.

can businesses afford to wait? If customers’ online demands, aren’t fulfilled by your company someone else may well step in and take those customers away.

Many CEOs hesitate, with worries about online business cannibalising existing channels. However in the current age of digital disruption,

Challenges to omnichannel business in Hong Kong Lack of talent or skills Bridging the physical and e-commerce world Measuring the return on investment (ROI) Establishing processes for linking social media to products Communication between different digital platforms Managing inventory well Promoting product information Last mile delivery Unsure about which technologies will deliver the greatest return Return logistics and refund settlement Technical problems Inconsistent search results for data about products Insufficient government support 0%

5%

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50%

Source: Survey analysis, Hong Kong e-commerce, 2016

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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An online business makeover Dr Guy Look, Sa Sa International Holdings

Dr Guy Look is CFO and Executive Director of Sa Sa International Holdings, the Asia-based chain of cosmetics stores. Sa Sa International has set up over 280 retail stores and consignment counters across five major areas within Asia, offering more than 700 different retail brands and employing a workforce of around 5000. Sasa.com’s sales revenue exceeded HK$400 million this year, up by 6.2 per cent from last year and contributed about 5 per cent of the company’s total revenue. While retailers in other countries see their e-commerce revenue accounting for 10 to 20 per cent of sales, Look and his company are targeting double-digit sales mix for Sa Sa’s online sales, he explains. Offering a new shopping experience for consumers To meet current commercial challenges Hong Kong is expected to face, Look says Sa Sa has improved its retail management and is starting to adopt an O2O business mode. This is intended to improve customers’ shopping experience while also capturing the opportunities of crossborder e-commerce. The company has launched new O2O shops in Shenzhen and Shanghai and by end of the year, will also have launched a new mainland version of its website, as well as a mobile site to increase its web traffic and conversion rate. “Consumers’ shopping experience, no matter if it is online or offline, is the most important driver in increasing retail consumption,” Look says. “However, with the prevalence of online shopping and the diversification of information through social media, the purpose of

30

developing e-commerce is not just to offset rental and wage costs.” He explains that as tastes and lifestyles change, especially among China’s younger generation, consumers are not necessarily purchasing luxury goods, but are looking for life experience, quality service and a combined O2O experiences. The impact of ecommerce on bricksand-mortar shops According to Look, Sa Sa plans to invest more resources in e-commerce, and start to integrate its online and offline businesses. These changes are driven by changes in consumer behavior, competition from online shopping, high rental costs, difficulties when opening new shops in traditional retail districts, customer loyalty and products that have low demand or sales volumes. “Developing an online shopping business is unavoidable,” he explains. “And online and offline businesses are inseparable.” Online shops also create opportunities for interaction and, even with the same customer, you can make more sales, reduce costs and strengthen loyalty, he adds. To control costs, Sa Sa has relocated some of its shops to areas of Hong Kong where sales performances are stronger and rents are more reasonable. IT ecosystem lags behind e-commerce development needs “The entire IT ecosystem in Hong Kong is lagging behind and can’t catch up with the city’s e-commerce development needs,” Look says. “It is difficult to recruit experienced IT talent.”

