Louisiana Tech University - ULS NEWS ARTICLES

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12/24/2017

Today's News University of Louisiana System 13 2017-08-30 Ruston

GSU, TECH HELP FLOOD-EFFECTED STUDENTS Grambling State and Louisiana Tech Universities have begun preparations for students affected by Hurricane Harvey and continue to wait as the tropical storm makes it way into Louisiana. GSU president Rick Gallot said in a prepared statement today the university continues to watch the Harvey-related flooding that has affected a large number of students from the Houston, Texas, and Lake Charles area.

13 2017-08-17 Ruston

THE HAPPENING: ALUMNI EVENT SET FOR THURSDAY More than 1,000 Louisiana Tech University alumni and supporters, shown here, packed the Monroe Civic Center for The Happening 2016 — Blue Bayou. 13 2017-06-29 Monroe

LA Tech Master of Arts in Teaching WEST MONROE, La - Louisiana Tech University, College of Education, is committed to the personal and professional development of both current students and other professionals. The Alternative Certification program at Louisiana Tech University offers a pathway to teacher certification with a Master of Arts in Teaching degree. This program is designed for persons who already have obtained a bachelors degree in a non-teaching area of study and who are now ready to teach in a PK-12 school. Watch the video for more details. You can also call 257-2849.

13 2017-06-29 Ruston

LOWEST FEE INCREASE IN A DECADE APPROVED Louisiana Tech University students will see a $136 increase in student fees per academic quarter while Grambling State University students will not after the University of Louisiana System executive committee special meeting recently approved fee changes for its nine universities.

13 2017-05-22 Ruston

Governor Edwards speaks at La Tech's graduation RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - 973 graduated on Saturday, which is the largest graduating class at Louisiana Tech and a special guest speaker Gov. John Bel Edwards encouraged them in their future life endeavors. "I'm excited today a 100,000 graduates now in the history of Tech," says Edwards. Despite cuts to the TOPS program the governor says higher education is moving into a better place. "This year we are currently in, we actually stabilized the state's support for higher education and as a result the tuition increases across the state were the lowest they've been in a decade." When it comes to the state budget, Edwards says there's still a steep hill to climb, but he already has his eyes set on next year's fiscal cliff. "There is no other fiscal session scheduled between now and then so in all likelihood unless we can get some big work done in the next three weeks we will have another special session to bring the legislature back to address the fiscal cliff," says Edwards. Right now it sits at $1.3 billion, which starts June 30th of 2018.

"1.3 billion dollars is so big in the grand scheme of things we don't protect education, higher education, k-12 education, health care we don't protect anything with a cliff that big unless we resolve the problem," says Edwards. Another big issue facing the state is the removal of four confederate monuments that were taken down in New Orleans.. "Now that the monuments are down that's what the city of New Orleans acting through the mayor and city council opted to do so now that it is done I hope we look forward and unify cause we have a lot of work to do here in Louisiana." Despite the problems in the state, the governor encouraged all the graduates to stay in Louisiana. 13 2017-05-05 Ruston

FORMER TECH ATHLETE HELPS START LOCAL HEALTHY KIDS RUNNING TO PROMOTE HEALTHY LIVING Lincoln Parish children ages 2 through middle school have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of running coordinated by a former Louisiana Tech University track and field athlete. The nonprofit Healthy Kids Running series is currently underway and local children can sign up to partake in the remaining three sessions of the program to learn, have fun and stay healthy. Sophia Jackson, a former Tech track athlete and current paraprofessional at Glen View Elementary, said Healthy Kids Running teaches local children how to run over a five-week period. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-05-02 Monroe

"Rumors" Showing at Louisiana Tech this Week! West Monroe, LA - Rumor has it, the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre is opening their fourth and final production of Rumors that will leave their audiences laughing out loud and wanting more of this dinner party gone wrong! This famous farce will be showing May 2-6, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. and May 7, 2017 at 2 p.m. in Stone Theatre, located in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts. Don’t miss your chance to see this door-slamming, fast paced comedy written by America’s greatest comedic playwright, Neil Simon where there is a secret behind every slamming door. Be aware the show has adult language. Ticket prices for the shows are as follows: $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old, and $15 seniors 65 years old and up. For group rates, please contact the box office, located in the Lobby of Stone Theatre, at 318-257-3942. Their hours are Monday – Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. Neil Simon's hilarious farce, Rumors, "has nothing on its mind except making the audience laugh," according to Frank Rich's review in the New York Times of the original Broadway production in 1988. The silliness revolves around a dinner party at the home of the Deputy Mayor of New York, who is conspicuously absent from his own party! His lawyer, accountant, psychiatrist, their wives, and an assortment of other guests spend the evening trying to determine why he is absent and how that might affect each of their careers. Filled with confusion and miscommunication, Rumors is a farcical masterpiece from America's greatest comedic playwright. For more information on the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, please visit them at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com , “like” thier Facebook page: facebook.com/latechtheatre, or follow them on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.

13 2017-04-28 Monroe

Louisiana Tech history students honored for research Two Louisiana Tech University graduate students were honored for their research efforts when the North Louisiana Historical Association held its annual spring banquet in Natchitoches. Paula J. Rowe, of Bossier City, took first place in the graduate division of the association’s annual W. Darrell Overdyke competition for the best research paper on the history of North Louisiana. Rowe’s paper was titled “Desegregation of C. E. Byrd High School, 1965-1977.” Receiving third place in the Overdyke competition was graduate student Nolen Leach, of Jonesboro, whose paper focused on “The Desegregation of Schools in Jackson Parish, Louisiana, 1969-2016.” Rowe and Leach researched and wrote their papers in Dr. Stephen Webre’s graduate seminar on historical research and writing. In addition to a cash prize, winning papers are published in the association’s journal, North Louisiana History. The Overdyke Student Awards are made in memory of the late Dr. W. Darrell Overdyke (1907-1973), who taught history at Centenary College for more than 40 years. They are made possible through the generosity of the late Martha Walker Overdyke and her brother, E. Laurence Walker of Shreveport. 13 2017-04-26 Ruston

TECH COES NAMES OUTSTANDING STUDENTS, FACULTY Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science recently announced its 2017 Outstanding Students and Faculty. Each Spring Quarter, COES faculty vote to recognize juniors and seniors who demonstrate excellence in the classroom and participate in service through student organizations. Graduating seniors vote on the two faculty members who most influenced their educations at Louisiana Tech. The results are announced and awards are presented at Spring Release, the annual crawfish boil and culmination of Engineering and Science Week. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-04-25 Monroe

