Mecklenburg County Park & Recreation Master Plan 2008

Loading...
Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation

10 YEAR MASTER PLAN

The Natural Place ToBe...

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Acknowledgments   

         

 



Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Table of Contents  Chapter One - Introduction ................................................................... 1  1.1 Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 2 

Chapter Two - Community Input Process ........................................ 19  2.1 Community Input Findings ............................................................................ 19  2.2 Community Survey Findings ........................................................................ 28  2.3 Demographics and Trends Analysis ........................................................... 39 

Chapter Three - General Park and Facilities Development Plan .. 46  3.1 Park Classifications and Facility Standards ............................................... 46  3.2 Facility Capacity Demand Standards Model .............................................. 53  3.3 Prioritized Facility Needs Assessment ....................................................... 63  3.4 General Park and Facilities Development Plan ........................................ 65 

Chapter Four - Greenways Master Plan Update ............................. 69  4.1 Introduction and History ................................................................................ 69  4.2 Need for Greenways and Trails ................................................................... 70  4.3 Benefits of the Greenways and Trails System .......................................... 71  4.4 Review of Peer Communities ....................................................................... 75  4.5 5-Year Action Plan ......................................................................................... 75  4.6 10 Year Action Plan ....................................................................................... 77  4.7 Management Policies and Recommendations .......................................... 77  4.8 Ranking Criteria .............................................................................................. 79 

Chapter Five - Nature Preserves Master Plan Update ................... 85  5.1 Introduction ..................................................................................................... 85  5.2 Need for Nature Preserves ........................................................................... 86  5.3 Benefits of the Nature Preserve System .................................................... 90  5.4 Management Goals ....................................................................................... 94  5.5 Management Policies .................................................................................... 94  5.6 Appropriate Use of Nature Preserves ......................................................... 95  5.7 Management Zones ....................................................................................... 96  5.8 Maintain Species of Concern ....................................................................... 97  5.9 Nature Preserve Designation of Land-Banked Properties ...................... 97  5.10 Acquisition of Nature Preserve Properties ............................................... 98  5.11 Recommendations for Future Nature Centers ........................................ 99  5.12 Capital Costs Associated with Recommendations ............................... 103 

Chapter Six - Greenprinting and Capital Improvement Plan ....... 104  6.1 Greenprinting Plan ....................................................................................... 104  6.2 Capital Improvement ................................................................................... 118  6.3 Capital Needs Assessment ........................................................................ 122  6.4 Funding and Revenue Strategies .............................................................. 123 

Chapter Seven - Recreation Program Development Plan ........... 129   

 

ii 

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................... 129  7.2 Program Needs Assessment ..................................................................... 129  7.3 Mecklenburg Situational Analysis .............................................................. 131  7.4 Gap Analysis ................................................................................................. 134  7.5 Cost of Service (1 Core Program – 1 Center) ......................................... 140  7.6 Facility Capacity Utilization ......................................................................... 146  7.7 Sports Tourism Strategy ............................................................................. 163 

Chapter Eight - Comprehensive Master Plan Development ........ 169  8.1 Vision ............................................................................................................. 169  8.2 Mission ........................................................................................................... 169  8.3 Conclusion .................................................................................................... 173   

Appendix Items (to view an Appendix, please click the title below) Appendix 1 – Household Survey Executive Summary  Appendix 2 – Greenway Master Plan  Appendix 3 – Nature Preserves Plan  Appendix 4 – Capital Improvement Plan  Appendix 5 – Capacity Demand Standards Model  Appendix 6 – Recreation Program Plan  Appendix 7 – Countywide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (CCORP)  Appendix 8 – Urban Growth Plan  Appendix 9 – Cultural Facilities Master Plan  Appendix 10 – Facility Standards Matrix   

 

iii 

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER ONE  ‐ INTRODUCTION  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  last  developed a Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan in  1989.  Many changes have occurred over the last 16 years in the  City  and  County  as  it  applies  to  the  demographic  growth  of  the  region,  the  enhanced  needs  for  open  space  and  protection  of  natural  resources,  and  the  need  for  quality  parks,  recreation  facilities and program services.  In an effort to meet these needs  and to remain ahead of development, with final build‐out of the  County  expected  to  occur  by  2025,  the  Department  chose  to  create a new Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan to  meet the needs of residents for the next 10 years.    The  Goals  and  Objectives  associated  with  the  Master  Plan  included the following:  •

Seeking  community  input  to  guide  the  Master  Plan  process and direction 



Coordinate  the  needs  and  input  from  the  City  of  Charlotte,  as  well  as  Towns  in  the  County  within  the  Master Plan to serve as one  park and recreation master plan for the entire County 



Analyze existing  master plan documents from other Towns in the County that have  relevance to the new County’s Master Plan 

The Comprehensive Master Plan components in this document include the following:  •

An updated Greenways Master Plan 



An updated Natural Preserves Master Plan 



A Greenprinting process developed by the Trust for Public Land for identifying open  space  lands  for  parks,  recreation  facilities,  greenways,  and  natural  areas  and  identifying service gaps for parks and recreation facilities in the County 



A Recreation Program Plan for establishing the needs of recreation program services  in the County 



Establishing a new Land and Facility Standards Matrix based on all public providers  assets that are available to the community 



A Capital Improvement Plan for existing owned assets for the next 10 years 



A Demand Analysis for sports fields in the County 



A Sports Tourism Plan for the County 

Each of these planning documents work together as one Master Plan in serving the County’s  needs for the next 10 years and will also act as stand‐alone documents for staff and other  service providers to use in daily work assignments.  All park and recreation service providers  1 

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

in  the  County  were  invited  to  participate  in  the  development  and  planning  of  this  Master  Plan document to ensure ownership to the document.    As  with  any  comprehensive  planning  process,  the  community  was  highly  involved  in  the  development  of  the  Master  Plan  through  stakeholder  and  focus  group  meetings.    Public  forums  were  held  across  the  County,  and  a  citizen  household  survey  was  conducted  that  helped to prioritize and identify the issues that needed to be addressed in the Master Plan  and to support the key recommendations to act on over the next 10 years.  From this community input process three key Master Plan Themes emerged for the Plan to  focus on and they are as follows:  •

“Conservation and Stewardship” 



“Parks and Greenways” 



“Recreation Programs and Facilities” 

Each theme was created to focus on key outcomes and strategies.  The first five years of the  plan is very specific in terms of meeting the needs of the community for acquiring land for  natural  areas  preservation  and  neighborhood  and  community  parks,  as  well  as  capital  improvements for existing and new recreation facilities and amenities.  The Master Plan is a living document with many moving components that must be achieved  simultaneously.  The Master Plan is outcome based with performance measures to hold the  County accountable to meet the needs of the community.  It will require the support of the  voters of the County to make the plan a reality.  A sense of urgency must be in place due to  the high levels of need that exist for acquiring available pieces of natural areas, as well as  acquiring  additional  park  lands  for  recreation  purposes,  greenways  and  trails,  and  the  development of parks and recreation facilities in underserved areas of the County.  1.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  developed  this  Master  Plan  process  to  lead  the  County and its Towns forward for the next ten years.  This Master Plan was developed based  on high levels of community input from stakeholders meetings, focus group meetings, public  forums  and  a  household  citizen  survey.    The  Master  Plan  used  many  new  techniques  and  methodologies  to  gauge  the  needs  of  residents  now  and  in  the  future  that  have  not  been  used in past master plans.   The result of this planning process is a Master Plan that will serve as a roadmap for the Park  and Recreation Department to follow with intensive implementation efforts for the first five  years and continued follow‐through for the next five years.  The Master Plan process takes a  comprehensive  approach  to  melding  goals,  objectives,  and  strategies  within  the  values  of  the community to create a structured plan that addresses all the issues facing the Park and  Recreation Department in meeting community needs.  Each theme addresses the specific issues and needs brought forward by the community in  the Master Plan process and addresses other needs which include the development a more  balanced parks and recreation system. 

 

 



Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

The key values the Master Plan focuses on are as follows:  • Clean and well maintained parks  • Safety and security of parks and recreation  facilities  • Affordable services  • Accessibility  to  parks,  recreation  facilities  and programs  • Providing open space, greenways and trails  to provide relief from urbanization  • Preserving natural areas  • Programming for a diverse population  • Maintain the importance of developing partnerships to maximize County resources  Through the statistically valid County‐wide survey, which had 1033 surveys completed with  a  95%  level  of  confidence  with  margin  of  error  of  +/‐  3%,  the  following  are  the  10  major  survey findings:  • Mecklenburg County Parks is the prime provider of parks and recreation services  • Usage of parks is high with good satisfaction  • Enjoyment of the outdoors and close to our home residence are prime reasons for  usage of parks and recreation facilities  • 88%  or  more  of  households  feel  it  is  important  to  use  Mecklenburg  County  Greenways  for  environmental  protection  and  a  major  connected  network  of  walking, biking and nature trails  • Unmet  citizen  needs  exist  for  a  wide  range  of  parks,  trails,  outdoor  and  indoor  facilities and programs   • Walking  and  biking  trails  are  the  most  important  facilities,  followed  by  small  neighborhood parks, and large community and district parks   • Special events/festivals and adult fitness and wellness programs are most important  programs  • Opportunities exist to grow programs at parks and recreation facilities   • Purchase land to preserve open/green space, use floodplain greenways to develop  trails/facilities,  develop  new  and  connect  existing  walking  and  biking  trails,  fix‐ up/repair  older  park  buildings/recreation  centers  and    upgrade  existing  neighborhood/community  parks  are  most  important  actions  respondents  would  support with tax dollars  • Over 75% of respondents would vote in favor (53%) or might vote in favor (25%) on  a bond referendum to fund the acquisition, improvement, and development of the  types of parks, trails, green space, and recreation facilities most important to their  households    

3

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

The population of the County has experienced 3.3% growth a year for the last seven years  from  2000  to  2007  and  is  expecting  3%  growth  to  continue  through  2012  for  a  total  population of 982,136 projected by 2012.   The key community needs exist in neighborhood park lands of 1,597 acres and community  park lands of 1,072 acres needed in 2008.  Other areas that needs exist in 2008 include the  need for playgrounds of (61); the need for (8) outdoor pools, and (238) miles of trails, (44)  basketball courts and (44) tennis courts, (12) skateparks, and (12) dog parks.  There is a need  for 6‐8 youth fast pitch softball fields and 8‐10 multi‐purpose sports fields.  And finally the  needs exists for 360,736 square feet of indoor aquatic space and 351,864 square ft of indoor  recreation center space to meet the park and recreation needs of residents based on best  practice industry standards of 1.5 square ft. of space per population for recreation centers  and ½ sq ft of space for aquatic facilities per population served.  The  Greenprinting  process  identified  gaps  in  services  as  it  applied  to  neighborhood  parks,  community parks and regional parks, as well as where gaps exist in recreation centers and  aquatic  facilities  across  the  County  for  the  Department  to  work  toward  to  make  needed  improvement and additions in these areas.  The Greenprinting process uses a series of layers  of  maps  based  on  the  demographics  of  the  community  and  identifies  elements  that  are  missing  in  land  and  recreation  facilities  based  on  the  values  the  community  stated  that  is  important to meet.  The maps demonstrate gaps and where amenities and parks should be  located along with land acquisition opportunities to support those needs.   The Charlotte‐Mecklenburg County community including the Towns in the County has very  high  expectations  for  the  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  to  meet.    The  residents  recognize  the  urgency  for  acquiring  land  and  the  need  for  additional  parks  and  recreation  facilities  in  the  County.    There  is  also  recognition  that  development  got  way  ahead  of  the  parks  and  recreation  system’s  capability  to  keep  up  and  that  the  Department  is  playing  catch  up.    This  will  require  the  community  to  be  patient  and  supportive  in  their  support  through approved bond issues for the Department to meet the needs.  1.1.1  GREENWAYS PLAN  There is a strong desire for greenways and trails in the system.  The Greenways Master Plan  outlines a strategy to develop 42.8 miles of greenways and trails on existing County lands by  the end of 2013 and another 61 miles of trails by 2018 for a total of 129 miles of trails to be  used for transportation and health and wellness purposes.  The following are the 5‐year and  10‐year action plans.   1.1.1.1   5‐YEAR ACTION PLAN  To  meet  the  needs  and  expectations  of  County  residents,  the  five  year  action  plan  will  pursue  an  aggressive  schedule  for  trail  development.    The  focus  will  be  on  County‐owned  land with the goal of providing more trails to more residents.  Concurrent goals include the  improved  efficiency  of  the  design  and  permitting  process  in  an  effort  to  meet  the  trail  development goals.   Goal – To construct 42.8 miles of new greenway trail by 2013 

 

 



Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 



Launch construction of 12.8 miles of currently funded projects within the first year  of the plan’s adoption 



Geographically disperse trail development throughout the County and surrounding  towns 



Focus trail construction on publicly‐owned land 



Work  with  permitting  agencies  to  streamline  the  trail  design  and  development  process 

Goal – To identify and prioritize acquisition efforts for the 10 year trail development plan  •

Base  trail  development  and  associated  land  acquisition  on  developed  ranking  methodology 



Confirm feasibility of targeted trail construction priorities after two years (2010) 

Goal – To improve connectivity to the existing and proposed greenway trail system  •

Work  with  Charlotte  Department  of  Transportation  and  coordinate  planning  and  development of overland connections  



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Planning  Department  and  other  municipal  planning  departments  to  incorporate  greenway  corridor  conservation  and  trail  development into the rezoning and subdivision processes 



Work  with  the  Charlotte  Area  Transit  System  (CATS)    to  incorporate  trail  development and connectivity to transit facilities 



Incorporate the greenway corridor system into the Long Range Transportation Plan  



Work with potential partners to synchronize trail development efforts and explore  funding opportunities 



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Schools  to  locate  and  construct  neighborhood  entrances that link schools and residential areas 



Implement improvements to the existing trail system 

Goal – To identify and designate official routes of the Carolina Thread Trail  •

Identify Little Sugar Creek, Long Creek, Mallard Creek and portions of Irwin Creek as  initial corridors of the Carolina Thread Trail 



Work with the municipalities within Mecklenburg County to identify the additional  Thread trail segments and formally adopt an alignment by 2009 

Goal – To better facilitate multi‐agency approach to trail development 

 



Work  with  CMU  to  prepare  and  adopt  a  joint  use  sanitary  sewer  and  greenway  easement instrument to be used when acquiring new joint use corridors 



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water  Services  to  adopt  a  joint  use  easement  to  be  used  when  acquiring  property  for  stream  restoration  and  trail  development 

5

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Work  with  Duke  Energy  and  other  utilities  on  a  joint  use  easement  to  develop  greenway trail facilities within these easements 



Investigate  possible  ordinance  amendments  to  encourage  trail  development  for  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg and the surrounding municipalities 

Goal – To explore policies and programs so that greenway corridors may better function as a  conservation and enhancement tool for floodplain and riparian plant and wildlife habitat   •

Work with Stewardship Services on management strategies for greenway corridors  



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water  Services  to  identify  partnership  projects and improvement projects within greenway corridors 



Work with  Extension  Services and Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water Services to  brainstorm  and  develop  outreach  efforts  to  educate  and  involve  homeowners  within the greenway corridors as to the value of the riparian habitats and possible  backyard  improvements  homeowners  can  make  to  conserve  and/or  improve  floodplain habitat 

1.1.1.2   10 YEAR ACTION PLAN  The  ten  year  action  plan  sets  forth  an  ambitious  goal  of  adding  an  additional  61  miles  of  proposed trail.  The feasibility of this goal will be reassessed within the first two years of the  5 year action plan to realistically assess the proposed development goals.  However, a focus  will remain on finishing significant stretches of trail, including Little Sugar Creek and Mallard  Creek greenways.  Goal  –  To  construct  61.9  miles  of  new  greenway  trail  by  2018,  bringing  the  total  miles  of  constructed greenway trail to 129  •

Disperse trail development throughout the County and surrounding towns 



Extend developed greenway trail and increase connectivity between greenway trail  systems 



Complete  signature  trails  including  Little  Sugar  Creek  Greenway,  Mallard  Creek  Greenway, and McDowell Creek Greenway  



Work with surrounding counties to identify desired regional connections 

Figures 1 and Figure 2 show the Greenway Master Plan Map and the Greenway Master Plan  Priority Map.   

 

 



Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 1 ‐ Greenway Master Plan 

 

7

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 2 ‐ Greenway Master Plan (Priority Map) 

 

 



Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  1.1.2  NATURE PRESERVES MASTER PLAN  The Nature Preserves Master Plan outlines a strategy to purchase up to an additional 6,991  acres  of  natural  areas  that  exist  in  the  County  over  the  next  10  years.    These  lands  are  located on 88 separate parcels that are still available, but the County is losing 14 acres a day  to development.  The  challenge centers on how quickly  the County  can either acquire the  properties  or  help  the  land  owners  to  preserve  their  properties  without  the  County  purchasing  the  properties  through  other  conservation  methods  available  to  them.    In  addition,  there  is  a  need  to  continue  to  update  the  three  existing  nature  centers  and  to  develop an additional five (5) nature centers in underserved areas of the County.  The last  nature center was developed in 1993.   New  policy  updates  were  completed  in  the  Nature  Preserves  Master  Plan  Update  to  help  manage existing nature preserves and creating a no net loss of species policy on preserves in  the  system  today.    As  part  of  the  Nature  Preserves  Master  Plan,  five  (5)  new  nature  preserves  are  recommended  on  existing  land  banked  properties  to  include  Stevens  Creek  Nature  Preserve,  Berryhill  Nature  Preserve,  Oehler  Nature  Preserve,  Gateway  Nature  Preserve and Community Park and Davis Farm Nature Preserve.  Figure 3 and Figure 4 show the Current Nature Preserves Map, as well as the Current and  Recommended Nature Preserves Map.    1.1.2.1   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE NATURE CENTERS  Currently  three  nature  centers  serve  the  entire  County.    Nature  Centers  are  the  primary  public  facilities  associated  with  nature  preserves.    The  three  nature  centers  are  located  at  Latta  Plantation,  McDowell,  and  Reedy  Creek  Nature  Preserves.    Based  on  gap  analysis,  many  residents  must  drive  considerable  distances  to  visit  a  nature  center,  creating  a  significant access and equity issue.  Additionally, the results of the 2008 Community Survey  as  well  as  best  practices  indicate  an  extremely  high  level  of  need  for  additional  nature  centers.    The  Department’s  recommended  standard  of  one  nature  center  per  100,000  residents  results  in  a  current  deficit  of  five  nature  centers,  and  a  deficit  of  nine  nature  centers  to  serve  residents  by  the  year  2022.    Refer  to  the  Mecklenburg  County  –  Facility  Standards  Spreadsheet  (Figures  33,  34  and  35)  in  the  Master  Plan.    Although  many  new  nature centers were planned or discussed over the years, no new centers have been built or  opened to the public for the past 15 years.  Based  on  the  community  survey  results  and  service  gap  analysis  of  existing  centers,  the  Nature Preserve Master Plan recommends five new nature centers to be built over the next  10  years.    These  nature  centers  would  provide  access  and  services  to  the  majority  of  the  County once opened (Figure 5).  An additional four (4) nature centers will be needed in the  following 5 years to meet the recommended standard.   

 

9

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 3 ‐ Current Nature Preserves 

 

 

10 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

   

Figure 4 ‐ Current and Recommended Nature Preserves 

11

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

   

Figure 5 ‐ Current and Proposed Nature Centers 

 

12 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

1.1.3  THE PROGRAM PLAN  The  Program  Plan  for  the  County  addresses  the  recreation  program  needs  of  the  community.    The  Program  Development  Plan  calls  for  the  following  programs  to  become  core programs for the Department in the future.  Many of these are core programs currently  and others are new.  Current programs to remain core are as follows:  • • • • • • •

Aquatics Programs  Environmental Education  Therapeutic Recreation programs  Athletics for adults and youth  4‐H programs  Golf Services  Senior Adult services 

New core programs to be added include:  • • • • • •

Outdoor Adventure Sports   Community‐wide Special Events  Active Adult Program for 50 to 65 year olds  Fitness and Wellness Programs   Summer Camps and After School Programs  Performing Arts and Fine Arts Programs in conjunction with ASC 

The  Program  Plan  recommends  stronger  efforts  be  made  in  programming  existing  recreation centers, and theme them to attract stronger user participation.  In addition, the  Program  Plan  focuses  on  better  efforts  to  market  the  services  provided  and  to  develop  program plans with Towns in the County, as well as other service providers so that the gaps  that  exist  in  services  are  addressed.    Partnerships  need  to  continue  to  be  developed  with  other service providers to maximize the County’s resources and to support future recreation  and aquatic center needs.  The  Sports  Tourism  Plan  addresses  the  need  to  provide  sporting  events  that  serve  traditional  sports  and  non‐traditional  sports.    These  events  require  some  to  be  annual  events  while  others  require  the  County  to  bid  for  the  events  as  it  applies  to  regional  and  national  amateur  sporting  events.      Many  of  the  non‐traditional  events  are  outdoor  adventure focused or activities like cheerleading  competitions that bring large numbers of  groups  to  the  County  to  compete.    Some  of  the  traditional  events  do  not  have  the  appropriate indoor and outdoor venues to host large competitions currently which will need  to be addressed in the future.  The Capital Improvement Plan for the County outlines the needs of the Department based  on  the  methodology  used  to  meet  community  needs.    The  capital  needs  demonstrate  a  need of $927,430,700 for the Department.  The Master Plan recognizes the need, but also  the  reality  of  limited  resources  available.    Key  leadership  in  the  County  must  decide  what  level of need they are willing to ask  the voters to support  through a series of bond issues  over a 10 year period.  As the County continues to grow and become more urbanized, the   

13

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

intensity of the needs will increase.  The challenges are apparent and the strategies need to  be  solid  in  meeting  the  needs  of  the  community  at  whatever  the  level  the  community  is  positioned to support.  1.1.4  RECOMMENDATIONS  1.1.4.1   VISION   The following vision presents how the Department desires to be viewed in the future:   “People  who  participate  in  recreation  in  Mecklenburg  County  will  have  a  system  of  parks,  greenways, and open spaces located throughout the County that will provide more parkland  per  capita  than  the  national  average,  will  connect  neighborhoods,  satisfy  public  recreation  needs, and will protect environmentally sensitive areas.”  1.1.4.2   MISSION  The following mission presents how the Department desires to be viewed in the future:  “To enrich the lives of our citizens through the stewardship of the County’s natural resources  and  ensure  efficient  and  responsive  quality  leisure  opportunities,  experiences  and  partnerships.”  1.1.4.3   COMMUNITY VISION FOR LAND  “Our Vision is to provide neighborhood park, community parks and regional parks across the  County  that  provides  a  balance  of  park  related  experiences  for  people  of  all  ages.  The  County  will  continue  to  acquire  additional  park  and  open  space  to  protect  the  regions  biodiversity  and  natural  heritage  through  the  promotion  of  open  space,  preservation,  conserving  natural  communities,  fostering  awareness  and  stewardship  through  environmental education and outdoor recreation.”  GOAL  To  protect  the  biodiversity  and  natural  heritage  of  each  Mecklenburg  County  Nature  Preserve for its intrinsic value, the health of our environment, and the long‐term benefit of  the  public.    To  acquire  additional  neighborhood  and  community  park  land  in  underserved  areas of the County to promote active and passive recreation pursuits for people of all ages.  Strategies  •



• •  

Implement  the  new  park  classifications  to  support  school  parks  and  community  parks  with  design  standards  and  user  outcomes  for  appropriate  recreation  opportunities both passive and active  Acquire  park  and  open  space  property  in  underserved  areas  of  the  County  to  support the appropriate types of parks that are needed based on 13 acres per 1000  population for neighborhood, community and regional parks  Acquire, or protect sensitive natural areas within the County to preserve the natural  communities in perpetuity  Acquire greenway corridors to support water quality and protect flood plain habitat  opportunities for public access via biking, and walking trails   

14 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

• •





• •

To collect and utilize the best available scientific data to provide a sound basis for  making management decisions  Implement  the  Nature  Preserves  policy  recommendations  as  it  applies  to  appropriate uses for natural areas and capacity demand by users with a no net loss  of species  Incorporate five new Nature Preserves designation to include: Stevens Creek Nature  Preserve,  Berryhill  Nature  Preserve,  Oehler  Nature  Preserve,  Gateway  Nature  Preserve and Community Park and Davis Farm Nature Preserve  Acquire  future  properties  for  Nature  Preserves  that  has  been  identified  in  the  Greenprinting process that identified sixty properties and 3,758 acres in the Tiered 1  and 28 properties in the Tiered 2 category for a total of 2,591 acres for a total of 6,  349 acres of potential preserve properties  Develop five new nature centers over the next 10 years to serve the environmental  education needs of the community in underserved areas of the County  Coordinate  with  the  Charlotte  Mecklenburg  School  District  land  acquisition  strategies  to  support  school  parks  and  recreation  facilities  in  developing  neighborhoods 

1.1.4.4   COMMUNITY VISION FOR GREENWAYS  “Develop a greenway corridor system that supports the drainage of water for water quality  and flood control purposes while creating trails along these corridors for transportation and  recreation purposes for walking, bicycling, running and wellness related activities for people  of all ages.”  GOAL   Continue the expansion of the greenway rail system along practical trail corridors that will  serve County residents and fulfill their need for additional walking and biking trails.  Strategies  • • • • • • •

• •

 

Expand the trail by 42.8 miles of trails in 5 years and 61.9 miles of trails in 10 years  for a total of129 miles on the ground by 2018  Identify and prioritize acquisition efforts for the 10 year trail development plan  Improve the connectivity to the existing and proposed greenway trail system  Incorporate the Greenway corridor system into the Long Range Transportation Plan  To identify and designate official routes of the Carolina Thread Trail  Better facilitate multi‐agency approach to trail development  To explore policies and programs so that greenway corridors may better function as  a  conservation  an  enhancement  tool  for  floodplain  and  riparian  plant  and  wildlife  habitat  Develop loop corridors within the trail system to connect to major attractions and to  support wellness and fitness components in neighborhood and community parks  Hold  a  policy  summit  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Planning  Departments  and  surrounding towns planning departments to consider the adoption of uniform open  space greenways, trails and parks standards 

15

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

1.1.4.5   COMMUNITY VISION FOR RECREATION FACILITIES  “Develop appropriate recreation facilities and amenities in underserved areas of the County  in  partnership  with  other  service  providers  to  maximize  the  County’s  resources  and  meet  the unmet recreation facility and amenity needs of residents.”  GOAL  To  meet  the  Facility  Standards  by  developing,  individually  and  in  partnership,  a  balanced  offering  of  recreation  facilities  and  amenities  that  adequately  meets  the  needs  of  their  target population.  Strategies  • • •

• • • •

Seek  to  meet  the  facility  standards  for  recreation  centers  and  aquatic  facilities  by  the end of 2018  Develop large sports complexes in existing community parks or regional parks  Continue  current  partnerships  and  incubate  new  partnerships  for  athletic  field  development and establish a partnership policy for each entity within the County to  provide increased asset capabilities and solidify working relationships for the future  Establish a priority usage policy based on entity participation  Develop  sports  courts  complexes  for  tennis  and  gyms  in  the  County  to  meet  the  needs of youth and adults but also for sports tourism purposes  Develop  art related facilities within recreation centers as outlined in the ASC master  plan approved in January of 2004  Partner with Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools on recreation center and park amenity  components  within  elementary  and  middle  school  sites  in  areas  that  are  missing  recreation centers and amenities 

1.1.4.6   COMMUNITY VISION FOR RECREATION PROGRAMS  “Develop  and  expand  recreation  programs  as  outlined  in  the  Master  Plan  to  increase  awareness  and  use  by  residents  of  the  County  and  to  create  more  opportunities  to  serve  people of all ages in a variety of recreation pursuits.”  GOAL  Offer  core  programs  outlined  in  the  program  plan  with  high  cost  recovery  levels,  utilize  training  and  performance  measures  to  create  consistency  and  employ  partners  and  volunteers  to  support  program  operations  and  build  advocacy  for  the  County  recreation  program brand.  Strategies  •

•  

Develop  and  expand  core  recreation  services  across  the  County  in  aquatics,  environmental  education,  adventure  sports,  therapeutic  recreation,  athletics,  community‐wide  special  events,  active  adults  and  seniors  over  65+,  fitness  and  wellness, facility rentals and new core programs in summer camps, after school and  cultural arts  Evaluate staffing needs to meet core program needs based on the hours required to  produce the programs desired and missing in the County    16 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

• •







• • •

Develop consistent program standards and program development process used for  all core programs offered to provide consistency in delivery of services    Implement the Sports Tourism Plan as it applies to  developing traditional and non‐traditional events in  the  County  to  promote  the  region  and  create  economic impact for the County  Develop  a  pricing  policy  based  on  the  true  cost  of  services  tied  to  the  level  of  exclusivity  a  user  receives  over  a  general  taxpayer  and  based  on  ability to pay  Develop  a  marketing  strategy  for  recreation  and  program  services  to  increase  the  level  of  participation  by  the  community  from  19%  to  30%  over the next five years  Develop  partnership  agreements  with  measurable  outcomes  for  all  special  interest  groups  involved  with the County  Develop  program  partnership  agreements  with  the  local  towns  to  maximize  each  other’s resources and meet the community’s unmet need  Develop program policies on public/public partnerships, public/private partnerships  and public/not‐for profit partnerships  Develop a specific branding program for program services across the County 

1.1.4.7   COMMUNITY VISION FOR OPERATIONS AND FINANCING  “Our  vision  is  to  continue  to  manage  all  parks,  facilities  and  programs  to  highest  level  of  productivity and efficiency as possible to meet the needs of the residents of the County.”  GOAL  Implement  a  financing  strategy  that  incorporates  all  available  resources  including  a  voter  approved bond levy for implementing the recommendations in the Master Plan.  Strategies  • •

• •

Implement  the  capital  improvement  program  to  repair  and  upgrade  parks  and  recreation facilities to maximize their useful life  Evaluate  the  opportunity  to  use  a  dedicated  Division  of  Park  Officers  within  the  Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department. in County Parks to eliminate  crime and  vandalism in parks  Seek  corporate  support  for  establishing  destination  facilities  such  as  a  zoo,  or  aquarium with appropriate feasibility studies  Train staff on the Greenprinting process and update all maps created in the Master  Plan every two years 

1.1.5  CONCLUSION  The Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department is a tremendous resource to the  community for people of all ages and interest.  The Department is highly respected by the   

17

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

community  and  delivers  a  well‐managed  park  and  recreation  system  to  the  taxpayers  of  Mecklenburg  County.    The  Department’s  last  Master  Plan  was  completed  in  1989  and  the  Department  now  is  trying  to  catch  up  to  the  tremendous  growth  the  County  has  experienced  and  address  the  needs  of  this  growth  with  updated  levels  of  parks,  nature  preserves  and  recreation  facilities  to  serve  a  growing  and  prosperous  community.    The  Master  Plan  outlines  the  needs  clearly  as  it  applies  to  park  land  needs,  nature  preserve  needs, recreation facility needs, trail needs, nature center needs and other amenity needs.    The challenges are grand in terms of the financing cost to support these needs.  The County  is expected to reach build‐out by 2025, which is a short amount of time to support the land  acquisition  efforts  required  to  save  the  most  sensitive  properties  that  still  exist  in  the  County,  as  well  as  to  acquire  land  in  underserved  areas  for  neighborhood  and  community  parks.    People who recreate in Mecklenburg will have a system of parks, greenways and open space  located throughout the County that will provide more park land per capita than the national  average,  will  connect  neighborhoods,  satisfies  public  recreation  needs,  and  will  protect  environmentally  sensitive  areas.    Residents  and  visitors  will  learn  from  and  be  inspired  by  our community’s arts and cultural activity.  We will have a local government that is highly  efficient,  effective,  accountable,  and  inclusive.    Partnerships  between  government,  the  private  sector  and  the  faith  community  will  be  bringing  together  people  from  diverse  backgrounds to address and solve community problems.  Let the implementation begin!     

 

 

18 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER TWO  ‐ COMMUNITY INPUT PROCESS  In  order  to  meet  the  needs  of  residents  and  users  of  the  system,  the  Master  Plan  was  developed through a robust and varied customer input process.  This process ensures that  recommendations  for  the  Master  Plan  have  an  external  customer  focus.    It  also  helps  to  direct the Department in being able to better deliver on resident needs, and having a clear  understanding  of  their  interests.    The  PROS  Team  interviewed  over  300  people  in  stakeholder interviews, as well as many others in 10 focus group meetings held in October  of  2007  and  (8)  public  forums  from  October  2007  to  March  of  2008.    In  addition  PROS  reviewed  user  surveys  from  specific  park  and  recreation  sites  as  well  as  program  participants to gain input into the needs of users.   The  following  details  a  summary  of  key  public  input  findings  from  the  qualitative  information  generated  from  residents  in  the  focus  groups,  stakeholder  interviews,  and  community public meetings.  2.1 COMMUNITY INPUT FINDINGS  2.1.1  GENERAL PERCEPTION OF THE PARK AND RECREATION SYSTEM  It  was  determined  through  Mecklenburg  County’s stakeholder meetings that the general  perception  of  the  parks  and  recreation  system  is  highly  respected  in  the  community.    On  the  whole, while serious complaints were not heard  from  constituents,  most  feel  that  the  system  maintenance  is  mid‐to‐high  level  and  superior  to other cities.  Citizens expect the park system  to  promote  public  health  and  well‐being,  preserve  the  environment,  while  improving  on  the  development  of  existing  and  future  parks,  trails  and  recreation  facilities  in  this  urban  society.    As  the  City  and  County  increases  density,  open  space  is  becoming  a  crucial  component,  especially  as  it  relates  to  the  protection  of  the  water  supply,  accommodating  drainage  corridors,  and  ensuring  air  quality.    The  community  wants  a  balanced  system,  of  parks  and  recreation  facilities  and  programs  with  equitable  and  fair  distribution  of  shared  resources which will have a greater impact on the entire community.  Safety of the parks is  an  issue  that  must  be  addressed.    Park  Rangers  are  desired  in  the  parks  again  with  law  enforcement  capability.    There  needs  to  be  better  equity  on  which  parks  and  greenway  areas  are  being  patrolled,  and  perhaps  the  Department  needs  to  put  cameras  in  some  parking  lots  and  boat  ramp  areas  to  protect  users  of  the  system.    A  key  quote  from  a  stakeholder  indicated  this  “We  are  on  the  cusp  of  becoming  a  great  parks  system;  it  is  a  make  or  break  time  to  develop  parks and  recreation facilities  now before it is too late for  this community.”    Some specific areas citizens indicated that require more focus for improvement include:  •  

Addressing the accessibility issues in all parks  19

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Distribution of park and recreation assets throughout the County, especially on the  eastside 



Providing  more  amateur  sports  facilities  and  improvement  of  athletic  fields  in  the  inner‐city 



Completing  and  adding  aquatics  facilities  in  the  south  or  southwest  areas  of  the  County 



Address  the  need  to  have  connectivity  between  transportation  and  greenway  planning 



Signage needs to be improved on where facilities are located 



Preservation of the County’s historic buildings 



Suburban parks and areas are in better condition than urban parks, however, they  need more green space and sports facilities, and could function better 



A major or “Signature Park” in the four wards uptown is highly desired 



Communication  efforts  between  parks  staff  and  the  community  needs  to  be  improved,  as  many  citizens  are  not  aware  or  understand  what  opportunities  and  services are available, and the changes taking place within the system 



Overall, citizens love and have great family experiences in the parks, however, most  feel  there  is  not  enough  open  space,  recreation  facilities,  and  neighborhood  parks  for the entire County 

Greenway  drainage  corridors,  paths,  trails  and  their  connectivity  to  major  destinations  were  frequently  mentioned by stakeholders as a great priority and they  indicated  the  community  would  appreciate  a  major  focus  on  these  areas.    Interconnectivity  with  other  greenways,  and  the  University  campuses  should  be  further  expanded  and  developed.  Completing  current  greenways planned needs to be a priority.  In addition,  the  public  would  like  the  greenway  system  to  be  considered  as  part  of  the  transit  system  that  can  be  neighborhood  based,  and  utilized  as  a  wellness  generator.    The  community  would  prefer  greenways  to  serve  as  an  alternative  mode  of  transportation, as well a recreation function.  The  community  views  the  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  as  one  of  the  most  efficient  agencies in the County because they are willing to explore and develop public and private  partnerships.    Partnering  should  be  a  paramount  piece  of  the  Master  Plan.    Stakeholders  believe Mecklenburg County could be the amateur sports capital of the South, through an  enhanced  partnership  with  the  hospitality  and  Convention  Visitor’s  Bureau.    Partnerships  with the Police Athletic League and Mecklenburg County Schools for recreations centers also  need  to  be  expanded.    Another  big  concern  discussed  by  stakeholders  was  the  County’s  ability to acquire and develop land to meet the needs of the growing community, and how  to work better with developers on how to utilize some of their land in development projects   

 

20 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

to meet specific for parks and recreation needs.  Economic development and the Parks and  Recreation  Master  Plan  need  to  work  together  into  the  County’s  General  Plan.  The  Parks  and Recreation Master Plan should point out the relationship between these two planning  components and center on how resources can be deployed through voter approved bonds  to address economic needs through effective parks and recreation development.  Larger community parks and regional parks are needed in the City of Charlotte.  The City has  a  adequate  number  of  recreation  facilities,  although  the  east  side  of  Charlotte  has  a  deficiency of neighborhood parks.  Social aspects of parks and neighborhoods are critical in the development and improvement  of the entire parks system and the County as a whole.  The social needs of the community,  as it applies to recreation development and program services, should be addressed for the  present  and  15  years  from  now.    The  parks  system  can  help  with  meeting  social  issues  as  well, through the programs and facilities they provide to the community.  The system is solid  on  parks  but  citizens  want  more  recreation,  facilities,  and  recreation  programs.   Mecklenburg  County  needs  to  re‐establish  inner‐city  recreation  programs  in  recreation  centers because recreation is a critical outlet for the youth and needs to be made a priority.   Stakeholder suggestions included:  •

Employing  teenagers  within  parks  and  recreation  services  because  employees  can  become mentors for young people to learn from 



Promoting the Parks and Recreation Department to work with the County on their  parenting initiatives focusing on young adults and teens 



Adding  more  programs  targeted  for  youth,  teens,  and  seniors  in  the  recreation  centers as well as the allocation of a scholarship fund  



The  County  has  been  very  good  in  the  therapeutic  recreation  program,  but  other  programs, such as summer camps, the arts, wellness and fitness related programs,  need to be improved 



Program  plans  should  be  developed  for  each  recreation  center  together  with  the  community and the schools 



Fitness space in the recreation centers, as well as programs such as “Kid‐fit” should  be  established  and  recreation  centers  should  use  the  daytime  periods  to  promote  fitness for seniors 



The  County  needs  to  develop  additional  outdoor  swimming  pools  in  the  inner‐city  and  reevaluate  the  use  of  the  pool  in  West  Charlotte,  as  it  is  not  used  by  the  community 



There  is  a  definite  need  for  family  and  afterschool  recreation  programs  in  the  County 



More  summer  programs  are  needed  and  the  quality  is  excellent;  however,  additional people need to be served 

 

 

21

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.1.2  WHAT IS VALUED MOST ABOUT PARKS AND RECREATION SERVICES  Residents value and equate their quality of life with:  •

Parks and open spaces that are clean and well maintained 



Safe (low security risk) parks, recreation facilities, and programs 



Affordable services  



They want equitable accessibility to recreation facilities, sports fields, programs, and  developed parks 



They  value  the  County  in  providing  more  open  space,  greenways  and  parks  as  the  County  continues  to  be  developed;  it  is  more  valued  as  a  relief  due  to  the  urbanization and development of the County 



Programming and providing diverse recreation experiences for broad age segments  across the County is also highly valued 



Other community values included maximizing partnerships, enhancing urban parks  and suburban parks, and the protection of water sheds for greenways purposes 

2.1.3  KEY PROGRAM SERVICE NEEDS  The stakeholders meetings identified several key program service needs for the Master Plan  to focus on.   • The community wants a diverse range of parent and child after‐school activities  • They want sports programs that provide opportunities for youth and adults  • Teen programs should be the number one priority  • Programs that serve younger children and families should be the priority   • Certain parks should be dedicated to family activities  • There  is  a  need  for  adequate  recreation  facilities  and  programs  to  support  and  provide for the growing senior population  Improvements in programming in these areas were requested and defined as highly  needed:  • Regional sports facilities and events  • Greenways programs and related events  • Recreation centers that provide historical, and inner‐city youth programs  • Special  events  and  festivals  that  are  well  done,  and  Department  needs  to  provide  more  opportunities  to  jointly  program  more  parks  and  street  festivals with community based events  • Segregate developed parks and passive spaces were also mentioned 

 

 

22 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

• The  community  is  changing  and  the  County  must  address  the  current  demand for soccer, skate board needs, and the need to develop customize  parks for the people who live next to neighborhoods parks  • Attendees  encouraged  more  partnerships  with  the  community,  including  private  and  non‐private  agencies  such  as  the  YMCA’s  who  also  provide  typical  programming  for  sports,  however,  some  citizens  cannot  afford  these,  and  it  would  be  better  if  the  parks  system  would  provide  greater  opportunities for the entire public  • The County needs a proactive approach to serving the needs of people who  don’t have the money to buy the services provided  • Some hard core issues need to be dealt with that include after school care,  providing  outdoor  education  developing  both  indoor  and  outdoor  sports  complexes,  creating  more  family  entertainment  and  activities  for  the  community to get people off the streets  2.1.4  KEY  OUTCOMES  FROM  THE  COMPREHENSIVE  MASTER  PLAN  THE  COMMUNITY WOULD LIKE TO SEE HAPPEN OVER THE NEXT TEN YEARS  The  Master  Plan  for  Mecklenburg  County  should  consider  creating  the  image  of  a  healthy  and vibrant lifestyle with a strong sense of community.  Key outcomes stakeholders would  like to see this Master Plan include: 

 



An overall clear vision; a plan that addresses gaps  in services and addresses capital needs for existing  and new recreation and park facilities 



The  interaction  partnerships 



More  activities  and  programs  and  that  focus  on  the needs of seniors, teens, and adults 