Sa Sa needs to develop several parts of its digital infrastructure, he says, including its ERP system and its warehouse management and VIP systems. In addition, it needs to hire IT talent with user interface/user experience (UI/UX) expertise, integrate its online and offline customer base, and deploy a multi-platform order management system for backend support. Such backend systems will give customers more shopping options, and a better shopping experience, and in return increase online traffic. Besides allocating more resources to IT training, the company also needs to enhance its frontline beauty consultants’ sales techniques so that, in this O2O era, they can be more responsive to customers with a range of online shopping experience. A long-term vision Look suggests the industry should have a long-term IT vision for investing in technology and talent through collaboration with universities and conducting R&D training to bridge the IT talent gap. He would also like to see the government be more supportive through measures such as more free trade agreements to facilitate cross border e-commerce and supporting the development of better logistics capabilities and capacity for e-commerce.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Delivering on digital technology’s possibilities Steve Suh, Floship Founded in 2015, Floship is an e-commerce logistics company that provides fulfilment services for online retailers. “These services consist of basic warehousing and storage, pick-pack and shipping,” explains Steve Suh, director and co-founder of Floship. “But where we’re a little different is, we’re focussed on e-commerce. In essence we are a technology company.” Contrary to many reports, and based on what he sees on the ground, Suh believes Hong Kong has an extremely active e-commerce market – but consumers are buying from mainland e-commerce companies rather than local ones. He also thinks many of the big existing logistics companies are working within an outdated model. What’s now possible for fulfilment companies Suh says Floship has developed its own proprietary system with features and value-added benefits that he thinks a traditional fulfilment company wouldn’t be able to provide. “A primary feature is around shipping,” he says. “Our clients can choose from ten different couriers and we offer ‘smart shipping’ – an optimisation that allows different couriers to be used for different parcels based on size and dimension.” This optimisation, he adds, can be done in real time. As well as enabling consumers to track orders online, Suh says Floship also uses embedded packaging technology so the most cost-efficient packaging will be selected automatically.

New versus old models Suh thinks many logistics companies have entrenched infrastructure and supply chains and may not have thought through whether they can just scrap that entire model and go with a more streamlined one that would allow them to ship worldwide direct from Hong Kong. He believes many companies are afraid to do that sort of cost analysis because of what it might imply in terms of consoldidating to one or a few hubs, rather than many. “When demand is very high and you have a high value product, the express shipping costs may be negligible,” Suh points out. He cites the example of smartphones. With the streamlined model, he suggests, companies wouldn’t need to worry about maintaining stock levels in different countries and then selling all that inventory through. And cross-border trade is being made an even more attractive proposition. Suh cites one example: “This year the US per-parcel duty exemption threshold has been raised from US$200 to US$800, which would cover pretty much any product you would want to sell online.” Why the logistics industry should be more bullish Suh sees many of the traditional big logistic companies trying to make Hong Kong the gateway for cargo going in and out of China by facilitating the shipping of containers. He considers this a mistake. “They could be shipping hundreds or thousands of containers but the revenue associated with this is limited. What we’re saying is, let’s go into the

container and bust open everything in there. Instead of one container we think of it as, say, 5,000 orders inside that container. We then say, ‘Why don’t we ship 5,000 individual parcels directly from Hong Kong to the end users in the US, around the EU, in the APAC region, or wherever’.” He says the revenue generated with this approach is many hundreds of times greater than that generated by just handing over the container to the logistics and delivery companies in the destination markets. Floship’s business is focussed on handling this much more lucrative end-to-end business. Hong Kong’s e-commerce market When considering the current robustness of the Hong Kong e-commerce market, Suh points to the findings of the internet traffic monitoring companies, which show that some of the highest ranked websites in Hong Kong are mainland and international e-commerce platforms. “This means Hong Kongers are using these websites a lot,” he says. “It’s just when people ask if there’s a lot of e-commerce activity in Hong Kong, they look at local players and their market share, and conclude there’s not a lot happening here. But they’re not actually checking to see how many shipments are coming in every day from China to Hong Kong.”

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

E-commerce drives logistics partnerships Joseph Phi, LF Logistics Joseph Phi is the President of LF Logistics, and is responsible for managing the logistics, freight, data analytics, and supply chain businesses of the Li & Fung Group. He is the Chairman of GS1 Hong Kong, an industry-led organization promoting global standards and best practices, and is the Director of GS1 Global Management Board. Mr. Phi currently serves as an Adjunct Professor in HK University of Science and Technology. Perfect storm in logistics Phi highlights low ocean freight rates, a sluggish world economy and strong US dollar as key factors influencing the logistics industry – a ‘perfect storm’, in his opinion. This therefore is one of the most difficult periods faced by many companies in this industry. However, on a positive note, amidst challenges there are also opportunities. Over the last couple of years, LF logistics has proactively adopted a number of strategies to increase its market share through service extension and new market entry, as well as improve its productivity through process innovation and automation. Phi cites its Singapore’s ‘World Gateway’ hub as an example of how LF Logistics has deployed new technologies to gain market share. E-commerce explosion When asked whether many companies are able to capitalize on the recent explosion in e-commerce, he indicated that depends on how they steer their own ships in the wake of the digital revolution. “The booming e-commerce