10 Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science names outstanding students, faculty Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science (COES) has announced its 2017 Outstanding students and faculty. Each Spring Quarter, COES faculty vote to recognize juniors and seniors who demonstrate excellence in the classroom and participate in service through student organizations. Graduating seniors vote on the two faculty members who most influenced their educations at Louisiana Tech. The results are announced and awards are presented at Spring Release, the annual craw-fish boil and culmination of Engineering and Science Week. The 2017 Outstanding Juniors are as follows: Lucia House (electrical engineering and mathematics), Joshua Joffrion (electrical engineering and physics), Samuel Johnson (chemical engineering), William Byerley (chemical engineering), Haley Dishman (mechanical engineering), Caroline Fontenot (cyber engineering), Christopher Kotar (mechanical engineering), Alex Pledger (mechanical engineering) and Matthew Upshaw (civil engineering). The 2017 Outstanding Seniors are as follows: Paige Boudreaux (industrial engineering), Beverly Case (mechanical engineering), Madeline Collins (mathematics and mechanical engineering), Danielle Eschete (mechanical engineering), Sari Freeman (industrial engineering), Blake Gautreaux (chemical engineering), John Herren (mechanical engineering), John Kraft IV (construction engineering technology), Gabriella Perez (electrical engineering), Ethan Sullivan (nanosystems engineering), Caylin VanHook (electrical engineering and physics), Luke Villermin (mechanical engineering), Mary Voisin (civil engineering) and Austin Ward (chemical engineering). “These outstanding juniors and seniors perform well academically, but their efforts do not stop there,” College Director of Enrollment Management and Employer Relations, Allie De Leo said. “These students are very involved around campus, within our College, and in the community. We, as a College, are very proud of these outstanding students and their accomplishments.” The 2017 Outstanding Faculty are Dr. Arden Moore (assistant professor of mechanical engineering and nano-systems engineering) and Dr. Timothy Reeves (lecturer of mechanical engineering). 13 2017-04-25 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Division of Nursing earns state award for best undergraduate program Louisiana Tech University’s Division of Nursing has been tabbed as the state’s top undergraduate degree program. The award was presented during the 16th Annual Nightingale Awards Gala honoring excellence in nursing, held on April 1 at the at L’Auberge Hotel in Baton Rouge. Sponsored by the Louisiana Nurses Foundation and Louisiana State Nurses Association (LSNA), the gala saw Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing honored as the Nursing School of the Year for Undergraduate Degree Programs. The award winner was determined by a panel of judges composed of nursing leaders from nine states. Nominations addressed the program’s commitment to selecting, retaining and educating future nurses, innovation in nursing education, National Council Licensure Examination first-time pass rates for the past two years, and faculty and student involvement in their professional organizations. “It is such an honor to receive this recognition at the state level,” said Donna Hood, director of Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing. “I am so proud of the excellent work of our faculty and students who go above and beyond what is required. This ongoing effort in retention, innovation and involvement prepares excellent nurses who are making a difference in healthcare throughout our region and even around the world.” Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing was represented by Hood; Nancy Darland, professor; Norlyn Hyde, instructor and also LSNA President; and current student Caleb Faul, President of Louisiana Association of Student Nurses. Darland was the recipient of the award for Outstanding Community Achievement by a Registered Nurse. “Nancy Darland does a phenomenal job taking her passion for nursing care of women and children and linking it with needs across the state,” Hood said. “Whether it is through her work with March of Dimes promoting healthy babies or through support of St. Jude's work addressing childhood cancer, Mrs. Darland is a true champion. She continues to devote additional time and effort in her work with professional nursing organizations and sets an amazing example for our students.” Louisiana Tech nursing alum Deborah Spann, RN-BC, CEN Tri-Regional Coordinator for Louisiana Emergency Response Network, received the award for Registered Nurse of the Year at the gala. “For a Louisiana Tech nursing alum to be selected as the Registered Nurse of the Year out of 33,000-plus registered nurses in the state of Louisiana is so exciting,” Hood said. “Deb Spann is an excellent example of the caliber of nurses who graduate from our program. She demonstrates excellence as a lifelong learner and is a passionate nurse leader. Her amazing work with emergency nurses across the state impacts the care of us all.” 13 2017-04-20 Ruston

TECH ASCE TEAMS WIN BIG AT DEEP SOUTH CONFERENCE The Louisiana Tech University American Society of Civil Engineers Steel Bridge and Concrete Canoe teams won first and second place, respectively, at the 2017 ASCE Deep South Conference held recently in Memphis, Tennessee. Competing against 10 other teams from universities around the region, the Steel Bridge team won first place in the “Display,” “Weight” and “Efficiency” categories, third place in the “Speed,” “Stiffness” and “Economy” categories, and first place overall. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-04-18 Ruston

› home › TECH DIVISION OF NURSING EARNS STATE AWARD FOR BEST PROGRAM Louisiana Tech University’s Division of Nursing has been tabbed as the state’s top undergraduate degree program. The award was presented during the 16th Annual Nightingale Awards Gala honoring excellence in nursing, held earlier this month at the at L’Auberge Hotel in Baton Rouge. Sponsored by the Louisiana Nurses Foundation and Louisiana State Nurses Association, the gala saw Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing honored as the Nursing School of the Year for Undergraduate Degree Programs. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-04-17 Monroe

Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science holds Commitment Day 2017 Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science (COES) held its inaugural Commitment Day signing event Tuesday, with more than 170 top-tier high school students from across the south committing to pursue their academic careers in engineering and science at Louisiana Tech. Applicants who achieved qualifying scores on the ACT and their families were invited to attend a luncheon event where they could meet with Louisiana Tech faculty and leaders including President Les Guice, COES Dean Hisham Hegab and COES Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies Heath Tims. “It was thrilling to see all of the new engineering and science commitments on campus, and getting engaged with our faculty and staff,” Guice said. “I commend Dean Hegab and Dr. Tims for their leadership in developing this program to celebrate those new students who are committed to come to Tech.” During the event, the invited students and their families received Louisiana Tech memorabilia and signed certificates of commitment. They were also treated to a performance by the members of the Louisiana Tech Band of Pride who are currently pursuing engineering and science degrees. After the Commitment Day luncheon, some of the students took placement exams. “It was a fun event,” Tims said. “It served as an opportunity for these students to formally share their commitment to being a part of our program. It was also an exciting time for the staff and faculty at Louisiana Tech to see some of the best and brightest that this region has to offer sign with us.” “We are very excited to host this new event to celebrate with outstanding students that will be joining our programs in engineering and science this fall,” Hegab added. “The turnout was tremendous, and it was great to welcome them into the Tech Family.” 13 2017-04-13 Ruston