Provide  program  guidelines  on  managing  changes  in recreation activities that people are engaging in (hiking trails and greenways are a  high  priority  for  most  now),  and  how  to  implement  changes  in  program  services  from lifecycle to lifecycle 



The  Master  Plan  should  address  the  perception  of  equity  in  parks  and  recreation  services,  and  include  an  attainable  schedule  for  implementing  the  recommendations in the Master Plan 



Agree and unite the County on priorities, and define what sets us apart 



Identify  critical  resources  (tracks  of  land  over  5  acres)  that  are  available  in  the  County  for  acquisition  and  long‐range  (ten  years)  proactive  land  acquisition  plan   with a development schedule 



Prepare a positive public communication outreach process to market, and educate  the community on the need to support and finance the system through a approved  voter bond issue 

with 

other 

governmental 

23

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Some  stakeholders  desire  a  consolidated  park  system  representing  every  municipality  in  the  system  to  eliminate  inefficient  duplication  and  overlap  of  services and how to best leverage available resources together 



Establishing goals and strategies for the short and long term needs for park land per  capita,  determining  proximity  from  any  household  to  a  park,  recreation  facility  or  program was also requested by stakeholders 

The community feels key leaders should drive the vision and incrementally move it forward.   Commitment  to  a  long‐term  vision  with  wide  spread  public  support  which  can  be  funded  with a sustainable operational approach is needed.  Equity and fairness of access to parks,  recreation  facilities  and  programs  is  crucial  to  the  outcome  of  the  Master  Plan.    The  greenway system and the connectivity that can be provided is a major issue that needs to be  addressed.    There  is  concern  regarding  the  number  of  small  neighborhood  parks  provided  and  how  developers  have  fallen  short  of  helping  with  the  livability  of  the  neighborhoods.   Many  stakeholders  would  like  to  see  parks  better  integrated  into  the  community  versus  sealed  pieces  of  land,  along  with  a  better  awareness  of  where  services  are  provided  on  a  coordinated  basis.    Regionalism  needs  to  be  addressed,  and  Master  Plan  must  consider  neighboring counties and how Mecklenburg County should be working together with them  as well.  2.1.5  STRENGTHS OF THE PARK AND RECREATION SYSTEM  The parks and recreation system of Mecklenburg County offers several strengths that should  be  the  foundation  for  building  this  Master  Plan.    Currently,  the  system  is  beginning  to  understand  a  new  sense  of  urgency  that  was  not  there  before.    Stakeholders  pointed  out  that the County is very strong in developing facilities and programs for families and youth.   Some  citizens  felt  the  Department  tended  to  build  large  regional  parks  while  there  was  a  lack  of  neighborhood  parks  to  support  the  community  needs  in  subdivisions,  given  the  limited funding available.  Strengths of the Department the community described include:  • A  good  track  record  of  management  of  parks  and  recreation  facilities  which  is  appreciated by the citizens  • There is a high degree of public involvement in parks and recreation planning  • Most stakeholders felt the Park and Recreation Commission overall does a nice job,  they  combine  interaction  with  the  community  on  public  process  and  outreach,  work  with  individual  neighborhoods,  and  encourage  citizen  involvement  in  management and development of the parks system.  These strengths explain why  the community is willing to invest in parks and facilities  • There is very dedicated and well trained staff in the Department  • Phenomenal natural resources  • The parks system does a good job with managing stewardship of its current holdings  • The  Department  has  great  accessibility  and  availability  of  park  types  available  and  uses  • The vision for Little Sugar Creek Greenway is outstanding   

 

24 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

• The water protection focus and how it relates and ties in to open space is excellent  • There  is  good  management  of  tennis  and  golf  facilities;  and  use  of  recreation  centers for community functions  • The  greenway  system  is  a  huge  strength  that  has  wide‐spread  public  support  because it promotes connectivity  • The  County  has  endorsed  partnerships  with  other  service  providers  and  they  see  this as a strength  2.1.6  OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE ISSUES  Some critical operational issues brought up during the stakeholders meetings included:  • Designing  parks  to  resolve  safety  issues  and  improve  emergency  procedures  • Facilitate  better  management  of  parks  • Building more shelters in parks  • Preventative maintenance is a very  important  element  the  County  needs  to  consider  as  the  County  continues to grow  • Operationally,  the  County  should  also consider adding more staffing  levels to adequately support facility maintenance and recreation program needs  • Some of the recreation centers need to be updated  • The  community  feels  the  system  does  not  have  enough  public  money  and  more  could come from the private sector to help in capital development and operational  costs  • Most  program  complaints  center  around  teen  programs,  that  there  is  not  enough  outlets for them to go to and enjoy  • Having  an  appropriate  amount  of  funding  for  capital  maintenance  to  support  the  parks and recreation infrastructure is an important issue to be addressed  • There  should  be  a  sustainable  funding  source  in  place,  but  beyond  an  annual   budget review to support parks and recreation needs  • Stakeholders  would  like  to  see  additional  spending  on  beautification  and  more  manicured parks  • In  the  lower  income  neighborhoods  there  is  a  lot  of  vandalism  that  needs  to  be  addressed in parks  • Air conditioning in recreation centers was also mentioned as a improvement that is  desired and it would increase attendance in the summer   

25

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

• Several stakeholders would like to see the County renovate Memorial stadium and  utilize it for more sports and high school functions  • Maintenance  standards  need  to  be  shared  with  neighborhoods  and  sports  groups  on  what  the  County  is  capable  of  delivering  and  more  efforts  to  inform  neighborhoods of the changes being planned in parks is desired  • Additional joint use facilities between municipalities, schools, colleges, and not‐for‐ profits are desired by the community  2.1.7  FUNDING LEVELS OF PARKS AND RECREATION  Stakeholders  offered  their  opinions  regarding  the  funding  levels  for  parks  and  recreation  compared  to  other  County  services.    The  most  frequently  discussed  opinion  was  that  the  park system is adequately funded operationally, but the Master Plan needs to address the  future needs of the system.  Most stakeholders stated that there is a need for a clear vision  for future funding and what it will mean to the future of Charlotte and the entire County,  and  to  the  quality  of  life  of  the  residents.    Some  indicated  they  had  no  issue  with  park  capital  funding  being  increased  for  future  land  acquisition,  greenways  and  recreation  facilities.  Equity of funding across the County is a big issue and it must be dealt with‐in future funding  efforts  by  the  County.    The  public  support  for  more  funding  for  parks  and  recreation  facilities  and  services  is  impressively  very  high,  with  a  lot  of  creditability  driven  by  key  leaders.    An  area  of  the  system  that  lacks  in  funding  is  in  the  capital  improvement  area.   Community  needs  far  outpace  the  money  available  and  the  County  needs  to  seek  many  more grant funds and earned income funds to support capital needs.  Land acquisition will  require the most funding, however funding for this area is too low.  The Department needs  to have more staff time dedicated to work with neighborhoods and their leaders to create  events in the community to keep the parks and recreation programs and services in front of  people, to capitalize on funding needs and fund raising awareness.  2.1.8  PARTNER AND VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT  Stakeholders envision many new opportunities for partnerships and volunteerism utilizing a  combination  of  people’s  time  and  corporate  financial  resources.    Future  partnerships  the  Park  System  should  embrace  are  with  City  Center  Partners,  developers,  neighborhoods,  schools, hospitals, insurance companies, the Heart Association, pharmaceutical companies,  libraries,  Towns,  University  of  North  Carolina,  Johnson  C.  Smith  University,  Queens  University,  convention  and  visitor  bureaus,  social  services  agencies,  churches,  Trust  for  Public Lands, The Urban Institute, and the hotel and tourism industries.    Going  green  is  a  good  partnering  opportunity  for  companies  to  be  involved  with  the  park  and  recreation  system,  and  could  be  a  great  resource.    There  could  be  an  improved  partnership with the YMCA, land trusts, and neighborhood associations.  Duke Energy was  also mentioned as a partnership that should be explored, as they currently share their land  for park use now with the County. 

 

 

26 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.1.9  ROLE OF PARK AND RECREATION IN LONG TERM LIVABILITY  The  community  felt  the  role  of  the  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  system  is  a  crucial  component  for  the  quality  of  life,  long‐term  health,  and  vitality  to  this  community  and  stakeholders  feel  the  system  cannot  continue  without  greater  funding  for  land  acquisition,  recreation  facilities  and  capital  improvement  monies.    Great  cities  have  great  park systems and in Mecklenburg County stakeholders feel that more is needed to provide  for the future needs of the parks and recreation system.  It is the most important element  the  County  provides  outside  of  mandated  services  and  the  County  needs  to  be  the  key  contributor to the quality of life of all residents in the County.  It is as critical as the schools,  police  and  safety  services,  and  it  is  as  important  as  the  arts.    People  need  an  outlet  after  work and the County must create a real value for quality recreation time.  Most  stakeholders  expressed  they  felt  there  is  a  highly  significant  role  for  parks  and  recreation  services,  now  and  in  the  future.    The  County  should  be  more  aggressive  in  the  provision of programs and services in the urban core.  One of the biggest challenge’s is for  the leaders who set policy to understand the critical importance that parks and recreation  services play in supporting preventative health issue and the park system needs to be at the  front of the health and wellness process, for the next decade.  Many key leaders mentioned  it would be better to have a unified system, but the Towns want more local control.    The County leaders need to get more aggressive with the developers in the County to have  them  support  more  of  the  recreation  and  parks  needs  of  the  community.    Park  and  Recreation needs to be at the table with all the key leaders on sports.  People want to live in  an  area  with  well  maintained  parks  and  it  creates  strong  economic  value  in  the  form  of  property  values.    There  is  tremendous  opportunity  and  potential,  which  is  currently  being  overlooked  for  how  parks  and  recreation  services  can  support  the  social  service  outreach  needs  of  the  community.  The  mission  of  the  parks  needs  to  build  on  ways  to  give  youth  more recreation and outdoor experiences to help them stay or get back on track.  As for as the City of Charlotte key leaders interviewed, they feel the parks system will only  enhance  the  livability  which  is  a  key  factor  in  attracting  businesses  and  individuals  to  Charlotte.  There is a strong desire for the parks to be family‐friendly.  The City of Charlotte  leaders feels they need all levels and types of parks in the city.  Stakeholders feel that parks  and recreation services should be included in the top five initiatives that are going on in the  City.  Like  the  regional  transit  system,  the  parks  system  is  totally  tied  to  the  livability  of  Charlotte.   

 

27

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  2.2 COMMUNITY SURVEY FINDINGS   Mecklenburg County  conducted a  parks and recreation citizen survey during the winter of  2007‐08  as  part  of  a  comprehensive  long  range  plan  for  the  County.    The  survey  was  designed  to  obtain  statistically  valid  results  from  households  throughout  Mecklenburg  County.  The survey was administered by a combination of mail and phone.  The  PROS  Team  worked  with  Leisure  Vision  and  Mecklenburg  County  officials  in  the  development  of  the  survey  questionnaire.    This  work  allowed  the  survey  to  be  tailored  to  issues of strategic importance to effectively plan the future system.  Leisure  Vision  mailed  surveys  to  a  random  sample  of  5,000  households  throughout  Mecklenburg County.  These were followed up by phone calls and the goal was to obtain a  total of at least 1,000 completed surveys.  This goal was accomplished, with a total of 1,033  surveys  having  been  completed.    The  results  of  the  random  sample  of  1,033  households  have a 95% level of confidence with a precision of at least +/‐3.0%.  The  summarized  findings  are  below  with  a  full  Household  Executive  Summary  located  in  Appendix 1:   2.2.1  VISITATION OF COUNTY PARKS DURING THE PAST YEAR  Figure 6 shows that 76% of respondent households have visited Mecklenburg County parks  during the past year.                                                 

Figure 6 ‐ Visitation of County Parks During the Past Year 

 

28 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.2.2  PHYSICAL CONDITION OF COUNTY PARKS  Of  the  76%  of  respondent  households  that  have  visited  Mecklenburg  County  parks  during  the  past  year,  90%  rated  the  parks  as  either  excellent (31%) or good  (59%) (Figure 7).               

Figure 7 ‐ Physical Condition of County Parks 

  2.2.3  PARTICIPATION IN COUNTY RECREATION PROGRAMS  Nineteen percent (19%)  of  respondent  households  have  participated  in  recreation  programs  offered  by  the  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  Department  in  the  past  year (Figure 8).       

Figure 8 ‐ Participation in County Recreation Programs 

 

29

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.2.4  OVERALL QUALITY OF PROGRAMS PARTICIPATED IN   Of  the  19%  of  respondent  households  that  have  participated  in  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  programs  during  the  past  12  months,  92%  rated  the  overall  quality  of  programs  they  have  participated  in  as  either excellent (32%)  or good (60%) (Figure  9).         

Figure 9 ‐ Overall Quality of Programs Participated In 

2.2.5  REASONS  FOR  USING  COUNTY  PARKS,  RECREATION  FACILITIES  OR  PROGRAMS  There  are  two  reasons  that  over  60%  of  respondent  households  use  Mecklenburg  County  parks,  recreation  facilities  or  programs:  enjoyment  of  the  outdoors (62%) and  close  to  our  home/residence  (61%) (Figure 10).        Figure 10 ‐ Reasons for Using County Parks, Recreation Facilities or Programs 

 

 

30 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.2.6  SUFFICIENT PARKS AND GREEN SPACE AREAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE  Thirty‐nine  percent  (39%)  of  respondent  households  feel  there  are  sufficient  parks  and green space areas  within  walking  distance  of  their  residence (Figure 11).                 

Figure 11 ‐ Sufficient Parks and Green Space Areas within Walking Distance 

2.2.7  WAYS RESPONDENTS LEARN ABOUT COUNTY PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES  From friends and neighbors (53%) is the most frequently mentioned way that respondents  learn  about  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  programs  and  activities.  The  other  most  frequently  mentioned  ways  that  respondents  learn  about County programs  and  activities  are  from  newspaper  articles  (41%),  website  (28%)  and  flyers/posters  at  parks  and  recreation  facilities  (22%)  (Figure  12). 

Figure 12 ‐ Ways Respondents Learn About County Programs and Activities 

 

31

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.2.8  IMPORTANCE OF VARIOUS GREENWAY OPTIONS  Seventy‐seven  percent  (77%)  of  respondents  feel it is very important  to  use  greenways  to  provide  environmental  protection,  and  66%  feel it is very important  to  use  greenways  to  provide  a  major  connected  network  of  walking,  biking  and  nature  trails  (Figure  13).             

Figure 13 ‐ Importance of Various Greenway Options 

  2.2.9  SUPPORT FOR VARIOUS AMENITIES  Over  two‐thirds  of  respondents are either  very  supportive  or  somewhat  supportive  of  each  of  the  three  amenities (Figure 14).                   Figure 14 ‐ Support for Various Amenities 

 

 

32 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.2.10  AMENITIES MOST WILLING TO FUND WITH TAX DOLLARS  Thirty‐three  percent  (33%)  of  respondents  would be most willing  to  fund  the  zoo  with  their  tax  dollars.   Twenty‐nine  percent  (29%)  of  respondents  would be most willing  fund  botanical  gardens,  and  25%  would be most willing  to  fund  an  aquarium  (Figure 15).         

Figure 15 ‐ Amenities Most Willing to Fund with Tax Dollars 

  2.2.11  NEED FOR PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES   There  are  five  parks  and  recreation  facilities that at least  60%  of  respondent  households  have  a  need  for:  walking  and  biking  trails  (76%),  large  community  parks  and  district  parks  (64%),  small  neighborhood  parks  (62%), nature center  and  trails  (62%)  and  park  shelters  and  picnic  areas  (60%)  (Figure 16).     

Figure 16 ‐ Need for Parks and Recreation Facilities 

   

33

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.2.12  ESTIMATED  NUMBER  OF  HOUSEHOLDS  WHOSE  NEEDS  ARE  BEING  MET  50% OR LESS  From the list of 28 parks and  recreation  facilities,  respondent  households  that  have  a  need  for  parks/facilities  were  asked  to  indicate  how  well  these  types  of  parks/facilities  in  Mecklenburg  County  meet  their  needs.    Figure  17  shows  the  estimated  number  of  households  in  Mecklenburg  County  whose  needs for parks/facilities are  only  being  50%  met  or  less,  based  on  335,891  households in the County.   

Figure 17 ‐ Estimated Number of Households Who’s Needs Are Being Met 50% or Less 

2.2.13  MOST IMPORTANT PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES  Based on the sum of their top four choices, the parks/facilities that respondent households  rated as the most important are walking and biking trails (44%), small neighborhood parks  (26%)  and  large  community  parks  and  district  parks  (23%).    It  should  also  be  noted  that  walking  and  biking  trails  had  the  highest  percentage of respondents  select it as their first choice  as  the  park/facility  that  is  most  important  to  their  household (Figure 18).         

Figure 18 ‐ Most Important Parks and Recreation Facilities 

 

 

34 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.2.14  NEED FOR RECREATION PROGRAMS  There  are  four  recreation  programs  that  over  35%  of  respondent  households  have  a  need  for:  special  events/festivals  (50%),  adult  fitness  and  wellness  programs  (49%),  family  recreation/outdoor  adventure  programs  (39%)  and  nature  education  programs  (37%) (Figure 19).     

Figure 19 ‐ Need for Recreation Programs 

  2.2.15  ESTIMATED  NUMBER  OF  HOUSEHOLDS  WHOSE  NEEDS  ARE  BEING  MET  50% OR LESS  From  the  list  of  22  recreation  programs,  respondent  households  that  have  a  need  for  programs  were  asked  to  indicate  how  well  these  types  of  programs  in  Mecklenburg  County  meet  their  needs.   Figure  20  shows  the  estimated  number  of  households  in  Mecklenburg  County  whose  needs  for  programs  are  only  being 50% met or less,  based  on  335,891  households  in  the  County.    Figure 20 ‐ Estimated Number of Households Who’s Needs Are Being Met 50% or Less 

 

35

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.2.16  MOST IMPORTANT RECREATION PROGRAMS  Based  on  the  sum  of  their  top  four  choices,  the  programs  that  respondent  households  rated  as  the  most important are special  events/festivals  (28%)  and  adult  fitness  and  wellness  programs  (28%).    It  should  also  be  noted  that  adult  fitness  and  wellness  programs  had  the  highest  percentage of respondents  select it as their first choice  as  the  program  that  is  most  important  to  their  household (Figure 21).       

Figure 21 ‐ Most Important Recreation Programs 

2.2.17  PROGRAMS PARTICIPATED IN MOST OFTEN  Based  on  the  sum  of  their  top  four  choices,  the  programs that respondents  currently  participate  in  most often at Mecklenburg  County facilities are special  events/festivals  (18%),  adult  fitness  and  wellness  programs  (8%)  and  family  recreation/outdoor  adventure  programs  (8%).   It  should  also  be  noted  that  special  events/festivals  had  the  highest  percentage  of  respondents  select  it  as  their  first  choice  as  the  program  their  household  currently  participates  in  Figure 22 ‐ Programs Participated in the Most  most often (Figure 22).   

 

 

36 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

2.2.18  ORGANIZATIONS MOST USED FOR INDOOR AND OUTDOOR FACILITIES  The  organizations  that  the  highest  percentage  of  respondent  households  have  used  for indoor and outdoor  recreation  and  sports  activities  during  the  past  12  months  are  Mecklenburg  County  parks  (56%),  YMCA  (37%)  and  churches  (36%) (Figure 23).           

Figure 23 ‐ Organizations Most Used for Indoor and Outdoor Facilities 

2.2.19  LEVEL OF SUPPORT FOR VARIOUS ACTIONS THE COUNTY COULD TAKE  There are three actions  that  over  55%  of  respondents  are  very  supportive  of  Mecklenburg  County  taking  to  improve  the  parks,  recreation  and  green  space  system:  develop  new  walking/biking  trails  and  connect  existing  trails  (59%),  use  floodplain  greenways  to  develop  trails  and  facilities  (58%),  and  purchase  land  to  preserve  open  space  and  green  space  (56%)  (Figure 24).    Figure 24 ‐ Level of Various Support for Various Actions the County Could Take 

 

37

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

2.2.20  ACTIONS MOST WILLING TO FUND WITH TAX DOLLARS  Based on the sum of their  top  four  choices,  the  actions  that  respondents  are  most  willing  to  fund  with  their  County  tax  dollars are: purchase land  to  preserve  open  space  and  green  space  (44%),  use  floodplain  greenways  to  develop  trails  and  facilities  (34%)  and  develop  new  walking/biking  trails  and  connect  existing  trails  (34%).    It  should  also  be  noted  that  purchase  land  to  preserve  open  space  and  green  space  had  the  highest  percentage  of  Figure 25 ‐ Actions Most Willing to Fund with Tax Dollars  respondents  select  them  as their first choice as the action they are most willing to fund with their County tax dollars  (Figure 25).  2.2.21  VOTING ON A BOND REFERENDUM  Seventy‐eight  percent  (78%)  of  respondents  indicated  they  would  either vote favor (53%) or  might  vote  in  favor  (25%)  of  a  bond  referendum  to  fund  the  acquisition,  improvement  and  development  of  the  types  of  parks,  trails,  green  space  and  recreation  facilities  most  important  to their household (Figure  26).         

Figure 26 ‐ Voting on a Bond Referendum 

 

38 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  2.3 DEMOGRAPHICS AND TRENDS ANALYSIS  2.3.1  DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS  The  Demographic  Analysis  provides  an  understanding  of  the  population  characteristics  of  the  potential  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  participatory  base.    This  analysis  demonstrates  the  overall  size  of  the  total  population  by  specific  age  segment,  race  and  ethnicity,  and  economic  status  and  spending  power  of  the  residents  through  household  income statistics.  2.3.2  SUMMARY  Mecklenburg  County  is  the  most  populous  and  densely  populated  county  in  the  State  of  North Carolina.  However, in stark contrast to the most populated county in the continental  United  States  –  New  York  County,  New  York,  which  had  an  estimated  persons  per  square  mile for 2006 of 66,940, Mecklenburg County has a sparse 1,321.5 persons per square mile  (695,454 persons divided by 526.3 square miles), or 2.06 persons per acre (695,454 persons  divided  by  336,819.2  acres).    The  County’s  population  density  equates  to  a  little  less  than  one tenth (8.3%) of the total North Carolina average of 165.2 persons per square mile.  Formed 246 years ago, Mecklenburg County contains 7 municipalities, including the city of  Charlotte and the towns of Cornelius, Davidson, Huntersville, Matthews, Mint Hill, Pineville  and portions of Stallings.  Between 2000 and 2007 the County experienced healthy growth  which  resulted  in  an  estimated  increase  of  nearly  157,945  persons  to  a  current  estimated  total of 852,657 persons.  Mecklenburg County has a relatively young population – 50.3%, or 428,830 persons, of the  total estimated population is 34 years of age or younger.  Only 24.6%, or 209,736 persons,  are aged 50 or older.  The gender distribution is split equally amongst the male and female,  a composition that is expected to stay relatively constant throughout the study period.  The  service  area  is  primarily  made  up  of  persons  classified  as  white  (60.2%;  526,716  total  persons) and black/African American (27.5%; 235,486 total persons); persons of Hispanic or  Latino origin account for only 8.2% (70,191 total persons) of the total population.  Current  median  household  income  for  the  County  is  estimated  at  $65,741,  sizably  greater  than  both  the  national  and  state  averages;  U.S.  median  household  income  for  2006  was  estimated at $48,451 and the State of North Carolina reported median household incomes  of  $41,616.  Household  incomes  reported  within  the  County  have  been  steadily  increasing  over  the  last  few  decades.    The  1990  Census  reported  a  median  household  income  of  $33,818  and  a  2000  median  household  income  of  $50,638.    Although  median  household  income  has  risen  in  the  past  years  nationwide,  total  individual  income  has  dropped;  this  phenomenon  is  due  to  the  increase  in  multiple  household  occupants  participating  in  the  work force.  2.3.3  METHODOLOGY  Demographic data used for the analysis was obtained from Environmental Systems Research  Institute,  Inc.  (ESRI),  the  largest  research  and  development  organization  dedicated  to   

39

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Geographical  Information  Systems  (GIS)  and  specializing  in  population  projections  and  market  trends.    All  data  was  acquired  in  January  2008  and  reflects  actual  numbers  as  reported in the 2000 Census and demographic projections for 2007 and 2012 as estimated  by  ESRI.    Straight  line  linear  regression  was  utilized  for  projected  2017  and  2022  demographics.  2.3.4  TOTAL POPULATION  Mecklenburg County has grown at a steady annual rate of 3.3% since 2000.  From 2000 to  2007, the County increased by an estimated 157,945 persons resulting in an estimated total  population of 852,657 persons today.  During much of this same period (2000 to 2006) the  State  of  North  Carolina‘s  population  growth  has  been  estimated  at  10.0%  overall  (1.43%  annual  rate)  –  an  increase  of  807,192  persons  from  2000  (estimated  population  of  8,049,313) to 2006 (estimated population of 8,856,505).   Population  categorization  by  major  age  segment  illustrates  the  relatively  even  age  distribution of the County (see Figure 27).   

Mecklenburg County; Population by Major Age Segment

     

100%

 

90%

 

80%

 

70%

 

60%

 

109,490

191,842

224,513

258,663

270,157

310,753

351,035

391,423 55+

50% 40%

 

213,822

153,672

35-54 196,951

214,142

238,378

252,637

269,594

<18

30%

 

20%

 

10%

 

0%

18-34

174,447

214,690

2000 Census 2007 Estimate

 

241,166

2012 Projection

269,557

297,431

2017 Projection

2022 Projection So urce: ESRI

 

Figure 27 ‐ Population by Major Age Segment 

  Currently, slightly more than half of the population is under the age of 35 (428,830 persons  34 & under; 852,657 total persons – 50.3%) and the largest single age group in the County is  35  to  54  age  segment  (270,155  persons  35  to  54;  852,657  total  persons  –  31.7%).    As  of  2006 18.0% of the total state population was aged 55 and above (2,045,950 persons aged  55+; 8,856,505 total persons).  However, when compared to Mecklenburg County, the state  composition of 55+ individuals is 5% more.  The County’s populace of 55+ numbers 153,672   

 

40 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

in  2007,  and  represents  18.0%  of  the  total  County  population.    This  youthful  population  composition blended with such natural beauty and resources, as well as favorable weather  patterns,  lends  itself  to  a  very  wide  range  of  recreational,  educational,  and  entertainment  opportunities.  2.3.5  POPULATION GROWTH  Growth  is  expected  to  steadily  continue  for  the  County  over  the  next  five  years  but  at  a  slightly lower pace than was experienced from 2000 to 2007 (annual growth rate of 3.3%),  an  annual  growth  rate  of  3.0%  is  expected  between  2007  and  2012  resulting  in  a  total  projected population for the County of  982,136 persons by 2012.  While  most  of  the  population  segments  are  expected  to  grow  in  number  in  the  next  five  years, it is projected that the County’s largest increases will be among the maturing adults  and mature adult segments. The five age segments with the largest percentage growth from  2007 to 2012 are projected to be:  •

60 – 64 years of age; 36.2% five year increase (33,216 to 45,230 persons) 



18 – 24 years of age; 29.0% five year increase (80,980 to 104,490 persons) 



85+ years of age; 28.4% five year increase (9,697 to 12,453 persons) 



65 – 74 years of age; 28.0% five year increase (37,888 to 48,496 persons) 



50 – 54 years of age; 24.2% five year increase (56,064 to 69,608 persons) 

Three of the top five ranked age segments in terms of percent growth from 2007 to 2012  (60‐64,  85+  and  65‐74)  contribute  to  the  55+  age  segment  (orange  block  in  Figure  27)  experiencing  the  greatest  percentage  growth  (5.0%  growth;  38,167  total  persons)  and  coming in second in total population per age segment to the 35‐54 age group (3.0% growth;  40,598 total persons).  Although the service area will begin to age, 73.4% of the population is still projected to be  under the age of 50 in 2012.   2.3.6  GENDER  The  gender  distribution  of  the  County  is  nearly  equal  (Figure  28).    This  distribution  is  projected to remain constant throughout the next five, ten, and fifteen year study periods.  Analyzing  the  population  by  gender  reveals  that  as  the  population  increases  in  age  the  female  share  of  the  population  also  increases.    For  2007,  the  under‐25  population  is  comprised of 51.0% male and 49.0% female.  As the population ages, the male composition  decreases resulting in a female majority.  Males comprise only 45.0% of the 50+ population  while females account for 55.0% of the 50+ population.  The gender disparity widens when  analyzing  those  aged  65+  –  the  gap  widens  by  5.0%  –  40.0%  male  as  compared  to  60.0%  female.  Similar  trends  are  anticipated  in  the  future.    Analyzing  this  breakdown  along  with  the  propensity  of  the  North  Carolinians  to  participate  in  outdoor  recreational  trends  and  cultural arts indicates a potential market geared toward the mature females may exist.  

 

41

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Men continue to outpace women in regards to gender participatory trends although the gap  has begun to decrease – 63.7% of women participate in an activity at least once per year as  compared to 64.2% of men.   While  men  and  women share a desire  for many of the same  activities,  men  claim  to  participate  in  their  favorite  activities  more  often  than  women in any ninety‐ day span.  With more  women  not  only  comprising  a  larger  portion of the general  populace  during  the  mature  stages  of  the  lifecycle,  but  also  participating  in 

Mecklenburg County; Total Population (by Gender)

1,200,000 1,100,000 1,000,000 601,983

900,000

542,426

800,000

484,524

700,000 600,000

- Male

420,446

- Female

341,102

500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000

353,611

432,211

497,612

615,038

555,287

100,000 2000 Census

2007 Estimate

2012 Projection

2017 Projection

2022 Projection

Source: U.S. Census & ESRI

recreational  activities  Figure 28 ‐ Total Population by Gender  further  into  adulthood,  a  relatively  new  market  has  appeared  over  the  last  two  decades.    This  mature  female demographic is opting for less team oriented activities which dominate the female  youth  recreational  environment,  instead  shifting  more  towards  a  diverse  selection  of  individual participant activities.    2.3.7  RACE AND ETHNICITY  Mecklenburg  County  Mecklenburg County Service Area; Population By Race is  predominantly  (2007) comprised  of  persons  classified  as  white.  62% With  60.2%  of  the  total  population  (526,716  of  the  estimated  852,657  persons  in  the  2007  population  are  classified  as  white  28% alone),  the  white  2% 0% alone  populace  is  4% 4% 0% roughly twice as large 

White Black/African American American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Tw o or More Races

So urce: ESRI

as  the  next  ethnic  Figure 29 ‐ Population Diversity, 2007  group,  Black/African  American.  Persons classified as Black/African American are currently estimated at 27.5% of   

 

42 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

the County population, or an estimated 235,486 total persons.  The remainder of the racial  categorization  (roughly  12%)  is  split  amongst  all  other  races.    The  current  racial/ethnic  composition  is  projected  to  remain  constant  during  the  remainder  of  the  study  period,  as  illustrated in Figure 29 and 30.   Persons  of  any  Mecklenburg County Servcie Area; Population By Race race  in  (2012) combination  with  being  classified  as  61% being  of  Hispanic  or  Latino  origin  account  for  nearly  ten  percent  of  the  population  (8.2%;  70,191  persons).   Future  projections  (Figure  30)  do  27% 2% indicate  a  slight  0% decrease  in  the  5% 5% white  population;  0% however, the basic  compilation of the  Figure 30 ‐ Population Diversity, 2012  racial/ethnic  structure is projected to remain relatively unchanged. 

White Black/African American American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Tw o or More Races

Source: ESRI

Ethnic  minority  groups  in  the  United  States  are  strongly  regionalized  and  urbanized  and  these trends are projected to continue.  Different ethnic groups have different needs when  it comes to recreational activities.  Ethnic minority groups, along with Generations X and Y,  are  coming  in  ever‐greater  contact  with  white  middle‐class  baby‐boomers  with  different  recreational  habits  and  preferences.    This  can  be  a  sensitive  subject  since  many  baby‐ boomers  are  the  last  demographic  to  have  graduated  high  school  in  segregated  environments, and the generational gap magnifies numerous ideals and values differences  which  many  baby‐boomers  are  unaccustomed  to.    This  trend  is  projected  to  increase  as  more baby‐boomers begin to retire and both the minority and youth populations continue  to increase. 

 

43

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  2.3.8  HOUSEHOLDS AND INCOME  Currently,  there  is  an  estimated  340,254  households  in  Mecklenburg  County  with  an  average household size of 2.45 persons.  In comparison, the State of North Carolina has the  relatively  same  average  household  size  –  2.49  –  while  the  average  household  size  for  the  entire U.S. is 2.61.    Income characteristics for the County mimic those of both the state and nation, but are on  average 58.9% higher than those for the State of North Carolina and on average are 44.5%  higher than the U.S income averages.  The estimated 2007 median household income in the  County is $ $65,741, up an astounding 29.8% from $ $50,638 reported in the 2000 Census  (see  Figure  31).    This  represents  the  earnings  of  all  persons  age  16  years  or  older  living  together in a housing unit.    Household Income; Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 2000 2007 2012 Income Range Census Estimate Projection Less than $15,000 28,247 36,561 744 $15,000 to $24,999 27,688 37,437 709 $25,000 to $34,999 34,101 35,235 1,005 $35,000 to $49,999 44,710 51,732 1,993 $50,000 to $74,999 58,289 61,309 5,002 $75,000 to $99,999 33,355 42,628 4,796 $100,000 to $149,999 27,381 39,106 9,209 $150,000 to $199,999 8,712 13,621 8,313 $200,000 or More 11,078 18,262 14,157 Average HH Income $ 68,732 $ 90,972 $ 112,823 Median HH Income $ 50,638 $ 65,741 $ 78,572 Per Capita Income $ 27,352 $ 36,594 $ 45,527

  ∆ Pop/$, '00-'07 8,314 9,749 1,134 7,022 3,020 9,273 11,725 4,909 7,184 $ 22,240 $ 15,103 $ 9,242

∆ %, ∆ Pop/$, '00-'07 '07-'12 29.4% (35,817) 35.2% (36,728) 3.3% (34,230) 15.7% (49,739) 5.2% (56,307) 27.8% (37,832) 42.8% (29,897) 56.3% (5,308) 64.8% (4,105) 32.4% $ 21,851 29.8% $ 12,831 33.8% $ 8,933

∆ %, '07-'12 -98.0% -98.1% -97.1% -96.1% -91.8% -88.7% -76.5% -39.0% -22.5% 24.0% 19.5% 24.4%

Source: U.S. Census and ESRI

Figure 31 ‐ Household Income by Range 

 

 

44 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

This  significant  increase  implies  that  significant  business  development  or  relocation  has  occurred  within  the  service  area  during  this  period.    The  County  has  similar  income  characteristics to both the  Mecklenburg County; Income Characteristics compared to state  and  national  the State of North Carolina and to the U.S. Averages averages (Figure 32).  Average  household  income  has  also  experienced a rather large  increase over the reported  2000  Census  –  rising  from  $57,184  to  an  estimated   $90,972.    Analyzing  the  households  by  income  range  reveals  that  52.1%  of  all  householda  earn  more  than  $50,000  per  year and 33.8% earn more  than  $75,000  per  year.    A  healthy household income  signifies  the  presence  of  disposable  income,  all  income  available  after  taxes,  and  therefore  the  ability  to  fund  various  entertainment, recreation,  and leisure activities.    

$120,000

$90,972

$95,000 $65,741

$66,570

$70,000

$57,184 41,616 $36,594

$45,000

25,267 22,945

$20,000

-$5,000 Mecklenburg County Est. 2007 Median HH Income

North Carolina, Est. 2006

Av erage HH Income

U.S. Average, Est. 2006

Per Capita Income

So urce: U.S. Census

Figure 32 ‐ Income Characteristics as Compared to State and National Averages 

     

 

48,451

45

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  CHAPTER THREE  ‐ GENERAL PARK AND FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT PLAN  3.1 PARK CLASSIFICATIONS AND FACILITY STANDARDS  3.1.1  PARK CLASSIFICATIONS  Each  type  of  park  classification  category  serves  a  specific  purpose,  and  the  amenities  and  facilities in each park type must be designed for the number of citizens the park is intended  to  serve,  drive  time,  active  and  passive  amenities,  and  the  uses  it  has  been  assigned.  The  Park  Classifications  have  been  updated  from  the  1992  Master  Plan  and  the  District  Park  Classification  has  been  dropped  and  Community  and  Neighborhood  School  Park  Classifications added for this Master Plan.   3.1.1.1   REGIONAL PARKS  Regional  Parks  ideally  shall  be  a  minimum  of  100  acres  in  size  or  larger  and  shall  serve  a  broad  geographic  region  of  the  County.    Each  citizen  living  within  the  County  shall  have  access to a regional park by driving no more than 20 minutes.  Regional Parks shall serve a  population  standard  of  five  (5)  acres/1000  persons.    Amenities  within  these  parks  will  be  both active and passive in nature.  Regional Parks will support competitive athletic leagues  and tournaments and have numerous athletic and passive park amenities such as tennis and  basketball  courts,  softball/baseball,  multi‐purpose  fields,  shelters,  playgrounds,  walking  trails  and  other  amenities  that  provide  for  an  all  day  experience.    Indoor  facilities  such  as  shelters, recreation centers, aquatic centers, and other special facilities are also typical in a  regional  park.    100  FT.  buffers  shall  be  maintained  around  the  entire  perimeter  of  these  parks.  3.1.1.2   COMMUNITY PARKS  Community Parks ideally shall be a minimum of 20‐100 acres in size and shall serve a more  localized service area within a geographic area of the County.  Each citizen living within the  County  shall  have  access  to  a  community  park  by  driving  no  more  than  15  minutes.   Community  Parks  shall  also  serve  a  population  standard  of  four  (4)  acres/1000  persons.   Amenities  within  these  parks  will  be  both  active  and  passive  in  nature  but  will  not  be  developed to the extent of regional parks.  Both active and passive type amenities similar to  regional  parks  will  be  permissible  but  not  to  the  quantity,  size  and  tournament  quality  standards  of  regional  parks.    100  FT.  buffers  shall  be  maintained  around  the  entire  perimeter of these parks.  3.1.1.3   NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS  Neighborhood  Parks  ideally  shall  be  a  minimum  of  2‐20  acres  in  size  and  shall  serve  the  immediately  adjacent,  local  neighborhood.    Each  citizen  living  within  this  area  shall  have  access to a neighborhood park by walking no more than a standard city block distance of six  (6)  blocks.    Neighborhood  Parks  shall  serve  a  population  standard  of  three  (3)  acres/1000  persons.  There will be no parking lots or restroom facilities provided at neighborhood parks.   Amenities will be informal in nature and may include picnic shelters, benches, multi‐purpose   

 

46 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

fields, ½ basketball and volleyball courts and walking trails among other amenities.  The 100  FT perimeter buffer requirement of regional and district parks is desired but not mandated.  3.1.1.4   SCHOOL / PARK  School Parks are facilities built in conjunction with the sighting of a school.  Most typically  these will be elementary schools‐ but middle and high school sites may also be considered.   School Parks shall serve a population standard of ½ acre/1000 persons.  Joint use facilities  will  be  the  primary  goal  of  a  school  park  and  may  include  amenities  such  as  ballfields,  playgrounds, basketball courts, multi‐purpose fields, parking lots and even indoor facilities  such as gyms, offices and classrooms.  3.1.2  FACILITY STANDARDS  Facility Standards are guidelines that define service areas based on population that support  investment  decisions  related  to  facilities  and  amenities.    Facility  Standards  can  and  will  change  over  time  as  the  program  lifecycles  change  and  demographics  of  a  community  change.   PROS evaluated park facility standards using a combination of resources.  These resources  included:  National  Recreation  and  Park  Association  (NRPA)  guidelines;  Best  Practices  of  other  cities/county’s  similar  in  size  to  Mecklenburg  County  (including  Maryland  National  Planning  Commission,  Fairfax  County  Virginia,  Lake  County,  Illinois,  and  Oakland  County,  Michigan);  recreation  activity  participation  rates  reported  by  American  Sports  Data  as  it  applies  to  activities  that  occur  in  the  United  States  and  the  Mecklenburg  County  area;  community  stakeholder  and  citizens  survey  input;  findings  from  the  prioritized  needs  assessment report and general observations by PROS.  This information allowed standards  to be customized to Mecklenburg County.  Figure 33 shows the Facility Standards for 2008.   Figure 34 shows the Facility Standards for 2012.  Figure 35 shows the Facility Standards for  2017.   PROS  did  not  incorporate  private  facilities  into  the  standard  based  on  their  membership  requirements.  PROS recognizes that these private facilities provide some level of recreation  contribution, but by the nature of having memberships create non‐stable use.  Non‐stable  use means people sign up for a membership and then after two or three years drop out of  their  membership  and  expect  public  facilities  to  be  there  for  them  when  they  do.   Membership organizations on average lose 30% of their membership annually.  The land acquisition standards will be a difficult challenge to achieve; however, the County  Real‐estate  Department  is  prepared  to  work  toward  meeting  these  needs  and  will  follow  this process.  • Seek to partner with schools on the acquisition and development of school parks to  support school and neighborhood park needs  • Work  with  other  public  agencies  in  the  County  that  acquire  property  for  utility  purposes to coordinate efforts to lease ground or obtain easements for park related  purposes  • Seek  grants  and  other  funding  opportunities  to  supplement  the  land  acquisition  budget   

47

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

• Seek to acquire sensitive natural areas before development occurs through right of  first refusal and through conservation easements as well as fee simple purchases  • Work with local land trusts to assist the County in acquiring sensitive natural areas  • Work  with  local  developers  and  Planning  Departments  on  providing  park  land  as  part of the development or re‐development process  • Through  the  GAP  analysis,  the  County  will  not  be  acquiring  land  or  developing  recreation facilities where a private facility provider has existing facilities.  Through  the CCORP Plan (see Appendix 7), the County has documentation of these facilities  and will use this information in their decision‐making process so as to compliment  services rather than duplicate services where the standard needs to be met       

 

 

48 

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

     

Mecklenburg County - Facility Standards Current 2007 Inventory - Developed Facilities

PARKS:

     

Park Type

Unit of Measure

Mecklenburg County Inventory

Boys & CMS Total Girls Club Total YMCA Total (6)