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development is both a blessing and a curse; it is only a blessing for companies that are quick to pivot. E-commerce is markedly different from the traditional brick-and-mortar business. Order size is smaller. Order frequency is higher. Service requirement is much higher.” Phi explained that LF Logistics pivoted early, as the firm spotted an opportunity in providing e-logistics service. It noted the ongoing struggle by most retailers and brand owners on how to integrate their separately managed traditional and e-commerce businesses, and foresaw the imminent need of online-offline convergence. This paved the way for the amalgamation of its fully developed competency in piece-picking with a market leading algorithm that optimizes the order fulfilment process for both online and offline businesses of its customers. Through innovation, LF Logistics has sustained its strong business growth momentum that has bucked the market trend, Phi adds.

together a bespoke service that brings out the best in every partner,” he said. The role of Hong Kong Phi added that Hong Kong should take concrete steps to reassert its leadership position as Asia’s premier supply chain hub. He called for collaboration among public and private sectors to develop logistics friendly policies that facilitate regional and global trade. In the near term, with the staggering e-commerce growth in Asia, it is crucial for Hong Kong to establish linkages with the various free trade zones in the region (especially China) to bolster cross-border e-commerce.

Partnership is key In addition, the pace of e-commerce development has prompted a rethink of the firm’s business model. To ensure a quick response, it has collaborated with property developers, transporters, last-mile delivery providers and other partners to leverage the use of their assets. “E-commerce is basically about building a partnership ecosystem to create a seamless buying experience for the final consumers. Over the years, we have successfully stitched

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Omnichannel prescription for success Malina Ngai, A.S. Watson Group Malina Ngai is COO of A.S. Watson Group, the international health and beauty retailer and member of multinational conglomerate CK Hutchison Holdings Limited. With a history dating back to 1841, in the past 175 years A.S. Watson has transformed into one of the largest international health and beauty retailers in Asia and Europe with 13,000 stores in 25 markets across Asia and Europe. Current commercial challenges Ngai says consumer sentiment continues to be stagnant across most Asian and European markets which A.S. Watson operates in, and this softness in demand makes it difficult for top-line growth to catch up with cost inflation. Also online and offline competition is increasingly intense at a time when the expectations of consumers are changing rapidly. “A recovery in mainland tourist numbers and in their spending is unlikely, and the number of nonmainland visitors is also slightly down,” Ngai says, addressing the Hong Kong market, specifically. She adds that it is very important, in order to generate interest amongst A.S. Watson’s core customers in the local market, the business continues to introduce a wide variety of new products and digital experiences. The e-commerce and omnichannel business model “Digital used to be a nice-to-have for many retailers but now it is necessary for survival,” she says. Ngai explains that ‘digital’ has been embedded in A.S. Watson’s overall business strategy since 2012, and in

that time it has helped increase the value of its customers’ spending, and boost their loyalty, as well as aid in the acquisition of new customers. “For any business to be successful today, one has to be customer centric, that is, make an effort to understand what adds value to the customer’s life, and how and when they need that value added,” she says. So, she goes on to explain, if customers want to browse the company’s products while travelling to work in the morning, they should be provided with the necessary touchpoint. If they want to find A.S. Watson on social media and hear what other customers have to say about the company or its products, they should be able to. If they want to order products online at midnight and pick them up at a store near their workplace, that service should be provided. “And if they prefer to walk in a store near home or a destination mall to browse and check out new products, we need to provide stores that are conveniently located and have a comfortable ambience.” Why the growth of e-commerce is relatively slow in Hong Kong Ngai says A.S. Watson’s online sales in markets such as the UK, Mainland China and Taiwan are relatively higher than those in Hong Kong. She believes the short distances consumers in Hong Kong have to travel to stores has slowed the growth of e-commerce in the city. She also notes that a high percentage of online sales in Hong Kong are generated from cross- border shopping from the mainland and countries like Korea, Japan and the US.