LA Tech's elementary education program ranks fourth in the country Louisiana Tech University’s elementary education program ranks fourth in the nation and first in the state, according to College Choice. College of Education Dean, Dr. Don Schillinger says Tech students complete a full year of student teaching. He says their students are placed in schools in August and stay with a teaching mentor until graduation day. “So they basically have a full year of teaching before graduation, and we’re seeing that be a pretty positive impact on teacher effectiveness and student test scores and student achievement,” Schillinger said. Schillinger says they are proud of this ranking and if they are able to produce better teachers it will have a lasting impression on elementary education in this state. “I think we’re going to see that we can retain them longer and increase the prestige of the teaching profession as we add rigor, and as our student achievement goes up, we’re starting to see the result of that,” Schillinger said. Schillinger is hopeful this ranking will attract more students, even from other states, to LA Tech. He says they’re also trying to recruit future teachers from rural areas and get them to return home, rather than staying in larger urban areas. “We’re thinking that might be the lever for change, the initiative, the catalyst that maybe starts changing and improving schools in our rural areas that maybe don’t get the support they need,” Schillinger said.

13 2017-04-11 Baton Rouge

LA Tech, Holtz Agree to Contract Extension RUSTON - Louisiana Tech University and head football coach Skip Holtz have agreed in principle to a five-year, $3.5 million contract extension, according to Director of Athletics Tommy McClelland. The new long-term contract extension is pending the approval from the University of Louisiana System's Board of Supervisors. Holtz has elevated the Bulldog football program to new heights in the Football Bowl Subdivision with multiple appearances in the Conference USA title game and three straight bowl victories. Tech is one of only four FBS teams to record 9 or more wins and a bowl game victory for three straight seasons, joining reigning national champion Clemson, Wisconsin and Utah. "The level of excitement for Louisiana Tech football is at an all-time high," said McClelland. "Getting a new contract done was critical to maintaining this momentum as we strive to reach even newer heights on the field. Skip Holtz is at the center of this movement. He and his staff have done such a tremendous job over the past four years, and we look forward to what the future holds." Since his arrival on campus four years ago, Holtz has compiled an overall mark of 31-22 while leading the Bulldogs to three straight 9-win seasons and three consecutive bowl victories, both program firsts since Tech moved to the Football Bowl Subdivision in 1989. Tech has won 19 of its last 24 Conference USA games over the last three years, tied with WKU for the best mark in the league during that time frame. "Skip's impact on and contributions to our football program have been exceptional," said Tech President Les Guice. "His leadership and mentorship of our student-athletes, and the class with which he has represented our university is a source of pride for all of our fans and friends. I am excited to know that he and his family will remain a part of the Tech Family for years to come."

This past year, Holtz earned Conference USA Coach of the Year honors after guiding the Bulldogs to a 9-5 overall record, a Conference USA West Division title and a 45-42 victory over No. 25 Navy in the Lockheed Armed Forces Bowl in Ft. Worth. It marked Tech's first win over a Top 25 team since the 2005 season. "I want to thank Dr. Guice and Tommy McClelland for their commitment to me and their confidence in our staff and what we are building at Louisiana Tech," said Holtz. "I am excited to get the deal done and know that I will be a part of the Louisiana Tech family and this program moving forward. I think this agreement displays the University's commitment to us and is a stamp of approval for the way we are building this academically, athletically and socially. The Ruston community and the Louisiana Tech fan base have been tremendous in their support of my family, our staff and this program." In 2015, Holtz led the Bulldogs to an 8-4 overall record and 6-2 mark in Conference USA, as the Bulldogs defeated Arkansas State in the R&L Carriers New Orleans Bowl. Holtz led LA Tech to its first ever appearance in the Conference USA title game in 2014 after Tech posted a 9-5 record and won the West Division. Tech posted a five-win improvement from the previous season and defeated Illinois 35-18 in the Zaxby's Heart of Dallas Bowl at Cotton Bowl Stadium. Tech ranked fourth nationally in scoring offense and led the country in points off of turnovers. For complete coverage of Bulldog Football, please follow Louisiana Tech on social media at @LATechFB (Twitter), /LATechFootball (Facebook) and @LATechFB (Instagram) or visit the official home of Louisiana Tech Athletics at LATechSports.com. 13 2017-04-10 Monroe

Louisiana Tech professional aviation celebrates 50 years with AVFEST 2017 RUSTON, La. (Press Release) – Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation is celebrating its 50th anniversary with its annual Aviation Festival (AVFEST) weekend for aviation students, staff, faculty, alumni and friends. AVFEST 2017 will take place April 28-29 on the Louisiana Tech campus and will begin with an alumni reception hosted by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and a jambalaya cook-off social at the Argent Pavilion. Weekend activities continue with an alumni “State of the Aviation Industry” presentation, hamburger lunch at the Ruston Regional Airport, and various other events and committee meetings. “The Professional Aviation Department continues to receive a tremendous amount of positive feedback and support from alumni, students and their families,” said Jordan Lyons, the Louis W. Waller Endowed Professor and head of the professional aviation department at Louisiana Tech. “The annual weekend tradition will continue to serve a valuable role in maintaining the family bond within this collegiate aviation group.”

AVFEST 2017 will conclude with a formal scholarship banquet in the Davison Athletics Complex. The awards presented at the banquet include academic scholarships and recognition of the Professional Aviation and Aviation Management Student of the Year, Flight Instructor of the Year and several others. The public is cordially invited to take part in this exciting celebration of professional aviation at Louisiana Tech. For more information on AVFEST or to purchase tickets for the Awards Banquet, visit www.latech.edu/aviation. Tickets are $35 each and must be purchased by April 20. All proceeds go to supporting the professional aviation program and its students. Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation has established itself as a high-quality degree program with a national reputation for outstanding graduates. The Department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International. It maintains the highest academic standards and keeps abreast of the latest in technologies and the needs of the aviation industry.

13 2017-04-10 Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH SCHOOL OF DESIGN PROVES ‘HOPE FLOATS’ Groundbreaking ceremonies will be held at 4 p.m, Monday for the Pisces Bridge for the Medcamps of Louisiana at Camp Alabama in in Sibley. The facility is located at 2090 Hwy. 145. The bridge project is a partnership between Medcamps of Louisiana and the Louisiana Tech School of Design. For several years, students in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design’s Architecture 335 class have collaborated with various organizations in Lincoln Parish to design and build structures ranging from homes for Habitat for Humanity to park pavilions around Ruston.