Service Levels - Current, National, and Recommended Total Combined Inventory

Municipal Inventory

Typical National Standards / BEST PRACTICES

Current Service Level

2008 Facility Standards

Recommended Standards; Revised for Local Service Area

Meet Standard/ Need Exists

Additonal Facilities/ Amenities Needed

Neighborhood / School Parks (Acres) 2 - 20 acres

Acre(s)

641.74

77.30

-

-

242.13

961.17

1.13

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,597 Acre(s)

Community Parks (Acres) 20 - 100 acres

Acre(s)

2,016.34

26.30

-

-

295.50

2,338.14

2.74

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,072 Acre(s)

Need Exists

559 Acre(s)

Regional Parks (Acres) 100+ acres

Acre(s)

3,703.95

-

-

-

-

3,703.95

4.34

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

Special Use - Golf/Sports Park/Other (Acres) (1)

Acre(s)

1,714.60

-

-

-

8.90

1,723.50

2.02

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000 Meets Standard

Total Park and Special Use Acreage

Acre(s)

8,076.63

103.60

-

-

546.53

8,726.76

10.23

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

4,000

Need Exists

Nature/Preserve Area (Acres)

Acre(s)

6,545.65

-

-

-

-

6,545.65

7.68

acres per

1,000

Greenways (Acres)

Acre(s)

3,131.02

-

-

-

-

3,131.02

3.67

acres per

1,000

Total Other Open Space Acreage

Acre(s)

9,676.67

-

-

-

-

9,676.67

11.35

acres per

1,000

Total Combined Inventory Acreage

Acre(s)

17,753.30

103.60

-

-

546.53

18,403.43

21.58

0.00

1,000

121.00

2.00

5.00

2.00

22.00

152.00

1.00

structure per

5,610

1.00

structure per

2,500

- Acre(s) 3,229 Acre(s)

AMENITIES: (2) Playgrounds

Structures(s)

1.00 structure per

61 Structures(s)

Outdoor Pools (2)

Site(s)

2.00

-

-

7.00

-

9.00

1.00

site per

94,740

1.00

site per

20,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

8 Site(s)

Spraygrounds (2)

Site(s)

5.00

-

-

-

-

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

25,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

12 Site(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Large

Structures(s)

16.00

-

-

-

-

16.00

1.00

structure per

53,291

1.00

structure per

20,000

1.00 structure per

20,000

Need Exists

27 Structures(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small (3)

Structures(s)

135.00

-

-

6.00

-

141.00

1.00

structure per

6,047

1.00

structure per

5,000

1.00 structure per

10,000 Meets Standard

1.00 structure per

- Structures(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Indoor

Structures(s)

7.00

-

-

-

-

7.00

1.00

structure per

121,808

1.00

structure per

50,000

50,000

Need Exists

Trails - All Surfaces - Paved (Miles) (4)

Mile(s)

86.69

0.13

-

0.50

16.00

103.31

0.10

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

Need Exists

Basketball Courts

Court(s)

108.00

3.00

2.00

2.00

12.00

127.00

1.00

court per

6,714

1.00

court per

2,500

1.00

court per

5,000

Need Exists

44 Court(s)

Tennis Courts

Court(s)

136.00

5.50

-

7.00

21.00

169.50

1.00

court per

5,030

1.00

court per

4,000

1.00

court per

4,000

Need Exists

44 Court(s)

Volleyball Courts

Court(s)

42.00

-

-

1.00

2.00

45.00

1.00

court per

18,948

1.00

court per

15,000

1.00

court per

15,000

Need Exists

12 Court(s)

Dog Parks (3 acre minimum)

Site(s)

4.00

-

-

-

1.00

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

12 Site(s)

-

3.00

1.00

site per

284,219

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

6 Site(s)

3.00

1.00

site per

213,164

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

6 Site(s)

Skateparks

Site(s)

2.00

Nature Centers

Site(s)

3.00

-

1.00 -

-

-

13 Structures(s) 238 Mile(s)

Aquatic Center/Indoor Pool (Square Feet)

Square Feet

65,593

-

-

-

-

65,593

0.08

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

360,736 Square Feet

Recreation/Fitness Center Space (Square Feet)

Square Feet

387,122

-

-

482,000

58,000

927,122

1.09

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

351,864 Square Feet

Notes: 1. Special Uses include Special Facilities, Recreation Centers, Pools, Golf Courses and Historic Sites 2. Two (2) Outdoor Pools include Cordelia and Double Oaks, while the rest are all included as Spraygrounds 3. Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small include Pavilions Medium, Pavilions small, Decks and Wedding Sites. It also includes the Outdoor Shelters listed by the YMCA among the secondary providers 4. Trails - All Surfaces include Bike Trails, Hiking Trails, Multipurpose Trails and Walking Trails 5. Recreation/Fitness Space includes Recreation Centers and Fitness Centers 6. School Park sites are not available to the community throughout the day, the school park acreage and inventories have been counted as 50% of the total acreage available. The sites used are the 13 facilities with recognized Joint Use Agreements 7. The Other Providers do not include HOAs, apartment complexes or universities since they are not truly available for community use and restricted to only a small population number Estimated Population - 2007: Projected Population - 2012: Projected Population - 2017: Projected Population - 2022:

852,657 982,136 1,097,712 1,217,020

Figure 33 ‐ Mecklenburg County ‐ Facility Standards 2008 

49 

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department        

Mecklenburg County - Facility Standards Current 2007 Inventory - Developed Facilities

PARKS:

Mecklenburg County Inventory

Boys & CMS Total Girls Club (6) Total YMCA Total

Service Levels - Current, National, and Recommended Total Combined Inventory

Municipal Inventory

Typical National Standards / BEST PRACTICES

Current Service Level

2012 Facility Standards

Recommended Standards; Revised for Local Service Area

Meet Standard/ Need Exists

Additonal Facilities/ Amenities Needed

Park Type

Unit of Measure

Neighborhood / School Parks (Acres) 2 - 20 acres

Acre(s)

641.74

77.30

-

-

242.13

961.17

1.13

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,985 Acre(s)

Community Parks (Acres) 20 - 100 acres

Acre(s)

2,016.34

26.30

-

-

295.50

2,338.14

2.74

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,590 Acre(s)

Regional Parks (Acres) 100+ acres

Acre(s)

3,703.95

-

-

-

-

3,703.95

4.34

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,207 Acre(s)

Special Use - Golf/Sports Park/Other (Acres) (1)

Acre(s)

1,714.60

-

-

-

8.90

1,723.50

2.02

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000 Meets Standard

Total Park and Special Use Acreage

Acre(s)

8,076.63

103.60

-

-

546.53

8,726.76

10.23

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

4,000

Need Exists

94 Structures(s)

Nature/Preserve Area (Acres)

Acre(s)

6,545.65

-

-

-

-

6,545.65

7.68

acres per

1,000

Greenways (Acres)

Acre(s)

3,131.02

-

-

-

-

3,131.02

3.67

acres per

1,000

Total Other Open Space Acreage

Acre(s)

9,676.67

-

-

-

-

9,676.67

11.35

acres per

1,000

Total Combined Inventory Acreage

Acre(s)

17,753.30

103.60

-

-

546.53

18,403.43

21.58

0.00

1,000

121.00

2.00

5.00

2.00

22.00

152.00

1.00

structure per

5,610

1.00

structure per

2,500

- Acre(s) 4,782 Acre(s)

AMENITIES: (2) Playgrounds

Structures(s)

1.00 structure per

Outdoor Pools (2)

Site(s)

2.00

-

-

7.00

-

9.00

1.00

site per

94,740

1.00

site per

20,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

11 Site(s)

Spraygrounds (2)

Site(s)

5.00

-

-

-

-

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

25,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

15 Site(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Large

Structures(s)

16.00

-

-

-

-

16.00

1.00

structure per

53,291

1.00

structure per

20,000

1.00 structure per

20,000

Need Exists

33 Structures(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small (3)

Structures(s)

135.00

-

-

6.00

-

141.00

1.00

structure per

6,047

1.00

structure per

5,000

1.00 structure per

10,000 Meets Standard

Picnic Pavilions - Indoor

Structures(s)

7.00

-

-

-

-

7.00

1.00

structure per

121,808

1.00

structure per

50,000

1.00 structure per

50,000

Need Exists

- Structures(s) 13 Structures(s) 290 Mile(s)

Trails - All Surfaces - Paved (Miles) (4)

Mile(s)

86.69

0.13

-

0.50

16.00

103.31

0.10

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

Need Exists

Basketball Courts

Court(s)

108.00

3.00

2.00

2.00

12.00

127.00

1.00

court per

6,714

1.00

court per

2,500

1.00

court per

5,000

Need Exists

69 Court(s)

Tennis Courts

Court(s)

136.00

5.50

-

7.00

21.00

169.50

1.00

court per

5,030

1.00

court per

4,000

1.00

court per

4,000

Need Exists

76 Court(s)

Volleyball Courts

Court(s)

42.00

-

-

1.00

2.00

45.00

1.00

court per

18,948

1.00

court per

15,000

1.00

court per

15,000

Need Exists

20 Court(s)

Dog Parks (3 acre minimum)

Site(s)

4.00

-

-

-

1.00

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

15 Site(s)

Skateparks

Site(s)

2.00

-

-

3.00

1.00

site per

284,219

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

7 Site(s)

Nature Centers

Site(s)

3.00

3.00

1.00

site per

213,164

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

7 Site(s)

-

1.00 -

-

-

Aquatic Center/Indoor Pool (Square Feet)

Square Feet

65,593

-

-

-

-

65,593

0.08

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

425,475 Square Feet

Recreation/Fitness Center Space (Square Feet)

Square Feet

387,122

-

-

482,000

58,000

927,122

1.09

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

546,082 Square Feet

Notes: 1. Special Uses include Special Facilities, Recreation Centers, Pools, Golf Courses and Historic Sites 2. Two (2) Outdoor Pools include Cordelia and Double Oaks, while the rest are all included as Spraygrounds 3. Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small include Pavilions Medium, Pavilions small, Decks and Wedding Sites. It also includes the Outdoor Shelters listed by the YMCA among the secondary providers 4. Trails - All Surfaces include Bike Trails, Hiking Trails, Multipurpose Trails and Walking Trails 5. Recreation/Fitness Space includes Recreation Centers and Fitness Centers 6. School Park sites are not available to the community throughout the day, the school park acreage and inventories have been counted as 50% of the total acreage available. The sites used are the 13 facilities with recognized Joint Use Agreements 7. The Other Providers do not include HOAs, apartment complexes or universities since they are not truly available for community use and restricted to only a small population number Estimated Population - 2007: Projected Population - 2012: Projected Population - 2017: Projected Population - 2022:

852,657 982,136 1,097,712 1,217,020

Figure 34 ‐ Mecklenburg County ‐ Facility Standards 2012 

 

 

50 

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

 

Mecklenburg County - Facility Standards

   

Current 2007 Inventory - Developed Facilities

PARKS:

Mecklenburg County Inventory

Boys & CMS Total Girls Club (6) Total YMCA Total

Service Levels - Current, National, and Recommended Total Combined Inventory

Municipal Inventory

Typical National Standards / BEST PRACTICES

Current Service Level

2017 Facility Standards

Recommended Standards; Revised for Local Service Area

Meet Standard/ Need Exists

Additonal Facilities/ Amenities Needed

Park Type

Unit of Measure

Neighborhood / School Parks (Acres) 2 - 20 acres

Acre(s)

641.74

77.30

-

-

242.13

961.17

1.13

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

3.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

2,332 Acre(s)

Community Parks (Acres) 20 - 100 acres

Acre(s)

2,016.34

26.30

-

-

295.50

2,338.14

2.74

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

4.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

2,053 Acre(s)

Regional Parks (Acres) 100+ acres

Acre(s)

3,703.95

-

-

-

-

3,703.95

4.34

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

5.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

1,785 Acre(s)

Special Use - Golf/Sports Park/Other (Acres) (1)

Acre(s)

1,714.60

-

-

-

8.90

1,723.50

2.02

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000

1.00

acres per

1,000 Meets Standard

Total Park and Special Use Acreage

Acre(s)

8,076.63

103.60

-

-

546.53

8,726.76

10.23

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

13.00

acres per

1,000

Need Exists

Nature/Preserve Area (Acres)

Acre(s)

6,545.65

-

-

-

-

6,545.65

7.68

acres per

1,000

Greenways (Acres)

Acre(s)

3,131.02

-

-

-

-

3,131.02

3.67

acres per

1,000

Total Other Open Space Acreage

Acre(s)

9,676.67

-

-

-

-

9,676.67

11.35

acres per

1,000

Total Combined Inventory Acreage

Acre(s)

17,753.30

103.60

-

-

546.53

18,403.43

21.58

0.00

1,000

121.00

2.00

5.00

2.00

22.00

152.00

1.00

structure per

5,610

1.00

structure per

2,500

-

-

7.00

-

9.00

1.00

site per

94,740

1.00

site per

20,000

- Acre(s) 6,169 Acre(s)

AMENITIES: (2) Playgrounds

Structures(s)

Outdoor Pools (2)

Site(s)

2.00

1.00 structure per

4,000

Need Exists

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

122 Structures(s) 13 Site(s)

site per

Spraygrounds (2)

Site(s)

5.00

-

-

-

-

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

25,000

1.00

50,000

Need Exists

17 Site(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Large

Structures(s)

16.00

-

-

-

-

16.00

1.00

structure per

53,291

1.00

structure per

20,000

1.00 structure per

20,000

Need Exists

39 Structures(s)

Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small (3)

Structures(s)

135.00

-

-

6.00

-

141.00

1.00

structure per

6,047

1.00

structure per

5,000

1.00 structure per

10,000 Meets Standard

Picnic Pavilions - Indoor

Structures(s)

7.00

-

-

-

-

7.00

1.00

structure per

121,808

1.00

structure per

50,000

1.00 structure per

50,000

Need Exists

Trails - All Surfaces - Paved (Miles) (4)

Mile(s)

86.69

0.13

-

0.50

16.00

103.31

0.10

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

0.40

miles per

1,000

Need Exists

- Structures(s) 15 Structures(s) 336 Mile(s)

Basketball Courts

Court(s)

108.00

3.00

2.00

2.00

12.00

127.00

1.00

court per

6,714

1.00

court per

2,500

1.00

court per

5,000

Need Exists

93 Court(s)

Tennis Courts

Court(s)

136.00

5.50

-

7.00

21.00

169.50

1.00

court per

5,030

1.00

court per

4,000

1.00

court per

4,000

Need Exists

105 Court(s)

Volleyball Courts

Court(s)

42.00

-

-

1.00

2.00

45.00

1.00

court per

18,948

1.00

court per

15,000

1.00

court per

15,000

Need Exists

28 Court(s)

Dog Parks (3 acre minimum)

Site(s)

4.00

-

-

-

1.00

5.00

1.00

site per

170,531

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

50,000

Need Exists

17 Site(s)

Skateparks

Site(s)

2.00

-

-

1.00

-

3.00

1.00

site per

284,219

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

8 Site(s)

Nature Centers

Site(s)

3.00

-

-

-

-

3.00

1.00

site per

213,164

1.00

site per

50,000

1.00

site per

100,000

Need Exists

8 Site(s)

Aquatic Center/Indoor Pool (Square Feet)

Square Feet

65,593

-

-

-

-

65,593

0.08

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

0.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

483,263 Square Feet

Recreation/Fitness Center Space (Square Feet)

Square Feet

387,122

-

-

482,000

58,000

927,122

1.09

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

1.50

SF per

person

Need Exists

719,446 Square Feet

Notes: 1. Special Uses include Special Facilities, Recreation Centers, Pools, Golf Courses and Historic Sites 2. Two (2) Outdoor Pools include Cordelia and Double Oaks, while the rest are all included as Spraygrounds 3. Picnic Pavilions - Medium/Small include Pavilions Medium, Pavilions small, Decks and Wedding Sites. It also includes the Outdoor Shelters listed by the YMCA among the secondary providers 4. Trails - All Surfaces include Bike Trails, Hiking Trails, Multipurpose Trails and Walking Trails 5. Recreation/Fitness Space includes Recreation Centers and Fitness Centers 6. School Park sites are not available to the community throughout the day, the school park acreage and inventories have been counted as 50% of the total acreage available. The sites used are the 13 facilities with recognized Joint Use Agreements 7. The Other Providers do not include HOAs, apartment complexes or universities since they are not truly available for community use and restricted to only a small population number Estimated Population - 2007: Projected Population - 2012: Projected Population - 2017: Projected Population - 2022:

852,657 982,136 1,097,712 1,217,020 Figure 35 ‐ Mecklenburg County ‐ Facility Standards 2017 

51 

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department                     This Page Intentionally Left Blank     

 

 

52 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  3.2 FACILITY CAPACITY DEMAND STANDARDS MODEL  3.2.1  INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE  PROS  prepared  customized  sports  field  asset  facility  standards  with  the  PROS  Capacity– Demand Standards Model tm (CDSM).  This process supports evaluation of the various assets  ability to meet demand (scheduled utilization) with the existing capacity.  The  basis  for  the  PROS  CDSM  is  quantifying  current  suggested  capacity  of  assets  and  comparing to current actual demand by unique individual usage.  As an asset management  and  program  planning  tool  directed  to  all  levels  of  department  administration  and  staff,  along with legislative boards and commissions, the Capacity–Demand Standards Model tm  will  identify  and  integrate  the  benefits  of  properly  managed  assets  that  lead  to  better  decision  making  regarding  athletic  assets.    Prioritized  recommendations  in  the  report  address  optimal  turf  management  strategies  and  effectiveness  in  field  allocation.    This  model addresses short‐term and long‐term asset requirements based on current day usage  patterns.  3.2.1.1   CAPACITY DEMAND OVERVIEW  Capacity  and  demand  are  exclusive  measurements,  independent  of  one  another.   Measurement,  defined  as  “something  ascertained  by  comparison  to  a  standard”,  is  the  ultimate  product  of  the  Capacity–Demand  Standards  Model.    Utilizing  the  suggested  capacity  as  the  independent  variable  in  the  function  allows  for demand  to  be  a  measured  solely on what specifically occurs.  Simply stated, capacity and demand may be demonstrated by a bathtub; the actual tub itself  represents the capacity – the ability to hold water, the suggested use.  Demand equates to  the  substance  that  is  released  into  the  tub  –  whether  it  be  water,  rocks,  sand,  or  toys.   Substance flowing over the rim signifies the tub is above capacity while a tub with substance  below the rim signifies the tub is operating below capacity.  The CDSM was created in response to the commonly used NRPA standards which state one  (1) asset to “X” number of persons.  PROS recognized the inexactness of a standard based  on  a  service  area  of  the  entire  population  when  a  particular  asset’s  participation  base  is  strictly regulated by a minimum and maximum age.  An example of this ambiguity is:  •



 

Traditional Asset Standard Approach – One (1) T‐Ball Field to 5,000 Persons  o

This standard implies that  for every 5,000 persons of the population there  should be one (1) T‐Ball field in the inventory 

o

Based  on  strictly  enforced  age  limits,  the  generality  of  the  standard  produces  an  inaccurate  portrayal  due  to  a  very  limited  participation  base  (generally between 5 and 6 years of age) in regards to the population as a  whole 

PROS Capacity–Demand Standards Model tm Approach – One (1) T‐Ball Field to X,000  5‐6 Year Olds  53

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

o

The  PROS  Capacity–Demand  standard  implies  that  each  T‐Ball  field  has  an  estimated service area of X,000 5 and 6 year olds 

o

This number is established by actual demand as it pertains to the individual  assets capacity; only those persons aged 5 and 6 are applicable 

Based on participation factors by activity as it applies to each individual sport field, capacity  and  demand  service  areas  (population  served  by  asset)  were  calculated  and  mapped  to  provide a graphical representation of gaps and overlaps in geographic area and population  served.    In  addition  to  graphical  representation  of  the  equitable  distribution  of  current  assets via mapping, asset need in terms of additional sports fields was determined utilizing  current assets available to the County and area municipalities.  From  the  service  area  mapping  and  the  correlating  detailed  data,  the  final  recommendations  present  alternatives  to  address  areas  where  assets  are  needed  or  the  potentially shifting from  an over‐served area to an underserved area.  Capital, operations,  and  maintenance  costs  can  be  applied  to  these  alternatives  and  a  cost‐benefit  analysis  performed to determine the optimal recommended solution.  For a complete review of the  Capacity Demand Standards Model see Appendix 5.  The following present the findings and  recommendations.     3.2.2  FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS  The  Capacity–Demand  Standards  Model  tm  is  not  intended  to  be  a  scheduling  tool.    The  purpose  of  the  model  is  to  assist  in  the  managing  and  planning  of  assets  to  meet  the  demand of the users.  Convenience is also not a factor in determining an assets capacity or  demand.    PROS  does  realize  that  although  a  particular  asset  may  demonstrate  excess  capacity, the desirability of the available time may be low – this is true in the case of many  early morning and late afternoon/late evening time slots.  Capacity–Demand is measured for three quartiles; multiple seasons may be in one particular  quartile and one season may span multiple quartiles. Quartiles were created to ensure that  the  same  parameters  were  being  measured  against  one  another  and  accurately  applied  across  the  system.    When  a  usage  occurs  in  more  than  one  of  the  quartiles,  usage  is  relationally split between the quartiles based on actual dates of usage as compared to the  quartile parameters.  Quartiles are defined as follows:  •

Quartile 1 – March 1st to May 31st 



Quartile 2 – June 1st to August 31st 



Quartile 3 – September 1st to November 30th 

Due  to  limited  programming  of  outdoor  assets  during  the  typical  winter  months,  the  4th  quartile (December 1st to February 28th/29th) was not analyzed or illustrated.  The current asset capacity, demand, and requirements are presented in Figure 36.  Based on  the current asset utilization by season – actual demand compared to suggested capacity by  asset type – the number and type of additional assets needed differs for each season.  The  largest single asset need compared to assets “on‐line” is for large multipurpose fields in the  first  quartile;  the  second  quartile/season  does  not  demonstrate  a  need  for  any  additional  assets.  Asset need by season is as follows:   

 

54 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 





First Quartile/Season Asset Need  o

Softball ‐ 220‐foot fence radius – Five (5) additional assets needed 

o

Softball ‐ 300‐foot fence radius – One (1) additional asset needed 

o

Multipurpose Field (Small) ‐ <240‐foot – Two (2) additional assets needed 

o

Multipurpose Field (Large) ‐ >300‐foot – Nine (9) additional assets needed 

Third Quartile/Season Asset Need  o

Softball ‐ 300‐foot fence radius – Eight (8) additional assets needed 

These asset shortages – where capacity is eclipsed by demand – are based on assets which  are “on‐line” during the specified quartiles.   When analyzing Figure 36, the first season’s requirements are listed in the top chart and the  third season requirements are shown on the bottom chart.  Total asset inventory available  for County usages is listed in the “Total Asset Inventory” column.  Assets that are “on‐line”  are shown in the “Total Assets in Use” column.  The culmination of the detailed capacity and  demand data is shown using two methods – players supported versus registered players and  event  hours  supported  versus  event  hours  required  (demanded).    Totals  are  based  on  the  current demand placed on each asset type.    3.2.2.1   DEMAND COMPARISON BY PERSONS AND HOURLY USAGE  Capacity and demand are displayed by player totals to illustrate the total number of persons  each field can support as it relates to the actual user base.  Player analysis does not provide  an  understanding  of  the  actual  intensity/frequency  each  asset  type  is  receiving,  but  an  understanding of how many players an asset can support if the usage were to mimic normal  usage  patterns  found  on  like  assets  within  the  geographical  area.    To  provide  an  understanding of the intensity/frequency, capacity and demand utilization is also shown by  hours  each  asset  is  actual  used  as  opposed  to  suggested  hours  of  use  based  on  asset  integrity.    Player  comparison  illustrates  “X”  players  can  be  supported  under  normal  conditions,  and  hourly  comparison  stipulates  “X”  number  of  hours  are  proposed  based  on  optimal usage guidelines.  An example of when the need to differentiate in persons and hours arises is explained in the  following:    One  usage  is  comprised  of  thirty  (30)  teams  that  utilize  the  asset  on  ten  (10)  occasions  for  one  (1)  hour  per  team  as  compared  to  six  (6)  teams  that  utilize  the  asset  on  more  than  fifty  (52)  occasions  for  an  average  of  two  (2)  hours  per  team.   The  usage  with  the  greatest  number  of  players  (roughly  300  players  versus  90  players) is actually utilizing the asset for half as many hours as the usage with the  least amount of players.  This results in a vast difference in intensity of usage.  3.2.2.2   ASSETS REQUIRED, ASSESTS ON‐LINE, AND NEW ASSETS  When analyzing total number of assets required to meet demand based on total inventory  available to the County participatory base, the column titled “Number of ADDITIONAL Assets  Required  by  Season  in  Excess  of  On‐Line  Assets”  illustrates  the  total  number  of  additional   

55

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

assets required to meet demand by season – this represents assets in excess of assets “on‐ line” on a system wide basis.  This figure represents total number of assets required to meet  demand based on optimal field usage guidelines and is rolled up to an asset category.  As noted on the previous page of this report, four asset types requiring additional assets to  meet  demand  in  the  first  quartile:  small  and  large  softball  fields  and  small  and  large  multipurpose  fields.    However,  as  shown  in  the  “Total  NON‐PROGRAMMED  Assets  Remaining  in  Inventory”  column  of  Figure  36,  a  portion  of  the  inventoried  assets  are  not  being utilized.  For example, there is a need for an additional 5 small softball fields to meet  the current demand; however, there are 10 total assets that are currently non‐programmed  during  this  particular  quartile  (20  total  small  softball  field  assets;  19  small  softball  field  assets  in  use).    Opening  up  these  assets  that  are  offline  (receiving  maintenance/rest)  for  usage  or  shifting  usages  to  other  assets  not  operating  at  full  capacity  may  help  alleviate  some  of  the  need  for  additional  fields.    Shifting  usage  to  other  assets,  however,  can  be  a  difficult alternative since scheduling conflicts may exist.    Removing  assets  from  a  programmed  rest/maintenance  state  should  not  be  considered  a  long  term  solution.    Assets  not  receiving  adequate  rest  and  maintenance  have  the  propensity to quickly decline into a substandard state.  It is strongly recommended that an  asset  usage  policy  specifying  rest  and  maintenance  periods  be  adopted  by  the  County.   During  no  one  quartile  should  all  assets  be  “on‐line”.    Upon  final  adoption  of  sport  field  programming,  it  is  recommended  that  each  asset  type  should  have  portion  of  total  inventory listed in the “Total NON‐PROGRAMMED Assets Remaining in Inventory” column.   Current asset on‐line/off‐line distribution that raises concern by each quartile is as follows:  •

First Quartile Assets With Potential of Overuse  o

o



T‐Ball  Field  –  3  assets  inventoried;  all  3  are  in  use;  3  required;  zero  new  assets are needed to meet current demand  ƒ

Zero  assets  are  receiving  rest/maintenance  (“Total  NON‐ PROGRAMMED Assets Remaining in Inventory)  

ƒ

Eighty‐six percent (86%) utilization of total hourly capacity 

Multipurpose Field, Large – 30 assets inventoried; 26 in use; 35 required; 5  new assets are needed to meet current demand  ƒ

Four  (4)  assets  are  receiving  rest/maintenance  (“Total  NON‐ PROGRAMMED Assets Remaining in Inventory) 

ƒ

More  than  100%  of  total  available  suggested  capacity  is  being  utilized  

Third Quartile Assets With Potential of Overuse  o

Softball Field, Large – 49 assets inventoried; 36 are in use; 44 required; zero  new assets are needed to meet current demand  ƒ

 

Thirteen  (13)  assets  are  receiving  rest/maintenance  (“Total  NON‐ PROGRAMMED Assets Remaining in Inventory)  

 

56 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

ƒ

Bringing  5  assets  on‐line  would  place  the  large  softball  field  utilization at 88% of total hourly capacity  

Capacity  and  demand  for  sport  field  assets  must  be  analyzed  with  the  community  values  prioritized  needs  assessment  from  the  Master  Plan.    Although  required  assets  may  be  in  excess of current assets available, meeting additional field requirements can occur through  a variety of methods and alternatives.  Some alternatives include:  •

Analyze  existing  natural  turf  multipurpose  assets  for  possible  conversion  to  synthetic turf fields; synthetic surface multipurpose assets with lighting significantly  increases capacity  



Purchasing additional land for sport complexes, or community/regional parks which  can  support  multiple  sport  field  assets;  sport  complexes  can  be  placed  within  community/regional park sites 

 

Players Supported (Normalized Usage Patterns) vs. Registered Players (Actual Demand)

1st Season

1st Quartile/Season Analysis; Asset (Field) Types T-Ball Field (temp backstop) Baseball - 60-foot base paths Baseball - 90-foot base paths Softball - 220-foot fence radius Softball - 300-foot fence radius Multipurpose Field (Small) - <240-foot Multipurpose Field (Large) - >300-foot

Total Asset Inventory 3 16 2 29 49 60 30

Total Total Other County Asset Assets Inventory 3 15 1 2 24 5 48 1 52 8 30 -

Average Average Event Hours Players REGISTERED per Season Total SUPPORTED Players by Supported Assets by Asset Type Asset Type PER ASSET In Use PER SEASON PER SEASON TYPE 3 272.52 157.71 1,449.44 11 828.85 92.33 4,716.82 19 1,143.13 208.06 6,872.99 39 2,446.71 988.54 14,061.09 49 4,580.52 249.39 24,740.75 26 2,048.99 273.29 10,502.26 Players Supported (Normalized Usage Patterns) vs. Registered Players (Actual Demand)

2nd Season

2nd Quartile/Season Analysis; Asset (Field) Types T-Ball Field (temp backstop) Baseball - 60-foot base paths Baseball - 90-foot base paths Softball - 220-foot fence radius Softball - 300-foot fence radius Multipurpose Field (Small) - <240-foot Multipurpose Field (Large) - >300-foot

Total Asset Inventory 3 16 2 29 49 60 30

Total Total Other County Asset Assets Inventory 3 15 1 2 24 5 48 1 52 8 30 -

Average Average Players REGISTERED Total SUPPORTED Players by Assets by Asset Type Asset Type In Use per Season per Season 3 270.45 75.48 11 828.85 83.12 18 1,122.25 419.87 40 2,487.02 1,191.97 45 4,065.98 234.46 21 1,704.88 253.78

3rd Season

Players Supported (Normalized Usage Patterns) vs. Registered Players (Actual Demand)

3rd Quartile/Season Analysis; Asset (Field) Types T-Ball Field (temp backstop) Baseball - 60-foot base paths Baseball - 90-foot base paths Softball - 220-foot fence radius Softball - 300-foot fence radius Multipurpose Field (Small) - <240-foot Multipurpose Field (Large) - >300-foot

Average Average Players REGISTERED SUPPORTED Players by by Asset Type Asset Type per Season per Season 267.19 64.33 364.89 43.53 576.11 192.02 2,250.30 948.44 4,434.36 232.06 2,008.52 296.16

Total Asset Inventory 3 16 2 29 49 60 30

Total Total Other County Asset Assets Inventory 3 15 1 2 24 5 48 1 52 8 30 -

Optimal Facility Usage Hours vs. Actual Facility Usage Hours

Total Assets In Use 3 5 10 36 45 26

Optimal Facility Usage Hours vs. Actual Facility Usage Hours

Event Hours per Season Supported 1,438.42 4,716.82 6,747.46 14,292.75 21,961.54 8,738.46

57

Number of Event Hours Assets per Season Required by Required Season 1.00 280.39 804.49 2.00 3,770.27 11.00 11,790.13 33.00 9,865.80 21.00 4,227.52 11.00

Number of NEW ASSETS ADDITIONAL REQUIRED IN Assets Total NONADDITION TO Required PROGRAMMED CURRENT by Season in Assets INVENTORIES Excess of Remaining in TO MEET On-Line Assets Inventory DEMAND None None None 5.0 None None 2.0 None None 11.0 None None 9.0 None None 15.0 None None 9.0 None

Optimal Facility Usage Hours vs. Actual Facility Usage Hours

Event Hours per Season Supported 1,421.12 2,076.52 3,463.82 12,932.33 23,951.28 10,294.81

Figure 36 ‐ Capacity Demand by Season 

 

Event Hours per Season Number of Required Assets PER ASSET Required by TYPE Season 1,247.50 3.00 2,259.66 6.00 8,665.25 24.00 14,110.23 40.00 25,582.38 51.00 13,785.73 35.00

Number of NEW ASSETS ADDITIONAL REQUIRED IN Assets Total NONADDITION TO Required PROGRAMMED CURRENT by Season in Assets INVENTORIES Excess of Remaining in TO MEET On-Line Assets Inventory DEMAND None None None 5.0 None None 2.0 None 10.0 None 5.0 1.0 10.0 None 2.0 11.0 None 9.0 4.0 5.0

Number of Assets Event Hours per Season Required by Season Required 232.04 1.00 382.10 1.00 2,587.66 8.00 15,633.97 44.00 15,192.06 29.00 9,634.02 25.00

Number of NEW ASSETS ADDITIONAL REQUIRED IN Assets Total NONADDITION TO Required PROGRAMMED CURRENT by Season in Assets INVENTORIES Excess of Remaining in TO MEET On-Line Assets Inventory DEMAND None None None 11.0 None None 2.0 None None 19.0 None 8.0 13.0 None None 15.0 None None 4.0 None

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

To  accurately  calculate  the  required  assets  by  season,  usages  must  be  rolled  up  to  the  specific asset type utilized.  The capacity and demand calculations presented prior in Figure  33 are by asset type by season.  Although it has been determined that capacity does service  the  demand  on  a  system  wide  level  based  on  available  assets  for  each  quartile,  it  is  also  important to recognize when demand exceeds capacity on an individual asset basis.  When  multiple  usages  occur  at  one  asset  or  individual  usages  require  a  large  number  of  asset  hours,  capacity  and  demand  are  analyzed  on  an  individual  asset  basis.    High  asset  usage  hours  are  usually  attributable  to  youth  programs  and  the  need  for  practice  time  as  well  as  game  time  or  tournament  quality  programs  which  have  a  high  utilization  factor;  conversely, adult programming typically does not practice, and games rarely take more than  1 or 1 ½ hours to complete.  In accordance with the results shown in Figure 37, 137 total assets are operating at or above  the  threshold  of  capacity  –  80%  –  during  the  first  quartile.    The  threshold  is  set  to  alert  appropriate personnel as to the potential of an asset to easily escalate to a state of distress.   More than 100 assets operate at 80% or more than suggested capacity for both the second  quartile (127 assets above suggested capacity threshold) and the third quartile (109 assets  above suggested capacity threshold). 

Multipurpose Field (Small) - <240-foot

Multipurpose Field (Large) - >300-foot

-

6.0 6.0 2.0 9.0 9.0 5.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 -

18.0 17.0 15.0 21.0 22.0 21.0 -

6.0 8.0 8.0 15.0 12.0 10.0 14.0 11.0 14.0 5.0 4.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

13.0 14.0 15.0 13.0 7.0 11.0 -

Total 1st Quartile/Season Assets Exceeding Capacity Total 2nd Quartile/Season Assets Exceeding Capacity Total 3rd Quartile/Season Assets Exceeding Capacity

3.0 3.0 1.0

9.0 9.0 1.0

-

18.0 18.0 9.0

39.0 39.0 36.0

42.0 37.0 36.0

26.0 21.0 26.0

Softball - 220-foot fence radius

1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 5.0 -

Baseball - 90-foot base paths

Current Total Assets Mecklenburg County SANCTIONED Assets Where Demand Exceeds 80.0% Capacity : By Site Classification / Type; by Season (Note: Excludes assets classified as "Maintenance") Neighborhood Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season Neighborhood Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season Neighborhood Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season Community Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season Community Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season Community Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season District Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season District Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season District Park Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season Elementary School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season Elementary School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season Elementary School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season High School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season High School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season High School Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season Community Center Assets Exceeding Cap.; 1st Season Community Center Assets Exceeding Cap.; 2nd Season Community Center Assets Exceeding Cap.; 3rd Season

Baseball - 60-foot base paths

3.0 3.0 1.0 -

T-Ball Field (temp backstop)

Softball - 300-foot fence radius

This  large  contingency  of  assets  receiving  such  high  use  leaves  very  little  opportunity  for  future programming or additional sport tourism opportunities (tournaments, etc.).  

Figure 37 ‐ Total Assets Where USAGES Exceed CAPACITY THRESHOLD 

 

 

58 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

As  noted  previously,  system  wide  capacity  by  asset  type  does  exist;  however,  there  are  a  multitude of individual assets which are being over‐used in terms of intensity/frequency of  hours  in  use.    To  meet  the  high  individual  usage  demand  placed  on  these  assets,  online  assets with additional capacity or off‐line assets (assets classified as receiving maintenance  or  rest)  could  be  utilized  to  disperse  some  of  the  demanded  hours  across  the  system.   However, the County may encounter extensive scheduling issues when trying to shift usages  within the already crowded sport field asset inventory.  Usages which had a higher amount  of hours required to meet demand than suggested asset hours are depicted in the Appendix  along with detailed usage.  3.2.3  PRELIMINARY RECOMMENDATIONS  As illustrated previously in Figure 36, although user demand does not exceed capacity as a  system,  excess  demand  is  present  at  individual  assets  (Figure  37).    To  meet  the  current  demand  and  projected  future  demand,  it  is  evident  that  the  County  will  need  to  continue  current partnerships and incubate new partnerships when possible.    3.2.3.1   SYNTHETIC SURFACES  Currently  the  County  has  limited  synthetic  surface  resources.    Of  the  189  different  assets  analyzed  for  the  Capacity–Demand  Analysis,  14  (7.4%)  have  synthetic  surfaces.    When  analyzing  the  benefit  of  utilizing  synthetic  turf  as  opposed  to  natural  turf,  not  only  should  the  annual  cost  saving  associated  with  routine  and  preventative  maintenance  be  studied,  but  the  increase  in  potential  capacity  and  the  guaranteed  integrity  of  the  playing  surface  should also be emphasized.  Due  to  the  differences  in  normal  usage  patterns  experienced  at  diamond  field  assets  and  multipurpose  field  assets,  it  is  only  recommended  that  synthetic  surfaces  be  installed  at  multipurpose fields – the level of intensity associated with “bat and ball” diamond sports is  much  less  than  that  found  in  multipurpose  field  sports  (i.e.  soccer,  football,  lacrosse).   Suggested  capacity  of  a  synthetic  surface  multipurpose  asset  with  lighting  is  exponentially  greater than that of many multipurpose assets currently in the County inventories.  Figure  38  illustrates  the  annual  maintenance  cost  savings  realized  in  most  synthetic  surface  installations following the initial capital investment.     

 

59

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Comparison of Annual Costs

  $1,800,000

 

$1,600,000 $1,400,000

 

$1,200,000

Annual Costs

 

   

$1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000

 

$400,000

 

$200,000 $0

 

1

 

2

3

4

Engineered Turf

 

5

6

Year Artifical Turf

7

8

9

10

Non-Engineered Turf

Figure 38 ‐ Annual Cost Comparison by Field type; Average of 4 Acre Plot 

Although overlays are not recommended for natural turf assets, one alternative that may be  utilized  to  help  alleviate  the  need  for  additional  land  is  the  combination  of  a  synthetic  multipurpose  asset  with  a  corner  synthetic  diamond  field  asset.    This  synthetic  surface  combination asset is designed to allow the multipurpose field to be completely independent  of the diamond field asset infield area; the aggregate infield surface borders the boundaries  of  the  multipurpose  field  but  do  not  intrude  onto  the  actual  playing  surface  of  the  multipurpose  asset.    However,  by  combining  the  two  distinct  assets  into  one  synthetic  combination asset (an asset with an overlay), the capacity for each use (multipurpose field  asset and diamond field asset) will in essence be reduced by half.  From  a  cost  savings  stand  point,  once  the  initial  investment  of  the  sports  field  has  been  made,  an  annual  maintenance  costs  savings  of  thirty  to  sixty  percent  (30‐60%)  can  be  expected when comparing an engineered sport field asset to a synthetic surface sports field  asset.    Annual  maintenance  costs  were  derived  utilizing  average  tasks  associated  with  maintaining each field by type.  This included the following tasks:  •



Natural Turf, Engineered Surfaces   o

Labor – Mowing, fertilization, aerificaiton, edging, pest control 

o

Supplies and Equipment – Fertilizer, seed, fungicide, mower, edger, aerator,  irrigation, and top dressing 

Synthetic Surfaces  o

Labor – Sweeping, grooming, weed control, pest control 

o

Supplies and Equipment – various turf supplies, patches, sweeper 

3.2.4  CONCLUSION  The results of the current Capacity–Demand Standards Model tm illustrate that as a whole,  the County System meets the demand of the various user groups for all assets during each   

 

60 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

quartile  except  for  large  multipurpose  fields  during  the  first  quartile.    However,  analyzing  assets  on  an  individual  basis  illustrates  that  certain  individual  assets  are  operating  with  excessive demand.  Such excessive wear can be detrimental to an asset’s integrity.  Excess  usage is clearly evident by the 100+ individual assets exceeding optimal capacity during each  of the three quartiles.  Some  capacity  shortages  could  be  attributed  to  the  current  process  of  resting  fields  to  generate  optimum  playing  surfaces.    Although  this  practice  is  highly  recommended  and  extremely  important  for  turf  regeneration  and  high  integrity  sport  fields,  very  few  communities have the abundance of necessary assets to allow for a portion of the inventory  to be offline during any one season.    It is recommended that the County continue partnering with neighboring towns and cities to  provide  recreational  opportunities  throughout  the  County.    For  optimal  service  offerings,  PROS recommends that all existing and potential partners define strategies and policies for  delivering services.   Due to the increased – nearly limitless – usage a synthetic surface can accommodate, it  is  recommended  that  the  County  consider  developing  two  distinct  athletic  complexes  to  relieve  the  excess  demand  from  current  programming  while  establishing  two  tournament  quality complexes with economic impact potential.  Synthetic surfaces with lighting are only  limited by the user’s ability to schedule free time.  Depending on the level of service that the  County desires to maintain each asset at, the assumptions made for cost comparison may  vary.  PROS  recommends  the  following  strategies  to  meet  the  capacity  required  by  the  existing  and projected demand of the County and various user groups:   •





 

Establish a rest and preventative/routine maintenance policy dictating a percentage  of assets to be held off‐line during each quartile/season  o

Establish  partnership  policy  for  each  of  the  entities  within  the  County  to  provide increased asset capacities and solidify working relationships  

o

Establish priority usage policy based on entity participation 

Prepare  cost  and  usage  analysis  for  all  Cooperative  Use  sport  field  assets  to  determine optimal operational, usage, and pricing agreements  o

An equitable partnership must be formed with all Cooperative Use providers  that correlates to the level of service provided 

o

Educate  sports  stakeholders  (i.e.  leagues,  parents,  coaches,  sponsors)  on  the cost of service associated with Cooperative Use asset usage and benefits  received;  this  can  build  support  for  future  maintenance  and  capital  improvement efforts 

o

Adopt usage agreements that gradually cease overlay use 

Excess  demand  can  be  addressed  and  potential  economic  impact  realized  by  developing  a  tournament  quality  youth/fast‐pitch  softball  field  complex  and  a  multipurpose field complex   61

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

o

Demand  exceeds  total  capacity  for  large  multipurpose  field  assets;  development  of  a  8‐10  field  multipurpose  field  complex  would  alleviate  excess  demand  while  providing  the  County  with  the  ability  to  shift  usage  patterns  and  attract  tournament  play;  a  minimum  of  four  (4)  fields  should  be regulation size fields with synthetic surfaces    

o

To assist in alleviating the high demand associated with softball fields, it is  proposed  that  the  County  develop  a  youth/fast‐pitch  softball  6‐8  field  complex;  currently  only  37%  the  County’s  total  softball  field  inventory  is  available for youth play (less than 300‐foot fence dimensions) 

o

Evaluate  existing  multipurpose  field  assets  to  determine  if  conversion  to  synthetic surfaces is beneficial 

Detailed asset inventory by usage by asset type, season, and site (park/school) is presented  as  a  supplement  in  Appendix  A  of  the  Appendix  5  –  Capacity  Demand  Standards  Model.   Detailed  inventory  by  usage  depicts  all  usages  that  occur  at  a  specific  asset;  some  assets  have multiple usages per season.  Capacity threshold by asset is also presented in Appendix  B of the Appendix 5 – Capacity Demand Standards Model. 