“Combined with the fact that Hong Kong people are frequent travellers to shopping destinations overseas, e-commerce growth in the next few years may continue to be concentrated on specific product and service categories only,” she adds. Online shopping behaviour across demographics Ngai says that for the generation Z customers – those aged 20 or younger – online shopping is a high-growth segment. “They are more digitally savvy, less inclined to save money, have a greater interest in exploring new products and experiences, and value the recommendations of their online friends.” Ngai adds that such behaviour is consistent across countries and regions. Through developing a greater understanding of this customer segment, and adjusting their business model to attract members of it, companies can seize these new opportunities for growth. Growth strategies for the next two years Ngai says A.S. Watson will adopt the same growth strategy in Hong Kong as it does globally. “Continuous store network expansion is fundamental for brick-and-mortar retail,” she explains. “Just as importantly, we will focus our investment in technology.”

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Putting a premium on trust Jessie Ting, Hong Kong Post

Hongkong Post was established over 170 years ago, and for most of that time the services it has offered the public have been focussed on the mass delivery of letters, collaterals and parcels, the selling of stamps and the like.

Services for SMEs Over ninety-eight per cent of the companies in Hong Kong are SMEs, and such businesses need to send out a huge volume of samples, documents and goods to their local and overseas partners.

However, in today’s rapidly changing digital world and growth of e-Commerce, Hongkong Post has evolved by developing new functions to serve individuals, communities and the commercial sector.

Ting explains that Hongkong Post will continue to meet the needs of SMEs by launching new postal solutions and products. These include a variety of delivery services, an online posting platform and an online sales platform, as well as other services to support online marketing.

Jessie Ting was appointed Postmaster General of Hongkong Post in October 2011. E-commerce drives demand for delivery services “In recent years, traditional mail has increasingly been replaced by electronic mail,” Ting notes. “Not many people still write letters and send Christmas cards. With an increasingly competitive and open market, we have broadened the scope of our delivery services.” She says the postal and courier market in Hong Kong is becoming increasingly competitive as new market players take advantage of the very low market entry threshold. With e-commerce, in particular, driving the higher demand for delivery services, Ting says Hongkong Post has refined its business objectives to respond to economic and technological developments.

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As the government department responsible for postal services, she says Hongkong Post is a trusted intermediary, and its ShopThruPost online shopping platform enables online customers to identify authentic products and receive their purchases through a reliable postal network. “With the ‘HK Trusted Product’ label, consumers can easily identify reliable brands and merchants, and purchase their products directly.” This label also serves to promote “authentic” brands in the local market, she adds.

“To enhance their competitiveness and allow them to achieve maximum efficiency, we need to provide them with affordable postal services.” she says. Globally networked with some 200 members of the Universal Postal Union, Hongkong Post can offer allround mail tracking services to many countries across the world. In addition, the Hong Kong Trade Development Council’s ‘Small Order Zone’ online sales platform has also adopted Hongkong Post’s Speedpost as its delivery solution. E-commerce and trust “The Internet is an anonymous world,” Ting suggests. “In an environment without physical stores, it may be difficult to authenticate online transactions.’

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Food for thought for traditional retailers Simon Wong Ka Wo, Kampery Group