13 2017-04-07 Monroe

Louisiana Tech professional aviation celebrates 50 years with AVFEST 2017 Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation is celebrating its 50th anniversary with its annual Aviation Festival (AVFEST) weekend for aviation students, staff, faculty, alumni and friends. AVFEST 2017 will take place April 28-29 on the Louisiana Tech campus and will begin with an alumni reception hosted by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and a jambalaya cook-off social at the Argent Pavilion. Weekend activities continue with an alumni “State of the Aviation Industry” presentation, hamburger lunch at the Ruston Regional Airport, and various other events and committee meetings. “The Professional Aviation Department continues to receive a tremendous amount of positive feedback and support from alumni, students and their families,” said Jordan Lyons, the Louis W. Waller Endowed Professor and head of the professional aviation department at Louisiana Tech. “The annual weekend tradition will continue to serve a valuable role in maintaining the family bond within this collegiate aviation group.” AVFEST 2017 will conclude with a formal scholarship banquet in the Davison Athletics Complex. The awards presented at the banquet include academic scholarships and recognition of the Professional Aviation and Aviation Management Student of the Year, Flight Instructor of the Year and several others. The public is cordially invited to take part in this exciting celebration of professional aviation at Louisiana Tech. For more information on AVFEST or to purchase tickets for the Awards Banquet, visit www.latech.edu/aviation. Tickets are $35 each and must be purchased by April 20. All proceeds go to supporting the professional aviation program and its students. Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation has established itself as a high-quality degree program with a national reputation for outstanding graduates. The Department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International. It maintains the highest academic standards and keeps abreast of the latest in technologies and the needs of the aviation industry. 13 2017-04-07 Monroe

Tech hosts national teacher training conference More than 200 education trainers from around the United States and Canada came to Louisiana Tech University this week for the National Field Experience Conference. Higher education leaders learn how to tailor teacher candidate's experience as student teachers to best serve the candidates and the communities, said Teresa Washut Heck, one of the program presenters. Training new teachers: Clinical residency aims to change teacher training in Louisiana | Schools adopt teacher training program | La. Tech showcases innovative clinical residency program Heck helped develop the St. Cloud State University Co-Teaching Model, which is used to train new teachers throughout the nation. This was her first time attending the conference, and she said she learned a lot from other participants because they're all in the field, learning how to adapt to their communities and meet increasingly difficult accreditation standards while universities are working with fewer employees. Libby Knepper-Muller designed the program for the event. She said it's all about interactive collaboration. Teresa Heck gives a prestionation on the St. Cloud Teresa Heck gives a prestionation on the St. Cloud State University Co-Teaching Model on Tuesday at the National Field Experience Conference pre-conference. (Photo: Courtesy of Amy Massey Vessel) Amy Massey Vessel, director of the Clinical Residency Center, said the TEAM model used by Louisiana Tech was highlighted as part of the conference. Vessel said the clinical residency plan at Tech incorporates elements of the St. Cloud model. It puts student teachers in the classroom for a full year. Presenters from Sallie Humble Elementary in Monroe included mentor Shannon Embanat, and Louisiana Tech Sallie Humble Clinical residents, Adriane Meggs, April Palmer and Kerrigan Pettis. Vessel said Embanat shared stories about seeing results in her student firsthand the benefits of having a resident in her room all year. Educators from accross the country met at Louisinana Educators from accross the country met at Louisinana Tech University this week for the National Field Experience Conference. (Photo: Courtesy of Amy Massey Vessel) Heck, who led several workshops, said Louisiana residents should be proud of what the education program at Tech is accomplishing. Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP. 13 2017-04-07 Ruston

TECH CONCLUDES RESEARCH LECTURE SERIES WITH NEUROLOGIST John Huguenard, professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford University and member of Stanford’s Center for Mind, Brain and Computation, will visit Louisiana Tech University on Monday for the final installment of the 201617 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series. Huguenard will discuss his research in a presentation, titled “Real Time Control of Seizures in Animal Models of Epilepsy,” at 3:30 p.m. Monday in the auditorium of University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The presentation is free and open to the public. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-04-04 Ruston

JOHNNY JAM BENEFITS TECH MUSIC The 18th annual John Simoneaux Memorial Jam will start at 2 p.m. Saturday at Sundown Tavern. The annual event hosts local and regional musicians to benefit the Louisiana Tech University Band of Pride. Pictured is the local band J.T. and Dan playing at last year’s Johnny Jam. 13 2017-03-31 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech classes cancelled due to power outage Ruston, La. - A power outage that covers the campus of Louisiana Tech has forced classes to be canceled. University officials say power to basic housing and food services are currently being restored. However, classes and academic activities on the main campus have been canceled today but will resume Friday. 13 2017-03-30 Monroe

Community Coffee chairman kicks off College of Business series at Louisiana Tech Matt Saurage will be featured speaker for 2nd Annual “Inside the C-Suite Series” The College of Business at Louisiana Tech University welcomes Matt Saurage, chairman of the board for Community Coffee, who will kick-off the 2nd Annual “Inside the C-Suite: A Series of Critical Conversations with CEOs, CIOs, CFOs and Key Executives,” at 6 p.m. April 12 in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) of the College of Business. “The Series strives to stimulate insightful conversation on current business issues by providing a platform for C-level executives to discuss the issues that keep them awake at night,” said Dr. Christopher Martin, dean of the College of Business at Louisiana Tech. “It is particularly exciting to me that all of the leaders who participate in this series are our alumni”. The conversations in the Inside the C-Suite Series cut across a variety of themes critical to business strategy including globalization, innovation, ethics and technology. Along with Saurage, future speakers will include: India Carroll, chief executive officer for Green Clinic (April 19, 6-7 p.m.), Robert LaCaze, executive vice president for Bayer Pharmaceuticals (April 27, 4-5 p.m.), and John Madden, vice president and owner of Madden Contracting Company, Inc. (May 2, 4-5 p.m.) The Inside the C-Suite Series presentations take place in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) of the College of Business and are open to Louisiana Tech University students, faculty and the general public. Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace. For more information on the Inside the C-Suite Series, please contact Mary Susan Britt, director of development for the College of Business, at [email protected] or 318-257-3741. For information on Louisiana Tech’s College of Business, please visit www.business.latech.edu or connect on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LATechBusiness, Twitter at @LATechBUSN and Instagram at @LATechBusiness. 13 2017-03-29 Monroe