 

 

62 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  3.3 PRIORITIZED FACILITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT  The  purpose  of  the  Facility  Needs  Assessment  is  to  provide  a  prioritized  list  of  facility  /  amenity needs for the residents of Mecklenburg County.  The Needs Assessment evaluates  both  quantitative  and  qualitative  data.    Quantitative  data  includes  the  statistically  valid  Community  Survey,  which  asked  1033  Mecklenburg  County  residents  to  list  unmet  needs  and  rank  the  importance.    Qualitative  data  includes  resident  feedback  obtained  in  Focus  Group meetings, Key Leader Interviews, and Public Forums.    A  weighted  scoring  system  was  used  to  determine  the  priorities  for  park  and  recreation  facilities / amenities.  This scoring system considers the following:  •



Community Survey  o Unmet  needs  for  facilities–  A  factor  from  the  total  number  of  households  mentioning  their  need  for  facilities.    Survey  participants  were  asked  to  identify the need for 28 different facilities.  Weighted value of 4.  o Importance  ranking  for  facilities  –  Normalized  factor,  converted  from  the  percent (%) ranking of facilities to a base number.  Survey participants were  asked to identify the top four facility needs.  Weighted value of 3.  Consultant Evaluation o Factor derived from the consultant’s evaluation of facility importance based  on demographics, trends and community input.  Weighted value of 3.

These weighted scores were then summed to provide an overall score and priority ranking  for  the  system  as  a  whole.    The  results  of  the  priority  ranking  were  tabulated  into  three  categories:  High Priority, Medium Priority, and Low Priority.   The  combined  total  of  the  weighted  scores  for  Community  Unmet  Needs,  Community  Priority  and  Consultant  Evaluation  is  the  total  score  based  on  which  the  Facility  Priority  is  determined.    Figure  39  depicts  the  Facility  /  Amenity  Needs  Assessment  for  Mecklenburg  County.               

 

63

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure  39  shows  that  walking  and  biking  trails,  small  (2‐10)  acres  neighborhood  parks  and  nature center and trails were the top three facilities / amenities.  These were followed by  large  community  parks  and  district  parks,  indoor  fitness  and  exercise  facilities  and  playground equipment and play areas as the other high priority facility/amenity needs.     

Mecklenburg County Facility / Amenity Needs Assessment

 

Overall Ranking

    Walking and biking trails Small (2-10 acres) neighborhood parks

  Nature center and trails   Large community parks and district parks                                

Indoor fitness and exercise facilities Playground equipment and play areas Park shelters and picnic areas Indoor swimming pools/leisure pool Indoor running/walking track Community gardens Outdoor swimming and spraygrounds Off-leash dog park Small (less than 2 acres) pocket parks Mountain bike trails Outdoor tennis courts Outdoor amphitheaters Outdoor basketball courts Indoor shelters Golf courses Youth/teen soccer fields Indoor basketball/volleyball courts Boating and sailing areas/sailing center Youth/teen baseball and softball fields Youth/teen football fields Adult softball fields Skateboard Park Adult soccer fields Soapbox Derby track

   

Figure 39 – Facility / Amenity Priority Needs Assessment

   

 

 

64 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  3.4 GENERAL PARK AND FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT PLAN  3.4.1  RECREATION CENTERS – SPECIAL FACILITY DEVELOPMENT  3.4.1.1   ASSESSMENT  The Master Plan’s citizen survey, community input, service analysis and needs assessments  call for new and expanded recreation centers to serve the community in ways that include:  •

Fitness and wellness 



Family recreation: multi‐generational 



Senior citizens programs 



Youth/teen after‐school programs 



Cultural arts programs 

National standards for recreation centers call for 1.5 sq. ft. per capita, measured against the  total population of the County.  Mecklenburg currently has 1.02 sq. ft. per person, based on  387,122 total sq. ft.  As the population grows dramatically in Mecklenburg over the next ten  years,  we  will  fall  increasingly  short  of  the  standard.    Projections  estimate  a  shortage  of  719,446 sq. ft. by 2017.  The  trend  in  recreation  centers  is  to  build  them  larger,  to  accommodate  more  multi‐ generational activities and operate more cost efficiently.  The size of our current recreation  centers  range  from  12,000  to  27,000  which  is  far  short  of  square  footage  by  today’s  standards.  New recreation centers should be developed in the 50,000 sq. ft. plus range and  regional recreation centers would range from 90,000‐110,000 sq. ft., far larger than what we  have now.   To help close the gap, the Master Plan envisions, over the next 10 years: 

 



Building  four  regional  recreation  centers,  “destinations”  that  may  tie‐in  with  aquatics, nature centers, community and regional parks or future CMS school sites.  Specific  sites  to  be  determined  based  on  strategic  locations  in  the  four  regions  of  the County  



Building two recreation centers to close the service gaps in key areas 



Expansion  of  nine  existing  recreation  centers  on  key  sites  which  allows  significant  increase of space and function to create “destination” facilities 



Renovation  of  three  existing  recreation  centers  specifically  targeted  to  provide  a  specific  program  focus  such  as  services  to  teens  or  senior  citizens  and  for  cultural  arts 



Development of two cultural art facilities 

65

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

3.4.1.2   METHODOLOGY  The methodology for where to build, expand, or renovate recreation centers is based on a  ranking  system  which  incorporates  scores  for  the  following  criteria  as  well  as  takes  into  account the Arts and Science Council’s Cultural Facilities Master Plan:  Master Planning   •

Is the recreation center identified in the 2008 Parks Master Plan?  

Property Ownership   •

Does  the  County,  or  partnering  entity,  currently  own  all  parcels  necessary  for  recreation center development?  

Service Gap   •

Are there any developed recreation centers within a 2.5 mile radius?  

Expansion   •

Does  the  project  expand  the  current  scope  of  programming  at  the  recreation  center?   

Partnership Opportunity   •

Has  a  school,  senior  center,  church,  and  /  or  library  partnership  opportunity  been  identified?   



Have outside funding sources been identified?   



Is the recreation center adjacent to a school, senior center, church, and / or library  facility?   

Linkages   •

Is the recreation center adjacent to a planned and / or developed greenway?   



Is the recreation center adjacent to a planned and / or developed park?   

Mass Transit   •

Is the recreation center within a 0.5 mile radius of a public transportation station /  depot?   

A complete list of projects for the 5 and 10 year plan, cost estimates and amenities is in the  2008‐2018 Capital Needs Assessment in the Master Plan.  The Master Plan contemplates all  recreation center development on existing County property.  3.4.2  AQUATIC CENTERS – SPECIAL FACILITY DEVELOPMENT  3.4.2.1 ASSESSMENT  The  Mecklenburg  County  Comprehensive  Master  Plan’s  citizen  survey,  community  input,  service  analysis  and  needs  assessments  notes  the  need  for  new  and  expanded  aquatic  facilities to provide the following services:    

 

66 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 



Youth learn to swim programs 



Water fitness and safety programs 

Typical  national  aquatic  facility  standards  are  .5  sq.  ft.  per  person,  measured  against  the  total population of the County.  Currently, Mecklenburg County has .08 sq. ft. per person of  indoor aquatic space, based on 65,593 total sq. ft.  The population is projected to continue  to increase in Mecklenburg County over the next  ten years which will increase the deficit.   As a result of population growth, a deficit of   483,263 sq. ft. is projected by 2017.  The trend in aquatic facilities is to build zero depth entry, multi‐generational facilities that  can accommodate family fun, fitness and learn to swim activities as a component of a larger  facility.    Future  plans  include  the  construction  of  local  and  regional  destination  aquatic  facilities to be designed for recreational, instructional and therapeutic uses.   Sizes will vary  however projections include intermediate to large sized facilities from approximately 30,000  sq. ft to 50,000 sq. ft.   To help close the gap, the following facilities are projected for the next 10 years:  •

Construction  of  four  regional  indoor  aquatic  facilities  centers  as  components  of  regional  recreation  centers  on  County‐owned  property.  Construction  of  one  intermediate sized indoor aquatic facility on County‐owned property.  Specific sites  are to be determined based on strategic locations in the four regions of the County   



Construction of four outdoor aquatic facilities as part of existing recreation centers  or parks to close the service gaps in key areas  



Expansion of two existing recreation centers to include aquatic facilities on key sites  which results in the creation of intermediate size “destination” facilities 



Renovation  or  expansion  of  two  existing  indoor  aquatic  facilities  specifically  targeted to provide recreational, instructional, fitness, therapeutic and competitive  programs. 



Construction of ten (10) outdoor spray grounds   



Renovation  of  two  existing  outdoor  pools  to  include  family  fun  features,  instructional and water fitness activities  

3.4.2.2   METHODOLOGY  The  methodology  for  where  to  build,  expand,  or  renovate  aquatic  facilities  is  based  on  a  ranking  system  which  incorporates  scores  for  the  following  criteria  the  ability  to  build  on  County‐owned land:   Amenity:   •

Does the project provide an amenity or recreation activity no currently available? 



Does the project produce a new or enhanced revenue generating program?  

Special Program:   •

 

 

Has a unique population been identified as beneficiaries of the project? 

67

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

o

Does  the  project  expand  program  offerings  that  address  one  of  the  following: (a) water Safety and learn to swim, (b) youth obesity or (c) crime  prevention? 

o

Partnership Opportunity: 

o

Has a private or public partnership opportunity been identified? 

o

Will taxpayer dollars be saved via an identified partnership? 

o

Have outside funding sources been identified? 

o

Is the project adjacent to a planned or developed greenway? 

o

Is the project adjacent to a planned or developed nature center? 

o

Is the project adjacent to a planned or developed recreation center? 

o

Is the project adjacent to a planned or developed park? 

Linkages: 

Mass Transit:  o

Is  the  project  within  a  .5  mile  radius  of  a  public  transportation  station  of  depot? 

A  complete  list  of  proposed  projects  for  the  5  and  10  year  plan,  cost  estimates  and  amenities is included in the 2008‐2018 Capital Needs Assessment of the Master Plan.               

 

 

68 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER FOUR  ‐ GREENWAYS MASTER PLAN UPDATE  4.1 INTRODUCTION AND HISTORY  The  Mecklenburg  County  Greenways  &  Trails  Master  Plan  has  been  updated  as  part  of  the  preparation  of  the  comprehensive Mecklenburg County Parks  and Recreation Master Plan.  The County’s  Greenways  and  Trails  program  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  North  Carolina  and  the  southeastern  United  States.    In  1966,  the  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Master  Plan  for  recreation  recommended  greenways  “as  logical  natural  elements  useful  in  creating  a  sense  of  physical  form  and  order  within  the  city.”    The  plan  proposed  that  greenways  preserve  the  open  space  of  urban residential areas while providing both active and passive recreation areas.  Although part of the planning fabric for several years, it was not until 1980 that an official  greenway master plan was developed.  The 1980 greenway master plan called for a 73‐mile  network of trails along 14 creek corridors.  The plan envisioned a “green necklace” of creeks  around  the  County  that  would  address  multiple  objectives,  including  habitat  conservation,  recreation,  alternative  transportation,  mitigation  of  flooding,  and  protection  of  water  supply.    In  1999,  the  County  developed  and  adopted  the  Greenway  Master  Plan  Update.   The update built on the objectives articulated in the 1980 Master Plan.  However, the focus  of  the  program  was  expanded  to  concentrate  more  on  stream  corridor  and  floodplain  protection.    This  2008  update  reaffirms  the  intent  to  adhere  to  the  vision  and  objectives  established  within  both  the  1980  and  1999  master  plans  –  to  protect  valued  stream  corridors for multiple purposes and to continue the development of appropriate creekside  trails and overland connector trails.   Over  the  next  five  years,  it  is  the  goal  of  the  County  to  continue  the  expansion  of  the  greenway trail system principally on land the County currently owns or is close to acquiring.   The five‐year action plan identifies the construction of practical trail corridors that will serve  County  residents  and  fulfill  their  need  for  additional  hiking  and  biking  trails.    The  ten‐year  development plan will focus on connecting trail systems that will create significant linkages,  enhance the regional trail network, and provide more residents with access to the growing  trail system.  The update also calls for the Park and Recreation Department to work closely  with other agencies to identify and develop programs and policies that improve efficiency of  developing a trail network system as well as focusing more attention on the stewardship of  the  greenway  corridors  so  they  may  better  serve  their  function  as  a  conservation  and  enhancement tool for floodplain and riparian plant and wildlife habitat.   This 2008 update includes:   

69

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



A brief description of the existing greenways and trails system 



A plan of action that describes goals for trail planning, design, construction, phasing  and operations 



A summary of benefits derived from the greenways and trail system 



An evaluation of best practices in greenway trail development across the region and  nation 



An evaluation of regulatory policies and programs 



A list of recommendations for programming greenways and trails 

At present, the County has over 30 miles of trail within 14 greenway and overland corridors.   Over 7 miles of trails connect nearby residents from neighborhoods and park facilities to the  main  trail  system.    Through  planning  efforts  of  both  greenway  staff  and  Mecklenburg  County Real Estate Services, over 3,000 acres of floodplain and riparian habitat have been  conserved.   4.2 NEED FOR GREENWAYS AND TRAILS  There is a clear public need and desire for greenways and trail development in Mecklenburg  County.  In the fall 2007 and early 2008, Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation hosted a  series of public meetings to seek public input on the master planning process.  Greenways  and  trails  were  a  major  topic  of  discussion  at  these  meetings.    A  community  survey  conducted  by  ETC  Leisure  Vision  found  that  the  development  of  walking  and  biking  trails  was an important and unmet need for the majority of Mecklenburg County residents.    The  results  of  the  2008  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  Master  Plan  update  reveal the public’s appreciation for natural areas and their desire for a comprehensive trail  system.  Echoing results found in Charlotte Department of Transportation’s (CDOT) bicycle  and  pedestrian  survey  results,  residents  desired  and  supported  the  development  of  an  interconnected trail system.   From a list of 28 parks and recreation facilities, the top 5 public requests were:  •

74% walking and biking trails (national average 68%) 



63% Large community parks and district parks 



62% Nature center and trails (national average 57%) 



61% Small neighborhood parks of 2‐10 acres 



59% Park shelters and picnic areas 

Survey results indicate County residents understand and support the role of greenways as  both corridors for environmental protection and potential trail development. 

 



93% of all residents felt the role of greenways as a connected network of walking,  biking and nature trails was very important (75%) or somewhat important (18%). 



88% of all residents felt the role greenways played in environmental protection was  very important (65%) or somewhat important (23%).   

70 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 



80%  of  residents  support  (56%  very  supportive,  24%  somewhat  supportive)  using  floodplain land to develop biking and walking trails 

The  results  generated  by  the  Mecklenburg  County  survey  support  trends  seen  throughout  the state and nation.  The results of the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan  (SCORP) for North Carolina closely mimic Mecklenburg County survey results, and provide a  strong  rationale  for  natural  resource  conservation  and  the  development  of  a  strong  trail  system.  According to the SCORP, the most popular outdoor activities for NC residents are:  •

75% Walking for pleasure  



62% Visiting historical sites 



71% Viewing scenery 



53% Visiting natural areas 



52% Picnicking 

4.3 BENEFITS OF THE GREENWAYS AND TRAILS SYSTEM  Greenways and trails provide a variety of benefits that ultimately affect the sustainability of  a community’s economic, environmental, and social health.  These benefits include:  •

Creating Value and Generating Economic Activity 



Encouraging Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation 



Improving Health through Active Living 



Providing Clear Skies, Clean Water, Protected Habitat 



Protecting People and Property from Flood Damage  



Enhancing Cultural Awareness and Community Identity 



Providing Safe Places for Outdoor Activities 



Creative value and Generating Economic Impact 

There  are  many  examples,  both  nationally  and  locally,  that  affirm the positive connection between greenspace and property  values.    Studies  indicate  residential  properties  will  realize  a  greater  gain  in  value  the  closer  they  are  located  to  trails  and  greenspace.    According  to  a  2002  survey  of  recent  homebuyers  by  the  National  Association  of  Home  Realtors  and  the  National  Association  of  Home  Builders,  trails  ranked  as  the  second  most  important  community  amenity  out  of  a  list  of  18  choices.    The  study  also  found  that  trail  availability  outranked  16  other  options  including  security,  ball  fields,  golf  courses,  parks,  and  access  to  shopping  or  business  centers.    Findings  from  the  Trust  for  Public  Land’s  Economic  Benefits  of  Parks  and  Open  Space,  and  the  Rails‐to‐Trails  Conservancy’s Economic Benefits of Trails and Greenways (listed in the plan) illustrate how  trail development and greenspace improve property values across the country. 

 

71

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

4.3.1  ENCOURAGING BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN TRANSPORTATION  The sprawling nature of many land development patterns often leaves residents and visitors  with no choice but to drive, even for short trips.  In fact, two‐thirds of all trips made are for a  distance  of  five  miles  or  less.    Surveys  by  the  Federal  Highway  Administration  show  that  Americans are willing to walk as far as two miles to  a  destination  and  bicycle  as  far  as  five  miles.    A  complete  trail  network  as  part  of  the  local  transportation  system,  will  offer  effective  transportation  alternatives  by  connecting  homes,  workplaces,  schools,  parks,  downtowns,  and  cultural attractions.  Greenway  trail  networks  can  provide  alternative  transportation  links  that  are  currently  unavailable.   Residents  who  live  in  subdivisions  outside  of  downtown areas are able to walk or bike downtown  for  work,  or  simply  for  recreation.    Trails  allow  residents to circulate through urban areas in a safe,  efficient,  and  fun  way:  walking  or  biking.    Residents  are  able  to  move  freely  along  trail  corridors without paying increasingly high gas prices and sitting in ever‐growing automobile  traffic.  Last but not least, regional connectivity through alternative transportation could be  achieved once adjacent trail networks are completed and combined.  4.3.2  IMPROVING HEALTH THROUGH ACTIVE LIVING  A region’s trail network will contribute to the overall health of residents by offering people  attractive, safe, accessible places to bike, walk, hike, jog, skate, and possibly places to enjoy  water‐based  trails.  In  short,  the  trail  network  will  create  better  opportunities  for  active  lifestyles.    The  design  of  communities—including  towns,  subdivisions,  transportation  systems,  parks,  trails  and  other  public  recreational  facilities—affects  people’s  ability  to  reach  the  recommended  30  minutes  each  day  of  moderately  intense  physical  activity  (60  minutes  for  youth).    According  to  the  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention  (CDC),  “Physical inactivity causes numerous physical and mental health problems, is responsible for  an estimated 200,000 deaths per year, and contributes to the obesity epidemic”.   In identifying a solution, the CDC determined that by creating and improving places in our  communities for physical activity, there could be a 25 percent increase in the percentage of  people  who  exercise  at  least  three  times  a  week.    This  is  significant  considering  that  for  people  who  are  inactive,  even  small  increases  in  physical  activity  can  bring  measurable  health benefits.  Additionally, as people become more physically active outdoors, they make  connections with their neighbors that contribute to the health of their community.  Many public agencies are teaming up with foundations, universities, and private companies  to launch a new kind of health campaign that focuses on improving people’s options instead  of reforming their behavior.  A 2005 Newsweek Magazine feature, Designing Heart‐Healthy  Communities, cites the goals of such programs “The goals range from updating restaurant  menus  to  restoring  mass  transit,  but  the  most  visible  efforts  focus  on  making  the  built  environment  more  conducive  to  walking  and  cycling.”    Clearly,  the  connection  between      72 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

health  and  trails  is  becoming  common  knowledge.    The  Rails‐to‐ Trails  Conservancy  puts  it  simply:    “Individuals  must  choose  to  exercise, but communities can make that choice easier.”  4.3.3  PROVIDING  CLEAR  SKIES,  CLEAN  WATER  AND  PROTECTED HABITAT  There  are  a  multitude  of  environmental  benefits  from  trails,  greenways,  and  open  spaces  that  help  to  protect  the  essential  functions  performed  by  natural  ecosystems.    Greenways  protect  and  link  fragmented  habitat  and  provide  opportunities  for  protecting  plant  and  animal  species.    Trails  and  greenways  reduce  air pollution by two significant means: first, they provide enjoyable  and safe alternatives to the automobile, which reduces the burning  of fossil fuels; second, they protect forested and natural areas that  create oxygen and filter air pollutants such as ozone, sulfur dioxide,  carbon monoxide and airborne particles of heavy metal.  Greenways  improve  water  quality  by  creating  a  natural  buffer  zone  that  protects  streams,  rivers  and  lakes,  preventing  soil  erosion  and  filtering pollution caused by agricultural and road runoff.  As  an  educational  tool,  trail  signage  can  be  designed  to  inform  trail‐users  about  water  quality  issues  particular  to  each  watershed.  Such  signs  could  also  include  tips  on  how  to  improve  water  quality.    Similarly,  a  greenway  can  serve  as  a  hands‐on  environmental  classroom for people of all ages to experience natural landscapes, furthering environmental  awareness.   4.3.4  PROTECTING PEOPLE AND PROPERTY FROM FLOOD DAMAGE  The protection of open spaces associated with trail and greenway development often also  protects natural floodplains along rivers and streams.  According to the Federal Emergency  Management Agency (FEMA), the implementation of floodplain ordinances is estimated to  prevent $1.1 billion in flood damages annually.  By restoring developed floodplains to their  natural state and protecting them as greenways, many riverside communities are preventing  potential flood damages and related costs.    Mecklenburg County has had its share of success converting former repetitive flood prone  properties  to  restored  greenway  lands.    Along  Little  Sugar  Creek,  the  Westfield  Road  restoration  project  was  completed  in  2004.    This  project  began  with  the  purchase  and  removal of 70 flood‐prone structures from the floodplain, followed by restoration of stream  banks  and  wetlands  and  more  effective  management  of  storm  water  from  surrounding  areas. Funding for the Westfield Road project came from a wide range of sources, including  the Charlotte‐Mecklenburg Storm Water Services, Mecklenburg County Park & Recreation,  North  Carolina  Department  of  Water  Quality,  and  the  North  Carolina  Clean  Water  Management Trust Fund. 

 

73

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

4.3.5  ENHANCING CULTURAL AWARENESS AND CULTURAL IDENTITY  Trails, greenways, and open space can serve as connections to  local  heritage  by  preserving  historic  places  and  providing  access  to  them.    They  provide  a  sense  of  place  and  an  understanding  of  past  events  by  drawing  greater  public  attention to historic and cultural locations and events.  Trails  often  provide  access  to  historic  sites  such  as  battlegrounds,  bridges,  buildings,  and  canals  that  otherwise  would  be  difficult to access or interpret.    Each  community  and  region  has  its  own  unique  history,  its  own  features  and  destinations,  and  its  own  landscapes.    By  recognizing,  honoring,  and  connecting  these  features,  the  combined  results  serve  to  enhance  cultural  awareness  and  community  identity,  potentially  attracting  tourism.    Being  aware  of  the  historical  and  cultural  context  when  naming  parks  and  trails  and  designing  features will further enhance the overall trail and park visitor’s experience.  4.3.6  PROVIDING SAFE PLACES FOR OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES  Greenways are one of the most studied landscapes in America.  Countless surveys, reports  and studies have been conducted by different organizations to determine the actual number  and  types  of  incidents  that  have  occurred  on  greenways.    In  Mecklenburg  County,  an  assessment of crime and the risk of crime have been studied extensively by geographers at  the  University  of  North  Carolina  Charlotte  over  a  10  year  period.    Two  fundamental  questions were asked and answered by this decade long study:   •

1) Do greenways suffer higher crime risk than nearby non‐greenway properties? 



2) Are greenways as safe as the urban landscapes that surround them? 

The researchers examined all types of crime and concluded that the subject of violent crime  could not be addressed because virtually no violent crime was recorded during the 10‐year  period.  Therefore, they addressed property crime.  They looked specifically at the Mallard  Creek  Greenway  in  North  Charlotte  and  worked  with  law  enforcement  officials  to  gather  and  examine  actual  police  reports.    The  researchers  identified  the  number  of  reported  crimes  in  the  County  as  a  whole  (53,947),  and  within  the  district  where  the  greenway  is  located  (4,701)  and  then  the  greenway  itself.    They  concluded  that  criminal  activity  associated with the greenway, in comparison to its landscape context, was negligible.  The  researchers  concluded  that  greenways  are  not  an  attractive  nuisance  and  do  not  attract  crime or a criminal element.  Numerous other studies throughout the United States confirm what the researchers at UNC  Charlotte found, that greenways do not attract crime, they are not havens for criminals, and  that people living adjacent to greenways are not likely to experience an increase in crime as  a  result  of  living  in  close  proximity  to  a  greenway.    A  study  in  Indianapolis,  IN,  concluded  that  people  who  use  the  greenway  were  more  likely  to  be  in  a  safer  environment  than  if  they were physically located in the adjacent residential neighborhood.   

 

74 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  4.4 REVIEW OF PEER COMMUNITIES  North Carolina has always been a leader in the national greenway movement.  The state was  one of the first in the nation to embrace a statewide forum supporting greenway creation at  the  local  level.    North  Carolina  is  one  of  the  few  states  in  the  nation  to  have  appointed  a  Governor’s Commission to examine the greenway movement and recommend strategies for  implementing greenways at all levels of government and in the private sector.  Within  this  context,  Mecklenburg  County  has  been  the  most  progressive  of  the  100  North  Carolina  counties  with  respect  to  planning  and  implementing  a  County‐wide  greenway  program.    The  vast  majority  of  greenway  implementation  success  in  North  Carolina  has  occurred at the municipal level.   More  than  50  North  Carolina  communities  of  all  sizes  are  engaged  in  greenway  implementation.    All  of  the  large  metropolitan  areas,  Raleigh,  Durham,  High  Point,  Greensboro,  Winston‐Salem,  Asheville,  Cary,  Fayetteville  and  Wilmington  have  developed  greenway trails.  Of these municipal programs, Raleigh’s Capital Area Greenway Program is  often  considered  to  be  the  oldest  and  most  comprehensive,  exhibiting  many  “best  practices.”    While  Raleigh’s  system  is  certainly  one  of  the  oldest,  Greensboro  actually  has  more miles  (80) of constructed greenway trail than any other  North Carolina municipality.   Raleigh has approximately 60 miles of constructed greenway trail.  4.5 5‐YEAR ACTION PLAN  To  meet  the  needs  and  expectations  of  County  residents,  the  five  year  action  plan  will  pursue  an  aggressive  schedule  for  trail  development.    The  focus  will  be  on  County‐owned  land with the goal of providing more trails to more residents.  Concurrent goals include the  improved  efficiency  of  the  design  and  permitting  process  in  an  effort  to  meet  the  trail  development goals.   Goal – To construct 42.8 miles of new greenway trail by 2013  •

Launch construction of 12.8 miles of currently funded projects within the first year  of the plan’s adoption 



Geographically disperse trail development throughout the County and surrounding  towns 



Focus trail construction on publicly‐owned land 



Work  with  permitting  agencies  to  streamline  the  trail  design  and  development  process 

Goal – To identify and prioritize acquisition efforts for the 10 year trail development plan  •

Base  trail  development  and  associated  land  acquisition  on  developed  ranking  methodology 



Confirm feasibility of targeted trail construction priorities after two years (2010) 

Goal – To improve connectivity to the existing and proposed greenway trail system   

75

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Work  with  Charlotte  Department  of  Transportation  and  coordinate  planning  and  development of overland connections  



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Planning  Department  and  other  municipal  planning  departments  to  incorporate  greenway  corridor  conservation  and  trail  development into the rezoning and subdivision processes 



Work  with  the  Charlotte  Area  Transit  System  (CATS)    to  incorporate  trail  development and connectivity to transit facilities 



Incorporate the greenway corridor system into the Long Range Transportation Plan  



Work with potential partners to synchronize trail development efforts and explore  funding opportunities 



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Schools  to  locate  and  construct  neighborhood  entrances that link schools and residential areas 



Implement improvements to the existing trail system 

Goal – To identify and designate official routes of the Carolina Thread Trail  •

Identify Little Sugar Creek, Long Creek, Mallard Creek and portions of Irwin Creek as  initial corridors of the Carolina Thread Trail 



Work with the municipalities within Mecklenburg County to identify the additional  Thread trail segments and formally adopt an alignment by 2009 

Goal – To better facilitate multi‐agency approach to trail development  •

Work  with  CMU  to  prepare  and  adopt  a  joint  use  sanitary  sewer  and  greenway  easement instrument to be used when acquiring new joint use corridors 



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water  Services  to  adopt  a  joint  use  easement  to  be  used  when  acquiring  property  for  stream  restoration  and  trail  development 



Work  with  Duke  Energy  and  other  utilities  on  a  joint  use  easement  to  develop  greenway trail facilities within these easements 



Investigate  possible  ordinance  amendments  to  encourage  trail  development  for  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg and the surrounding municipalities 

Goal – To explore policies and programs so that greenway corridors may better function as a  conservation and enhancement tool for floodplain and riparian plant and wildlife habitat  

 



Work with Stewardship Services on management strategies for greenway corridors  



Work  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water  Services  to  identify  partnership  projects and improvement projects within greenway corridors 



Work with  Extension  Services and Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Storm  Water Services to  brainstorm  and  develop  outreach  efforts  to  educate  and  involve  homeowners  within the greenway corridors as to the value of the riparian habitats and possible  backyard  improvements  homeowners  can  make  to  conserve  and/or  improve  floodplain habitat   

76 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

4.6 10 YEAR ACTION PLAN  The  ten  year  action  plan  sets  forth  an  ambitious  goal  of  adding  an  additional  61  miles  of  proposed trail.  The feasibility of this goal will be reassessed within the first two years of the  5 year action plan to realistically assess the proposed development goals.  However, a focus  will remain on finishing significant stretches of trail, including Little Sugar Creek and Mallard  Creek greenways.  Goal  –  To  construct  61.9  miles  of  new  greenway  trail  by  2018,  bringing  the  total  miles  of  constructed greenway trail to 129  •

Disperse trail development throughout the County and surrounding towns 



Extend developed greenway trail and increase connectivity between greenway trail  systems 



Complete  signature  trails  including  Little  Sugar  Creek  Greenway,  Mallard  Creek  Greenway, and McDowell Creek Greenway  



Work with surrounding counties to identify desired regional connections 

4.7 MANAGEMENT POLICIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS  The  County  recognizes  that  to  ensure  residents  continue to benefit from the greenway and trail  system  there  must  be  a  commitment  to  the  protection  and  conservation  of  riparian  corridors, the development of trails that provide  desired  connections  and  outdoor  recreation  opportunities.    The  following  policy  recommendations  will  guide  the  department  in  the  planning  and  development  of  greenway  corridors.   4.7.1  STAKEHOLDER  APPROACH  TO  PLANNING  The  greenway  trails  listed  in  the  five  and  ten  year  action  plan  will  undergo  additional  planning  and  design  to  ensure  that  the  public  has  the  opportunity  to  have  input  into  the  final  route  and  alignment  of  each  trail  segment  and  to  identify  the  opportunities  and  constraints associated with project development.  In an effort to better engage the public in  the  planning  and  development  process  associated  with  greenway  trail  development,  the  Department  will  use  a  stakeholder  approach  to  greenway  trail  design.    The  stakeholder  group  will  be  formed  before  the  first  community  workshop  is  held.    Group  participation  should  be  limited  (12  persons,  maximum)  and  made  up  of  an  array  of  citizen  and  local  officials with a specific interest in the planning and design of the proposed trail section.  For  each  trail  segment,  potential  stakeholders  will  be  identified  and  may  include,  but  are  not  limited to, a representative of each of the following groups: 

 



Surrounding Homeowners/HOA Board Members  



Park and Greenway Advisory Council Members  77

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Local Business Owners 



Local Advocacy/Special Interest Groups 



Town and/or Planning Board Members 



Park and Recreation Division Manager 



Transportation Staff 



School Staff 



Health Department Staff  

4.7.2  INCORPORATION OF TOWN GREENWAYS AND TRAILS PLANS  Since  the  1999  Greenway  Master  Plan  update,  many  of  the  surrounding  towns  have  developed and adopted their own  greenways and  trails master  plans.   Greenway Planning  and  Development  staff  will  serve  as  consultants  to  the  towns  to  help  implement  the  adopted plans.  The plans and priorities of the towns are and will continue to be reflected in  the County’s greenways and trails development goals.  4.7.3  COORDINATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES  To meet the goals advanced in this update, there will need to be considerable collaboration  with  partners,  including  permitting  agencies,  surrounding  towns,  advocacy  groups  and  others.    The  update  contains  an  Appendix  which  specifically  addresses  the  current  opportunities and constraints for greenway trail development as defined by existing codes,  policies and ordinances. The following are some of the recommendations resulting from this  overview:  •

Hold  a  policy  summit  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Planning  Department  and  surrounding  towns’  planning  departments  to  consider  changes  to  the  adoption  of  uniform open space, greenways, and parks standards 



Work  with  County  and  City  storm  water  and  floodplain  management  officials  to  discuss  an  appropriate  County‐wide  strategy  for  building  greenways  that  address  issues  related  to  the  Post  Construction  Ordinance  and  floodplain  development  ordinance 



Work  with  Duke  Energy  and  other  utility  agencies  on  the  development  of  trials  within utility corridors 

4.7.4  CAPITAL COSTS 5 & 10 YEAR ACTION PLANS  Current capital needs for the planning, development and implementation of the five and ten  year action plan, as well as improvements to existing facilities, is estimated at $161,282,000.  These capital costs do not include land acquisition. 

 

 

78 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  4.8 RANKING CRITERIA  The Greenway Team has established the following ranking criteria to assist with the Capital  Needs Assessment prioritization of greenway trails.    •

No Significant Barrier to Construction – Barriers such as railroads, interstates, major  infrastructure, difficult grades, and others present physical and financial obstacles to  greenway trail construction.  Preference should be given to greenways that do not  require unusually difficult construction or high costs.    o



Ten  (10)  points  awarded  when  a  greenway  trail  does  not encounter a significant barrier to construction. 

Percent  Planned  Miles  Developed  per  Park  District  –  Guarantees  that  all  areas  of  the  County  get  equal  consideration  for  greenway  trail  development.    Points  are  awarded based on the percentage of greenway miles identified  in  the  Master  Plan  (per  Park  District)  that  are  under  design,  construction,  or  currently  developed.    Greenway  projects  in  Park Districts that have a smaller percentage of planned miles  developed are awarded more points.    o o o o

<10% of planned miles developed = 10 points.  11%  through  30%  of  planned  miles  developed  =  5  points.  31%  through  50%  of  planned  miles  developed  =  2  points.  > 50% of planned miles developed = 0 points. 

The current % per park district including current projects as of  3/17/2008 is as follows:  o o o o o o o o o •

 

CPD1:   2.42 / 9.7   CPD2:   2.50 / 9.5   CPD3:   5.48 / 9.9   EAST:   1.36 / 15.6   NORTH: 7.5 / 36.6  NE:  10.24 / 47.4   NW:  0.0 / 31.0  SOUTH: 13.33 / 64.2  SW:  0.49 / 26.7 

= 25%   = 26%   = 55%   = 9%  = 20%  = 22%   = 0%  = 21%  = 2% 

= 5 Points  = 5 Points  = 0 Points  = 10 Points  = 5 Points  = 5 Points  = 10 Points  = 5 Points  = 10 Points 

Project  Partnership,  Public  or  Private  –  Greenway  is  planned  and  built  in  conjunction  with  another  public  or  private  project.    Examples  include  Carolina  Thread Trail, CHA Housing projects, Metropolitan Midtown, CPCC expansion, CDOT  sidewalk  extension,  LUESA  Stream  Restoration,  CMUD  Relief  Sewer,  and  others.   There may not be a quantifiable dollar amount known, but it is perceived that when  projects are done together there are some major cost savings involved.    79

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

o •

Funding  Partnership,  Public  or  Private  –  Funding  can  limit  expansion  of  the  greenway  system.    MCPR  has  success  with  park  and  greenway  bonds,  but  it  is  important  to  consider  seeking  additional  funds  from  other  sources,  and/or  partnering  with  other  projects  to  save  cost.    Examples  include  seeking  donations  from  developers  through  the  rezoning  process,  partnering  with  the  towns  as  they  apply for grants, or partnering with other public agencies such as LUESA, CDOT, or  CMUD.  o



1  point  awarded  per  $10,000  contributed  to  a  greenway  project  from  an  outside agency. 

Located within the ETJ of a surrounding Town – MCPR has a goal of reaching out to  provide equal service of park and greenway facilities County‐wide.  This includes the  six surrounding towns in the County other than Charlotte.   o



10 points awarded per partnership mile 

10 points awarded when greenway encounters ETJ of a surrounding town. 

Listed in Other Adopted Plans or Studies – The 1999 Greenway Master Plan took a  comprehensive  look  at  the  planned  greenway  system  for  10  years.    It  is  also  important that the Charlotte‐Mecklenburg Planning Commission and six small towns  in  the  County  have  established  district,  small  area,  neighborhood,  corridor,  and  transit plans which reference greenway linkages as a key objective and policy guide.   This criterion incorporates other County and municipal policies into greenway trail  development.  o

5 points if greenway section is listed in any other plan 

4.8.1  LINKS  Being linear features, greenway trails function best when they link to points of interests and  activated spaces.  Each criterion below is important to the prioritization for development.  A  particular  greenway  receives  the  number  of  points  specified  for  each  link  and  a  smaller  number of points for each additional link.  •

Link  to  a  Public  or  Private  School  –  Greenway  trails  can  provide  an  alternative  means  of  transportation  for  students  and  school  staff  as  well  as  educational  opportunities  for  students.    This  criterion  applies  to  any  pre‐K  through  12th  grade  public or private school.  o



Link  to  another  Park,  Greenway,  Recreation  Center,  Nature  Preserve,  or  Cultural  Arts/Historical  Facility/Property  –  Connection  to  these  facilities  is  one  of  the  primary  goals  of  the  greenway  system.    It  is  important  to  look  at  how  greenways  connect to other recreational and cultural opportunities.   o



 

5 points for the first link, 2 points per additional links 

5 points for the first link, 2 points per additional links  

Link  to  a  Planned  Regional  Trail  (ex.  –  Carolina  Thread  Trail)  –  It  is  important  for  MCPR  to  contribute  to  the  vision  for  regional  trails  and  as  such  should  prioritize  those greenway trails that would connect to a delineated regional trail.   

80 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

o •

Link to a “Destination” Listed in the Master Plan – The Greenway Master Plan will  provide a list of significant destinations that should be a connectivity focus for the  greenway program.  Some examples are Bank of America Stadium, Carowinds, U.S.  National Whitewater Center, Verizon Amphitheatre, and James K. Polk site.   o







3 points for the first link, 1 point per additional link 

Link  to  a  Mixed‐Use  Development  –  Greenway  trails  play  a  key  role  in  creating  a  pedestrian‐friendly  community.    Likewise,  mixed‐use  centers  are  built  to  accommodate pedestrians.  Connecting to urban centers such as Birkdale increases  the mobility of pedestrians.  o 3 points for the first link, 1 point per additional link  Link  to  Transit  –  Another  primary  goal  of  the  greenway  trail  system  is  to  provide  transportation  alternatives,  and  to  link  to  other  transportation  opportunities.    As  the CATS bus and light rail systems continue to expand, greenway linkage to mass  transit becomes extremely important.  o 3  points  for  linking  to  light  rail  station,  regional  transit  centers,  or  park  &  ride lots  o 1 point per link to bus stops/bus routes  Link to Office or Commercial Area – It is also important for the greenway system to  connect  to  other  uses  besides  residential  areas  and  parks  to  encourage  use  of  greenways  for  commuting  to  work  and  performing  errands.    This  criterion  can  be  applied to retail services and office complexes.  o o o



4 points for the first link, 1 point per additional link 

Link  to  a  College  or  Library  –  These  institutions  are  centers  for  civic  and  cultural  activity  and  also  are  hubs  of  pedestrian  activity,  making  them  ideal  targets  for  greenway trail connection.   o



5 points for providing a regional trail connection 

3 points for linking to a business park  3 points for linking to a regional shopping center (ex. Southpark, Northlake)  1 point per link to general office or commercial area 

Opportunity  for  a  Neighborhood  Access  –  The  more  neighborhoods  that  are  connected  to  the  greenways,  the  greater  the  potential  number  of  greenway  patrons.    Neighborhood  access  points  should  be  emphasized  to  encourage  more  people to use the greenways.  o

2 points per potential neighborhood access 

4.8.2  LAND ACQUISITION MULTIPLIER  The most important factor in prioritizing greenway trail construction is property ownership.   Therefore,  greenway  sections  with  the  fewest  parcels  remaining  to  be  acquired  should  be  given highest priority.      •  

Land Acquisition Multiplier – The sub‐total of all other ranking criteria is multiplied  as shown below based on the number of parcels remaining to be purchased.  81

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

o

Multiply based on the number of parcels remaining to be purchased.  ƒ

0 parcels = total (1)  

ƒ

1 – 3 parcels = total (.75) 

ƒ

4 – 6 parcels = total (.5) 

ƒ

6+ parcels = total (.25) 

Figure  40  outlines  the  Greenway  Master  Plan  and  the  Greenway  Corridors  in  the  County,  while Figure 41 demonstrates the priorities in 5 year and 10 year timelines for the planned  projects.       