Simon Wong Ka Wo, Chairman of Kampery Group, founded his company in 1993. The company adopts a one-stop approach for its import, manufacturing, wholesale and retail businesses. It exports products such as coffee, tea, wine, coffee machines, milk products, and healthy and organic snacks, and also operates several local brands. The Group has over 2500 sales points and 200 consignment counters located in mainland China and Hong Kong, as well as internationally. Wong is also the President of the Hong Kong Federation of Restaurants and Chairman of the Hong Kong Brand Development Council. Technology reduces costs Wong thinks Hong Kong’s traditional food and beverage sectors are facing challenges from the rising cost of rents, salaries and raw materials, manpower shortages and the impact of internet technology on the entire business model. With the mindset and behaviour of consumers constantly changing, he believes businesses will be eliminated if they don’t adopt advanced technologies. “As many SMEs have excellent heritage brands, they need to pave the way for their ‘transformation and upgrade’,” he says. “New technology brings in new business models and most importantly, it reduces operational costs, increases user-friendliness and efficiency. It will be more difficult for companies to survive if they limit themselves only to street stores.” Survival through online shopping Wong says the greatest obstacle to the survival of SMEs and restaurants is the

lack of funding that would allow them to establish their own online platforms. He suggests even small or old street stores, could make use of the largescale main-land online retailers’ networks and platforms, to promote their unique, traditional and authentic products, even those that are handmade, online. This could help increase their exposure and widen their profit channels. Food Suppliers’ Platform For the last few years, Kampery Group has invested in the development of its own e-commerce platform and online retail businesses, Wong explains. Customers can shop online for its branded products via a 3D simulated supermarket. To keep pace with technological innovation, the company is looking to upgrade this into a virtual reality supermarket, he adds. Wong plans to build a new food platform for organic and health food suppliers from local and overseas markets. Whether these suppliers are Kampery’s business partners or not, they will be able to connect with other suppliers and do business with them. Although the platform is not yet available, he says nearly 1,000 suppliers are ready to register. He believes the platform not only enhances mutual business development, but also reduces manpower costs and shortens delivery times, so that fresh organic food can be delivered to hotels and restaurants, in a way that is not only efficient but also allows the tracing of food origins to ensure food safety.

Rebalancing offline and online investment Wong says the cost to his company of opening five stores per year would be about HK$3 million. However, if Kampery only opens one store, the remaining budget of HK$2.5 million can be used to improve the existing software and further develop its online retail and wholesale businesses. Taking Green Dot Dot, Kampery’s organic and health food export, wholesale and retail business as an example, Wong says the brand has already acquired 200,000 members and he expects this number to increase steadily. To develop the online side of this business, he has set objectives to increase, in phases, the number of members to 700,000 - in, other words, about 10 percent of Hong Kong’s population. Seeking new online innovations On a recent business exchange visit to the mainland, Wong says he was intrigued by new mobile apps he saw that are targeted at the food service sector. With the opportunities they offer to reduce costs, he believes some of these could transform industry business models. One was an ‘order pick-up’ app that consumers can use to place orders with restaurants or food stores that can be picked up at designated times. Another was a ‘network delivery’ app, through which a network of restaurants can use designated teams in different districts to handle food orders and deliveries.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

About KPMG KPMG China operates in 16 cities across China, with around 10,000 partners and staff in Beijing, Beijing Zhongguancun, Chengdu, Chongqing, Foshan, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shenzhen, Tianjin, Xiamen, Hong Kong SAR and Macau SAR. With a single management structure across all these offices, KPMG China can deploy experienced professionals efficiently, wherever our client is located. KPMG is a global network of professional services firms providing Audit, Tax and Advisory services. We operate in 155 countries and regions, and have 174,000 people working in member firms around the world. The independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Each KPMG firm is a legally distinct and separate entity and describes itself as such. In 1992, KPMG became the first international accounting network to be granted a joint venture licence in mainland China. KPMG China was also the first among the Big Four in mainland China to convert from a joint venture to a special general partnership, as of 1 August 2012. Additionally, the Hong Kong office can trace its origins to 1945. This early commitment to the China market, together with an unwavering focus on quality, has been the foundation for accumulated industry experience, and is reflected in the Chinese member firm’s appointment by some of China’s most prestigious companies.