Louisiana Tech to honor high school students, educator for computing accomplishments The College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech University will recognize 10 high school students and one teacher at its 5th Annual National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) awards breakfast on April 1 in the Ropp Center on the Louisiana Tech campus. The award recognizes high school women for their computing-related achievements and interests. Recipients are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history and plans for post-secondary education. NCWIT Recognitions Program Director Ammi Ludwick will be in attendance to take part in the presentation of the NCWIT’s Awards for Aspirations in Computing. Ludwick works closely with the managers of the NCWIT AspireIT K-12 Outreach Program, the NCWIT Collegiate Award and NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Community to increase the depth of the technology talent pool and supports the affiliate teams as they continue to broaden the reach of NCWIT’s message with the Aspirations and Educator Award. NCWIT seeks to increase women’s participation in technology careers by providing encouragement, visibility, community, leadership opportunities, scholarships and internships to aspiring and technically-inclined young women. The Award for Aspirations in Computing offers both national and local affiliate competitions to generate support and visibility for women’s participation in communities nationwide. In addition to identifying a pool of talented young women, the Aspirations in Computing Award also identifies outstanding educators who play a vital role in encouraging young women to continue their interest in computing and technology. In addition to honoring students, the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award recognizes educators for their efforts to promote gender equity in computing. For more information, contact Charlotte Wilkerson at [email protected] 13 2017-03-28 Monroe

Louisiana Tech grows innovative TEAM clinical residency model in Caddo Parish RUSTON, La. – Students and faculty from Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education recently visited several elementary and secondary school sites in Caddo Parish to advance the model for their highly successful and innovative TEAM (Teacher Educators and Mentors) clinical residency program. The team from Louisiana Tech accepted an invitation from the Caddo Parish School System to tour more than half a dozen schools across the region and learn about the unique aspects of the campuses, meet school leaders and observe a variety of grade levels implementing best teaching practices. One of the first stops in Caddo Parish for the TEAM administrators was Shreve Island Elementary School where Principal Glenn Colvin and his student ambassador team provided an insightful tour of the school. “There is no more valuable training for a teacher than what they will receive in the real world classroom under the guidance of an experienced teacher,” said Colvin. “These candidates are going to be so much more prepared for the classroom because of the TEAM programs new approach to teacher preparation.”

The TEAM program is a research-based model designed by Dr. Amy Vessel and Dr. Dawn Basinger from Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, and represents a transformative redefinition of the expectations and roles of teacher educators and school mentors in the clinical experiences. It features the St. Cloud Co-Teaching Model, a TEAM evaluation system, university and district liaisons, edTPA national assessments, on-going professional development for mentors, and a collaborative university/district partnership in the development of future teachers. “The key to the TEAM model schools continues to be clear communication and mutual respect between the university and the school district,” said Vessel. “We are delighted to work with the leadership of Caddo Parish and look forward to growing rich partnerships with each of their schools. “Our ultimate goal is to increase quality teachers for our students throughout Louisiana as well as achieve higher retention rates of those that choose this admirable profession.” In 2014, Louisiana Tech was the only teacher preparation program in north Louisiana to initiate the full-year clinical residency program replacing traditional student teaching. Through the 2016-2017 school year, 100 percent of elementary candidates have participated in the 3rd year of full-year clinical residencies. Northwood High School Principal Darlene Simons said she has seen an increase in teacher candidates from Louisiana Tech over the past few years. “Our teachers and staff are excited about the transition to the TEAM model as it will allow for an even greater experience for our newest teachers.” Vessel, who is the director of professional and clinical experiences for Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, said it’s a logical decision for the partnerships to grow into northwest Louisiana parishes as many of the teacher candidates are from there. “We want to prepare teacher candidates at Louisiana Tech through our outstanding content and methodology coursework and support them throughout their clinical residency program closer to home,” said Vessel. “I am very excited to have the opportunity to partner with a high-quality university like Louisiana Tech to address the serious teacher shortage issue in our school system,” said Dr. Lamar Goree, superintendent of Caddo Parish Schools. “We’re excited to be able to couple practical experiences with the theoretical practices to create wonderful teachers for our children.” Louisiana Tech expects future TEAM Model Clinical Residency Schools in Caddo Parish to include Booker T. Washington New Technology High School, Midway Professional Development School, Mooretown Professional Development School, Northwood High School, Shreve Island Elementary School, Southwood High School, Walnut Hill Elementary/Middle School, and Youree Drive Middle Advanced Placement Magnet School. 13 2017-03-27 Monroe

Louisiana Tech, BPCC sign agreement to create pathway to CIS degree RUSTON, La. – Louisiana Tech University and Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that creates a pathway for students at BPCC who have completed their associate’s degree in business and are looking to pursue a bachelor’s degree at Louisiana Tech. Louisiana Tech President Les Guice was joined by BPCC Chancellor Rick Bateman, Jr. Thursday on the Tech campus to officially sign the agreement which ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information. The Pathway Articulation Agreement developed by the two institutions enables BPCC students who have earned an Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration to gain admission to the four-year Computer Information Systems (CIS) program in Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “Partnerships with higher education institutions like BPCC are critical to creating opportunities for our students to continue their studies and to position themselves to be competitive and productive in their career fields,” said Guice. “These agreements are also of great benefit to our industry partners who are coming to north Louisiana to find talented professionals who can contribute to the growth of their companies from day one.”

“We are always pleased when our partnerships build new bridges to four-year institutions, assist our students in moving on toward advanced degrees and advance our role in the talent development pipeline for a critical industry sector in our regional economy,” said Bateman. As both institutions are committed to seamless transfer so students may successfully complete their academic goals, the new partnership enhances access for students across north Louisiana to a bachelor’s degree program with the outstanding faculty and resources of Louisiana Tech, and provides excellent credentials for entry-level employment and career advancement. “We're thrilled to see Louisiana's institutions of higher learning adapt their curriculum to the needs of our industry,” said CSRA President and CEO Larry Prior. “This is another positive example of Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech working together to identify and develop the skills needed for their students’ careers. CSRA has become a part of the Bossier community and we're happy to support this progress.” For more information on Louisiana Tech’s CIS program, visit http://www.business.latech.edu/cis. 13 2017-03-24 Monroe