 

 

82 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

 

Figure 40 ‐ Greenway Master Plan 

 

 

83

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  Figure 41 ‐ Greenway Master Plan (Priority Map) 

 

 

84 

 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER FIVE  ‐ NATURE PRESERVES MASTER PLAN UPDATE  5.1 INTRODUCTION  The  Mecklenburg  County  Nature  Preserves  Master Plan has been updated as part of the 2008  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  Master  Plan.    The  Division  of  Nature  Preserves  and  Natural  Resources  (formerly  the  Stewardship  Services  Division)  has  been  utilizing  the  1997  Nature  Preserves  Public  Use  Master  Plan  and  the  2003  update  to  manage  a  growing  system  of  nature  preserves;  however,  due  to  system‐wide  growth  it  has  become  evident  the  plan  needs  to  be updated.   The 2008 plan includes:  a review of  the  Division’s  Mission  and  Vision;  an  overview  of  the  benefits  of  natural  resource  conservation,  natural  areas,  and  nature‐based  programming;  a  review  of  nature  preserve  distribution;  management  goals  and  policies;  management  strategies  for  nature  preserves;  a  strategic  acquisition  strategy  for  future  land  protection;  recommendations  for  future  facilities  and  programming;  and  capital  costs  associated  the  recommendations.    Currently,  the  Division  protects and manages 14 nature preserves on 5,783.4 acres.  Facilities and services include  the  operation  of  three  nature  centers,  a  56‐site  campground,  35  miles  of  hiking  trails,  37  parking areas, 25 bathrooms, and five picnic shelters.  Nature‐based and outdoor adventure  recreation  programs  are  provided  for  over  50,000  participants  annually.    Latta  Plantation,  Reedy  Creek,  and  McDowell  Nature  Preserves  provide  outdoor  nature‐based  recreation  opportunities for over 500,000 visitors per year.  Natural Resources staff collect and analyze  scientific  data  used  for  land  management,  planning,  and  the  land  use  decision  making  process.    Staff  identify,  inventory  and  monitor  natural  areas,  maintain  the  largest  wildlife  database in the region, manage for rare, threatened, and federally endangered species, and  provide technical assistance to government agencies, outside organizations, and the public.  The mission for the Mecklenburg County Division of Nature Preserves and Natural Resources  is to “protect the region’s biodiversity and natural heritage for its inherent value and for the  benefit  of  future  generations  by  promoting  open  space  reservation,  conserving  natural  communities,  and  fostering  awareness  and  stewardship  through  environmental  education  and outdoor recreation.”  The vision is for “natural communities to exist within Mecklenburg County in perpetuity and  for these interconnected high‐quality natural areas to benefit and be valued by all citizens.”  Definition—Nature  Preserves  protect  natural  areas  and  are  managed  for  their  ecological  value  and  native  biodiversity,  and  where  appropriate,  provide  the  public  with  the  opportunity to explore and experience nature.   

 

85

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Nature preserves protect and enhance our air and water quality, contribute to the  public  understanding  of  natural  systems  and  native  species,  provide  sites  for  educational  activities,  outdoor  recreation,  wildlife  observation,  and  nature  appreciation, and preserve unique features and the natural beauty of Mecklenburg  County. 



Acquisition  or  designation  of  sites  of  any  size  is  authorized  where  warranted  to  protect  a  significant  ecological,  geological,  or  cultural  resource  (when  co‐located  with a significant ecological resource). 

Objectives—Nature  preserves,  as  designated  by  the  Mecklenburg  Board  of  County  Commissioners, are declared to be at their highest and best use for public benefit by serving  one or more of the following public purposes:  •

Contribute to the growth and development of public understanding of and empathy  for  natural  systems,  and  the  consequent  development  of  public  understanding  for  the interdependence of all forms of life and vital dependence of the  health  of the  human community on the health of other natural communities. 



Provide  sites  for  scientific  research  and  examples  for  scientific  comparison  with  more disturbed sites. 



Provide  sites  for  educational  activities  and  places  where  people  may  observe  the  natural world, learn about environmental systems, and reflect upon nature. 



Provide  habitat  for  the  survival  of  rare  plants  or  animals,  natural  communities,  or  other significant biological features. 



Provide opportunities for nature‐based recreation compatible with the protection of  the natural area. 



Provide  places  for  the  preservation  of  natural  beauty  or  unique/unusual  natural  features.  



Provide large, contiguous  undeveloped natural lands in perpetuity for the purpose  of conserving open space and creating wildlife corridors within densely developing  urban areas. 



Provide  small  habitat  areas  within  urban  or  suburban  development  areas  that  can  act  as  “stepping  stones”  to  habitat  corridors  or  between  larger  protected  habitat  areas. 

5.2 NEED FOR NATURE PRESERVES  There is a clear public need and desire for nature‐based recreation in Mecklenburg County.   Public  input  framed  the  planning  process  for  the  1997  Nature  Preserves  Master  Plan.    A  series  of  meetings  were  conducted  with  stakeholders  throughout  the  County.    It  became  clear through those public meetings that residents desired passive open space and natural  areas that would allow walking/hiking, wildlife viewing, and opportunities to learn about the  natural heritage of their community.  Over the past 10 years, community support for open  spaces  and  natural  resource  conservation  remained  strong.    The  visioning  efforts  for  the  2008  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  Master  Plan  clearly  reveal  the  public’s   

 

86 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

appreciation for natural areas.  Stakeholders and focus groups from all geographic areas of  the  County  stated  that  open  space  and  natural  resources  are  very  important  to  the  community.  Representative comments from stakeholders and focus groups include:  •

“Do not have enough nature preserves.” 



“Preservation of the environment, our society, and our youth is what is expected of  the County.” 



“Natural settings provide a great way to center yourself in an urban environment.” 



“The availability of green space is of high value.” 



“Green  Space  needs  should  be  a  focus.  This  includes  the  environment  and  air  quality.” 



“Water  protection  and  the  connection  to  open  spaces  needs  to  continue  to  be  a  ‘strength’ of the system.” 



“We need to be a ‘green’ community.” 



“Land acquisition is a high priority.” 



“Environmental  stewardship  is  a  strength  of  the system.” 

The  importance  of  nature  preserves  and  their  associated  facilities  and  programming  was  further  revealed  and  confirmed  in  the  random  household  Community  Survey  conducted  as  part  of  the  master  planning  process.    The  survey  was  completed  in  January  2008,  and  had  a  goal  of  1,000  completed  surveys.  The survey results are statistically valid with  a confidence level of 95% (+/‐ 3.5%).   The results of  the survey continue to confirm that County residents  value  nature  preserves  and  the  outdoor  opportunities they provide. Representative data include:  •

Seventy‐six  percent  (76%)  of  residents  have  visited  a  Mecklenburg  County  park  in  the past year (national average 72%). 



Top two reasons people visited parks: enjoyment of the outdoors (62%) and close to  home (61%). 



(Only)  39%  of  residents  feel  there  are  sufficient  parks  and  green  space  within  walking distance of their homes. 

From a list of 28 types of parks and recreation facilities, the top 5 requested by the public  were: 

 



76% Walking and biking trails (national average 68%) 



64% Large community parks and regional parks 



62% Nature center and trails (national average 57%)  87

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



62% Small neighborhood parks of 2‐10 acres 



60% Park shelters and picnic areas 

Soccer  fields  (32%),  youth  baseball/softball  fields  (32%),  football  fields  (27%),  golf  courses  (26%), and other athletic facilities/amenities were all considerably lower.  The top three needs (currently only being 50% met or less), based on 335,891 households in  the County, are:  •

Walking and biking trails 



Nature center and trails 



Community gardens 

Most  popular/top  four  programs  residents  have  a  need  for  (from  a  list  of  22  program  categories) include:  •

50% Special events/festivals 



49% Adult fitness and wellness programs 



39% Family recreation/outdoor adventure programs 



37% Nature education programs 

The  results  of  the  Statewide  Comprehensive  Outdoor  Recreation  Plan  (SCORP)  for  North  Carolina  closely  mimic  the  Mecklenburg  County  survey  results,  and  provide  a  strong  rationale  for  natural  resource  conservation  and  the  provision  of  nature  preserves.   According to the SCORP, outdoor activities for North Carolina residents are very popular and  include:  •

75% Walking for pleasure 



71% Viewing scenery 



62% Visiting historical sites 



53% Visiting natural areas 



52% Picnicking 

All  of  these  activities  and  more  are  experienced  at  County  nature  preserves.    Outdoor  recreation  surveys  at  the  national  level  have  also  shown  the  desire  of  Americans  to  have  outdoor experiences.  The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has conducted a nationwide  recreation  survey  every  five  years  since  1955.    It  is  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  comprehensive  continuing  recreation  surveys  in  the  country.    The  2006  survey  found  that  87.5 million U.S. residents 16 and older participated in wildlife‐related recreation.  Of that,  the  vast  majority  participated  in  wildlife  watching  activities  (i.e.  bird  watching,  nature  observation,  nature  photography,  etc.)  with  approximately  71.1  million  residents  participating in these activities.  This was an 8% increase over the prior survey. In contrast,  the number of sportspersons (fishers and hunters) declined by 10%.  Overall, nearly a third  of the U.S. population enjoyed wildlife watching in 2006.  Of all wildlife, birds attracted the  biggest following, with 47.7 million participating from home, close to home, or taking trips  specifically to bird watch.  Additionally, these wildlife watchers spent $45.7 billion on their   

 

88 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

activities.    Survey  responses  revealed  that  benefits  to  outdoor  enthusiasts  range  from  personal  satisfaction  to  social  interaction.    Wildlife  watchers  make  up  one  of  the  largest  segments of visitors served at nature preserves.  Finally,  the  Outdoor  Industry  Foundations  Outdoor  Recreation  Participation  StudyTM  (research conducted by The Leisure Trends Group) provides data on numerous trends since  1998.  The objectives of this study are to “annually track nationwide participation levels for  Americans 16 and older in active outdoor activities, give insight into American’s behavior as  outdoor  recreationists,  and  provide  independent  and  projectable  research  to  help  the  outdoor industry.”  Key findings of the 2006 report include:  •

161.1  million  (72%)  Americans  16  and  older  participated  in  an  outdoor  activity  in  2005. 



The  majority  of  these  Americans  participated  in  between  one  and  three  activities  (62.6%). 



The  top  five  active  outdoor  activities*  by  percent  of  Americans  who  participated  are: Bicycling, Fishing, Hiking, Camping, and Trail Running.  o

*Wildlife watching was not an activity measured by this survey. This survey  included only active outdoor recreational pursuits. 

All of the top five activities, especially fishing, hiking,  camping,  and  trail  running,  are  offered  at  Mecklenburg County nature preserves.  Although not  one  of  the  top  five  activities,  the  activity  with  the  greatest  decline  over  the  eight  year  period  was  overnight  backpacking  (22.5%  decline).    This  follows  a  national  trend  where  the  greatest  growth  in  individual  outdoor  activities  are  those  that  can  be  “Done  in  a  Day.”    For  instance,  hiking  (on  unpaved  trails)  continues  to  remain  one  of  the  most  popular  outdoor  activities.    The  2005  American  hiker  was  a  relatively  balanced  demographic  by  gender,  household  affluence,  children  in  household,  and  region of the country.  The average hiker hit the trails on average 11 times in 2005, with 20%  hiking more than 11 times.  Additionally, Hispanic hikers are increasing in numbers.  Results  such  as  these  highlight  the  importance  of  providing  “local”  and  “close  to  home”  opportunities  to  explore  nature,  hike,  trail  run,  bird  watch,  picnic,  canoe/kayak,  fish,  and  camp.  Results  of  these  local  and  national  surveys  provide  the  basis  for  many  of  the  recommendations contained within this Master Plan.  Arguably, never before has the need  and  desire  by  the  public  for  nature  preserves,  access  to  nature  trails  and  facilities,  and  nature‐based  outdoor  recreational  programming  been  so  strong  at  both  the  local  and  national level. 

 

89

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  5.3 BENEFITS OF THE NATURE PRESERVE SYSTEM  The benefits of acquiring, protecting and managing natural preserves are numerous.  For the  purpose  of  this  report,  they  are  broken  down  into  three  categories:  Environmental,  Economy, and Health/Quality of Life benefits.  For more information, refer to the full 2008  plan.  5.3.1  ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS  The  environmental  benefits  of  protecting  open  space,  high  quality  natural  areas,  tree‐ canopy,  watersheds,  and  shorelines  are  extensive  as  there  is  a  direct  correlation  between  forested  lands  and  water  quality.    The  County  has  experienced  a  significant  loss  of  open  space  to  development  and  an  increase  of  impervious  surfaces  in  the  past  20  years.   Increased storm water runoff from these surfaces creates significant impacts to our streams,  lakes,  and  water  quality.    The  run‐off  enters  creeks  and  tributaries,  creating  scouring  and  heavy  erosion,  and  in  many  areas  eventually  draining  into  the  region’s  drinking  water  supply.    Currently  most  streams  do  not  meet  the  County’s  “fishable  or  swimmable”  standard.    Additionally,  for  the  first  time,  the  water  quality  of  Mountain  Island  Lake  (MIL)  slipped  from  excellent  to  excellent/good,  largely  due  to  development  upstream  of  main  tributaries  in  the  Huntersville  area.  (LUESA  2006  State  of  the  Environment).    As  development  continues,  and  impervious  surfaces  continue  to  increase,  protecting  the  watersheds  of  critical  drinking  reservoirs  will  continue  to  be  necessary.    A  2003  study  indicated  that  the  nearly  5,800  acres  of  nature  preserve  property  throughout  the  County  have  a  storm  water  retention  capacity  of  29  million  cubic  feet  per  year.    This  means  that  County nature preserves are naturally filtering this amount of storm water annually, which  otherwise would fall onto impervious surfaces and directly enter the tributaries and lakes of  the County.   One  goal  of  the  County  has  been  to  protect  the  watershed  of  MIL,  the  source  of  drinking  water for most Mecklenburg County and City of Charlotte residents.  It is for this reason that  the majority of nature preserve acreage is located in the NW region of the County.  The goal  of Phase1 of this program was to protect 80% of both the shoreline and the key tributaries  of the lake.  To date, the region has done a fair job of protecting the shoreline (nearly 74%  protected).    Mecklenburg  County  nature  preserves  protect  14  miles  of  this  shoreline,  the  vast  majority  of  the  74%.    Although  additional  shoreline  needs  to  be  protected,  this  is  encouraging.  However, only 20% of the tributaries have been protected.  Nature preserves  such  as  Gar  Creek  Nature  Preserve  were  specifically  purchased  for  protection  of  this  vital  tributary,  which  discharges  immediately  upstream  of  the  MIL  drinking  water  intake.   Because  additional  development  within  the  MIL  watershed  is  occurring  and  likely  to  continue to occur until “build out”, land along tributaries and the lake should be pursued for  acquisition and protection.   It  is  interesting  to  note  that  a  survey  completed  by  the  Trust  for  Public  Lands  in  Mecklenburg  County  revealed  extremely  strong  citizen  support  for  protecting  our  drinking  water  quality.    Water  quality  ranked  2nd  in  priorities  just  behind  crime/public  safety,  and  ahead of schools, transportation, and jobs/economic development.    

 

90 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Another  factor  in  the  health  of  Mecklenburg  County  residents  is  air  quality.    Local  studies  have shown the significant beneficial impact that an extensive forest can have on air quality.   The  Urban  Ecosystem  Analysis  of  Mecklenburg  County,  which  was  prepared  by  American  Forests  in  2003,  revealed  that  from  1984  to  2001,  the  forested  land  in  Mecklenburg  County  decreased  over 22%.  There is a direct correlation between air  quality and forested land. Urban forests reduce the  negative  effects  of  air  pollution  by  removing  carbon  dioxide,  sulfur  dioxide,  carbon  monoxide,  ozone  and  particulate  matter.    The  American  Forests  study  estimated  that  the  forested  lands  in  Mecklenburg  County  remove  17.5  million  pounds  of  pollutants  from  the  air  annually.    As  of  2007,  County  nature  preserves  accounted  for  472,000  pounds of air pollution removal every year.  It has  been  conservatively  estimated  that  the  air  quality  benefits provided by the County nature preserves can be valued at $2,210,000 per year.  5.3.2  ECONOMIC BENEFITS   Although not well known, County nature preserves provide direct, and significant, economic  benefits.    The  greatest  of  these  benefits  derives  from  higher  sale  prices  and  associated  higher yearly property taxes via the “proximity effect.”  The proximity effect results from the  fact  that  people  are  willing  to  pay  more  (for  a  comparable  home)  based  on  location.    In  layman’s  terms  this  is  known  as  “location,  location,  location….”    Real  estate  markets  consistently show people are willing to pay more for homes located close to parks.  Dr. John  Crompton, Texas A&M University, is a well‐known authority on the subject.  His work, “The  Proximate  Principle:  The  Impact  of  Parks,  Open  Space  and  Water  Features  on  Residential  Property Values and the Property Tax Base”, explores this effect in detail.  Over 30 empirical  studies  clearly  show  parks  have  an  overwhelming  positive  effect  on  property  values.    The  resulting higher sale price and associated yearly taxes by an owner living adjacent to or near  a park represent a direct, immediate, and on‐going economic return to a municipality on its  investment  in  the  park.    This  is  a  direct  economic  tax  benefit  to  the  community,  with  no  increase in services (or associated expenditures) required.    The effect of parks on property values is not a new phenomenon.  Frederick Law Olmsted,  the architect of New York’s Central Park, justified the purchase of this park by showing how  the rise in adjacent land value would produce enough new tax revenue to pay for the park  investment.  By 1864, Olmsted could document new tax revenue with a $55,880 net return  in annual taxes.  By 1873, the park – which until then had cost approximately $14 million,  was responsible for an extra $5.24 million in taxes each year.   Not surprisingly, Crompton’s recent work clearly shows that “passive properties” and parks  (non‐athletic parks such as nature preserves) show the greatest proximity effect.  In fact, on  average,  properties  adjacent  to  passive  parks  such  as  nature  preserves  experience  a  20%  increase  in  value.    The  proximity  effect  declines  to  zero  percent  for  properties  2,000  feet  away,  or  an  average  of  6‐8  city  blocks.    Using  the  results  of  these  studies,  it  has  been   

91

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

estimated  that  the  tax  benefit  of  Mecklenburg  County  nature  preserves  on  the  adjacent  2,026  property  owners  and  3,146  nearby  property  owners  within  1,000  feet  of  a  preserve  equals $1.18 million per year.   Two  additional  economic  benefits  of  County  nature  preserves  include  tourism  and  direct  revenue  generation.    Based  on  the  2004  Charlotte  Tourism  Report  and  visitation  to  the  nature  preserves  and  the  many  special  events  hosted  at  these  sites  every  year,  the  estimated yearly tourism benefit of County nature preserves in 2005 was $1.08 million.  The  direct  revenue  associated  with  Department  fee‐based  nature  programs,  camps,  shelter  rentals, and the McDowell campground totaled $181,000 in 2006.  Taken together, the tax  benefit, tourism benefit, and revenue of the nature preserves and associated facilities and  programs alone exceeds $2.4 million per year.    5.3.3  HEALTH & QUALITY OF LIFE BENEFITS   The  nature  preserves  system  and  connecting  trails/greenways  significantly  benefit  the  health  of  local  residents.    This  is  a  very  important  consideration  as  studies  indicate  approximately  33%  of  Americans  are  overweight.    The  Centers  for  Disease  Control  report  that  the  number  of  overweight  adult  Americans  increased  over  60%  between  1991  and  2000.  The percentage of  overweight  children  between the ages of two and five years old  increased  by  almost  36%,  and  studies  show  the  amount  of  television  that  children  watch  directly  correlates  with  measures  of  their  body  fat.    One  recent  study  found  that  children  ages eight to ten years old experience an average of 6‐10 hours of “screen time” per day.   Childhood obesity is up 300% over the past two decades, with nearly two out of every ten  children  now  obese.    As  stated  in  the  Outdoor  Recreation  Participation  Study  TM,  the  decline  in  the  average  number  of  outings  taken  by  16  to  24  year  olds  is  a  result  of  competition by other non‐outdoor activities.  For example, on an average day in 2005, 14%  of 16 to 24 year old males indicated they played video games and 31% indicated that it was  one  of  their  favorite  activities.    Another  2006  survey  found  that  91%  of  parents  cite  television, computers, and video games as the main cause of their children’s disinterest in  outdoor play.   Other health issues include the growing number of children with Type II diabetes, asthma,  and  attention  deficit  disorder  (ADD).    Stress  levels  continue  to  rise  as  well,  and  stress  is  linked to both physical and mental health.  More than ever, stress is recognized as a major  drain  on  corporate  productivity  and  competitiveness.    Depression,  one  type  of  stress  reaction,  is  predicted  to  be  the  leading  occupational  disease  of  the  21st  century,  and  is  responsible  for  more  days  of  lost  work  than  any  other  single  factor.    Annually,  over  $300  billion  is  spent  on  stress‐related  workers  compensation  claims,  reduced  productivity,  absenteeism, health insurance costs, direct medical expenses and employee turnover. This  equals, on average, $7,500 per U.S. employee.   Nature preserves can be, and are, part of the solution to these significant health and societal  issues.  Over 100 studies find that spending time in nature reduces stress.  As documented  in  “Last  Child  in  the  Woods”  by  Richard  Louv,  other  studies  find  that  children  with  nature  near  their  home  report  lower  levels  of  behavioral  conduct  disorders,  anxiety,  and  depression.    Studies  demonstrate  children  have  a  greater  ability  to  concentrate  in  more  natural  settings,  and  that  children  engage  in  more  creative  forms  of  play  in  green  areas.    

 

92 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Incredibly, studies even suggest that children who spend more time playing outdoors have  more friends, and there is compelling evidence that nature is useful as therapy for Attention  Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).    In response to these trends, there is growing support for the reconnection of children and  nature.    The  Division  of  Nature  Preserves  and  Natural  Resources  makes  a  strong  effort  to  help resolve these health and social issues by providing environmental education programs  throughout the nature preserve system.   Research  conducted  at  150  schools  in  16  states  over  a  10‐year  period  found  that  environmental  education  produces  student  gains  in  social  studies,  science,  language  arts,  and  math;  improves  standardized  test  scores  and  grade  point  averages;  and  develops  problem‐ solving,  critical  thinking,  and  decision  making  skills.   In  addition,  environmental  education  students  typically  outperform  their  peers  in  traditional  classes and these students also demonstrate better  attendance and behavior.  For more than a decade,  the  National  Environmental  Education  &  Training  Foundation  and  the  Roper  Starch  polling  organization  have  been  conducting  surveys  that  show  95%  of  American  adults  support  environmental education.  Every year, staff conduct  hundreds  of  educational  programs  for  over  30,000  students and residents.  As the only public provider  of  hands‐on,  outdoor,  environmental  education  in  the  County,  the  Division  will  continue  to  enhance  and  expand  these  offerings  as  funding  permits.   Although  it  is  clear  that  residents  of  Mecklenburg  County  value  open  space  and  natural  resource  conservation  and  that  there  are  significant  environmental,  economic,  and  health  benefits from nature preserves, there are other reasons that these resources are a value to  the community.  The quality of life as well as economic vitality in the region is consequently  enhanced  by  both  recreational  and  educational  opportunities  available  throughout  the  nature preserve system.  Ecotourism is a growing component of regional economies across  the country.   This type of tourism is generally based on the attraction of natural areas for  outdoor  recreation,  viewing  of  wildlife  and  scenic  resources,  and  visitor  education.    Even  though it would seem that ecotourism would be something experienced in wilderness areas,  many urban areas are taking advantage of natural and cultural resources to attract visitors  and provide local residents the opportunity to partake in outdoor adventures close to home.   Local examples include the Carolina Thread Trail, which will link natural and cultural sites in  a 15 county region within the Piedmont, and the Central Carolinas Biodiversity Trail, which  will guide visitors to areas with unique wildlife and natural areas throughout the Piedmont.   A strong nature preserves system will be a key component of these regional trails and will  attract regional and national visitors to the Charlotte metropolitan area, which in turn will  benefit the local economy.   

 

93

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

5.3.4  REVIEW OF PEER COMMUNITIES  As of 2005 there were 6.6 acres of nature preserve per 1,000 residents.  A review of thirteen  peer communities showed that the Mecklenburg County Nature Preserves system is lagging  far behind other communities in acquiring and protecting lands for protection and nature‐ based  recreation.    No  other  community  reviewed  had  less  land  set  aside  for  natural  resource management, wildlife and watershed protection, and passive recreation, either by  total acreage, acres per resident, or percent of County land.  5.4 MANAGEMENT GOALS  •

To protect the biodiversity and natural heritage of each Mecklenburg County Nature  Preserve  for  its  intrinsic  value,  the  health  of  our  environment,  and  the  long‐term  benefit of the public. 



To collect and utilize the best available scientific data to provide a sound basis for  making management decisions. 



To  maintain,  enhance,  and/or  restore  the  integrity  and  biodiversity  of  natural  communities.  



To identify target species in need of monitoring and/or management. 



To  identify,  acquire,  designate  and  protect  as  Nature  Preserve  other  County  areas  containing important ecological, geological, or cultural resources. 



To attempt to link together Nature Preserves and other natural areas. 



To  minimize  the  impact  of  external  human  influences  on  Nature  Preserve  properties. 



To  provide  nature‐based  outdoor  recreation  and  education  opportunities  to  the  public, while ensuring protection of our natural resources and natural areas. 

5.5 MANAGEMENT POLICIES  The  County  recognizes  that  to  ensure  that  residents  continue  to  benefit  from  the  nature  preserve  system  there  must  be  a  commitment  to  protection  of  natural  areas  within  the  preserves,  minimizing  impacts  from  outside  influences,  and  giving  priority  to  natural  communities  when  conflicts  arise.    The  following  policies  will  guide  the  Division  of  Nature  Preserves and Natural Resources in managing resources on nature preserves to enhance the  natural environment throughout the County. 

 

 

94 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  5.6 APPROPRIATE USE OF NATURE PRESERVES  The Division recognizes that there should be limitations to some outdoor recreation pursuits  and that some public uses have been determined to be inappropriate for nature preserves.  It is critical that any public use of a nature preserve will  not  cause  unacceptable  impacts  to  the  resource.    The  determination  of  appropriate  public  use  will  be  the  “recreation  vs.  resource”  test.    The  appropriateness  of  public  uses  in  nature  preserves  will  be  evaluated  for  consistency  with  the  Division’s  Mission,  Management  Goals,  Management  Policies,  or  County  Ordinance;  actual  and  anticipated  impacts  to  the  resource;  and  resources  available  to  manage  the  current/proposed  use.  Policy  –  If  it  is  determined  that  a  proposed  public  use  will result in unacceptable impacts to the resource, then  this use will be disallowed from the nature preserve.  If  it is determined that current public uses are creating unacceptable impacts to the resource,  that public use will be eliminated.  Appropriate public uses at nature preserves are:  •

Hiking/Walking/Jogging 



Wildlife Observation/Bird Watching 



Nature Study and Appreciation/Spending Time in Nature 



Educational Activities (school groups, scouts, public, colleges/universities, etc.) 



Public  and  Private  Nature–based  Programs  (environmental  education,  outdoor  recreation) 



Picnicking 



Fishing 



Canoe/Kayaking 



Camping (currently at McDowell Nature Preserve and Copperhead Island only) 



Biking on Paved Roads Only 



Horseback  Riding  (Latta  Plantation  Nature  Preserve  only;  limited  to  designated  equestrian trails) 

This  policy  addresses  appropriate  uses  within  a  nature  preserve.    Mecklenburg  County  ordinances and policies have also been adopted to govern the use and operation of County  Park  and  Recreation  Facilities.    The  County  ordinances  and  policies  are  presented  in  the  Appendix to this plan.  All County ordinances apply to nature preserves.   The following uses and actions are prohibited within nature preserves:   

95

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Removal  or  destruction  of  any  natural  objects,  including  plants  or  minerals  (per  County ordinance) 



Feeding of wildlife, including waterfowl (per County ordinance) 



Mountain Biking on natural/non‐paved trails 



ATV Riding (per County ordinance) 



Swimming (per County ordinance) 



Dogs off leash (per County ordinance) 



Horseback Riding (except at Latta Plantation on designated equestrian trails) 



Releasing of pets or feral animals (per County ordinance) 



Camping (except at established campgrounds) 



Hunting and trapping (except specially approved deer management hunts) 



Injuring,  killing,  or  harassing  in  any  manner,  any  bird  or  animal  (per  County  ordinance) 

5.7 MANAGEMENT ZONES  Public  uses  at  nature  preserves  are  based  upon  “management  zones”  designated  within  each nature  preserve.  These zones are determined by the natural resources found within  them.  The specific management of each zone differs, as well as the permitted public uses  and  amenities,  based  on  the  quality  of  the  natural  areas  of  the  zone,  potential  impacts  certain  activities  can  have  on  these  areas,  and/or  other  significant  features  (i.e.  the  presence  of  endangered  species,  etc.).    All  natural  areas  within  a  nature  preserve  are  designated  as  Natural  Zone,  Outstanding  Natural  Zone,  or  Critical  Natural  Zone.    These  zones  exhibit  significant  biological  diversity  and  ecological  processes.    The  overall  management  priority  of  these  zones  is  the  conservation  and  restoration  of  natural  communities  and  the  protection  of  animal  and  plant  species.    In  addition  to  the  three  natural  zones,  a  Cultural  and  Historical  Zone  has  been  established  for  the  protection  and  management  of  unique  cultural  resources,  and  a  Support  Development  Zone  has  been  established to permit the construction and building of facilities which support the mission of  the Division.  Management zones are assigned a hierarchy level (i.e., 1 to 4 where 1 is the  most  significant)  based  on  their  ecological  sensitivity  and  development  restrictions.    Zone  maps have been established for all nature preserves and can be found in the master plan.   •

Hierarchy Level 1 ‐ Critical Natural Zone 



Hierarchy Level 2 ‐ Outstanding Natural Zone 



Hierarchy Level 3 ‐ Natural Zone 



Hierarchy Level 3 ‐ Cultural and Historical Zone 



Hierarchy Level 4 ‐ Support Development Zone 

Policy  –  If  changes  to  management  zones  in  a  nature  preserve  are  proposed,  the  changes  can  only  be  upgraded  to  a  more  strict  management  zone  (i.e.,  to  a  higher  hierarchy  level,  such  as  a  Natural  Zone  to  Outstanding  Natural  Zone)  or  result  in  an  overall  decrease  in   

 

96 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Support Development Zone.  Because the nature preserve is established to preserve natural  communities, it is evident that the predominant management zones with a nature preserve  will be the Natural, Outstanding, and Critical Zones.   Policy  –  The  total  amount  of  Support  Development  Zone  within  a  nature  preserve  may  never exceed 10% of the total preserve acreage.  Definitions of the nature preserve management zones can be found in the master plan, as  well as specific restrictions, permitted uses, and management priorities for each zone.  5.8 MAINTAIN SPECIES OF CONCERN  Policy – Every attempt shall be made to ensure no net loss of species of local conservation  concern or their critical habitat within the nature preserve system.   The  Division  monitors  and  manages  for  numerous  local,  state,  and  federal  species  of  conservation concern.  The long term goal is to ensure these species do not disappear from  our  community.    To  accomplish  this,  the  Division  will  conduct  comprehensive  surveys  for  and protect species of concern.  The Division will strive to recover all species of concern and  their  critical  habitats  within  the  nature  preserve  system.    To  accomplish  this,  the  Division  will: adhere to policies within this master plan, coordinate with state and federal agencies to  ensure  that  all  management  activities  meet  the  requirements  of  state  or  federal  species  recovery plans, and prepare and implement management plans for all natural areas.   5.9 NATURE PRESERVE DESIGNATION OF LAND‐BANKED PROPERTIES  In  2007  the  Division  completed  an  analysis  of  undeveloped  “land‐banked”  Department  properties.    The  analysis  was  conducted  in  an  attempt to document natural resources at each site  and provide recommendations, where appropriate,  for properties that should be considered for nature  preserve designation (either whole or in part).   The original analysis included 46 properties totaling  3,522 acres that, at the time, were land‐banked and  undeveloped.    Since  that  time,  21  of  these  properties  (1,856  acres)  have  been  developed.  Many  of  the  remaining  properties  do  not  contain  significant natural resources or high quality natural  areas,  and  are  therefore  recommended  to  be  developed  as  Neighborhood,  Community,  or  Regional Parks based on need.  Two properties, the  Back Creek and Pennington properties, contain high quality natural areas, but with sensitive  planning  and  design  they  could  still  support  limited  active  use  development  and  provide  active parks.   Of the remaining  properties, six contain exceptional natural areas and/or unique features,  rare species of concern, and high biodiversity.  Five are recommended for Nature Preserve  designation in the Department’s new 10‐year master plan.  These new Nature Preserves will  be:   

97

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  



Stevens Creek Nature Preserve 



Berryhill Nature Preserve 



Oehler Nature Preserve 



Gateway Nature Preserve & Community Park 



Hucks Road/Davis Farm Nature Preserve 

The locations of these five properties are within the service radii of other Community and  Regional Parks.  Hence, residents living near these preserves have, or will have, their active  recreation  needs  met  at  those  facilities.    Total  acreage  of  the  above  five  properties  (or  portions thereof) to be designated nature preserve is 730.6 acres.  This will bring the total  acreage  of  the  nature  preserve  system  to  6,514  acres.    The  sixth  property  containing  exceptional natural resources, Sherman Branch, is in an area of the County that also shows a  strong  need  for  a  Regional  Park  (existing  active  recreation  service  gap).    Therefore,  the  Department  recommends  the  Sherman  Branch  property  remain  “landbanked”  and  undesignated for the time being.  The Department will pursue land acquisition nearby for an  active  Regional  Park  to  serve  this  area.    This  could  then  result  in  Sherman  Branch  being  designated Nature Preserve.  Information of each of the six properties mentioned above is  available through the Department.  5.10 ACQUISITION OF NATURE PRESERVE PROPERTIES  To  assist  with  a  strategic  approach  toward  nature  preserve  land  acquisition,  the  Trust  for  Public  Lands  completed  a  “greenprinting”  analysis  of  Mecklenburg  County.    The  greenprinting  process  takes  community  values  and  uses  them  as  a  basis  for  rating  properties.    Two  analyses  were  conducted  to  determine  Nature  Preserve  priority  land  acquisitions.    The  first  was  a  “Critical  Wildlife  Habitat”  greenprint,  and  the  second  was  a  “Parcel Prioritization” greenprint.  The Critical Wildlife Habitat considered and mapped the  following:  forested  habitat,  early  successional  habitat,  wetland  habitat,  riparian  habitat,  Natural  Heritage  Sites,  buffer  zones  adjacent  to  existing  unique/rare  habitats,  wildlife  corridors,  presence  of  rare  species  of  concern,  critical  watersheds,  and  large  unbroken  natural areas remaining in the County.  Based on a weighted matrix, lands were ranked 1‐5,  five being lands exhibiting the highest “critical habitat values.”  The second analysis evaluated parcels of land throughout the County, and those parcels that  were  both  larger  and  contained  the  least  amount  of  impervious  cover  were  also  mapped  and ranked.  Where these parcels overlaid with mapped Critical Habitat areas scoring 3‐5, a  final ranking was established.  This final ranking is based on a scale of 1‐24, with twenty‐four  being the highest possible score a parcel could receive, based on various factors such as size,  undeveloped state, and the presence of critical habitat factors.   Properties  which  scored  a  value  of  16‐24  (Tier  1)  contain  the  greatest  value  in  terms  of  critical habitat.  Properties which scored a value of 15 are considered Tier 2.  The combined  acreage of these 120 properties is 6,446.  These properties should be considered for future  nature  preserve  acquisition,  as  they  would  greatly  contribute  to  the  unmet  needs  of  the  community  and  protect  significant  areas.    Therefore,  the  Department  has  set  a  goal  of  acquiring and protecting an additional 6,446 acres of nature preserve properties.    

 

98 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Properties scoring 14 or less may still contain critical habitat and would significantly benefit  the community by protection.  Acquisition of these properties should be pursued if funding  and opportunity exists.  The maps in Figure 42 and Figure 43 show the Current and the Current and Recommended  Nature Preserves respectively.    5.11 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE NATURE CENTERS  Currently  three  nature  centers  serve  the  entire  County.    Nature  Centers  are  the  primary  public  facilities  associated  with  nature  preserves.    The  three  nature  centers  are  located  at  Latta  Plantation,  McDowell,  and  Reedy  Creek  Nature  Preserves.    Based  on  gap  analysis,  many  residents  must  drive  considerable  distances  to  visit  a  nature  center,  creating  a  significant access and equity issue.  Additionally, the results of the 2008 Community Survey  as  well  as  best  practices  indicate  an  extremely  high  level  of  need  for  additional  nature  centers.    The  Department’s  recommended  standard  of  one  nature  center  per  100,000  residents  results  in  a  current  deficit  of  five  nature  centers,  and  a  deficit  of  nine  nature  centers  to  serve  residents  by  the  year  2022.    Refer  to  the  Mecklenburg  County  –  Facility  Standards  Spreadsheet  (Figures  33,  34  and  35)  in  the  Master  Plan.    Although  many  new  nature centers were planned or discussed over the years, no new centers have been built or  opened to the public for the past 15 years.  Based  on  the  community  survey  results  and  service  gap  analysis  of  existing  centers,  the  Nature Preserve Master Plan recommends five new nature centers to be built over the next  10  years.    These  nature  centers  would  provide  access  and  services  to  the  majority  of  the  County once opened (Figure 44).  An additional four (4) nature centers will be needed in the  following 5 years to meet the recommended standard.   

 

99

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 42 ‐ Current Nature Preserves 

 

 

100 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 43 ‐ Current and Recommended Nature Preserves 

 

101

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 44 ‐ Current and Proposed Nature Centers 

 

 

102 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  5.12 CAPITAL COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS  Current  capital  needs  for  the  master  planning  and  development  of  five  new  nature  preserves and basic amenities (bathrooms, shelters, trails, parking lots), the master planning  and  development  of  four  existing  designated  preserves  (Evergreen,  Flat  Branch,  RibbonWalk, and Haymarket), the construction of new nature centers, and the expansion of  two  existing  nature  centers  is  estimated  at  $54,900,000  over  the  next  ten  years.    These  capital costs do not include land acquisition for future nature preserves.  A detailed breakdown of these estimated costs is included in the Department’s Master Plan.     

 

103

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  CHAPTER SIX  ‐ GREENPRINTING AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN  6.1 GREENPRINTING PLAN  Greenprinting  is  a  unique  modeling  process  and  framework  developed  by  the  Trust  for  Public  Land  (TPL)  and  validated  in  over  40  locations  across  the  US.    Greenprinting  uses  Geographic  Information  Systems  (GIS)  to  make  informed,  strategic  decisions  about  land  conservation and resource protection priorities.   The process applies a systematic approach  to  translate  regional  values  into  objective  metrics  for  modeling  conservation  priorities  across the landscape.  Based  on  input  from  community  focus  groups,  workshops,  interviews,  and  surveys,  Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation staff identified key park, greenway, and natural  resource protection goals, including:  •

Meet Active and Passive Recreation and Park Needs 



Increase Greenway Connectivity and Trail Usability 



Protect Critical Habitat 



Protect Water Resources 



Enhance Water Quality 



Maintain Cultural Landscapes 

6.1.1  NATURAL AREAS PROTECTION  This  section  describes  the  greenprinting  process  as  it  relates  to  the  protection  of  natural  areas.    Land  acquisition  priorities  for  Natural  Areas  were  determined  using  a  2‐stage  approach:  1. Resource Analysis – Top‐down conservation assessment  2. Parcel Prioritization – Bottom‐up acquisition analysis  To accomplish the resource analysis, Mecklenburg County Natural Areas staff identified the  metrics shown in Figure 45 to characterize areas of critical habitat on the landscape.  Each  criterion  was  modeled  and  mapped,  using  best  available  data,  as  described  in  the  table.   Staff then assigned weights to each criterion, to communicate relative strategic importance  for protection.  Figure 46 represents a weighted aggregation of all critical habitat criteria. 

 

 

104 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

In general, staff assigned highest strategic importance to areas that buffer existing natural  areas from roads and/or that represent large contiguous habitat areas.    Criteria Buffer zones adjacent to identified unique/rare habitats and NHSs

 

 

Relative Importance 25%

Large Unbroken Natural Areas

25%

Wildlife Corridors

10%

Endangered, Rare, and Species of Concern

10%

Critical Watersheds

5%

Forested Habitat

5%

Early Successional Habitat

5%

Wetland Habitat Riparian Habitat

5% 5%

Natural Heritage Sites

5%

Modeling Methodology Result for Large Unbroken Natural Areas model (see below), identifies contiguous areas of natural lands that are unfragmented by roadways. Used this result to identify natural buffer zones that are immediately adjacent to Natural Heritage sites and Nature Preserves, and extend out to keep these areas isolated from roadways. Identifies large contiguous natural areas unfragemented by roadways. Natural areas were extracted from National Landcover datasets. Highest priority was assigned to largest contiguous areas -greater than 1000 acres. Medium High priority was assigned to contiguous natural areas between 750 and 1000 acres. Moderate priority was assigned to areas of 500-750 acres. Identified potential wildlife movement network between Nature Preserves and Natural Heritage Sites. Stream corridors were considered as the primary corridors. Where connections to Nature Preserves and/or Natural Heritage Sites could not be achieved via stream corridors, areas with forest cover and/or existing greenways were used to complete the connections. Combines Mecklenburg County species siting data (Amphibians, Birds, Mammals, Reptiles) data with Mecklenburg County Natural Heritage Areas and NCNHP species of concern data. Removed plant communities and those elements no longer existing. Computed density of species sitings within a half mile radius. Areas with highest density of siting were assigned highest priority. Based on Mecklenburg County critical watersheds data. Location of forested areas based on Mecklenburg County tree canopy dataset. Used SEGAP ecological systems data to identify herbaceous and shrub successional vegetation locations Includes a 100 ft buffer around all wetland areas. Includes locations for all lakes, ponds and streams. Stream locations based on SWIM buffers data. Combines data from Mecklenburg County Natural Heritage Areas dataset with NCNHP species points and lines. Buffered NCNHP species points and lines by 328 ft. (100m). Removed plant communities.