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

About GS1 Hong Kong Founded by the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce in 1989, GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards organisation that develops and drives adoption of easy-to-implement global standards for business to uniquely identify, accurately capture and automatically share vital information about products, locations and assets. Headquartered in Brussels, Belgium, GS1 has over 110 national chapters in 150 countries. GS1 Hong Kong’s mission is to enable Hong Kong enterprises to improve the efficiency, safety, and visibility of supply chains across multiple sectors and facilitate commerce connectivity through the provision of global standards and a full spectrum of standards-based solutions and services. GS1 Hong Kong engages with communities of trading partners, industry organisations, government, and technology providers to understand and respond to their business needs through the adoption and implementation of global standards. Currently, GS1 Hong Kong has over 7,000 corporate members covering close to 20 industries including retail consumer goods, food and food services, healthcare, apparel, logistics as well as information and technology. GS1 Hong Kong continually enhances and rolls out new services and solutions to help our corporate members to embrace new realities, new challenges, and new opportunities. For more information about GS1 Hong Kong, please visit www.gs1hk.org. GS1 Hong Kong 22/F., OTB Building, 160 Gloucester Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong Tel : +2861 2819 Fax : +2861 2423

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

About YouGov YouGov is an independent, publicly listed global consumer insight company. We are one of the most recognised and quoted names in research across the UK, Europe and North America – and we are expanding quickly throughout Asia Pacific. We help businesses grow by providing a real-time picture of consumer perception and behaviour, enabling our clients to make rapid, informed decisions. YouGov provide a range of timely and cost-effective consumer market research tools. Our signature products include BrandIndex – the daily brand perception tracker; Profiles – our segmentation and media planning platform; and Omnibus – the fastest and most cost effective way to obtain trusted consumer opinion from a representative consumer sample. Visit our website for more details: http://hk.yougov.com/

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Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Contact KPMG Jessie Qian Partner-in-charge, Consumer Markets KPMG China +86 21 2212 2580 [email protected] Anson Bailey Partner-in-charge, Consumer Markets Hong Kong +852 2978 8969 [email protected] Karmen Yeung Partner, China Tax KPMG China +852 2143 8753 [email protected] Daniel Hui Principal, China Tax KPMG China +852 2685 7815 [email protected] Irene Chu Partner Head of Technology, Media & Telecommunications Hong Kong +852 2978 8151 [email protected] Henry Shek National Head of Cyber Security Services, Advisory KPMG China +852 2143 8799 [email protected] Simon Lee Partner, Audit KPMG China +852 2826 8061 [email protected]

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Egidio Zarrella Clients and Innovation Partner KPMG China +852 2847 5197 [email protected]

Willy Kruh Global Chair, Consumer Markets +1 416 777 8710 [email protected]

Maggie Lee Head of Capital Markets Development Hong Kong +852 2826 8063 [email protected]

Mark Larson Global Head of Retail +1 312 665 2126 [email protected]

Fergal Power Partner, Advisory KPMG China +852 2140 2844 [email protected] Christoph Zinke Partner, Strategy KPMG China +852 2140 2808 [email protected]

Dan Coonan Global Executive, Consumer Markets +44 20 7694 1781 [email protected] Elaine Pratt Global Marketing, Consumer Markets +1 416 777 8195 [email protected]

Torsten Duwenhorst Head of Data & Analytics KPMG China +852 2140 2231 [email protected] Belle Morton Director, Customer Advisory KPMG China +852 2847 5078 [email protected] Patrick Kirby Director, Advisory KPMG China +852 2913 2568 [email protected]

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

Contact GS1 Anna Lin GS1 Hong Kong Chief Executive +852 2863 9700 [email protected] Stephen Lam GS1 Hong Kong Chief Operation Officer +852 2863 9765 [email protected] Joe Ho GS1 Hong Kong Head of Customer Development +852 2863 9778 [email protected]

Corinna Fung GS1 Hong Kong Senior Manager, Corporate Communications +852 2863 9787 [email protected] Dick Ng GS1 Hong Kong Manager, Industry Engagement Logistics & e-Commerce +852 2863 9779 [email protected]

Contact YouGov Patrick Corr Co-CEO Asia Pacific Hong Kong +852 9026 4049 [email protected] Colin Marson Co-CEO Asia Pacific Singapore +65 9383 3819 [email protected] Piotr JJ Szymanski Regional Director, Asia Pacific Client Service Hong Kong +852 9383 7918 [email protected]

Louise Vacher Consulting Director of Consumer & Retail United Kingdom +44 (0) 20 7012 6156 [email protected] Stephen Harmston Head of YouGov Reports United Kingdom +44 (0) 207 012 6139 [email protected]

Acknowledgements Writer:

John Brennan

Contributors: Corinna Fung and Anson Bailey Designer:

Chan Pui Lam

Outlook for e-commerce in Hong Kong

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© 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL.