Louisiana Tech, BPCC sign agreement to create pathway to CIS degree Louisiana Tech University and Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that creates a pathway for students at BPCC who have competed their associate’s degree in business and are looking to pursue a bachelor’s degree at Louisiana Tech. Louisiana Tech President Les Guice was joined by BPCC Chancellor Rick Bateman, Jr. Thursday on the Tech campus to officially sign the agreement which ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information. The Pathway Articulation Agreement developed by the two institutions enables BPCC students who have earned an Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration to gain admission to the four-year Computer Information Systems (CIS) program in Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “Partnerships with higher education institutions like BPCC are critical to creating opportunities for our students to continue their studies and to position themselves to be competitive and productive in their career fields,” said Guice. “These agreements are also of great benefit to our industry partners who are coming to north Louisiana to find talented professionals who can contribute to the growth of their companies from day one.” “We are always pleased when our partnerships build new bridges to four-year institutions, assist our students in moving on toward advanced degrees and advance our role in the talent development pipeline for a critical industry sector in our regional economy,” said Bateman. As both institutions are committed to seamless transfer so students may successfully complete their academic goals, the new partnership enhances access for students across north Louisiana to a bachelor’s degree program with the outstanding faculty and resources of Louisiana Tech, and provides excellent credentials for entry-level employment and career advancement. “We're thrilled to see Louisiana's institutions of higher learning adapt their curriculum to the needs of our industry,” said CSRA President and CEO Larry Prior. “This is another positive example of Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech working together to identify and develop the skills needed for their students’ careers. CSRA has become a part of the Bossier community and we're happy to support this progress.” For more information on Louisiana Tech’s CIS program, visit http://www.business.latech.edu/cis. 13 2017-03-22 Monroe

Percussion Festival returns to Louisiana Tech with marimba artist Kevin Bobo The fifth North Louisiana Youth Percussion Ensemble (NLYPE) Festival will return to Louisiana Tech University’s Howard Auditorium March 24-25. The event was created in part to provide a performance platform for high school percussionists. “Much like school bands and orchestras attend festivals to gain exposure to classic works in the repertoire, this event was designed to similarly encourage an appreciation for the percussion ensemble genre,” said Gregory Lyons, host and an associate professor of music at Tech. Another benefit comes in allowing students to engage with and learn from their peers in a supportive, noncompetitive environment. Each previous NLYPE Festival has featured a world-class guest artist, and this year is no exception. Appearing for the first time at Louisiana Tech will be marimba composer and performer, Kevin Bobo. Bobo is professor of percussion at Indiana University. He has performed on five continents and nearly 40 states in the U.S. He has also authored two method books and composed numerous pieces for a variety of instruments and ensembles. The festival begins with an open rehearsal coached by Professor Bobo from 3-5 p.m. Friday from in Howard Auditorium. Then at 7:30 p.m., Bobo will take the stage for the opening festival concert. On Saturday starting at 8 a.m., spectators will be treated to performances by Ruston High School Intermediate and Advanced Percussion Ensembles, followed by the Neville High School Percussion Ensemble and concluding with the Jena High School Percussion Ensemble. Next on the schedule is a marimba clinic with Professor Bobo at 10 a.m., followed by percussion related door prizes. Capping off the weekend is the closing festival concert Saturday at noon featuring the Louisiana Tech University Percussion Ensemble and the Honors Youth Percussion Ensemble, a select group comprised of students from each participating high school for this occasion only. Admission to the Friday rehearsal and the Saturday morning high school performances is free. Admission to the opening and closing festival concerts as well as the marimba clinic is $5 adults/$3 students. All events are free for Tech faculty, staff and students with valid ID. For more information, contact Dr. Lyons at [email protected] or (318) 257-5470. MORE NEWS: Audit: $22K in student funds missing from school 13 2017-03-21 Monroe

Louisiana Tech welcomes medical illustrator as part of research lecture series Natalie Doolittle, director of medical animation at High Impact, Inc., will visit Louisiana Tech University on March 27 for a presentation titled, “Biomedical Visualization: Art Influencing Science and Medicine,” as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series. Doolittle’s lecture will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend. As a medical illustrator, animator and art director, Doolittle specializes in creating engaging visuals to communicate scientific content with clarity. She earned her master’s degree in biomedical visualization from University of Illinois at Chicago in 2013, and went on to become a medical animator for a genetics research lab at the Centre for Molecular Medicines and Therapeutics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Doolittle currently leads a team of 3-D artists as the director of medical animation at High Impact, where she manages the content and production of animations and 3-D illustrations for litigation, pharmaceutical and medical device companies. “Ms. Doolittle’s medical illustrations and animations are masterfully crafted,” said Nick Bustamante, associate professor of art in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design. “Her work beautifully brings scientific concepts and medical research to life. This will be a great opportunity for our students to meet a top professional in the field of medical illustration and animation.” In addition to her role at High Impact, Doolittle also serves as a member of the external advisory board for VISTA (Visual Integration of Science Through Art) at Louisiana Tech and its developing concentration in pre-medical illustration that will be offered to students in biology, biomedical engineering, and art beginning in fall 2017. Her visit is being hosted in partnership with Louisiana Tech’s School of Design and Bustamante, and is supported through the Medical Illustration Foundation at Louisiana Tech with funds raised through the Digital Art Exhibit and Auction. As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research. This year, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series expands into a critical area beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education. Developed by Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor in Louisiana Tech’s School of Biological Sciences, and jointly organized by Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series has brought many internationally known research leaders to Louisiana Tech and is now in its fourth year. For more information on the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series and access to recordings of all of the lectures, please visit our website: http://biomedicalresearch.wixsite.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at [email protected] or Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore at [email protected] 13 2017-03-15 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech to host small business, research funding workshop Louisiana Tech University will assist small businesses throughout the region in learning more about how federal agencies award funding for research at the 2017 Regional R&D Workshop, March 22 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center. The workshop, offered by Louisiana Tech and the Technology Transfer Office, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center at 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport, and will focus on training attendees to take advantage of the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs. SBIR and STTR are programs that require certain federal agencies to reserve a portion of their research and development (R&D) budget for small businesses. The goal is to use federal R&D funding to help increase private-sector commercialization of innovations while still meeting federal research needs. Small businesses can utilize these funds to support their proof of concept and prototype development, thereby preserving their own limited funds for other R&D or commercialization activities. Jim Greenwood, a nationally recognized SBIR/STTR consultant, will conduct the training and will offer strategies on submitting a winning proposal, as well as insight on topics such as university/industry collaborations, commercializing technology, and cost accounting. Attendees will receive valuable information about funds that can help strengthen their SBIR/STTR proposals. Registration is $25 if paid by March 18 and $30 on-site. The first 35 who pay and attend will be eligible to receive a free SBIR/STTR proposal review by Greenwood Consulting Group. Advanced registration is required. The registration fee also covers refreshments, lunch, and a program workbook. To register, go online to http://shreveportsbirsttrmarch222017.eventbrite.com. 13 2017-03-03 Monroe