Figure 45 – Areas of Critical Habitat 

105

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

 

  Figure 46 ‐ Areas Critical for Habitat Protection 

   

 

 

106 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

The Greenprint analysis for natural area protection also included an acquisition prioritization  analysis,  using  the  above  resource  analysis  as  a  baseline.    This  analysis  was  used  to  score  parcels  based  on  the  opportunity,  appropriateness,  and  importance  for  realizing  the  2008  Natural  Areas  plan.    Mecklenburg  County  Stewardship  Services  Natural  Areas  Acquisition  Ranking Criteria were used as a framework.  Acquisition criteria used for this analysis are as  follows:  Requirements:  •

Must be greater than 5 acres 



Must contain a critical natural resource 

Scoring Criteria:  •

Total area of natural or pervious cover  



Cultural resource present: farmland or historic site 



Adjacent to an existing Nature Preserve 



Targeted  for  acquisition  (MIL  Corridor  property  or  2007  Natural  Areas  Needs  Assessment property) 



Significant for water quality protection 



Adjacent to existing park or greenway 



Adjacent to other natural areas (CLC lands) 



No Nature Preserve within a 3 mile radius 

The following map depicts areas that were identified as best opportunities for Natural Areas  acquisition, using the criteria listed above.  Properties were grouped based on overall score:  •

Tier 1 and Tier 2 included 120 properties for 6,446 acres 



Tier  3  locations  (not  mapped)  included  85  additional  properties,  covering  6,991  additional acres 

See Figure 47 on the next page.      

 

107

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

 

Figure 47 ‐ Tier 1 and Tier 2 ‐ Priority Lands for Natural Area Protection 

             

 

 

108 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

6.1.2  PARK FACILITIES NEEDS ANALYSIS  This section describes the greenprinting process as it relates to needs and opportunities for  park facility sitings.  The Park Facilities needs analysis used a 2‐stage approach:  1. Capacity Service Area Analysis‐ service areas for existing park facilities based on  facility capacity  2. Gap Analysis and Parcel Prioritization – identification of opportunities for new  facilities in service area gaps  The  capacity  service  area  population  of  each  asset  represents  the  market  size  or  pool  of  potential  users  that  a  specific  asset  can  potentially  support.    Demand  service  area  population  for  each  asset  is  based  on  actual  usage  and  the  correlating  population  served.   These  factors,  when  mapped  against  population  density,  show  the  geographic  area  or  market size for the age segment and gender for a particular asset based on the capacity of  the representative asset to support the usage.    Gap analysis and parcel prioritization modeling was then used identify opportunities for new  facilities in the service area gaps determined above.  Criteria used for this analysis included  the following:  6‐1. Master Planning:   • Is the project identified in the 2008 Parks Master Plan?  •

Does the project have its own approved Master Plan? 

6‐2. Service Gap:   • Are there any parks within the project’s intended service radius?   6‐3. Residential Population:   • What is the residential population within the intended project’s service radius of the  project (normalized to 0.5 mile radius)?  6‐4. Expansion:   • Does  the  project  expand  the  current  scope  of  programming  at  the  facility  (i.e.  additional phase of development)?  6‐5. Partnership Opportunity:   • Is project adjacent to a school and / or library?  •

Has a public and / or private partnership been identified? 



Has an outside funding source been identified? 

6‐6. Linkages:   • Is project adjacent to a planned and / or developed greenway?  •

Is the project adjacent to a planned and / or developed nature center? 



Is project adjacent to a planned and / or developed recreation center? 

6‐7. Mass Transit:   • Is the project within a 0.5 mile radius of a public transportation station / depot?  

 

109

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

The  following  maps  (Figures  48  –  53)  illustrate  both  service  area  coverage  for  each  park  facility type,  and 2010 Population Density Projections within the gaps, as projected by the  UNCC Traffic Analysis Zone Study.  The maps include Neighborhood Parks, Community Parks,  Regional Parks, Community and Regional Parks, Recreation Center, Aquatics Facility service  areas.  The planned school sites too have been depicted in separate maps following these  service  area  maps.    The  three  maps  include  proposed  Elementary  School  Sites,  Middle  School Sites and High School Sites.  The County will be looking to partner with the CMS to  maximize  usage  of  the  new  school  sites  and  seek  to  fulfill  some  of  the  current  gaps  in  neighborhood and community park sites with the new school sites.   

 

 

110 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

 

Figure 48 ‐ Neighborhood Parks ‐ Service Area Analysis 

             

 

111

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

 

Figure 49 ‐ Community Parks ‐ Service Area Analysis 

         

 

 

112 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 50 ‐ Regional Parks ‐ Service Area Analysis 

           

 

113

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 51 ‐ Community and Regional Parks ‐ Service Area Analysis 

             

 

 

114 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 52 ‐ Recreation Centers ‐ Service Area Analysis 

       

 

115

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 53 ‐ Aquatic Facilities ‐ Service Area Analysis 

         

 

 

116 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

6.1.3  NEXT STEPS  The  Greenprint  framework  provides  an  on‐going  decision  support  tool.    Mecklenburg  County  GIS  staff  will  receive  training  and  delivery  of  the  Greenprint  GIS  modeling,  parcel  prioritization, and reporting tools.  This will allow the County GIS staff to update and extend  the models as new data or priorities are identified.  GIS staff will be able to produce parcel‐ level statistics and profiles, for assistance in acquisition evaluation.   

 

117

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  6.2 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT  6.2.1 FACILITY ASSESSMENTS AND CAPITAL MAINTENANCE PROGRAM (CMP)  The  purpose  of  this  CMP  report  is  to  assist  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation  Department  North Carolina in evaluating the physical aspects of this property and how its  condition  may  affect  the  County’s  financial  decisions  over  time.    For  this  assessment,  representative samples of the major independent building components were observed and  their physical conditions were evaluated.  These components included the site and building  exteriors  and  representative  interior  areas.    The  estimated  cost  for  repairs  and/or  capital  reserve items is included in the 5 year, 10 year and 20 year cost projections.   Specialized Park Services (SPS) property management staff and code enforcement agencies  were  interviewed  for  specific  information  relating  to  the  physical  property,  code  compliance,  available  maintenance  procedures,  available  drawings,  and  other  related  documentation.  The  assessment  team  Engineering  &  Environmental  Consulting  Services  (EMG  Consultants  and SPS) visited each identified property to evaluate the general condition of the buildings  and  site  amenities,  reviewed  available  construction  documents  in  order  to  familiarize  themselves with and be able to comment on the in‐place construction systems, life safety,  parking  areas,  interior  elements,  park  amenities,  mechanical,  electrical  and  plumbing  systems,  and  the  general  built  environment.    The  assessment  team  conducted  a  walk‐ through inspection of the buildings in order to observe building systems and components,  identify  physical  deficiencies  and  formulate  recommendations  to  remedy  the  physical  deficiencies.  The  Physical  Needs  Assessment  was  performed  at  the  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation request using methods and procedures as outlined.  These estimates are based  on  invoice  or  bid  documents  provided  either  by  the  Owner/facility  and  construction  costs  developed  by  construction  resources  such  as  R.S.  Means  and  Marshall  &  Swift,  staff  and  consultants  experience  with  past  costs  for  similar  properties,  city  cost  indexes,  and  assumptions regarding future economic conditions.  6.2.2  METHODOLOGY  Based upon our observations, research, and judgment combined with consulting commonly  accepted empirical Expected Useful Life (EUL) tables, EMG and staff rendered an opinion as  to  when  a  system  or  component  will  most  probably  necessitate  replacement  during  the  evaluation period.  The evaluation period for this assessment is 20 years.  Accurate historical  replacement records provided by the Property Manager are typically the best source for this  data.    Exposure  to  the  weather  elements,  initial  system  quality  and  installation,  extent  of  use,  and  the  quality  and  amount  of  preventive  maintenance  exercised  are  all  factors  that  impact the effective age of a system or component.  As a result, a system or component may  have an effective age that is greater or less than its actual age.  The Remaining Useful Life  (RUL) of a component or system equals the EUL less its effective age. 

 

 

118 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

A facility condition index (FCI) score was calculated for each facility.  The FCI is the ratio of  the  cost  of  needed  maintenance  and  repairs  divided  by  the  cost  of  replacement.    The  priority of each project was then set by evaluating the weighted criteria shown below:  •

4‐1. Facility Condition:  



o What is the Facility Condition Index Rating of the project?   4‐2. Safety:  



o Does the project correct a safety concern?  4‐3. Accessibility:  



Does  the  project  improve  ADA  accessibility  to  an  existing  program  component?   4‐4. Visitation: 



o Does the project improve visitation?   4‐5. Security: 



o Does the project improve security?  4‐6. Operation and Maintenance Costs: 



Does  the  project  impact  operation  and  maintenance  costs  in  a  positive  manner   4‐7. Operational Support: 



o Does the project have potential to generate revenue or partnerships?   4‐8. Citywide Citizen Survey: 

o

o

o Does the project meet priorities identified in the citywide customer survey?   This assessment has provided a current and meaningful 20 year Capital Needs/Improvement  Plan and it can be updated and used by staff.  All existing park related buildings, structures,  and amenities were included in the CMP.    The total estimated CMP cost for all park districts during 2008‐2012 is $21,924,706, adjusted  for  inflation.    The  total  estimated  CMP  cost  for  2013‐2017  is  $31,653,392,  adjusted  for  inflation.  The estimated combined CMP cost for the next ten years is $53,578,098.  Figure  54 and 55 indicate the five and ten year improvements that are scheduled and the level of  distribution across the County of where project dollars will be spent. 

 

119

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 54 ‐ Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation 2008‐2012 Maintenance Program (CMP) 

   

 

120 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

 

Figure 55 ‐ Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation 2013‐2017 Capital Maintenance Program (CMP) 

 

121

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  6.3 CAPITAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT  The Capital Needs Assessment (CNA) is a community driven document that outlines the park  and  recreational  needs  of  the  community.    The  CNA  provides  a  list  of  capital  projects  projected  to  be  completed  over  the  next  5‐10  years.    Projects  listed  in  the  CNA  were  compiled through community input.  Priorities guide the department in formulating the list  from which projects are identified to create future bond referendum(s).    The  CNA  is  broken  down  into  six  (6)  categories:    (1)  Conservation  and  Stewardship;  (2)  Greenways; (3) Parks; (4) Recreation Facilities; (5) Improvements; and (6) Land Acquisition.   Each  of  these  individual  categories  have  respective  project  ranking  criteria  that  guide  prioritization  of  individual  projects.    This  provides  an  objective  methodology  to  ranking  projects.   The  community  input  process  starts  with  citizens  and  Advisory  Councils.    Community  workshops  are  organized  throughout  the  County  for  citizens  to  provide  input  on  needed  facilities and projects.  The various citizen Advisory Councils conduct these meeting jointly  with staff.  A  preliminary  CNA  is  then  developed  by  the  Staff  to  include  project  and  budget  data  collected  from  all  departmental  service  divisions  and  advisory  councils.    The  Strategic  Planning and Long Range Finance Committee reviews the CNA document provides feedback  to  staff.    This  document  is  then  presented  to  the  Park  and  Recreation  Commission  for  information.   The  Capital  Needs  Assessment  (CNA)  and  the  Capital  Improvement  Plan  (CIP)  are  then  presented  to  County  Senior  Leadership  and  then  an  annual  presentation  is  made  to  the  Citizens  Capital  Budget  Advisory  Committee  (CCBAC).    The  CCBAC  reviews  the  information  presented and then makes a formal recommendation to the County Manager and the Board  of  County  Commissioners  (BOCC).    The  BOCC  then  adopts  the  capital  program  at  the  spending levels they identify and approve.  Once the BOCC approves the amount of money  the  bond  referendum  will  contain  for  parks,  the  CNA  is  used  to  determine  which  projects  will be included on the bond referendum.  Each  of  these  individual  categories  has  respective  project  ranking  criteria  that  guide  prioritization  of  individual  projects.    This  provides  an  objective  methodology  to  ranking  projects.  In addition, the Park and Facility Standards in the Master Plan outline the needs of  the  community  based  on  best  practice  standards  for  populations  similar  to  Mecklenburg  County.    These  needs  depict  the  gaps  in  land,  facilities,  and  amenities  missing  in  Mecklenburg County to create a more balanced system.    Figure 56 presents the Capital Needs Assessment for 2008‐2018.   

 

 

122 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan  2008-2018 CAPITAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT COST BREAKOUT BY CATEGORY Category

New Development 10Y

5Y

Improvements 10Y

Total

5Y 7,800,000

Conservation and Stewardship

36,000,000

0

36,000,000

Greenways

46,887,000

109,175,000

156,062,000

5,220,000

9,000,000

10,800,000

19,800,000

10,703,000

11,400,000

3,100,000

32,400,000

123,539,402

Parks-Community Parks-Neighborhood

11,400,000

Parks-Regional

14,400,000

Parks-School

2,100,000

18,000,000 -

2,100,000

Rec. Facilities-Aquatic-Improvements

-

Rec. Facilities-Aquatic-New

0

10,500,000

10,500,000

63,000,000

25,000,000

88,000,000

Rec. Facilities-Rec. Ctr.

-

-

600,000 8,000,000 142,930,800

11,100,000 30,115,600 19,460,500 -

Total

5Y

18,900,000

Maintenance & Repair 10Y -

-

Total

Grand-Total -

54,900,000

5,220,000

-

-

-

161,282,000

40,818,600

-

-

-

60,618,600

3,100,000

-

-

-

14,500,000

142,999,902

-

-

-

175,399,902

600,000

-

-

-

2,700,000

31,900,000

39,900,000

-

-

-

39,900,000

9,000,000

9,000,000

-

-

-

19,500,000

46,623,800

189,554,600

-

-

-

277,554,600

24,000,000

-

-

-

24,000,000

Rec. Facilities-Special

-

-

-

24,000,000

Improvement-Athletics

-

-

-

17,700,000

4,517,000

22,217,000

-

-

-

22,217,000

Improvement-Parks

-

-

-

17,407,500

3,873,000

21,280,500

-

-

-

21,280,500

Improvement-Maint. & Repair Total

SUMMARY: 5 YR. NEW DEVELOPMENT 5 YR. IMPROVEMENTS 5 YR. MAINT & REPAIR 5 YR. TOTAL

$182,787,000

$173,475,000

$356,262,000

$361,000,702

-

$156,589,900

$517,590,602

21,924,706

31,653,392

53,578,098

$21,924,706

$31,653,392

$53,578,098

$182,787,000 $361,000,702 $21,924,706 $565,712,408

Figure 56 ‐ 2008‐2018 Capital Needs Assessment 

  6.4 FUNDING AND REVENUE STRATEGIES  As  with  any  Master  Plan  process,  the  needs  typically  outweigh  the  available  resources  available.    It  is  important  for  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  Department  to  develop  other  financing  alternatives  used  by  other  large  metropolitan  systems  to  help  finance operational costs and capital costs.  The voters of the County have been supportive  for the system in the past and hopefully in the future as well.  The following are financing  options used by other systems that may already be used by the Department, but there may  be  other  alternatives  that  could  be  considered  for  helping  the  Department  finance  the  system in the future.   6.4.1  GENERAL FUNDING SOURCES  General  Fund:  General  funds  derived  from  property  taxes  and  other  municipal  income  sources  are  a  normal  way  of  supporting  park  system  operations  but  are  limited  in  their  ability to fund significant land acquisition or capital development.   General  Obligation  Bond:  A  general  obligation  bond  is  a  municipal  bond  secured  by  the  taxing and borrowing power of the municipality issuing it.    Governmental  Funding  Programs:  A  variety  of  funding  sources  are  available  from  federal  and  state  government  for  greenspace‐related  projects.  For  example,  the  Land  and  Water  Conservation  Fund  provide  funds  to  state  and  local  governments  to  acquire,  develop,  and  improve  outdoor  recreation  areas.  Federal  Community  Development  Block  Grant  (CDBG)  funds  can  be  used  in  part  to  support  greenspace  related  improvements.  Transportation  enhancement funds available through SAFETELU, the current federal transportation bill, can    123

53,578,098 $927,430,700

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

be used for trail and related greenspace development.   AmeriCorps grants  can be  used  to  fund support for park maintenance.  Bond  Referendum:  This  funding  approach  involves  submission  of  a  bond  measure  to  be  used  to  finance  greenspace  acquisition,  development,  and/or  maintenance  to  a  direct  popular vote. According to the Trust for Public Land, voters in 23 states approved 104 ballot  measures in November 2006 that will provide $6.4 billion in funding for greenspace‐related  acquisition and development.  6.4.2  DEDICATED FUNDING SOURCES  Park Impact Fees: These fees are attached to the cost of new residential development based  on  the  square  footage  or  number  of  bedrooms  per  unit  to  generate  funds  for  park  acquisition  and  development.    Impact  fees  typically  range  from  a  low  of  $500  dollars  per  unit  to  a  high  of  $9,000  dollars  per  unit  and  should  be  periodically  updated  to  address  market rates and land values.    Tax Allocation District: A  Tax Allocation District  (TAD) involves the issuance  of tax‐exempt  bonds  to  pay  front‐end  infrastructure  and  eligible  development  costs  in  partnership  with  private developers.  As redevelopment occurs in the district, the “tax increment” resulting  from  redevelopment  projects  is  used  to  retire  the  debt  issued  to  fund  the  eligible  redevelopment costs.  The public portion of the redevelopment project funds itself using the  additional taxes generated by the project.  TADs can be used to fund greenspace acquisition  and development as an essential infrastructure cost.  Boulevard  Tax:  This  funding  source  has  been  used  by  Kansas  City,  MO  to  develop  and  maintain  its  nationally  known  parkways  and  boulevard  system.    Residents  who  live  along  these corridors pay a charge based on a lineal foot that is added to their property tax bill.  This approach has proven to be very beneficial to owners when selling their homes because  of the added value to their properties.  Cash‐in‐Lieu  of  Open  Space  Requirement:  Ordinances  requiring  the  dedication  of  open  space  within  developments  to  meet  the  park  and  recreation  needs  of  the  new  residents  often have provisions allowing cash contribution to substitute for the land requirement. The  proceeds can be applied to a park off‐site that serves the needs of the development.  Dedicated Sales Tax:  A dedicated sales tax has been used by many cities as a funding tool  for  capital  improvements.  The  City  of  Lawrence,  KS  passed  a  one‐cent  sales  tax  for  parks  that  has  generated  over  $50  million  in  park  improvements  over  the  last  seven  years.    The  City of Phoenix receives sales tax revenue from car rentals to support capital needs of parks  and recreation services.  Facility Authority: A Facility Authority is sometime used by park and recreation agencies to  improve  a  specific  park  or  develop  a  specific  improvement  such  as  a  stadium,  large  recreation center, large aquatic center, or sports venue for competitive events.  Repayment  of  bonds  to  fund  the  project  usually  comes  from  sales  taxes.    The  City  of  Indianapolis  has  created several recreational facilities to meet local needs and national competition venues  as  an  economic  development  tool.    The  Facility  Authority  is  responsible  for  managing  the  sites and operating them in a self‐supporting manner.    

 

124 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Improvement District: An improvement district allows for special assessments on property  owners to support acquisition, development, and/or maintenance costs. There are various  types of improvement districts that apply to parks and greenspaces.  Landscape and Lighting  Districts  are  used  by  California  communities  to  fund  park  development  and  ongoing  maintenance.    Park  Benefit  Districts  establish  assessments  on  properties  based  on  the  benefits and costs of acquisition and development associated with a parkland improvement.  Benefit Districts are typically applied to regional parks, large community parks, event plazas,  signature  parks,  and  attractions  located  in  downtown  areas  or  areas  slated  for  redevelopment.  In Park Maintenance Districts, the assessments are earmarked to fund park  maintenance within a designated area (similar to Landscape and Lighting Districts).  Real Estate Transfer Fee: This relatively new form of funding is being used by a number of  agencies  and  states  to  acquire  and  develop  parkland.    The  money  is  generated  by  the  transfer of real estate from one owner to another owner, with the municipality retaining a  percentage of the value of the property (typically one‐half percent) at the time of sale. The  proceeds can be dedicated to acquiring land or for other greenspace purposes.   Revolving  Fund:  This  is  a  dedicated  fund  to  be  used  for  greenspace  purposes  that  is  replenished on an ongoing basis from various funding sources.   Stormwater Utility Fee: Also referred to as a Surface Water Management Fee, this funding  source is derived from fees on property owners based on measures such as the amount of  impervious surfacing. It is used by many cities to acquire and develop greenways and other  greenspace resources that provide for stormwater management. Improvements can include  trails, drainage areas, and retention ponds that serve multiple purposes such as recreation,  environmental  protection,  and  stormwater  management.  The  City  of  Houston  is  using  this  source  to  preserve  and  maintain  bayous  and  to  improve  their  access  and  use  for  flood  control and recreation purposes.    Transient Occupancy Tax: This funding source is used by many cities and counties to fund  improvements  to  parks  to  improve  the  image  of  an  urban  area,  to  enhance  parks  surrounded  by  hotels  and  businesses,  to  support  the  development  of  a  park‐related  improvement, or to build an attraction. Transient occupancy taxes are typically set at 5 to  10% on the value of a hotel room and can be dedicated for parkland improvement purposes.  Wheel  Tax:  A  Wheel  Tax  is  a  method  of  taxation  commonly  used  by  cities  or  counties  to  generate revenue. The tax is charged to motorists based upon the number of wheels their  vehicles  have,  often  collected  at  the  time  of  vehicle  registration  or  tag  renewals.  Wheel  taxes can be used to fund management and maintenance of park roads and parking lots.  6.4.3  REVENUE CAPTURE  Land  Leases/Concessions:  Land  leases  and  concessions  are  public/private  partnerships  in  which  the  municipality  provides  land  or  space  for  private  commercial  operations  that  enhance  the  park  and  recreational  experience  in  exchange  for  payments  to  help  reduce  operating  costs.  They  can  range  from vending  machines  to  food  service  operations  to  golf  courses.  User Fees: User fees are fees paid by a user of recreational facilities or programs to offset  the costs of services provided by the municipality. The fees are set by the municipality based   

125

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

on cost recovery goals and the level of exclusivity the user receives compared to the general  taxpayer.  Capital Improvement Fee: A capital improvement fee can be added to the admission fee to  a  recreation  facility  to  help  pay  back  the  cost  of  developing  the  facility.  This  fee  is  usually  applied  to  golf  courses,  aquatic  facilities,  recreation  centers,  ice  rinks,  amphitheaters,  and  special  use  facilities  such  as  sports  complexes.  The  funds  generated  can  be  used  either  to  pay back the cost of the capital improvement or the revenue bond that was used to develop  the facility.  Corporate Naming Rights: In this arrangement, corporations invest in the right to name an  event, facility, or product within a parks system in exchange for an annual fee, typically over  a ten‐year period. The cost of the naming right is based on the impression points the facility  or event will receive from the newspapers, TV, websites, and visitors or users. Naming rights  for  park  facilities  are  typically  attached  to  sports  complexes,  amphitheaters,  recreation  centers, aquatic facilities, stadiums, and events.  Corporate Sponsorships: Corporations can also underwrite a portion or all of the cost of an  event,  program,  or  activity  based  on  their  name  being  associated  with  the  service.  Sponsorships  typically  are  title  sponsors,  presenting  sponsors,  associate  sponsors,  product  sponsors,  or  in‐kind  sponsors.  Many  cities  and  counties  seek  corporate  support  for  these  types of activities.  Maintenance Endowment Fund: This is a fund dedicated exclusively for parks maintenance,  funded by a percentage of user fees from programs, events, and rentals.  6.4.4  PRIVATE FUNDING SOURCES  Business/Citizen  Donations:  Individual  donations  from  corporations  and  citizens  can  be  sought to support parks and greenspaces. As an example, the Naperville, IL Park District has  an  ongoing  program  soliciting  tax  deductible  contributions  from  individuals,  community  organizations, and businesses to enhance park and recreational services.  Private  Foundation  Funds:  Nonprofit  community  foundations  can  be  strong  sources  of  support for parks and greenspace. The City of Indianapolis has received over $100 million in  grants from the Lily Endowment for park‐related improvements.  Nonprofit  Organizations:  Nonprofit  organizations  can  provide  support  for  greenspace  and  parks in various ways. Examples include: 

 



Conservancy  or  Friends  Organization:  This  type  of  nonprofit  is  devoted  to  supporting a specific park such as the Central Park Conservancy in New York or the  Piedmont Park Conservancy in Atlanta. 



Land  Trust:  Land  trusts  are  nonprofits  focused  on  greenspace  preservation.  In  Atlanta,  the  Trust  for  Public  Land  and  Conservation  Fund  help  to  facilitate  greenspace  acquisition  by  the  City  but  do  not  own  land  and  easements  outright.  Project  Greenspace  proposes  establishment  of  a  new  land  trust  dedicated  to  acquiring and managing greenspace in Atlanta. 



Conservation District: Conservation Districts operate like a land trust but are set up  to protect specific properties areas with high greenspace value, such as watersheds   

126 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

or  sensitive  natural  areas.  The  conservation  district  role  is  to  provide  landowners  with tax benefits to allow their properties to be preserved as part of the district.  •

Parks Foundation: Established to support system‐wide parks and recreation needs,  park  foundations  have  helped  many  cities  across  the  nation  to  acquire  land  and  develop  parks.  For  example,  the  Parks  Foundation  of  Houston  raises  $5  million  annually  on  average  for  land  acquisition  and  park  improvements.    Mecklenburg  County’s  Partners  for  Parks  is  a  perfect  example  of  how  this  has  worked  locally to provide park improvements and programs. 



Greenway  Foundations:  Greenway  foundations  focus  on  developing  and  maintaining  trails  and  green  corridors  on  a  county  /  city  wide  basis.  The  City  of  Indianapolis  Greenway  Foundation  develops  and  maintains  greenways  throughout  the city and seeks land leases along the trails as one funding source, in addition to  selling miles of trails to community corporations and nonprofits. The development  rights along the trails can also be sold to local utilities for water, sewer, fiber optic,  and  cable  lines  on  a  per  mile  basis  to  support  development  and  management  of  these  corridors.  King  County  in  the  Seattle  area  has  done  a  very  good  job  in  accessing this funding source for greenway development. 



Gifts to Share: This approach is used in Sacramento, CA in the form of a nonprofit  that solicits donations for park improvement projects. 

Homeowner Association Fees:  Homeowner association fees are typically used to maintain  dedicated greenspace areas within private residential developments. They could be applied  to maintaining privately owned greenspace that is publicly accessible through an agreement  between the developer and the County / City.  Lease Back: Lease backs are a source of capital funding in which a private sector entity such  as  a  development  company  buys  the  land;  develops  a  facility  such  as  a  park,  recreation  attraction,  recreation  center,  pool,  or  sports  complex;  and  leases  the  facility  back  to  the  municipality  to  pay  off  the  capital  costs  over  a  30  to  40  year  period.  This  approach  takes  advantage  of  the  efficiencies  of  private  sector  development  while  relieving  the  burden  on  the municipality to raise upfront capital funds.  6.4.5  VOLUNTEER SOURCES  Adopt‐a‐Park:  In this approach local neighborhood groups or businesses make a volunteer  commitment  to  maintaining  a  specific  park.  Adopt‐a‐Park  arrangements  are  particularly  well‐suited  for  smaller  parks  which  are  less  efficient  for  a  parks  department  to  maintain.   Most cities and counties have a number of Adopt‐a‐Park agreements in place.  Neighborhood  Park  Initiatives:  These  are  formal  or  informal  initiatives  by  local  groups  to  address  the  needs  of  an  individual  park.  Examples  include  park  watch  programs  such  as  Mecklenburg County has and “clean up/fix up” days.  Adopt‐a‐Trail: This is similar to Adopt‐a‐Park but involves sponsorship of a segment of a trail  (e.g., one mile) for maintenance purposes. 

 

127

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Community Service Workers: Community service workers are assigned by the court to pay  off some of their sentence through maintenance activities in parks, such as picking up litter,  removing graffiti, and assisting in painting or fix up activities. Most workers are assigned 30  to 60 hours of work. 

 

 

128 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER SEVEN  ‐ RECREATION PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PLAN   7.1 INTRODUCTION   The Mecklenburg County Recreation Program Plan seeks to undertake a holistic view of the  state of the recreation program market in Mecklenburg County.  This program plan includes  a  situational  analysis  of  Mecklenburg  County’s  existing  program  offerings  via  the  program  assessment,  market  identification  from  a  user  and  competitor  perspective,  a  gap  analysis  that  seeks  to  identify  existing  gaps  in  core  programs  and  a  demand  analysis  of  needs  for  sports related amenities.    The  consulting  team  will  then  address  these  findings  by  offering  a  program  organizational  and  development  plan.    Lastly,  this  program  plan  report  will  evaluate  the  amateur  sports  tourism market in Mecklenburg County and its surrounding areas within a 200 miles radius  to determine sport competition gaps and sports facility needs to service that gap.  7.2 PROGRAM NEEDS ASSESSMENT  The  purpose  of  the  Program  Needs  Assessment  is  to  provide  a  prioritized  list  recreation  program needs for the residents of Mecklenburg County.  The Needs Assessment evaluates  both  quantitative  and  qualitative  data.    Quantitative  data  includes  the  statistically  valid  Community  Survey,  which  asked  1033  Mecklenburg  County  residents  to  list  unmet  needs  and  rank  the  importance.    Qualitative  data  includes  resident  feedback  obtained  in  Focus  Group meetings, Key Leader Interviews, and Public Forums.    A  weighted  scoring  system  was  used  to  determine  the  priorities  for  park  and  recreation  facilities / amenities and recreation programs.  This scoring system considers the following:  •

Community Survey 



Unmet needs for recreation programs – A factor from the total number of  households  mentioning  their  need  for  facilities  and  recreation  programs.   Survey participants were asked to identify the need for 28 different facilities  and 22 recreation programs.  Weighted value of 4  o Importance  ranking  for  programs  –  Normalized  factor,  converted  from  the  percent  (%)  ranking  of  programs  to  a  base  number.    Survey  participants  were  asked  to  identify  the  top  four  recreation  program  needs.    Weighted  value of 3  Consultant Evaluation   o

Factor  derived  from  the  consultant’s  evaluation  of  program  importance  based on demographics, trends and community input.  Weighted value of 3  These weighted scores were then summed to provide an overall score and priority ranking  for  the  system  as  a  whole.    The  results  of  the  priority  ranking  were  tabulated  into  three  categories:  High Priority, Medium Priority, and Low Priority.   o

The  combined  total  of  the  weighted  scores  for  Community  Unmet  Needs,  Community  Priority and Consultant Evaluation is the total score based on which the Program Priority is 

 

129

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

determined.    Figure  57  depicts  the  Recreation  Program  Priority  Needs  Assessment  for  Mecklenburg County.    Figure  57  identifies  Adult  Fitness  and  Wellness  Programs,  Special  Events  /  Festivals  and  Family  Recreation  –  Outdoor  Adventure  Programs  as  the  three  core  program  areas  that  merited the highest priority.      

Mecklenburg County Program Needs Assessment

Adult fitness and wellness programs Special events/festivals Family Recreation - Outdoor Adventure programs Nature Education programs Education/Life skills Youth Learn to Swim programs Water fitness programs Senior programs Tennis lessons, clinics and leagues Adult sports programs Adult art, dance, performing arts Youth/teen sports programs Youth/teen summer camp programs Adult swim programs Golf lessons Before and after school programs Pre-School programs Martial arts programs Youth/teen fitness and wellness programs Youth/teen art, dance, performing arts Programs for people with disabilities Gymnastics and tumbling programs

 

Figure 57 – Program Priority Needs Assessment

 

 

High 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

 

130 

Medium Low

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  7.3 MECKLENBURG SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS  The  Consultant  Team  performed  a  detailed  assessment  of  Mecklenburg  County  Park  and  Recreation’s  program  offerings.    This  assessment  offers  an  in‐depth  perspective  of  the  recreation  program  offerings  and  helps  to  identify  the  strengths,  weaknesses  and  opportunities  in  the  program  delivery  system.    The  assessment  also  provides  recommendations of core programs, program gaps, review of service systems in support of  programming,  review  of  the  organizational  structure,  duplication  of  programs  with  other  recreational  service  providers  in  the  community,  and  provides  direction  in  future  program  offerings for the County.   The  Consultant  Team  based  these  program  findings  and  comments  from  a  variety  of  methods including:  • • • • • • • • • •

Staff interviews and focus groups  Program assessments for approximately 50 program areas  Review of public meeting comments  Lifecycle and age segment review of programs  Similar provider analysis  Market capture  Review of needs assessment survey  Web site and Get Going Guide review  Review of service system and marketing methods  Review of measurement results 

This program plan addresses the program offerings from a macro and micro perspective.  It  identifies system‐wide key issues and presents recommendations for these issues, while also  offering recommendations to elevate the existing core programs to the next level and ways  to  best  position  program  delivery  for  the  future.    The  plan  is  organized  according  to  the  following sections:  • • • • • • • • • • • •  

Program Portfolio and Analysis  Specific Program Analysis  Organizational Structure Review  Similar Provider Analysis  Marketing Method Review  Customer Satisfaction Measurement System Review  Backstage Support Review  Web Site Review  Financial and Pricing Review  Corporate Support/Partners  Performance Measurement Review  Program Development  131

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

7.3.1  PROGRAM PORTFOLIO AND ANALYSIS  The Consulting Team advocates the importance of developing core  program  areas  as  a  means  of  focusing  on  quality  control  and  ensuring  alignment  of  program  offerings  with  customer  need.   Furthermore, core program areas suggest a rational decision making  process in choosing programs to be offered, rather than existing as a  random  process  based  on  the  energy  and  personality  interest  of  program  staff.    The  core  program  process  also  helps  to  fulfill  a  systems  approach  to  programming  and  better  enables  the  Department  staff  to  offer  geographical,  and  age  segment  based  programs,  while  managing  the  life  cycle  balance  of  existing  programs to achieve the highest efficiency and productive programs  possible.  Currently,  Mecklenburg  County  program  offerings  are  organized  according to the following core areas:  • • • • • • • • • •

Aquatics programs  Recreation center programs  Senior services and programs  Nature Center programs  Environmental outdoor recreation programs  Athletics  Therapeutic Recreation programs  Community special events   4‐H programs   Golf services 

The needs assessment household survey conducted as part of the Master Plan is helpful in  identifying core program needs.  According to the results of the survey, the highest ranking  percentage of households having a need for recreation programs is as follows:  • • • • • •

Special events  Fitness and wellness activities  Family recreation/outdoor adventure programs  Nature education programs  Education/life  skills  programs  (Life  skills  are  abilities  individuals  can  learn  that  will  help them to be successful in living a productive and satisfying life)  Water fitness programs 

All  of  these  areas  are  included  in  the  recommended  core  program  list  provided  by  the  consulting team.   

 

 

132 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

A  follow  up  question  on  the  household  survey  related  to  how  well  Mecklenburg  County  meets  the  needs  for  these  most  important programs.  The highest number of  households  with  needs  being  met  50%  or  less ranked as follows:  • • • •

• •

Adult fitness and wellness programs  Special events/festivals  Family  recreation/outdoor  adventure programs  Education/life  skill  programs  (Life  skills  are  abilities  individuals  can  learn  that  will  help  them  to  be  successful in living a productive and satisfying life)  Water fitness programs  Tennis lessons, clinics and leagues 

Again this list matches up well with the recommended core program list.  According to the needs assessment household survey, 19% of households have participated  in a recreation program during the last year.  This compares to a national average of 30% of  household participation. The reason for this level of participations can be traced back to the  Departments primary emphasis in the past on park land acquisition and park development  with  a  lesser  emphasis  on  recreation  program  services.    Therefore,  the  Department  has  a  significant non‐user market to tap into.  While program participation is lower than average,  park visitation of 76% is slightly higher than average.  The Department could take advantage  of  this  good  level  of  park  visitation  to  increase  program  participation  by  having  informational kiosks about programs located in parks.  While  the  program  participation  rate  is  low,  the  quality  of  the  programs  is  rated  high.   Overall quality was mentioned as excellent by 32% of the respondents and good by 60% of  the  respondents.    This  translates  into  92%  overall  satisfaction,  which  compares  to  the  numbers  the  Department  achieves  through  their  customer  satisfaction  measurement  system.  A longer term goal for quality satisfaction is to achieve an excellent quality rating by  50% or more respondents.  Best in class systems target this as a goal.    Within  the  program  assessments,  staff  completed  an  analysis  of  the  distribution  of  programs according to their lifecycle stage.  The lifecycle assessment was more intuitive and  qualitative,  rather  than  using  actual  quantifiable  data.    Nonetheless,  it  gives  programming  staff an opportunity to see how programs fall along the lifecycle continuum.  The following  shows  the  distribution  of  percentage  share  of  programs  in  each  category  of  the  lifecycle  stage:  •  

Introduction 18%  133

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

• • • • •

Take off 34%  Growth 26%  Mature 9%  Saturated 10%  Decline 5% 

This actually  is excellent performance,  as obviously, programs are better positioned in the  introduction, take off and growth life cycle stages (almost 80%).  PROS recommend that at  least 60% of programs fall into these categories.  Only 5% of programs are categorized in the  decline  stage.    The  recommendation  is  to  change  or  eliminate  programs  that  show  a  downward  trend,  occurring  over  at  least  a  couple  of  years.    The  high  percentage  of  programs  in  the  earlier  stages  of  the  lifecycle  suggests  that  programming  is  beginning  to  become a more dynamic part of the Department’s repertoire of programs and services.  This  is  a  result  of  new  leadership  in  the  organization.    The  complete  lifecycle  program  distribution is included in the Appendix.    Program assessment information also included age segment breakdowns.  Also included in  the  Appendix  is  the  complete  list  of  programs  according  to  age  segments.    The  overall  percentage breakdown includes:  • • • • • •

Preschool 11%  Elementary 17%  Middle School 23%  High School 19%   Adult 16%   Senior 14% 

Again, this is an excellent spread throughout all age segments.  Most park systems have a  much  higher  percentage  of  preschool  and  elementary  age  programs,  fewer  middle  school  programs, and even less high school age programs.  As the population ages, there should be  a  shift  toward  more  senior  programs.    In  reviewing  the  youth  survey  results  provided  by  Department staff, many of the surveys mentioned a disinterest in what the Department has  to offer in the way of park and recreation services.  This, despite 42% of program offerings  targeted  for  teens  in  middle  and  high  school.    Ideally  youth  programs  require  consistent  review  and  assessment  of  users  to  keep  programs  positioned  well  in  the  minds  of  young  people  with  more  programs  targeted  to  drop‐in,  three  hour  workshops  on  skill  development, special events based around music, dance, club sports and entertainment.  7.4   GAP ANALYSIS  County  facilities  were  modeled  for  Gap  Analysis,  or  areas  that  exhibit  gaps  in  service.   County  facilities  were  geo‐coded  by  address  and  are  represented  on  the  map  by  green  circles.  Drive time analysis for each County facility was also established.  Each center’s drive  time  area  represents  a  10‐minute  drive  time  based  on  posted  speed  limits  of  all  road/thoroughfares.    Ten  minute  parameters  were  utilized  based  on  travel  trends  and      134 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

standard  center  offerings.    Drive  time  does  not  include  stop  signs  or  stop  lights  or  any  impeded  traffic  flows;  drive  time  analysis  depicts  a  “best  case  scenario”  or  optimal  drive  time.    The 10‐minute drive time areas are depicted by the purple polygon areas on the map.  The  portions of the Figure 58 that are not encompassed with the purple polygon area represent  gaps or underserved areas.  In Figure 59, portions of the map that have overlapping purple  service areas represent an opportunity for the County to diversify programming.  Other  service  providers  consisting  of  local  YMCA  facilities  were  also  modeled  for  Gap  Analysis.    YMCA  facilities  were  geo‐coded  by  address  and  depicted  on  the  map  by  blue  points/circles.  Drive time analysis for each YMCA facility was established based on the same  10‐minute service area as the County facilities.  These other service provider service areas  are represented by the orange polygon areas on the map which depicting the culmination of  a 10‐minunte drive time from all YMCA facilities based on a best case or optimal scenario of  traffic flowing at posted speed limits on all roads and thoroughfares with no impeded traffic,  including stop signs, stop lights, and traffic congestion.  The portions of the map that are not  covered by orange polygon areas represent gaps in YMCA facility service areas.  Portions  of  the  combined  County  facility  and  other  service  provider  map  that  are  not  covered by either the purple or orange polygon areas represent the gaps in overall facility  service areas.  This portrays the assumed unmet need for additional services based on drive  times.    Portions  of  the  combined  map  represented  by  a  maroon  or  pink  color  represent  overlaps  of  County  and  private  sector  provider  drive  time  service  areas,  showing  an  opportunity  to  diversity  programming  to  provide  an  opportunity  for  an  exemplary  and  expansive program offering.  Interpretation of the map shows that the core‐County area is adequately served based on  drive  time  analysis  by  both  County  facilities  and  YMCA  facilities,  with  the  YMCA  facilities  offering extended service areas in the northern, southern, and southwestern portions of the  County.  Portions of the eastern, northeastern, northwestern and southwestern regions of  the County are not served by the combined service area.  Furthermore,  each  County  facility  was  mapped  with  participation  data  for  each  facility,  where available, to illustrate the current market for each facility.  Addresses of anonymous  users were mapped based on available CLASS system data for each facility, but due to the  relatively recent practice of utilizing CLASS for all participatory data, not all County centers  are depicted.  County facilities were geo‐coded by address and are represented on the map  by purple points/circles.  Drive time analysis for each County facility was established based  on  a  service  area  of  10‐minute  drive  times.    These  areas  are  represented  by  the  purple  polygon  areas  on  the  map  depicting  the  culmination  of  a  10‐minute  drive  time  from  all  County facilities based on a best case or optimal scenario of traffic flowing at posted speed  limits  on  all  roads  and  thoroughfares  with  no  impeded  traffic,  including  stop  signs,  stop   

135

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

lights, and traffic congestion.  Participation data was divided into three categories based on  a measurement of a direct line between two points – “as the crow flies”:   • • •

Light  blue  –  these  dots/points  represent  those  participants  who  reported  a  home  address less than five miles from the County facility  Orange  –  these  dots/points  represent  those  participants  who  reported  a  home  address five to ten miles from the County facility  Red – these dots/points represent those participants who reported a home address  ten miles or more from the County facility 

Figure 58 depicts the County Center Gap Analysis which demonstrates the total service area  served  by  the  various  Mecklenburg  County  Recreation  Centers.    As  can  be  seen  from  the  figure, the North side, East side, parts of the South‐East side and the South‐West side of the  County are underserved by County facilities.  However, it is also important to establish the  service  area  served  by  other  providers  to  evaluate  if  there  is  an  actual  gap  in  the  services  offered or if that gap is adequately filled by comparable private providers.    Figure  59  depicts  the  County  Center  and  Private  Service  Provider  Gap  Analysis  which  demonstrates the total service area served by the various Mecklenburg County Recreation  Centers  and  the  Private  Service  Providers.    It  must  be  noted  that  in  this  case  the  private  service  providers  considered  were  primarily  YMCA  facilities  since  they  are  the  most  comparable  and  widespread  service  providers.    As  Figure  59  demonstrates  the  North  side  and large portions of the South‐east side are served by the YMCA facilities.  However, the  Eastern,  Northeastern  and  Northwestern  portions  as  well  as  part  of  the  west  side  of  the  County are underserved by the combined facilities.    Interpretation of the individual recreation center service area maps show that most County  facilities  have  the  bulk  of  their  participants  within  its  five  mile  radius,  yet  participants  are  distributed throughout the County and beyond showing a willingness to travel to particular  County facilities, such as First Ward Recreation Center and Mallard Creek Recreation Center  among others.  Also, as seen in the case of Tom Sykes Recreation Center for example, which  has a high proportion participants driving from a distance than from nearby, there seems to  be a potential audience with the 10 minute drive time of that recreation center that could  be captured and converted into users of the system.    On the other hand, there is a relatively small participant size at certain recreation centers,  the  Merry  Oaks  Recreation  Center  and  the  Philip  O’Berry  Recreation  Center  for  example.   One reason could be the limited facility availability since it is a shared school site.  However,  there  does  exist  an  opportunity  to  identify  other  causes  for  limited  participation  and  evaluate means to attract a larger portion of the target market.    The  Albemarle  Road  Recreation  Center  Drive  Time  Analysis  is  shown  in  Figure  60  as  an  example, for all other recreation centers refer to Appendix 6. 