KPMG Mainland China Beijing

Beijing Zhongguancun

Chengdu

8th Floor, KPMG Tower, Oriental Plaza 1 East Chang An Avenue Beijing 100738, China Tel : +86 (10) 8508 5000 Fax : +86 (10) 8518 5111

Room 603, Flat B, China Electronic Plaza No.3 Danling Street Beijing 100080, China Tel : +86 (10) 5875 2555 Fax : +86 (10) 5875 2558

Chongqing

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Fuzhou

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Unit 1203A, 12th Floor Sino International Plaza,137 Wusi Road Fuzhou 350003, China Tel : +86 (591) 8833 1000 Fax : +86 (591) 8833 1188

Guangzhou

Hangzhou

Nanjing

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8th Floor, West Tower, Julong Building 9 Hangda Road Hangzhou 310007, China Tel : +86 (571) 2803 8000 Fax : +86 (571) 2803 8111

46th Floor, Zhujiang No.1 Plaza 1 Zhujiang Road Nanjing 210008, China Tel : +86 (25) 8691 2888 Fax : +86 (25) 8691 2828

Qingdao

Shanghai

Shenyang

50th Floor, Plaza 66 1266 Nanjing West Road Shanghai 200040, China Tel : +86 (21) 2212 2888 Fax : +86 (21) 6288 1889

19th Floor, Tower A, Fortune Plaza 61 Beizhan Road Shenyang 110013, China Tel : +86 (24) 3128 3888 Fax : +86 (24) 3128 3899

Shenzhen

Tianjin

Xiamen

9th Floor, China Resources Building 5001 Shennan East Road Shenzhen 518001, China Tel : +86 (755) 2547 1000 Fax : +86 (755) 8266 8930

Unit 06, 40th Floor, Office Tower Tianjin World Financial Center 2 Dagu North Road Tianjin 300020, China Tel : +86 (22) 2329 6238 Fax : +86 (22) 2329 6233

12th Floor, International Plaza 8 Lujiang Road Xiamen 361001, China Tel : +86 (592) 2150 888 Fax : +86 (592) 2150 999

4th Floor, Inter Royal Building 15 Donghai West Road Qingdao 266071, China Tel : +86 (532) 8907 1688 Fax : +86 (532) 8907 1689

17th Floor, Office Tower 1, IFS No. 1, Section 3 Hongxing Road Chengdu, 610021, China Tel : +86 (28) 8673 3888 Fax : +86 (28) 8673 3838

KPMG Hong Kong SAR and Macau SAR

GS1

Hong Kong

Macau

Hong Kong

8th Floor, Prince’s Building 10 Chater Road Central, Hong Kong 23rd Floor, Hysan Place 500 Hennessy Road Causeway Bay, Hong Kong Tel : +852 2522 6022 Fax : +852 2845 2588

24th Floor, B&C, Bank of China Building Avenida Doutor Mario Soares Macau Tel : +853 2878 1092 Fax : +853 2878 1096

kpmg.com/cn/socialmedia

22/F., OTB Building, 160 Gloucester Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong Tel : +2861 2819 Fax : +2861 2423

kpmg.com/app

gs1hk.org kpmg.com/cn The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavour to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act upon such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation. GS1 Hong Kong is the local chapter of GS1®, a not-for-profit, standards orgnaisation. GS1 is a regis-tered trademark of GS1 AISBL. © 2016 KPMG, a Hong Kong partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Printed in Hong Kong. Publication number: HK-CM16-0001 Publication date: November 2016

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