Prominent engineer, professor to visit Louisiana Tech as part of research lecture series Dr. Lijie Grace Zhang, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and biomedical engineering and medicine at George Washington University, will visit Louisiana Tech University on March 13 as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series. Zhang’s presentation titled, “Integrating 3-D Bioprinting and Nanomaterials for Complex Tissue Regeneration,” will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local community are cordially invited to attend. Zhang and her lab at George Washington apply a range of interdisciplinary technologies and approaches in nanotechnology, stem cells, tissue engineering, biomaterials and drug delivery for various biomedical applications. Specifically, her lab is interested in designing nanostructured scaffolds tissue regeneration, studying the influence of environment on directing stem cell differentiation and developing sustained drug release systems for the treatment of cancer. Zhang has earned a number of awards including the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award, Young Innovator in Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Award, and the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award. She also has an impressive publication record and a history of mentoring students and postdocs. Most recently, Zhang published a book titled, “3-D Bioprinting and Nanotechnology in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine,” with co-authors, Drs. John Fisher and Kam Long, and was a featured speaker at the 2016 Experimental Biology meeting. She earned her Ph.D. from Brown University and completed a postdoc at Harvard Medical School before joining the faculty at George Washington. Developed by Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor in Louisiana Tech’s School of Biological Sciences, and jointly organized by Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series has brought many internationally known research leaders to Louisiana Tech and is now in its fourth year. The series focuses on biomedical research with the intent of demonstrating the broad and interdisciplinary nature of this field of research. Zhang’s presentation is sponsored by sponsored by Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Science and the School of Biological Sciences. All 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free and open to the public. Seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. at University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at [email protected] 13 2017-03-01 Monroe

Ruston mayor encourages Louisiana Tech graduates to ‘be bold, be brave and believe’ Saturday, March 25 served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker. Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave. “I want to encourage you to be bold,” Walker said. “Bold in your work. Bold in your goals and ambitions. Bold with your dreams… Being bold is one reason you are graduating from a nationally recognized university today. It was a bold move by then President Dan Reneau and his staff, one of which is our president today, Dr. Les Guice, who took this university to selective admissions. A move that many thought would hurt this university, but look at us now.” Walker also encouraged graduates to believe in themselves and others. “We hear this a lot but I think this is the key to success in so many ways. Have the confidence to move forward,” he said. “Believe in the great education you have received at Louisiana Tech University. This wonderful faculty and staff have prepared you for your future so go out and use that education to change the world in your own way.” Lastly, Walker told the graduates they have the tools to succeed in this world – they just need to be brave. “You are ready to face whatever this world has for you,” he said. New Louisiana Tech graduate Laura Laughlin majored in family and child studies and will return to her alma mater as a graduate counseling student. “I'm so blessed to be able to graduate from this university,” Laughlin said. “Louisiana Tech has made such a positive impact on my life.” She also had advice for current students on the same path she recently was. “I would advise current students to be working on their communication skills,” she said. “They are so necessary in every part of life. If you can hold an intelligent, flowing conversation with people, you can get very far.” In addition to celebrating the new graduates, the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association inducted Caroline Reaves, a 1985 economics graduate and the CEO of Mortgage Contracting Services, into its Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Brooks Hull, vice president for advancement, presented Reaves with the Tower Medallion officially making her the 78th member of the Hall. Established in 1976, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity. Upon graduating from Tech in 1985, Reaves moved to Oklahoma City where she began her professional career at Friendly Bank in the Commercial Loan Department. She went on to be a paralegal at Sun Belt Federal Savings and Loan, followed by a position at McAfee & Taft. In 2007, Reeves was offered a position as COO of Mortgage Contracting Services (MCS) and was promoted to CEO in 2009. Under Reaves leadership, MCS has grown from 40 employees in one office to over 800 employees in multiple offices across the nation. In 2013, MCS made the decision to bring all jobs onshore and chose Ruston as home for MCS’ third office. The Ruston office currently has 150 employees and growing. Under Reaves’ leadership, the company’s revenues have grown over 300 percent. Commencement officially ends winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring classes begin Wednesday, March 8. 13 2017-02-27 Ruston

Ruston mayor serves as keynote speaker at LA Tech commencement RUSTON, La. (KNOE) - Saturday, March 25 served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker. Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave. “I want to encourage you to be bold,” Walker said. “Bold in your work. Bold in your goals and ambitions. Bold with your dreams… Being bold is one reason you are graduating from a nationally recognized university today. It was a bold move by then President Dan Reneau and his staff, one of which is our president today, Dr. Les Guice, who took this university to selective admissions. A move that many thought would hurt this university, but look at us now.” Walker also encouraged graduates to believe in themselves and others. “We hear this a lot but I think this is the key to success in so many ways. Have the confidence to move forward,” he said. “Believe in the great education you have received at Louisiana Tech University. This wonderful faculty and staff have prepared you for your future so go out and use that education to change the world in your own way.”

Lastly, Walker told the graduates they have the tools to succeed in this world – they just need to be brave. “You are ready to face whatever this world has for you,” he said. New Louisiana Tech graduate Laura Laughlin majored in family and child studies and will return to her alma mater as a graduate counseling student. “I'm so blessed to be able to graduate from this university,” Laughlin said. “Louisiana Tech has made such a positive impact on my life.” She also had advice for current students on the same path she recently was. “I would advise current students to be working on their communication skills,” she said. “They are so necessary in every part of life. If you can hold an intelligent, flowing conversation with people, you can get very far.” In addition to celebrating the new graduates, the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association inducted Caroline Reeves, a 1985 economics graduate and the CEO of Mortgage Contracting Services, into its Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Brooks Hull, vice president for advancement, presented Reeves with the Tower Medallion officially making her the 78th member of the Hall. Established in 1976, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity. Upon graduating from Tech in 1985, Reeves moved to Oklahoma City where she began her professional career at Friendly Bank in the Commercial Loan Department. She went on to be a paralegal at Sun Belt Federal Savings and Loan, followed by a position at McAfee & Taft. In 2007, Reeves was offered a position as COO of Mortgage Contracting Services (MCS) and was promoted to CEO in 2009. Under Reeves leadership, MCS has grown from 40 employees in one office to over 800 employees in multiple offices across the nation. In 2013, MCS made the decision to bring all jobs onshore and chose Ruston as home for MCS’ third office. The Ruston office currently has 150 employees and growing. Under Reeves’ leadership, the company’s revenues have grown over 300 percent. Commencement officially ends winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring classes begin Wednesday, March 8. Courtesy: Louisiana Tech University 13 2017-02-27 Ruston