 

 

136 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 58 ‐ Community Center Gap Analysis 

     

137

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Figure 59 ‐ Mecklenburg County and Other Providers Service Area 

 

 

 

138 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Figure 60 ‐ Albemarle Road Recreation Center 

 

139

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  7.5   COST OF SERVICE (1 CORE PROGRAM – 1 CENTER)  The purpose of the cost of service analysis is to evaluate the programs and services at the  Albemarle Road Recreation Center to achieve the following:  • • •

Determine the cost effectiveness of each program area including identifying subsidy  levels and resource efficiencies  Analyze  operations  associated  with  each  program  area  to  identify  total  costs  and  assist in the design of appropriate user fees   Facilitate and document the achievement of pricing policies and recovery goals 

The cost of service analysis is to determine the total cost of providing services to individual  customers,  groups  of  customers,  or  an  entire  customer  base.    The  total  cost  of  service  includes all direct and indirect costs.  The results of the analysis support decision making for  determining  what  programs  and  services  require  additional  operating  capital  or  additional  fees to be charged for specific services.  Following is the methodology used to prepare this  cost of service analysis:   • •

• • •

Direct  costs  include  those  incurred  directly  such  as  salaries  and  benefits,  store  inventory,  activities,  uniforms,  supplies,  equipment  rental,  contractual  services,  printing, programming, and volunteer program.  All  costs  other  than  direct  costs  are  indirect  costs.    Indirect  costs  are  allocated  to  each department and/or program based upon the indirect cost allocation included  in the model.  The portion of indirect cost allocated to each cost center is based on  the allocation methodology applied to the specific indirect cost element.  The direct cost plus the indirect costs equal the total costs.  The total costs divided by the units of service were identified to determine the total  costs per unit of service.  The  result  of  the  cost‐of‐service  analysis  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  the  Department should recover the total costs‐of‐service through user fees.   The Pricing  Policy should guide the recovery of costs through user fees. 

The review performed by the PROS team includes:  • •

Cost recovery of services for Albemarle Road Recreation Center  The readiness for the development of a comprehensive cost of services model  

This  review  results  in  an  action  plan  that  identifies  information  needed  to  perform  a  detailed  cost  of  service  analysis  and  develop  a  cost  of  service  model.    The  action  plan  provides  strategies  for  implementing  a  cost  of  service  approach  for  budgeting  and  pricing  including  documenting  the  cost  of  individual  functions  and  services  provided  by  the  Department.    In  addition,  the  recommended  cost  of  service  approach  will  document  the  revenue recovery of individual programs and services, and permits the establishment of cost  recovery goals and policies.     

 

140 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

A cost‐of‐service analysis includes three levels of assessment:   •





Direct Cost ‐ The most detailed analysis will be at the program level and will assess  the  cost  and  related  recovery  for  each  activity  within  the  budget  programs.    This  assessment will document the direct cost of each program area.    Indirect Cost – The second tier assessment will allocate the Department indirect and  administrative costs to the program areas.  The indirect and administrative should  be  reviewed  in  relationship  to  both  the  direct  cost  and  potential  extra  administrative  and/or  facilities  costs  associated  with  each  program  offering.   Indirect  costs  include  services  from  organization  units  outside  recreation;  such  as,  building and grounds maintenance, accounting services, legal services, and external  service  charges  and  contractors.    Administrative  costs  include  the  general  administrative functions and governance of the Department.  Other  Financial  Impacts  –  The  third  tier  assessment  will  allocate  debt  service,  external costs, and external funds; such as grants, gifts or donations, to the program  areas.   

Details on specific activities, programs, services, and permits will be needed to complete a  true cost‐of‐service analysis.  This includes:  • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Programs ‐ Details for each activity including:  Number of activities/sessions  Attendance/participants  Current fee schedules  Actual revenues by program  Facilities ‐ Details regarding facilities including:  Number of facilities by function  Size and attributes of each facility  Age of facilities  Approximate historical cost of facility construction  Maintenance ‐ Details for each activity including:  Historical work order summary, if available  Staff hours and costs by program  Maintenance Equipment  Supply, material, and part warehousing  Contracted maintenance functions 

With the additional activity information and the currently available accounting information,  the Department would be able to complete a comprehensive cost‐of‐direct analysis.  7.5.1  DATA ASSESSMENT  The PROS Team reviewed this information to identify the format of the financial information  and the availability of activity statistics sufficient to document the cost per unit of service.   The program budget information is not presented at the program level for each activity and  service.  The PROS Team’s overall assessment of the data includes 

 

141

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

7.5.2  COST OF SERVICE FOR ABLEMARLE ROAD RECREATION CENTER  The provided information is sufficient to asset the total recreation programs at the center.   Recreation  Specialists  and  Recreation  Assistant  costs  where  estimated  based  on  our  experience at other agencies.  Figure 61 shows the direct costs from fiscal year ending 2007 with the estimated salary costs  and program revenues.  With the estimated salary costs, the revenue recovery is 26% of the  expenses.    Albemarle Road Recreation Center BFY 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007

Fund 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001

Dept PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK

Unit 5201 5630 5650 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700

Unit Name Contracted Services Structural Services Turf & Irrigation Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness FWRC Fitness Fitness Fitness

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Expense 11,982.50 584.60 134.50 119.09 48.50 3,158.94 1,659.99 250.05 5,665.94 32.04 152.64 1,326.49 493.00

$

25,608.28

$ $

Expense 40,000.00 27,000.00

Total Staff Costs

$

67,000.00

Total Expenses

$

92,608.28

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Revenue 300.00 11,262.50 1,295.00 1,105.00 60.00 1,100.00 6,000.50 55.00 (104.50) 767.72 264.77 820.00 1,004.50 (82.00)

$

23,848.49

8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002 8002

Location Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center

Object 5313 6025 6025 5110 5121 6005 6025 6035 7395 5110 5110 5110 5110

Object Name Security Materials-Maint & Repair Materials-Maint & Repair Auto Allowance - Mileage Printing Departmental Supplies Materials-Maint & Repair Uniforms-Clothing Instructional Costs Auto Allowance - Mileage Auto Allowance - Mileage Departmental Supplies Instructional Costs

Operating Expenses BFY

BFY 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007

Fund

Fund 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001 0001

Dept

Unit

Dept PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK PRK

Unit 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700 5700

Unit Name

Unit Name Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness Fitness

Sub-Unit Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center

Sub-Unit Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center Albemarle Road Recreation Center

Total Revenues Total Recovery

 

Sub-Revenue Source After School Program Cheerleading Classes & Programs Co-Rec Soccer Trips Youth Baseball Youth Basketball Youth Soccer Reimbursement of Costs Misc-Concessions Coca-Cola Gym Rental Center/Facility Rent

26%

   

Object Name Recreation Specialist Recreation Assistant

Figure 61 ‐ Expenses and Revenues 

 

142 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

The  Youth  Basketball  program  cost  recovery  is  shown  in  Figure  62.    Youth  Basketball  recovered 122% of the direct costs and 23% of the direct and indirect costs. 

Youth Basketball Direct $6,380.00

Revenues Expenditures Staffing: Recreation Specialist (120 hours X $23 per hour) Trophies Uniforms Banquet Referees: 44 games x 2 refs x $25 Gym Use: $55 per hour x 350 hrs Total Expenditures TOTALS Recovery

 

Indirect

$2,760.00 $520.50 $2,500.50 $0.00 $2,200.00 $5,221.00

$19,250.00 $22,010.00

$1,159.00 122%

Total $6,380.00

$2,760.00 $520.50 $2,500.50 $0.00 $2,200.00 $19,250.00 $27,231.00 -$20,851.00 23%

Figure 62 ‐ 2007 Youth Basketball Expenses and Revenues 

  The  other  programs  at  the  Albemarle  Road  Recreation  Center  had  no  reported  direct  or  indirect expenses.    7.5.3  PRICING OF SERVICES  After  the  cost‐of‐service  is  documented,  the  Department  may  wish  to  review  its  comprehensive  Pricing  Policy  to  compare  the  current  cost  recovery  to  the  established  recovery policies.  The cost of service result also document the level of required subsidy to  maintain the programs and services based on Department goals and objectives.   The  result  of  the  cost‐of‐service  analysis  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  the  entity  should  recover all of the costs of a service through user fees.  Though the cost of service depicts the  cost to provide a service, it should not be used as a cost recovery benchmark.  The cost of  service  results  document  what  is  required  in  the  way  of  operating  capital  and  what  rates  should be set to meet the recovery goals of the pricing policy.  When evaluating the pricing  of services, organizations typically analyze their target market and the social and economic  impact  of  the  service,  the  characteristics  of  the  product  or  service,  and  environmental  influences.  A Pricing Policy provides the Department with consistent guidelines in pricing services and  programs.  This  allows  users  to  better  understand  the  philosophy  behind  pricing  a  service.   Furthermore, the level of service and benefits users receive is translated into a price that is  based on a set subsidy level, or on the level of individual consumption or exclusivity that is  involved outside of what a general taxpayer receives. 

 

143

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Cost‐of‐service documentation with adopted pricing policies provides the Department with  the tools to adjust the pricing of programs and services as operation and maintenance costs  increase against a fixed tax revenue stream.    The objectives of pricing user fees are fourfold:  • Equity  • Revenue production  • Efficiency  • Redistribution of income  Equity  means  that  those  who  benefit  from  the  service  should  pay  for  it;  and  those  who  benefit the most should pay the most. The type of service will directly determine the cost  recovery  strategy  or  pricing  strategy  to  be  used  in  pricing  park  and  recreation  services.  Public agencies offer three kinds of services.  •

Public  services  normally  have  no  user  fee  associated  with  their  consumption.    The  cost for providing these services is borne the general tax base.  • Merit  services  can  be  priced  using  either  a  partial  overhead  pricing  strategy  or  a  variable cost pricing strategy.  Partial overhead pricing strategies recover all direct  operating  costs  and  some  determined  portion  of  fixed  costs.    The  portion  of  fixed  costs not covered by the price established represents the tax subsidy.  Whatever the  level of tax subsidy the Department needs to effectively communicate the level of  tax subsidy being provided by the Department.  • Private  park  and  recreation  services  are  where  only  the  user  benefits,  then  most  park and recreation agencies are pricing services using a full cost recovery strategy.   The price of this particular service is intended to recover all fixed and variable costs  associated with the service.  Revenue  production  means  that  user  fees  from  parks  and  recreation  programs  and  activities  will  assist  in  the  overall  operation  of  the  Park  and  Recreation  budget.    Revenue  production gives the Department needed cash flow for projects not budgeted in that year’s  budget.    It  gives  flexibility  in  providing  services  not  normally  provided  through  tax  dollars.   Example:    Promotional  dollars  for  programs  and  services.    Revenue  production  gives  the  Department in‐kind dollars for grant matches and the ability to enhance facilities.    Revenue production helps offset tax dollars spent on a specific program that over time has  lost  enthusiasm  by  the  public,  but  demands  more  tax  dollars  to  maintain  expenses  associated with a market that is losing support.  Revenue dollars paid by individuals would  place value on the experience that the individual is obtaining from the services provided by  the Department which develops a deeper commitment to the programs they help support.  Efficiency is maintained by the Department  utilizing revenue  dollars because expenditures  are  not  made  unless  necessary  revenues  are  available.    Priorities  in  management  of  park  lands, resources and activities are clearly defined because the services provided are clearly  made priorities because direct user dollars are associated with the activities that the public  wants provided.  Cost tracking of dollars spent for each activity is documented.  Pricing can  achieve six positive results:  • • •  

Reduces congestion and overcrowding  Indicates clientele demand and support  Increases positive consumer attitudes   

144 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 



Provides  encouragement  to  the  private  sector  (so  it  can  compete  with  us,  and  we  can reallocate our resources when necessary)  • Provides incentive to achieve societal goals  • Ensures stronger accountability on agency staff and management  Redistribution of income means that the dollars associated with each activity it came from  to  pay  for  direct  cost  and  for  future  improvements  associated  with  the  activity.    Example:   Adult  softball  players  pay  fees  for  maintenance  and  capital  improvements  associated  with  the activity they choose to participate in.  7.5.4  SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS  7.5.4.1   ACTION PLAN  The following Action Plan presents the steps required for the Department  to implement a  full cost of service approach.  The action plan is organized by major task.  In certain cases,  tasks may be performed simultaneously with others to gain efficiencies and to recognize the  integral  nature  of  certain  activities.      Action  plan  step  will  document  extent  to  which  program areas are self‐supporting, at breakeven or requiring a subsidy.  7.5.4.2   DATA COLLECTION  Data collection includes gathering the required operating data.    7.5.4.3   COST ANALYSIS  The  cost  analysis  documents  total  costs  for  each  program  or  service.    In  a  multi‐program  organization, the  costs can be  divided  into two different  types:  direct and indirect.  Direct  costs are those that are clearly and easily attributable to a specific program.  Indirect costs  are  those  which  are  not  easily  identifiable  with  a  specific  program,  but  which  may  be  necessary to the operation of the program.  These costs are shared among programs and, in  some  cases,  among  functions.    Administrative  cost  also  need  to  be  identified  such  as  purchasing,  human  resources,  information  services,  general  management  and  governance  which should be charged as indirect costs.  7.5.4.4   COST OF SERVICE MODEL  A  Cost  of  Service  Model  documents  the  analysis  and  facilitates  annual  updates.    A  cost  of  service model is developed to incorporate and allocate direct and indirect costs in order to  make management decisions on pricing of services and to indicate revenue impacts, subsidy  levels,  and  operational  effectiveness.    The  model  incorporates  budgeted  expenditures  allowing  for  continuous  updates,  efficient  analysis  and  informed  decisions.    This  model  is  used in budget development and pricing of programs and services.  7.5.4.5   USER FEE DESIGN  The analysis of each program area’s resource requirements documents the proper allocation  of  resources  to  achieve  the  Department’s  desired  quality  and  quantity  of  services  and  programs.    Additionally,  the  analysis  provides  a  method  for  documenting  operational  efficiency and determining subsidy levels.   

145

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

The cost analysis information is used to assess functional responsibilities and identify areas  in need adjustments in staffing levels and budgeted funds.    Based on the pricing policies and recovery goals, the Department will have the capabilities  to revise existing and/or design new user fees.    7.5.4.6   UPDATE OF REVENUE PLAN  The final step is an update of the Department's revenue plan to project program demand,  user fees, and program revenues over a five‐year period.  7.5.4.7   RECOMMENDED TIMELINE  It  is  recommended  that  the  Department  implement  the  Action  Plan  over  a  four‐month  period of time.  This time line includes the data gathering and analysis action step presented  above along with time to train key staff members in the processes and use of the model.  7.5.4.8   REQUIRED RESOURCES   To successfully perform and maintain a cost of service approach, the Department will need:  • • • •

The additional activities and financial information discussed above   One or two key staff to be trained in the processes and to be responsible for future  cost analysis and updates  Staff  time  available  to  gather  the  required  information  and  review  the  analytical  results  A  computer  with  sufficient  memory  (minimum  512mb‐1Gb  preferable),  hard  disk  space  (minimum  80mb  available),  and  software  (Microsoft  Excel  2003)  to  run  the  model. 

7.5.4.9   UPDATE OF PRICING POLICIES  During  the  cost  of  service  analysis  is  an  opportune  time  to  review  and  update  the  Department's  pricing  policies  to  maximize  the  results  of  the  cost  of  service  analysis  and  make adjustments to policies and cost recovery goals.  7.6   FACILITY CAPACITY UTILIZATION  The  Albemarle  Road  Recreation  Center  (ARRC)  is  used  as  a  sample  to  document  the  utilization  of  recreation  facilities.    Based  on  the  information  reviewed,  the  ARRC  has  78  operating hours per week available for County programs and other sanctioned programs, of  which 2 hours – from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM, Monday through Friday – are apportioned to the  Charlotte  Mecklenburg  Schools  Alternative  to  Suspension  program.    It  must  be  noted  that  the  Non‐prime  time  %  at  ARRC  is  skewed  a  bit  from  the  typical  center  due  to  having  the  school truancy program on site.  The non‐prime time usage of 71‐83% is not typical across  the board and systems tend to be less than 50% generally.        146 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Based  on  the  program  schedules,  78  total  operating  hours  are  derived  from  an  available  schedule that includes  Monday through Friday, 7:00AM to 9:00PM, and Saturday hours of  9:00AM  through  5:00PM.    Programmed  activities  begin  with  at  7:00AM  Monday  through  Friday in the gymnasium and extend through the 8:00PM hour on Tuesday, Wednesday, and  Thursday in Class 1.  The gymnasium and three classrooms are scheduled at total of 170.5  hours per week and total aggregate operational hours for the four areas amounts to 312.0  hours.    The  Albemarle  Road  Recreation  Center’s  total  weekly  utilization  for  all  four  areas  comes to 57%.  Albemarle Road Recreation Center Utilization (Overall); Prime-time / Non Prime-time Total Center Hours - AGGREGATE ROOM TOTALS Total Programmed Hours - ALL PROGRAMS Percent Utilized - TOTAL CENTER Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Prime-time Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Non Prime-time

Monday 56.0 32.0 57% 27% 30%

Tuesday Wednesday 56.0 56.0 35.0 35.0 63% 63% 30% 30% 32% 32%

Thursday 56.0 35.0 63% 30% 32%

Friday 56.0 32.0 57% 27% 30%

Saturday 32.0 32.0 55% 0% 0%

Sunday Closed Closed N/A N/A N/A

Weekly Total 312.0 170.5 57% 26% 28%

Total Prime-time Hours Available (7-10A; 3-8P) Prime-time Hours Scheduled Percent of Prime-time Utilization

32.0 15.0 47%

32.0 17.0 53%

32.0 17.0 53%

32.0 17.0 53%

32.0 15.0 47%

32.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

192.0 81.0 42%

Total Non Prime-time Hours Available (10A-3P; 8-9P) Non Prime-time Hours Scheduled Percent of Non Prime-time Utilization

24.0 17.0 71%

24.0 18.0 75%

24.0 18.0 75%

24.0 18.0 75%

24.0 17.0 71%

24.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

144.0 88.0 61%

Figure 63 ‐ Albemarle Road Recreation Center Overall Utilization 

Analyzing  the  capacity  utilization  by  prime‐time  and  non  prime‐time  categories  provides  a  proactive process for program planning and scheduling.  Based on pricing policies and cost  recovery goals, both convenience (time) of use and level of exclusivity that an individual or  group receives should be incorporated into the fee charged.  Prime‐time program slots, time  slots throughout the day that are more desired, should not only  be programmed with the  most  sought  after  programs,  but  also  with  the  programs  that  have  the  greatest  cost  recovery.    The  utilization  during  the  prime‐time  portions  of  the  day  is  not  a  challenge  at  many centers, rather the bigger challenge is how to entice users into the center during the  “down” time.  Prime‐time and non prime‐time hours were classified as:  • •

Prime‐time Hours – 7:00 to 10:00AM; 3:00 to 8:00PM  Non Prime‐time Hours – 10:00AM to 3:00PM; 8:00 to 9:00PM 

The following information was provided for the Albemarle Road Recreation Center and has  been utilized for the various program areas.    • Total center hours  • Programmed hours attributed to each area  • Total percent utilization  • Prime‐time and non prime‐time utilization   Gymnasium  The Gymnasium is schedule for a total of 46 hours per week; weekly utilization equates to  59% of available hours (78 total operational hours; 46 total programmed hours).     

147

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Prime‐time utilization reached a high of 63% for both Tuesday and Wednesday (5 of the 8  hours categorized as prime‐time were programmed).  Prime‐time programming for Tuesday  and  Wednesday  equates  to  36%  of  all  operational  hours  (5  hours  of  prime‐time  programming of the total 14 operating hours available).    Non prime‐time utilization peaked at 100% for Tuesday and Wednesday (all 6 of the hours  classified as non prime‐time were programmed), or 43% of total operational hours for each  of the respective days (6 hours of prime‐time programming of the total 14 operating hours  available).  Gymnasium Utilization; Prime-time / Non Prime-time (Based on program schedule provided for Albemarle Road Center ) Total Hours Available - ARRC Total Hours Scheduled - Gymnasium Percent Utilized - Gymnasium Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Prime-time Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Non Prime-time

Monday 14.0 8.0 57% 21% 36%

Tuesday Wednesday 14.0 14.0 11.0 11.0 79% 79% 36% 36% 43% 43%

Thursday 14.0 8.0 57% 21% 36%

Friday 14.0 8.0 57% 21% 36%

Saturday 8.0 0% 0% 0%

Sunday Closed Closed N/A N/A N/A

Weekly Total 78.0 46.0 59% 24% 35%

Total Prime-time Hours Available (7-10A; 3-8P) Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Gymnasium Percent of Prime-time Utilization - Gymnasium

8.0 3.0 38%

8.0 5.0 63%

8.0 5.0 63%

8.0 3.0 38%

8.0 3.0 38%

8.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

48.0 19.0 40%

Total Non Prime-time Hours Available (10A-3P; 8-9P) Non Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Gymnasium Percent of Non Prime-time Utilization - Gymnasium

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 6.0 100%

6.0 6.0 100%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

36.0 27.0 75%

 

Figure 64 ‐ Gymnasium Utilization 

 

Classroom 1  Classroom 1 is schedule for a total of 58 hours per week; weekly utilization equates to 74%  of available hours (78 total operational hours; 58 total programmed hours).  Class 1 has the  greatest occurrence of prime‐time programming amongst all four areas.  Thirty‐two (32) of  the 58 programmed hours can be attributed to prime‐time hours.  Prime‐time utilization reached a high of 100% on Thursday (all of the 8 hours categorized as  prime‐time were programmed) with Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday each having  75% utilization for during the prime‐time hours (6 of the 8 hours categorized as prime‐time  were  programmed).    Prime‐time  programming  for  Thursday  equates  to  57%  of  all  operational hours (prime‐time programming accounted for 8 hours of the total 14 operating  hours available) while Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday each equate to 43% of all  operational  hours  (6  hours  of  prime‐time  programming  of  the  total  14  operating  hours  available).  Non prime‐time utilization followed the same pattern as prime‐time scheduling, peaking at  100% for Thursday (all 6 hours categorized as non prime‐time were programmed) and 83%  utilization  for  Monday,  Tuesday,  Wednesday,  and  Friday.    Non  prime‐time  programming  accounted for 36% of all program hours for Class 1 for each of the days except Thursday, of  which 43% of programmed hours were non prime‐time.   

 

148 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Class 1 Utilization; Prime-time / Non Prime-time (Based on program schedule provided for Albemarle Road Center ) Total Hours Available - ARRC Total Hours Scheduled - Class 1 Percent Utilized - Class 1 Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Prime-time Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Non Prime-time

Monday 14.0 11.0 79% 43% 36%

Tuesday Wednesday 14.0 14.0 11.0 11.0 79% 79% 43% 43% 36% 36%

Thursday 14.0 14.0 100% 57% 43%

Friday 14.0 11.0 79% 43% 36%

Saturday 8.0 0% 0% 0%

Sunday Closed Closed N/A N/A N/A

Weekly Total 78.0 58.0 74% 41% 33%

Total Prime-time Hours Available (7-10A; 3-8P) Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 1 Percent of Prime-time Utilization - Class 1

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 8.0 100%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

48.0 32.0 67%

Total Non Prime-time Hours Available (10A-3P; 8-9P) Non Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 1 Percent of Non Prime-time Utilization - Class 1

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 6.0 100%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

36.0 26.0 72%

 

Figure 65 –Classroom 1 Utilization 

  Classroom 2  Classroom 2 is schedule for a total of 55 hours per week; weekly utilization equates to 71%  of available hours (78 total operational hours; 55 total programmed hours).  Thirty (30) of  the 55 programmed hours can be attributed to prime‐time hours.  Both prime‐time and non prime‐time utilization stay constant each day of the five day week  for  Class  2.    Prime‐time  utilization  remained  a  stable  75%  all  five  days  –  Monday  through  Friday  (6  of  the  8  hours  categorized  as  prime‐time  were  programmed).    Prime‐time  programming for each of the five days equates to 43% of all operational hours (prime‐time  programming accounted for 6 hours of the total 14 operating hours available).  Non  prime‐time  utilization  followed  the  same  steady  scheduling  pattern  displayed  by  the  prime‐time slots.  Each of the five working days non prime‐time slots were programmed at  an  83%  utilization  (5  of  the  6  hours  categorized  as  non  prime‐time  were  programmed).   When compared to total operating hours, Class 2 non prime‐time programming accounted  for  36%  of  all  program  hours  for  each  of  the  five  days  (5  of  the  total  14  operating  hours  available).  Class 2 Utilization; Prime-time / Non Prime-time (Based on program schedule provided for Albemarle Road Center ) Total Hours Available - ARRC Total Hours Scheduled - Class 2 Percent Utilized - Class 2 Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Prime-time Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Non Prime-time

Monday 14.0 11.0 79% 43% 36%

Tuesday Wednesday 14.0 14.0 11.0 11.0 79% 79% 43% 43% 36% 36%

Thursday 14.0 11.0 79% 43% 36%

Friday 14.0 11.0 79% 43% 36%

Saturday 8.0 0% 0% 0%

Sunday Closed Closed N/A N/A N/A

Weekly Total 78.0 55.0 71% 38% 32%

Total Prime-time Hours Available (7-10A; 3-8P) Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 2 Percent of Prime-time Utilization - Class 2

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 6.0 75%

8.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

48.0 30.0 63%

Total Non Prime-time Hours Available (10A-3P; 8-9P) Non Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 2 Percent of Non Prime-time Utilization - Class 2

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 5.0 83%

6.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

36.0 25.0 69%

 

Figure 66 ‐ Classroom 2 Utilization 

   

149

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Classroom 3  Classroom  3 is  the  least  programmed  areas  within  the  Albemarle  Road  Recreation  Center.   Unlike the gymnasium and each of the other two classrooms, Classroom 3 is scheduled for  less than half of the available opportunities.  One of the reasons for this due to the fact that  it is an activity room and is used more often as ‘open play area’.  The limited use occurs in  the form of 2 hours per day, Monday through Friday, for a total of 10 programmed  hours  per  week.    Weekly  utilization  for  Class  3  equates  to  13%  of  available  hours  (78  total  operational hours; 10 total programmed hours).    Based on scheduling, Class 3 is allocated to senior programs on a daily basis from 10:00AM  to 12:00 noon.  There is no prime‐time utilization for Class 3.  Non prime‐time utilization remains steady, if not robust.  Each day, Monday through Friday,  has a total of two non prime‐time program hours.  This is the equivalent of 33% of the total  available  non  prime‐time  hours  (2  of  the  6  total  non  prime‐time  hours)  and  14%  of  total  center hours per day (2 of the total 14 daily operating hours available).  Class 3 Utilization; Prime-time / Non Prime-time (Based on program schedule provided for Albemarle Road Center ) Total Hours Available - ARRC Total Hours Scheduled - Class 3 Percent Utilized - Class 3 Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Prime-time Percent of Total Hours Utilized - Non Prime-time

Monday 14.0 2.0 14% 0% 14%

Tuesday Wednesday 14.0 14.0 2.0 2.0 14% 14% 0% 0% 14% 14%

Thursday 14.0 2.0 14% 0% 14%

Friday 14.0 2.0 14% 0% 14%

Saturday 8.0 0% 0% 0%

Sunday Closed Closed N/A N/A N/A

Weekly Total 78.0 10.0 13% 0% 13%

Total Prime-time Hours Available (7-10A; 3-8P) Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 3 Percent of Prime-time Utilization - Class 3

8.0 0%

8.0 0%

8.0 0%

8.0 0%

8.0 0%

8.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

48.0 0%

Total Non Prime-time Hours Available (10A-3P; 8-9P) Non Prime-time Hours Scheduled - Class 3 Percent of Non Prime-time Utilization - Class 3

6.0 2.0 33%

6.0 2.0 33%

6.0 2.0 33%

6.0 2.0 33%

6.0 2.0 33%

6.0 0%

Closed Closed N/A

36.0 10.0 28%

Figure 67 ‐ Classroom 3 Utilization 

  Summary  Classroom 1 and Classroom 2 are used the most of all four areas – Classroom 1 is utilized a  total  of  74%  of  available  time  and  Classroom  2  is  utilized  71%  of  available  times.    These  utilization factors include Saturday; although there are no programs scheduled for Saturdays  at  the  ARRC,  the  opportunity  to  schedule  exists  therefore  the  operational  hours  were  figured into the utilization.    Classroom  3  receives  relatively  no  use;  with  only  two  scheduled  hours  per  day  Mondays  through  Fridays,  the  room  has  a  total  of  68  additional  hours  available  for  programming.   Programs  to  complement  the  existing  senior  programs  should  be  explored.    Another  alternative  to  the  senior  programming  in  Classroom  3  may  be  to  extend  the  age  segment  offering  of  Classrooms  1  and  2  into  Classroom  3  to  allow  for  a  true  family  experience.    

 

150 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Ultimately, all programming options should be explored to increase Classroom 3 utilization  and to increase the evening utilization of all of the classroom spaces.  The  Gymnasium  is  well  used  during  the  week,  however,  program  information  may  not  adequately  account  for  open  gym  periods.    The  ARRC  staff  should  explore  actively  scheduling  Saturday  mornings  to  increase  utilization  and  program  revenues.    Partnerships  with public and private leagues may be possible.  7.6.1  PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PLAN  Based  on  a  review  of  all  the  information  regarding  recreation  programs,  PROS  Consulting,  recommends the following future core programs:  • • • • • • • • • • • •

Aquatics programs  Environmental/nature center programs  Adventure sports (outdoor recreation) programs  Therapeutic recreation programs and services  Athletics  Community‐Wide Special Events  4‐H programs  Golf services  Active adults 50‐64 and Seniors 65 programs  Fitness and wellness programs  Facility rentals  Summer camps and after school programs  

This  list  includes  all  of  the  current  core  programs.    The  additional  items  are  fitness  and  wellness,  differentiating  the  senior  market  between  “active  adults”  and  seniors,  facility  rentals,  summer  camps,  and  after  school  programs.    Senior  programs  are  recommended  to  develop  into  a  core  program,  given  the  growing  market  of  this  age  group  as  well  as  “active  adult”  interest  in  recreation  opportunities.    The  program  area  should  evolve  into  two  distinct  program  areas  between  the  more  active  adults  and  the  more  senior  market  as  mentioned  previously.    Education  and  life  skill  programs  scored  high  on  the  program  needs  assessment  (program  priorities),  which should result in an increase in these  kind of programs.   

151

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Fitness  and  wellness  programs  had  the  second  highest  program  need  of  the  22  programs  listed  on  the  needs  assessment  survey.    This  translates  into  165,930  households  having  a  need for fitness activities.  Of the households whose needs for recreation programming are  only being met by 50% or less, adult fitness and wellness programs had the greatest unmet  need.  Fitness activities are served by the eight fitness centers as well as fitness classes and  activities at some of the recreation centers.  This includes only approximately 9,600 square  feet  for  all  the  fitness  centers  combined.    The  centers  should  re‐position  themselves  to  accommodate  larger  square  footage  dedicated  to  fitness  as  well  as  more  hardwood  floor  areas for group exercise and indoor cycling.    Some centers, such as the Mallard Creek center, have a significant emphasis on fitness.  This  is a key program area to grow in the future, not only for adults and seniors, but for youth as  well.    With  the  increase  in  childhood  obesity,  there  is  tremendous  interest  in  offering  programs  geared  toward  the  outcome  of  developing  healthier  children.    The  inventory  of  fitness programs should include:  • • • • • • • • • • •

Boot camps  Personal training  Indoor cycling  Yoga  Pilates  Group exercise (jazzercise, Zumba, kickboxing)  Youth fitness  Nutrition  Wellness seminars  Massage  Corporate fitness 

All recreation centers should offer a mix of these programs each programming cycle and for  all age segments.    It  is  also  recommended  that  facility  rentals  become  a  core  program  area.    Over  70  rental  areas  and  sites  exist  for  receptions,  weddings,  family  reunions,  corporate  events,  picnics,  and birthday parties.  This area has a significant presence on the web and is a great amenity.   Significant revenue opportunity exists in this area.    Summer camp programs/before and after school should also grow into a core program area.   This is based on discussions with similar providers who commented on the  need for more  after school programs and summer day camp programs.   Cultural  arts  programming  does  not  have  much  of  a  presence  in  the  current  program  offerings,  as  only  a  few  cultural  arts  programs  are  offered  throughout  the  entire  system.   There  is  a  tremendous  opportunity  to  develop  this  as  a  significant  program  area.    If  this  program area grows successfully, in the future, it should be regarded as a core program as  well.  Opportunities exist to partner with arts groups as a way of getting started, as well as   

 

152 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

nearby  colleges.    Arts  programming  can  include  dance,  performing  arts,  music,  and  visual  arts.  Dance programs can include:  • • • • • • • • •

Ballroom dancing  Latin dance and salsa  Dance African  Square dancing  Swing dancing  Wedding dancing  Belly dancing  Youth dancing (jazz, tap, ballet)  Adult dancing (jazz, tap, ballet) 

Many park and recreation systems do very well in  the dance area and are attracting more and more  students  with  a  resurgence  of  dance  interest  throughout  the  United  States.    Many  offer  “a  school  of  dance”  program,  which  is  a  yearlong  program  that  attracts  more  serious  dancers.   Richmond,  Virginia’s  Department  of  Parks,  Recreation and Community Facilities offers such a  program.  Performing arts can include:  • • • •

Youth drama clubs  Improv and mime  Musical theatre  Theatre production 

Music can include:  • • • • •

Private music lessons  Guitar  Piano  Voice  Community singing group 

Through a partnership with the Community School of the Arts, Suzuki violin instructions are  offered.  Visual arts can include:  • •  

Cartooning  Ceramics, youth and adult  153

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

• • • • •

Sketching and drawing, youth and adults  Crafts, youth and adult  Photography  Watercolor  Jewelry design 

The key to developing art programs is space and designated space is needed in recreation  centers as well as having an art center for fine arts and performing arts in the County.  Large  systems such as Seattle, Dallas, Columbus, and Indianapolis, all have designated art centers  that provide classes, training, exhibits, performances and events to promote the arts in the  community.    Other  programming  area  gaps  include  self  defense  and  martial  arts.    This  program  area  is  under‐  represented  in  the  current  program  offerings  as  only  a  few  recreation  centers  offered this as a program area in the current Get Going Guide.  Self defense is generally a  strong  program  area  for  most  park  and  recreation  systems  throughout  the  United  States.   Though,  this  program  area  ranked  in  the  low  program  category  in  the  program  needs  assessment.    This  could  be  a  result  of  Mecklenburg  County  not  having  a  presence  in  this  program area and was not considered an important program.  Demand could be created by  targeting this as an important program area. This program area can include:  • • • • • • •

Adult karate  Youth karate  Tae Kwon Do  Self defense for adults  Aikido  Shaolin Kung Fu  Wing Chun 

Gymnastics/tumbling offerings are very minimal.  Bette Rae Thomas Recreation Center has  been offering a program for the past year.  This is an area that can be further developed and  offered  at  various  other  centers  too,  based  on  the  market  demand.    Program  areas  can  include:  • • • •

Tot gymnastics  Junior gymnastics  Tumbling  Parent/tot gymnastics  

Recreation program development needs to be a core competency of the organization.  The  recreation  program  skill  set  currently  needs  to  be  developed  and  improved.    The  Department  should introduce a  training program for all recreation programming staff  that  provides consistency and quality control in the programming process.  This can be facilitated  through  a  train  the  trainer  program,  in  order  to  offer  the  program  on  a  continuous  basis.   The training can include items such as:   

 

154 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Recreation program development…what to offer  Marketing and promotions of programs  Get Going Guide process (timelines, submissions, writing material)  Instructional quality, guidelines for contractual employees  Customized customer service training  Instructor selection  and supervision(staff and contractual)  Measuring customer satisfaction  Quality control in recreation programs   Cross promotions with other program areas  Financial and budget goals, results  Program standards  Instructor Tool Kits  Measuring program performance 

A recreation development process manual should then be developed and include all of this  information.  New staff can then receive training as part of the orientation process.  In  order  to  maintain  good  program  development  throughout  the  entire  system,  the  Department  should  consider  developing  an  annual  program  review  process  in  which  staff  presents information about their key program results to senior leaders of the organization.   This  helps  to  identify  cross  promotional  opportunities,  potential  impacts  to  other  areas  of  the Department, support needed by County government, and provides the Department with  an overall assessment of program performance.  In addition, from a staffing standpoint, the  Department will be well served with a standard of 1 staff / 9500 residents.  This means that  the Department is currently short by about 15 staff members given their current staffing of  75.    This  additional  staff  will  be  vital  to  ensure  the  successful  implementation  of  the  additional  recommended  core  programs  and  also  to  address  the  growth  in  future  programming.    In reviewing the program assessments, program areas generally do a good job with human  resource  requirements  for  programs.  This  includes  annual  review  of  policies  and  procedures, customer service training offered twice a year, life safety training on a regular  basis,  and  regular  performance  appraisals.    These  work  actions  support  good  instructional  quality and are all good practices.    As for suggestions for improvements, as a result of a lack of a programming system, there is  no consistency in the recreation programming experience for customers.  The Department  does  not  deploy  a  comprehensive  set  of  standards  throughout  the  system.    Standards  do  not  exist  throughout  all  program  areas,  though  there  are  examples  of  standards  being  in  place.  Specifically, as mentioned in the previous paragraph, there are standards for human  resource requirements.   Standards  include  those  items  that  need  to  be  present  to  ensure  quality  control  in  a  recreation program.  Standards ensure there is no gap between customers expectations of  service  and  customers  perspective  of  service  based  on  actual  experience  (the  difference   

155

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

between what customers expect and what their opinion is based on their experience) Not all  standards can be applied consistently across all programs because there are different needs  for different programs.    Examples of standards include:  • • • • • • • • • • •

Cleanliness  Safety  Staff appearance (uniforms)  Program registration process  Telephone answering standards  Instructional lesson plans  Class minimums and maximums  Staff to student ratios  Injury reporting  Policy use and communication  Customer relations   Each  program  area  should  identify  its  major  list  of  standards and have that list as a part of new employee  orientation and training.  In order to help remind staff  of their standards, program areas can come up with a  standard  of  the  month  and  reinforce  its  practice  through email reminders or through staff meetings.   

After  developing  the  standards,  the  next  step  is  to  develop  a  method  to  ensure  that  standards  are  being  followed.  One method to accomplish that objective is  to  develop  an  audit  process.  A  check  list  of  performance  is  developed  and  then  staff  (or  an  objective  third  party  person)  is  assigned  to  visit  programs  and  ensure  conformance  with  identified standards.   Much  variation  exists  among  those  involved  in  programming  regarding  the  use  of  contractual versus employed staff.  In many cases, contractual employees are hired to fulfill  specialty  program  areas  in  which  there  is  abundant  supply  of  private  contractors.    This  includes  areas  such  as  karate.    In  other  cases,  contractual  employees  exist  because  the  Department  heretofore  strategically  positioned  itself  to  farm  out  recreation  programming  activities.    Contractual  employee  percentages  vary  across  the  board  as  well.    Systems  throughout  the  country  are  moving  to  more  of  a  split  of  60‐40%  to  70‐30%  contractor  to  park agency.    Communication  processes  with  part  time  staff  is  a  challenge  for  a  Department  the  size  of  Mecklenburg County.  It is very difficult to deploy mission, vision and values with staff who  work only a couple of hours a week for the Department.  Efforts should be made to ensure   

 

156 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

that  part  time  programming  staff  feel  connected  and  informed  about  the  Department.   These  staff  have  very  heavy  interface  with  the  public,  and  they  need  to  have  a  sense  of  attachment to the Department.  During the orientation and training period of programming  staff,  it  is  good  practice  to  have  an  instructor’s  tool  kit  that  outlines  the  Department’s  mission,  vision,  strategy,  balanced  scorecard,  etc.    The  tool  kit  should  also  include  quality  standards  for  their  area.    Having  face  time  with  senior  leaders  is  important  to  this  staff  group.  A regular once or twice a year meeting with this group is important.  7.6.2  MARKETING ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS  An  analysis  of  the  Department’s  marketing  approach  reveals  that  it  is  imperative  for  the  Department  to  evolve  into  a  more  strategic and systematic marketing system.   The Department currently does not have a  marketing  plan  that  guides  marketing  activities  for  the  future.    An  overall  plan  should  exist,  supplemented  by  brief  individual  business  plans  for  core  programs  and  services.    The  marketing  plan  should  be  aligned  with  the  Department’s  strategies.    Elements  of  the  plan  should  include  an  overall  SWOT  of  marketing  (strengths,  weaknesses,  opportunities  and  threats),  major  marketing  strategies,  and  an  action  plan  with  annual  goals  and  objectives.    It  is  important  for  marketing  to  be  connected  to  the  performance  of  various  program  and  services areas to determine where marketing resources should be targeted.   There should  also be an evaluation of what is currently done in the way of allocating marketing resources.   For example, Ray’s Splash Planet and the Aquatics Center are treated differently in terms of  marketing.    Ray’s  has  $80,000  to  work  with  and  the  Aquatics  Center  receives  only  several  thousand.  There  is  only  1.5  staff  dedicated  toward  marketing  activities.    Current  efforts  relate  to  publicity  and  public  information,  rather  than  a  comprehensive  approach  to  marketing.   There should be more labor support in this area.  Similarly sized departments have at least  three  or  four  marketing  staff  involved  in  marketing,  corporate  and  community  relations,  public  information,  web  site  development,  and  graphic  design.    An  ideal  Department  marketing budget should be about 4‐5% of the operating budget.    In  absence  of  sufficient  staff  to  handle  marketing  activities,  it  may  be  useful  to  develop  a  cross  functional  marketing  team  that  monitors  the  entire  marketing  system.    Interns  from  nearby colleges may also provide some additional labor resources.     

157

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

The Get Going Guide is published twice a year.  Most park systems publish program guides  three to four times a year, with it trending toward three times a year.  The lack of frequency  of  the  Guide  probably  affects  lower  than  average  household  percentage  of  program  participants.    The  Get  Going  Guide  is  a  good  name  for  a  program  guide,  representing  involvement  and  action,  which  will  contribute  to  the  overall  health  and  wellness  of  the  community.    The  layout  of  the  Guide  is  easy  to  follow.    It  is  particularly helpful for each major program area to  list programs by the various age categories.  The  Guide  is  actually  a  new  marketing  piece.   Previous  to  last  year,  there  was  no  system  wide  program  guide.  However,  there  are  currently  thousands of households not receiving the Guide as  it  is  distributed  primarily  through  the  elementary  schools and Department facilities. It was distributed  through the newspaper, but this was determined to  be too expensive.  This undoubtedly contributes to  the  low  participation  rates  of  recreation  programs  by  residents.    According  to  the  needs  assessment  survey,  only  17  %  of  residents  learn  about  Mecklenburg  County  Parks  and  Recreation  programs  and  activities  through  the  Get  Going  Guide.    Typically,  across  the  United  States,  49%  of  households  rely  on  the  program  guide  as  their  primary  means  of  receiving  information.    On  the  other  hand,  41%  of  households  rely  on  the  newspaper  for  information  about  the  Department  activities.    Therefore,  the  distribution  through  newspapers should be reconsidered.    The  Guide  is  also  distributed  to  centers  and  other  locations.    About  100,000  copies  are  printed.  Staff indicated that many more guides need to be printed, particularly based on the  fact  that  335,891  households  exist  in  the  County.  28%  of  households  receive  their  information  about  park  and  recreation  services  from  the  web  site,  which  is  a  good  percentage that will undoubtedly climb.  Having on‐line registration and the Guide included  in  the  web  site  is  good.  There  are  large  park  systems  that  enable  the  residents  to  “subscribe” to the guide and even charge a small subscription fee.  Others use advertising as  a  way  of  defraying  expenses.    Eventually,  the  importance  of  a  hard  copy  brochure  will  diminish  as  more  and  more  households  become  familiar  with  on‐line  registration  and  program information.     

 

158 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

The frequency of the Guide’s distribution is less than other systems, as most other systems  have three or sometimes even four distribution periods.  The Mecklenburg staff feel that the  twice a year frequency works, as compared to not having any program guide at all.  Some  staff takes it upon themselves to develop interim publicity pieces, knowing that twice a year  distribution does not provide enough reach and frequency for program promotion.  During  staff interviews, many staff commented on the need to improve the navigation of the web  site to make it easier for people to sign up for programs and classes.  The  Get  Going  Guide  process  reinforces  maintaining  the  status  quo  in  recreation  programming  because  of  the  infrequency  and  cycle  time  of  its  distribution.    For  one  thing,  staff  needs  to  develop  their  information  far  in  advance  of  the  guide’s  distribution.  .    As  a  result,  one  staff  person  mentioned that only a third of what is really  offered  is  included  in  the  guide.    Secondly,  there isn’t an incentive to come up with new  program  ideas  within  the  six  months  between  the  guide’s  distribution.    Staff  had  a  variety  of  opinions  about  the  Get  Going  Guide  and  how  to  make  it  more  effective.    Some  thought  it  was  great,  and  a  significant  improvement, just by virtue of it being available.  Others thought the layout of information  should be changed to make it easier reading for customers.  It is important to have customer  feedback  about  the  Get  Going  Guide.    One  suggestion  is  to  have  a  series  of  focus  groups  with  a  variety  of  customers,  and  go  through  a  set  of  questions  relating  to  the  design  and  layout, organization of information, frequency of distribution, and program descriptions.  Beyond  the  Get  Going  Guide,  individual  program  and  facility  areas  supplement  their  publicity by developing site specific or program specific brochures.  The nature centers and  outdoor  education  have  their  own  publication  that  is  done  quarterly.  It  is  called  Natural  Connections.  Therapeutic Recreation has the TR Wire, which is published seasonally.  Some of the programming areas keep a database of names of users in order to email them.   Though, it was mentioned that some  of the lists need to be updated.  All areas should do  this.    According  to  the  program  assessments,  only  some  areas  used  email  blasts.    This  is  something  that  should  be  applied  consistently.    All  program  areas  should  develop  a  participant  database  at  the  time  of  registration  and  initiate  email  blasts  from  these  lists.   Email  blasts  can  be  set  up  to  go  to  all  customers  in  the  database,  or  targeted  customers  within program areas.    According to youth survey information provided by the Department, the teen market has a  very low level of awareness of programs and services.  It may be helpful to develop MySpace   

159

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

or  Facebook  promotional  efforts.    Many  libraries  in  the  Chicago  area  have  used  this  successfully to gain a better teen audience.    As for branding and image, the Department’s logo has been  in  use  for  quite  some  time.    It  is  visible  at  locations  throughout the Department.  At some point in the future, it  may be useful for the Department to have something more  contemporary.    Though,  this  is  not  a  short  term  priority.   The  slogan  of  The  Natural  Place  to  Be….is  a  good  one  and  reinforces  the  notion  of  get  going,  be  active  and  Mecklenburg County is the place for recreation.  In order to  develop  a  stronger  image  for  recreation  programming,  a  separate  theme  and  brand  could  be  developed.    This  has  been done in other systems throughout the country.  The Department just started a monthly e‐newsletter that is  available  on  the  web.    It  would  help  to  evaluate  its  effectiveness after a period of time.    Staff members have a high level of satisfaction toward the media contact and public service  announcements that go out.  However the Department is at the mercy of the newspapers as  far as whether or not the information is printed.  One staff mentioned the idea of getting  more exposure through the local cable government access television station.  7.6.3  CORPORATE SUPPORT AND PARTNERSHIPS  The most significant corporate relationship for the Department is the sponsorship of youth  sports  activities  by  Blue  Cross/Blue  Shield.    Within  the  program  offerings,  other  corporate  supports relationships include Starbucks, the Charlotte Bobcats, Coca Cola Bottling Company  and Wal‐Mart.    Specific  program  areas  use  many  non  for  profit  and  community  association  to  deliver  programs.  According to the program assessments close to 300 partners are included in the  partnership inventory.   Examples include the Charlotte Boxing Academy and the Charlotte  Flights  Track  and  Field  Club  for  youth.    Therapeutic  Recreation  uses  Special  Olympics  and  Carolina Rehabilitation.    Many  program  areas  use  Charlotte  Mecklenburg  Schools,  including  aquatics  competition,  Ray’s, golf courses, and sports.  Institutions of higher learning include Ray’s partnership with  Johnson  and  Wales  University,  Wingate  University,  and  the  UNC‐Charlotte  Center  for  Mathematics,  Science  and  Technology.    As  mentioned  previously  in  the  similar  provider  section, Mecklenburg County partners with the YMCA in a variety of activities.  Recreation  classes and golf partner with Boys and Girls Clubs.  In addition the Department partners with  the  Police  Athletic  League  in  offering  sports  activities.    Events  and  festivals  use  libraries,   

 

160 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Mecklenburg  Health  Department,  the  Police  and  Fire  Departments,  and  neighborhood  associations.    Obviously, Mecklenburg County uses partners for virtually all of its program areas.  Because  of the vast size of the number of partners used, it becomes difficult to ensure that written  partnerships  exist  and  are  up  to  date.    A  process  should  be  put  into  place  to  ensure  that  equitable agreements exist and are up to date.  Based  on  the  results  from  the  similar  provider  analysis,  opportunities  exist  for  more  partnerships  with  the  YMCA,  YWCA,  and  local  towns.    In  addition,  there  is  opportunity  to  partner more with corporations beyond the ones mentioned above.   As for corporate partnerships, the goal is to develop and implement sustainable strategies  for increasing revenue from public‐private partnerships.  7.6.3.1   PROPERTY ASSETS  Evaluate what Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation has to offer sponsors and how it is  currently  packaged.  Discuss  with  or  survey  current  sponsors  to  better  understand  their  priorities and what is important to them.   Strategy: The feedback will help shape adjustments in how sponsor benefits are packaged.  For instance, if e‐blasts or web site content is listed as one of the most important benefits to  a company, then these should be included in a higher priced, higher level sponsor package.  7.6.3.2 SURVEY  Provide companies with specific information about the people or households they will reach  through  a  sponsorship.  Knowing  the  audience  will  make  proposals  more  compelling  to  companies,  and  will  provide  Mecklenburg  County  with  another  way  to  identify  potential  sponsors.   Strategy: Survey adult members or participants to profile their purchasing habits, interests  and lifestyles. This information should be provided in proposals to companies when selling  sponsorships.  Questions  such  as,  does  your  family  have  a  pet?  What  other  membership‐ based organizations do you belong to?   This data will assist Mecklenburg County sponsorship sellers in addressing prospects’ unique  needs  and  will  demonstrate  that  members  or  attendees  are  potential  customers  or  consumers for a sponsor.  7.6.3.3 PROSPECTING AND SALES  Key leadership and staff should work together in identifying and securing sponsors. Rarely  does  one  person  have  all  the  contacts  or  all  the  information  on  a  business.  Researching  prospects,  compiling  a  list  of  contacts  and  taking  a  collaborative  approach  to  the  sales  prospect is more effective and efficient 

 

161

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Strategy:  Combine  your  knowledge  of  Mecklenburg  County  with  your  research  of  a  company for a powerful proposal and better‐integrated sponsorship package. This will move  Mecklenburg County into solution‐based sales and away from one time transactions.   Hoovers.com,  a  local  Chamber  contact,  board  members,  trade  publications  and  general  Internet research are all viable ways of developing a profile of information.  Invest in sales  training for key staff and if possible, sponsorship conferences, such as those offered by IEG,  a leading national sponsorship organization.     7.6.3.4 REVENUE AND PRICING  The  Department  has  a  detailed  Revenue  and  Pricing  Policy  that  provides  a  very  specific  framework  for  the  pricing  of  services.    Services  are  divided  into  three  categories:    basic,  extended,  and  special  services.  These  follow  the  traditional  model  of  public,  merit  and  private  goods.  Basic  and  special  services  require  formal  approval  from  the  County  Board.   The  Department  director  has  the  discretion  to  establish  extended  services.    These  include  general recreation programming fees.  Non‐County fees are 50% more than resident fees.  This is a steeper percentage than what  PROS  typically  finds.      Systems  generally  establish  higher  non‐resident  fees  when  resident  demand for services exceeds capacity.  Otherwise non‐resident fees are set at a lower than  50% surcharge in order to generate sufficient revenue from non‐residents.   Many program areas do not have cost recovery goals or track cost per experience.  Having  cost recovery goals is an important method of ensuring financial accountability.  It provides  a  guide  post  for  staff  in  the  establishment  of  fees.    Aquatic  programs  do  track  their  cost  recovery,  and  according  to  the  program  assessment,  successfully  recover  100%  of  direct  costs. 

 

 

162 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  7.7   SPORTS TOURISM STRATEGY  7.7.1  INTRODUCTION  The  section  of  the  report  seeks  to  provide  a  broad  analysis  of  the  current  situation  with  respect  to  availability,  demand  and  impact  of  amateur  sports  tourism.    Additionally,  factoring  in  events  held  in  the  surrounding  region  and  assessing  growth  trends  regionally  and  nationwide  will  help  identify  gaps  and  potential  event  offerings  for  the  County.   Evaluating the available resources in the County in light of the gaps will help devise types of  traditional and non‐traditional amateur sports events that  could  be pursued in the future.   This section will then outline event types that would best serve the County’s aim to attract  various events and consequently boost sports tourism and economic growth.    Over  the  last  several  years,  Sports  Tourism  has  emerged  as  one  of  the  fastest  growing  sectors of the tourism industry.  Sports Tourism is broadly defined as “All forms of active and  passive involvement in a sporting activity, participated in casually or in an organized way for  non‐commercial  or  business  /  commercial  reason  that  necessitate  travel  away  from  home  and  work  locality”.  Passive  involvement  includes  travelling  to  view  sporting  events  or  museums  while  active  involvement  would  be  defined  more  as  scuba  diving,  cycling,  golf,  running etc.    7.7.2  CURRENT SITUATION – NATIONAL AND REGIONAL TRENDS  Information obtained released by American Sports Data (ASD) earlier this decade has shown  that swimming, walking, bowling, bicycling, and fishing top the list of most popular sports.   These are sports that appeal to young and old, can be done anywhere, and can be enjoyed  regardless of level of skill. They also have appeal because they have a social aspect: people  enjoy walking together; fishing boats and bowling leagues offer camaraderie.    Participation  rates  in  swimming  have  remained  steady  over  course  of  the  study  period  in  which  it  was  tracked  (1998  to  2005)  and  recorded  by  ASD.  While  there  has  been  a  slight  decline of three percent (3.2%) in total participation from 1998, with over 91.3 Americans  swimming at least once during 2005, swimming remains the most popular sport activity in  the United States.  Among the new fitness activities, some activities saw growth because they're simply "hot,"  some  new  sport  to  invigorate  fitness  and  leisure  time.    Wakeboarding,  paintball,  wall  climbing,  and  mountain  biking,  BMX  biking,  snowboarding  are  all  part  of  the  "extreme  sports"  category,  that  have  been  showing  growth  trends,  activities  for  the  younger  generation.    Paintball  in  particular  is  getting  increasingly  popular  and  over  15000  participants from all over the country had participated in the inaugural Paintball World Cup  at Disney’s Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando 2006.  From a traditional team sport standpoint, the ERA report has shown that Baseball, Softball,  Football and Soccer all experienced single‐digit growth trends in this region in the last few  years.    Also,  lacrosse  has  demonstrated  a  high  growth  percentage  too  and  is  among  the  fastest  growing  sports  especially  on  the  coasts.    The  list  of  fastest  growing  high  school   

163

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

sports, as mentioned in the ERA report, has Lacrosse, Bowling, Ice Hockey, Water Polo and  Soccer in the top five over the last 5 and 10 year period.    ASD  data  more  specific  to  the  Mid‐Atlantic  region  also  corroborates  these  findings.   Baseball, Cheerleading, Ice Hockey, Football, Lacrosse, Soccer and Volleyball all have higher  than average participation rates.  Evaluating an index of participation where 100 is average,  the following are some of the indexes for sports that are growing and poised to grow further  in  this  region.    With  regard  to  sports  participation,  a  geographic  index  is  simply  the  participation rate of a given geographic segment against the national participation.  Thus an  index of 100 would indicate that participation in that sport is identical to national averages  while  a  higher  than  100  index  would  indicate  greater  popularity  for  that  sport  in  a  geographical region.    •

Lacrosse (index 286, 1.4 participants per 1000 ), with over half a million participants  in the Mid‐Atlantic region alone and increasing  • Indoor Soccer ( index 161, 2.8 participants per 1000), over 1 million participants  • Wrestling (index 148, 1.4 participants per 1000), over half a million participants  • Ice Hockey ( index 157, 1.6 participants per 1000),   • Baseball (index 121, 4.4 participants per 1000), over 1.5 million participants  • Volleyball  –  court  (index  115,  5.1  participants  per  1000),  almost  2  million  in  court  volleyball  • Cheerleading (index 114, 1.8 participants per 1000)  In  addition,  Martial  Arts,  Kayaking  and  Mountain  Biking  too  have  higher  than  average  participation  numbers  and  these  trends  are  indicative  of  the  current  demand  and  growth  potential  of  a  variety  of  competitive  and  semi  competitive  events  in  these  sports.    Tennis  too  has  demonstrated  rejuvenated  interest  and  has  grown  over  10%  in  the  last  five  years  nationwide.  Also, nationwide trends and the sheer number of events held demonstrate the  high  growth  of  endurance  running  events  like  the  marathons,  half‐marathons,  biathlons,  triathlons and ironmen races.  The annual National Duathlon Festival held in Richmond, VA  in partnership with USA Triathlon is an example of the growing body of such hybrid events  that are being organized successfully all over the country.     7.7.3  MECKLENBURG COUNTY – REGIONAL EVENTS  PROS  performed  the  situational  analysis  by  exploring  various  systems  within  a  200  mile  radius that had a population of 50,000 residents.  This would ensure that they were within a  distance that could compete for sports tourists and also have the size and infrastructure to  match the scale of events possible.  It must be noted that in an attempt to track as many  amateur  sports  events  as  possible,  there  could  be  some  that  may  have  been  left  out.   However,  with  such  a  large  pool  of  events  the  overall  trends  and  gaps  would  be  very  evident.    In  reviewing  the  activities  of  all  the  cities  surveyed  within  a  200  mile  radius,  the  activities  were categorized according to:  • • • •  

Entertainment and sports – spectators (17%)  Adventure Sports / Outdoor recreation (4%)  Competition, tournaments and races (65%)  Festivals and Special events (15%)   

164 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

The above percentages depict the event break‐up based on the pre‐defined categories.    A  large  number  of  cities  seemed  to  offer  a  variety  of  running  and  bike  competitions  and  races.    It  seems  as  though  every  community  offers  this  as  a  primary  staple  of  events.   However, a number of these events are the 5K, 10K, 1 mile races that tend to get a majority  of  their  participants  from  the  local  community  itself  and  do  not  truly  draw  in  a  regional  presence.    Trends  on  American  Sports  Data  depict  that  Recreational  Walking  and  Running  are among the most preferred activities across all races throughout the country.  Running /  jogging  has  witnessed  a  12.3%  increase  nationwide  from  2000  –  2005.    This  interest  in  recreational  participation  is  likely  to  manifest  into  a  larger  attraction  towards  competitive  events as well, albeit for a much smaller population segment.    As for sporting events, youth events are relatively well represented throughout the region,  particularly baseball and basketball.  However, it appears that football, softball and soccer  events are not as abundant as the others.  ASD data has shown that field sports, including  lacrosse  and  soccer,  and  to  a  lesser  extent  touch  and  tackle  football  have  been  demonstrating  positive  growth  trends.    The  majority  participation  for  these  events  comprises  of  a  younger  audience  under  the  age  of  21,  though  there  does  remain  active  adult participant population for the other sports, particularly soccer.    Cheer  and  Dance  competitions  are  among  the  largest  draws  for  a  regional  audience  and  affiliated  spectators.    The  increased  visibility  on  sports  media  like  ESPN  among  others  has  only served to heighten the interest and draw greater participation.  There are a few cheer  and  dance  events  being  held  regionally  including  the  National  Cheer  Star  Competition  in  Savannah, GA, International Dance Challenge in Knoxville, TN, Georgia Peach Open National  Championship ‐ Cheer & Dance, and various smaller Cheerleading competitions in Concord  NC.  However, this is definitely a market that  has high growth potential in  this region and  the County could be well served by an increased focus on attracting similar events.    The  third  most  frequent  offering  is  the  festival  and  special  event  category.    The  needs  assessment survey for Mecklenburg County suggested a very high interest in special events,  so  this  may  be  an  area  that  could  be  looked  into.    However,  given  the  nature  of  these  events,  they  are  unique  from  one  place  to  another  and  it  is  a  challenge  to  accurately  estimate the demand or gaps for special events.    Barely a blip on the radar screen is the outdoor recreation category.  The Nantahala Outdoor  Center in Asheville, NC offers a variety of year round events while Richmond, VA hosts the  annual  James  River  Adventure  Games  which  draws  a  regional  audience  to  participate  in  a  variety of events that include Off‐road Triathlon, Trail Running, Mountain Biking, canoeing,  kayaking, Open Water Swim and Rowing.  This is a fast growing format that offers activities  for a wide demographic and encourages family participation.   7.7.4  OPPORTUNITIES AND STRATEGIES RECOMMENDED  The  N.C.  Department  of  Commerce’s  Sports  Development  Office  and  the  Charlotte  Sports  Commission are currently engaged in  promoting  the state and  the region by  vying to  host  events  and  attracting  visitors  to  the  region.    They  have,  thus  far,  been  successful  in  their  endeavors as seen by the current calendar of events that includes the Spring Regional Diving  USA meet and from 2008 Fencing Junior Olympics to AAU Sumer State Championships.     

165

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Industry experts who have worked with large cities interested in hosting events have stated  a  preference  in  the  short  term  towards  hosting  smaller  circuit  events  that  occur  on  an  annual basis over the larger one off single or multi‐sport event.  The rationale behind this is  that  the  circuit  events  allow  the  City  to  build  its  brand  and  image  while  constantly  positioning itself to host the larger one‐off events as well.    The  very  experience  of  hosting  circuit  events  can  be  leveraged  into  creating  a  stronger  position  for  the  City  /  County  to  bid  on  events.    Indianapolis  with  the  Indy  500,  the  Indianapolis Mini‐Marathon, an ATP Tour event and various swimming championships had  positioned itself exceptionally well and the Pan‐American Games, the World Police and Fire  Games  and  the  NCAA  Final  Four’s  only  serve  to  enhance  that  reputation.    There  are  numerous opportunities for the County and the Sports Commissions to work in tandem and  continue  to  build  relationships  with  various  sports  governing  bodies  to  host  events  in  the  region.    Also, to foster the organic growth of similar events the County could set up a ‘Sports Event  Incubator’  program  similar  to  the  model  employed  by  the  City  of  Richmond  (Richmond  Sports  Backers).    This  program  could  serve  as  a  support  system  and  breeding  ground  for  ideas and future events that have the potential to mature into larger regional events.    7.7.5  YOUTH FOCUS  In looking at the smaller events, the County would be well served with a strategic focus on  youth  sports.    The  potential  for  affiliated  spectators  i.e.  family  /  friends  travelling  for  the  event  is  usually  higher  for  youth  sports  events  as  compared  to  adult  sports.    The  demographic trends in the region point to a large segment of youth in the coming years and  this further helps make the case for a youth focus sports event strategy.  In addition, given  its unique location and scale of available resources, the County should seek to position itself  as  a  regional  destination  for  national  circuit  events  for  youth  sports  similar  to  what  it  has  done with the AAU Summer State Championships.    Based  on  the  findings  of  the  Capacity  Demand  Standards  Analysis,  Mecklenburg  County  is  currently well placed and meeting overall current field demands.  However, there are over  100  fields  that  are  subject  to  overuse  and  face  significant  wear  and  tear.    Thus,  the  study  recommends developing tournament quality athletic sports complexes with synthetic multi‐ purpose  field  capacity.    The  extended  usage  and  the  flexibility  that  these  fields  provide  would  provide  a  huge  boost  to  the  County’s  ability  to  host  additional  regional  sports  tournaments  for  a variety  of  sports  from  diamond  sports,  to  soccer,  lacrosse,  football  and  even field hockey.  Also from a facility standpoint, an indoor multi‐purpose fieldhouse would  be another asset type that would help to expand the ability of event that the County could  bid for and host.    The  current  amateur  sports  events  offerings  vary  from  the  Special  Olympics  to  Spring  Regional  Diving  USA  meet  and  from  2008  Fencing  Junior  Olympics  to  AAU  Sumer  State  Championships.  Suggested event types to focus on include:   • • • •  

Traditional Sports tournaments  Cheer and Dance events  Endurance Events  Adventure Sports Events   

166 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

Youth Sports tournaments have been expanding as well and there exist a variety of sports  governing  bodies  and  leagues  that  seek  venues  to  host  their  events  year  round.   Additionally,  a  strategy  that  the  County  could  pursue  is  to  tie  up  with  organizations  that  conduct  regional  and  nationwide  circuit  tournaments  like  Rocky  Mountain  Nationals  (Wrestling), Kick‐It 3v3 (Soccer) etc.  These circuit events essentially follow the model of the  Final  Four  tournament  with  regional  qualifiers  and  championship  games  in  fixed  destinations  every  year.      They  tend  to  offer  secure  participation,  a  regional  and  national  audience as well as opportunities to increase the popularity of various sports in the area.    Additionally,  with  additional  infrastructure  development  there  would  be  opportunities  for  structured  programming  around  these  tournaments.    In  addition,  there  are  multiple  opportunities to partner with various organizations to host sports specific camps on a year  round  basis  that  would  draw  in  a  regional  participation  as  well.    Some  good  models  to  evaluate could be the David Beckham soccer academy in Los Angeles and Nike Sports Camps  (U.S.  Sports  Camps)  that  are  that  are  organized  throughout  the  country.  The  trends  and  growth  patterns  as  well  as  the  gaps  in  sports  offerings  for  the  region  indicate  an  affinity  towards, soccer, volleyball, lacrosse, touch and tackle football, and softball events.    As  mentioned  earlier,  Cheer  and  Dance,  marching  and  baton  twirling  events  have  been  steadily  growing  and  there  is  a  good  opportunity  for  the  County  to  become  the  largest  regional destination for these events.  However, the lack of a fieldhouse could hamper the  County’s ability to offer this at the desired scale.  The County could be well served by further  exploring the possibility of a fieldhouse that could offer a variety of such events along with  other youth sports events like martial arts, wrestling, gymnastics, basketball, volleyball etc.   A  good  example  of  that  model  would  be  the  fieldhouse  at  Disney’s  Wide  World  of  Sports  Complex  in  Orlando,  FL.    Based  on  operational  experience,  it  appears  that  female  youth  sports  activities  including  gymnastics,  softball  and  volleyball  tend  to  draw  in  the  largest  affiliated spectator group of all sports.    Endurance events are among the fastest growing group of events and tend to have a larger  number of affiliated spectators that would be willing to travel to various events. In addition,  there are very low barriers to entry both from a participant and a host site standpoint.  Any  individual  willing  and  able  to  participate  could  do  so  with  limited  time  and  resources.   Similarly,  from  an  organization  standpoint,  a  system  requires  limited  infrastructure  investment and could  do so in multiple places.  Also, as events like the Chicago Marathon  and the Boston Marathon have shown, there is a huge impact on the branding and image of  the  City  as  a  result  of  hosting  the  large  scale  events.    The  Thunder  Road  Marathon  in  Charlotte, which serves as a qualifier for Boston Marathon, is a good starting point.  Adventure sports have been attracting an increasing ‘adrenalin‐seeking’ audience base over  the past few years.  In addition to the U.S Olympic Trials, events like an annual Charlotte /  Mecklenburg County adventure sports triathlon or an adventure sports festival similar to the  James  River  Adventure  Sports  Festival  could  seek  to  leverage  the  US  National  Whitewater  Center.  These would help generate additional revenue streams for the center’s operations  as well as generate additional economic impact for the region.   

 

167

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

  7.7.6  SUMMARY  Overall, the County is well placed to further its claim as the regional sports destination and  attracting  a  wider  audience  base  for  its  amateur  sports  events.    From  an  infrastructure  standpoint, tournament quality multipurpose sports complexes and a fieldhouse for indoor  traditional and non‐traditional sports events would assist the County.  Youth sports events,  including  tournaments  and  cheer  and  dance  events,  present  high  growth  opportunities.   Endurance  and  adventure  sports  events  too  exhibit  similar  patterns.    These  events  have  demonstrated high growth trends and operational experiences have shown that they tend  to be very successful in drawing regional and national audiences.  A focus on creating annual  circuit events versus attracting one‐off events would be recommended.  Overall, a greater  emphasis  on  building  additional  tournament  quality  infrastructure  and  targeting  youth  sports  events,  organized  internally  or  in  partnership  with  event  organizers,  would  be  the  ideal mix to promote the region and boost the influx of sports tourists visiting the Charlotte‐ Mecklenburg area.     

 

 

168 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  CHAPTER EIGHT  ‐ COMPREHENSIVE MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT   8.1 VISION   The following vision presents how the Department desires to be viewed in the future:   “People  who  participate  in  recreation  in  Mecklenburg  County  will  have  a  system  of  parks,  greenways, and open spaces located throughout the County that will provide more parkland  per  capita  than  the  national  average,  will  connect  neighborhoods,  satisfy  public  recreation  needs, and will protect environmentally sensitive areas.”  8.2   MISSION  The following mission presents how the Department desires to be viewed in the future:  “To enrich the lives of our citizens through the stewardship of the County’s natural resources  and  ensure  efficient  and  responsive  quality  leisure  opportunities,  experiences  and  partnerships.”  8.2.1  COMMUNITY VISION FOR LAND  “Our Vision is to provide neighborhood park, community parks and regional parks across the  County  that  provides  a  balance  of  park  related  experiences  for  people  of  all  ages.  The  County  will  continue  to  acquire  additional  park  and  open  space  to  protect  the  regions  biodiversity  and  natural  heritage  through  the  promotion  of  open  space,  preservation,  conserving  natural  communities,  fostering  awareness  and  stewardship  through  environmental education and outdoor recreation.”  8.2.1.1 GOAL  To  protect  the  biodiversity  and  natural  heritage  of  each  Mecklenburg  County  Nature  Preserve for its intrinsic value, the health of our environment, and the long‐term benefit of  the  public.    To  acquire  additional  neighborhood  and  community  park  land  in  underserved  areas of the County to promote active and passive recreation pursuits for people of all ages.  Strategies  •



• • •

 

Implement  the  new  park  classifications  to  support  school  parks  and  community  parks  with  design  standards  and  user  outcomes  for  appropriate  recreation  opportunities both passive and active  Acquire  park  and  open  space  property  in  underserved  areas  of  the  County  to  support the appropriate types of parks that are needed based on 13 acres per 1000  population for neighborhood, community and regional parks  Acquire, or protect sensitive natural areas within the County to preserve the natural  communities in perpetuity  Acquire greenway corridors to support water quality and protect flood plain habitat  opportunities for public access via biking, and walking trails  To collect and utilize the best available scientific data to provide a sound basis for  making management decisions  169

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  







• •

Implement  the  Nature  Preserves  policy  recommendations  as  it  applies  to  appropriate uses for natural areas and capacity demand by users with a no net loss  of species  Incorporate five new Nature Preserves designation to include: Stevens Creek Nature  Preserve,  Berryhill  Nature  Preserve,  Oehler  Nature  Preserve,  Gateway  Nature  Preserve and Community Park and Davis Farm Nature Preserve  Acquire  future  properties  for  Nature  Preserves  that  has  been  identified  in  the  Greenprinting process that identified sixty properties and 3,758 acres in the Tiered 1  and 28 properties in the Tiered 2 category for a total of 2,591 acres for a total of 6,  349 acres of potential preserve properties  Develop five new nature centers over the next 10 years to serve the environmental  education needs of the community in underserved areas of the County  Coordinate  with  the  Charlotte  Mecklenburg  School  District  land  acquisition  strategies  to  support  school  parks  and  recreation  facilities  in  developing  neighborhoods 

8.2.2  COMMUNITY VISION FOR GREENWAYS  “Develop a greenway corridor system that supports the drainage of water for water quality  and flood control purposes while creating trails along these corridors for transportation and  recreation purposes for walking, bicycling, running and wellness related activities for people  of all ages.”  8.2.2.1   GOAL   Continue the expansion of the greenway rail system along practical trail corridors that will  serve County residents and fulfill their need for additional walking and biking trails.  Strategies  • • • • • • •

• •

 

Expand the trail by 42.8 miles of trails in 5 years and 61.9 miles of trails in 10 years  for a total of129 miles on the ground by 2018  Identify and prioritize acquisition efforts for the 10 year trail development plan  Improve the connectivity to the existing and proposed greenway trail system  Incorporate the Greenway corridor system into the Long Range Transportation Plan  To identify and designate official routes of the Carolina Thread Trail  Better facilitate multi‐agency approach to trail development  To explore policies and programs so that greenway corridors may better function as  a  conservation  an  enhancement  tool  for  floodplain  and  riparian  plant  and  wildlife  habitat  Develop loop corridors within the trail system to connect to major attractions and to  support wellness and fitness components in neighborhood and community parks  Hold  a  policy  summit  with  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  Planning  Departments  and  surrounding towns planning departments to consider the adoption of uniform open  space greenways, trails and parks standards 

 

170 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

8.2.3  COMMUNITY VISION FOR RECREATION FACILITIES  “Develop appropriate recreation facilities and amenities in underserved areas of the County  in  partnership  with  other  service  providers  to  maximize  the  County’s  resources  and  meet  the unmet recreation facility and amenity needs of residents.”  8.2.3.1   GOAL  To  meet  the  Facility  Standards  by  developing,  individually  and  in  partnership,  a  balanced  offering  of  recreation  facilities  and  amenities  that  adequately  meets  the  needs  of  their  target population.  Strategies  • • •

• •

• •

Seek  to  meet  the  facility  standards  for  recreation  centers  and  aquatic  facilities  by  the end of 2018  Develop  large  sports  complexes  in  existing  community parks or regional parks  Continue  current  partnerships  and  incubate  new  partnerships  for  athletic  field  development  and  establish  a  partnership  policy  for  each  entity  within  the  County  to  provide  increased  asset  capabilities  and  solidify  working  relationships  for  the future  Establish  a  priority  usage  policy  based  on  entity  participation  Develop  sports  courts  complexes  for  tennis  and  gyms  in  the  County  to  meet  the  needs  of  youth  and adults but also for sports tourism purposes  Develop    art  related  facilities  within  recreation  centers as outlined in the ASC master plan approved in January of 2004  Partner with Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools on recreation center and park amenity  components  within  elementary  and  middle  school  sites  in  areas  that  are  missing  recreation centers and amenities 

8.2.4  COMMUNITY VISION FOR RECREATION PROGRAMS  “Develop  and  expand  recreation  programs  as  outlined  in  the  Master  Plan  to  increase  awareness  and  use  by  residents  of  the  County  and  to  create  more  opportunities  to  serve  people of all ages in a variety of recreation pursuits.”  8.2.4.1   GOAL  Offer  core  programs  outlined  in  the  program  plan  with  high  cost  recovery  levels,  utilize  training  and  performance  measures  to  create  consistency  and  employ  partners  and  volunteers  to  support  program  operations  and  build  advocacy  for  the  County  recreation  program brand. 

 

171

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department  

Strategies  •

• • •

• • • • • •

Develop  and  expand  core  recreation  services  across  the  County  in  aquatics,  environmental  education,  adventure  sports,  therapeutic  recreation,  athletics,  community‐wide  special  events,  active  adults  and  seniors  over  65+,  fitness  and  wellness, facility rentals and new core programs in summer camps, after school and  cultural arts  Evaluate staffing needs to meet core program needs based on the hours required to  produce the programs desired and missing in the County  Develop consistent program standards and program development process used for  all core programs offered to provide consistency in delivery of services    Implement the Sports Tourism Plan as it applies to developing traditional and non‐ traditional events in the County to promote the region and create economic impact  for the County  Develop  a  pricing  policy  based  on  the  true  cost  of  services  tied  to  the  level  of  exclusivity a user receives over a general taxpayer and based on ability to pay  Develop  a  marketing  strategy  for  recreation  and  program  services  to  increase  the  level of participation by the community from 19% to 30% over the next five years  Develop partnership agreements with measurable outcomes for all special interest  groups involved with the County  Develop  program  partnership  agreements  with  the  local  towns  to  maximize  each  other’s resources and meet the community’s unmet need  Develop program policies on public/public partnerships, public/private partnerships  and public/not‐for profit partnerships  Develop a specific branding program for program services across the County 

8.2.5  COMMUNITY VISION FOR OPERATIONS AND FINANCING  “Our  vision  is  to  continue  to  manage  all  parks,  facilities  and  programs  to  highest  level  of  productivity and efficiency as possible to meet the needs of the residents of the County.”  8.2.5.1   GOAL  Implement  a  financing  strategy  that  incorporates  all  available  resources  including  a  voter  approved bond levy for implementing the recommendations in the Master Plan.  Strategies  • •

• •

 

Implement  the  capital  improvement  program  to  repair  and  upgrade  parks  and  recreation facilities to maximize their useful life  Evaluate  the  opportunity  to  use  a  dedicated  Division  of  Park  Officers  within  the  Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department. in County Parks to eliminate  crime and  vandalism in parks  Seek  corporate  support  for  establishing  destination  facilities  such  as  a  zoo,  or  aquarium with appropriate feasibility studies  Train staff on the Greenprinting process and update all maps created in the Master  Plan every two years 

 

172 

Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan 

  8.3 CONCLUSION  The Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation Department is a tremendous resource to the  community for people of all ages and interest.  The Department is highly respected by the  community  and  delivers  a  well‐managed  park  and  recreation  system  to  the  taxpayers  of  Mecklenburg  County.    The  Department’s  last  Master  Plan  was  completed  in  1992  and  the  Department  now  is  trying  to  catch  up  to  the  tremendous  growth  the  County  has  experienced  and  address  the  needs  of  this  growth  with  updated  levels  of  parks,  nature  preserves  and  recreation  facilities  to  serve  a  growing  and  prosperous  community.    The  Master  Plan  outlines  the  needs  clearly  as  it  applies  to  park  land  needs,  nature  preserve  needs, recreation facility needs, trail needs, nature center needs and other amenity needs.    The challenges are grand in terms of the financing cost to support these needs.  The County  is expected to reach build‐out by 2025, which is a short amount of time to support the land  acquisition  efforts  required  to  save  the  most  sensitive  properties  that  still  exist  in  the  County,  as  well  as  to  acquire  land  in  underserved  areas  for  neighborhood  and  community  parks.    Parks  provide  a  resource  that  will  be  saved  in  perpetuity  and  will  provide  generations  a  place to enjoy the outdoors, develop skills, and enjoy the social and wellness benefits that  parks and recreation services provides to the community.  To achieve the recommendations  outlined in the Master Plan will take strong leadership and strong support of the taxpayers  of  the  County.    The  parks  and  recreation  system  fully‐developed  will  provide  residents  an  incredible  environment  to  work  live  and  play,  as  well  as  provide  economic  benefits  for  homeowners and businesses.  Most importantly it will provide the quality of life resident’s  desire.  Let the implementation begin!   

 

173

Presented by

In associaton with

5841 Brookshire Blvd. • Charlotte NC 28216 • parkandrec.com Printed on 100% recyled paper

Loading...

Mecklenburg County Park & Recreation Master Plan 2008

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation 10 YEAR MASTER PLAN The Natural Place ToBe...   Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan  Acknowled...

8MB Sizes 3 Downloads 16 Views

Recommend Documents

Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation 2016 Track and Field
May 7, 2016 - Track Meets. ▫ Components of a Workout. • The Warm-up. • Long Jump. • Sprinting. • Throwing (Sof

Surface Water - Mecklenburg County
Surface Water 1987. Recommendations/2007 Results. By Rusty Rozzelle, Program Manager, Mecklenburg County Water Quality.

Benefits Brochure - Mecklenburg County
other types of claims, visit coloniallife.com for additional information. What is Medical Bridge and how does it work? T

Mecklenburg County Employee Benefits - services
other types of claims, visit coloniallife.com for additional information. What is Medical Bridge and how does it work? T

Township Master Plan - Leelanau County
During the Great Depression of the 1930's many properties, especially farms in poor soil areas, reverted to ... The aver

Economic Outlook - Mecklenburg County
8. Economic Outlook. Long Range Financial Planning. M e c k l e n b u r g C o u n t y N C . g o v. Economic Forecast –

TPA 2008 Master Plan - Port Tampa Bay
INTRODUCTION AND 2000 MASTER PLAN REVIEW . ...... Exhibit I-10. TPA Historical Capital Expenditures. $13.8. $33.2. $38.7

N.C. Food Code Changes - Mecklenburg County
The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services has adopted significant changes to North Carolina's food code that will

mecklenburg county human resources policy & procedures
to the Mecklenburg County Human Resources Director, or designee, provided that all necessary agreements .... For the pur

January 28, 2014 - Foothills Park & Recreation District
Jan 28, 2014 - MOTION: Director Bradley moved that the Foothills Board of Directors approve the January .... by departme