Louisiana Tech students, professor win first place in Shell Eco-Car team competition RUSTON, La. – Four students and one faculty advisor from Louisiana Tech University’s Eco-Car team have won first place in the “Best Overall Team” category at a new event called “Hack-a-Truck,” sponsored by Shell Oil Company last weekend at Google’s headquarters in Palo Alto, California. Eight universities from across the country were invited to the event, and paired off into four teams tasked with designing the “food truck of the future.” Louisiana Tech students Matthew McHenry (electrical engineering), Matthew LaCroix (computer science), Kyle Dupree (mechanical engineering) and Tommy Naquin (mechanical engineering), along with faculty advisor Dr. Michael Swanbom, worked with students and advisors from the University of Illinois on a superherothemed food truck that claimed the honor for the best overall team at this element of Shell’s #MakeTheFuture initiative. “I could not be more pleased with the creativity, innovation, drive and cooperation that I saw from this team during this 42hour brain-blitz,” said Swanbom. “The Louisiana Tech Eco-Car team will be participating in the Shell Eco-marathon event for the tenth consecutive year this spring.”

The Louisiana Tech-University of Illinois team was tasked with designing a food truck that optimized the customer experience while integrating several emerging technologies focused primarily on energy harvesting and conservation. Design tasks included choosing a menu, picking out appropriate appliances, laying out the food preparation process to maximize the rate of production and the development of an enticing theme. “Louisiana Tech has had a lot of success competing and winning with our undergraduate programs in regional and national events,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean for undergraduate studies at the College of Engineering and Science and Eco-Car team faculty advisor, added. “We are proud of the way these students represented our program, and are already looking forward to sending a team next year.” In addition to the group winning best overall team, most creative design, best story and best food honors, Shell will commission a food truck based on the Louisiana Tech-University of Illinois team design and, following its use at the Shell Eco-Marathon event in Detroit, Mich. in late April, the food truck will be donated to a low-income community. 13 2017-02-27 Ruston

Tech holds winter commencement Saturday served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker. Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2017-02-24 Ruston

PROFESSOR RECEIVES STATE PROFESSIONALISM AWARD Norman Pumphrey, associate professor of civil engineering and program chair of construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech University, has received the 2017 Professional Engineer Faculty Professionalism Award from the Louisiana Engineering Foundation. The award, which seeks to recognize faculty who encourage their colleagues and who benefit their students and the profession with the promotion of professionalism within their universities, was presented to Pumphrey at the 21st Joint Engineering Societies Conference held recently in Lafayette. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online 13 2017-02-22 Monroe

Medical illustration exhibit, auction at Louisiana Tech to showcase student works Interdisciplinary course brings together art, science to create digital illustrations Faculty from Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, School of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering program will showcase the digital art of their students at the 2nd Annual Student Digital Painting Art Exhibit and Auction, March 10 at the F.J. Taylor Visual Art Center Gallery on the campus of Louisiana Tech. The exhibit will open at 6:30 p.m. and feature the digital illustrations of 18 talented Louisiana Tech students in their ART 320: Digital Painting course. An auction of the artwork will follow at 7:00 p.m. with proceeds going to building a program in premedical illustration and supporting the students involved. Tickets to the event are $10 and can be purchased at Louisiana Tech’s Marbury Alumni Center or at the door. Last year’s event raised close to $4,000 that was used to support promotion of the program, tablets for use in the digital painting class and an on-campus visit by Natalie Doolittle, director of animation for High Impact. The Student Digital Painting Art Exhibit and Auction will feature the final project of the students in the ART 320 class, which was a medical illustration designed for the cover of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research Seminar Series brochure cover. The class is focusing on four thematic topics in biology and medicine: Biology’s Central Dogma, The Brain, The Cardiovascular System, and Drug Delivery. Newman and Caldorera-Moore are the co-organizers of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series that has grown into one of Louisiana Tech’s premier interdisciplinary programs. The winning cover design will be announced at the event and will be one of four pieces auctioned off to raise money for the further development of an academic curriculum in pre-medical illustration. Nicholas Bustamante, associate professor of art, created this class after collaborating with Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, to create images, scientific manuscripts and publications. Together, the three professors found a need for other collaborations between the arts and sciences as a way to communicate complex ideas. As a result of their partnership, Bustamante, Newman and Caldorera-Moore established VISTA (Visual Integration of Science Through Art), a program designed to offer a new interdisciplinary curriculum for students who have an interest in both art and science. The VISTA program will prepare students for application to graduate school in medical illustration and will offer a unique educational experience for students with a passion for art. 13 2017-02-16 Monroe

Louisiana Tech civil engineering students earn scholarships from DOTD RUSTON, La. – Ten Louisiana Tech University students majoring in civil engineering have each earned $1,000 scholarship awards from the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Cameron Broussard, Cody Abshire, Hunter Calhoon, Lane Brister, Matthew Upshaw, Ryan Barton, Stetson Keen, Taylor Cappe, Tyler Bridges and Victor Seth Bivens were selected from a highly-accomplished pool of applicants from across the state. They received the scholarship awards from DOTD Secretary Shawn D. Wilson at a ceremony held at the DOTD headquarters in Baton Rouge. The scholarships are funded by the Southeastern Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Louisiana DOTD, and the Louisiana Transportation Research Center, and are awarded to juniors and seniors in civil engineering programs across the state. Students are selected by transportation officials from the DOTD as well as representatives from universities throughout Louisiana. Dr. Nazimuddin “Wasi” Wasiuddin, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and advisor of the Transportation Leadership Council at Louisiana Tech, says that the scholarships illustrate that Louisiana Tech Civil Engineering students are well prepared for the industry after graduation.

“Louisiana DOTD puts special emphasis on summer internship, co-op, and industry experiences in the transportation area when awarding these competitive scholarships,” said Wasiuddin. “The involvement of students in transportation-related activities here at Louisiana Tech also plays a key role in scholarship decisions. The Transportation Leadership Council, a student group at Louisiana Tech, which is organized under our American Society of Civil Engineers student chapter, hosted a number of outside speakers and participated in activities to build student leaders in the transportation industry. “The success of our students in securing these scholarships reflects their readiness to serve the State and the transportation industry, and we are thankful to Louisiana DOTD, SASHTO and LTRC for their support.” Dr. David Hall, director of the civil engineering and construction engineering technology programs at Louisiana Tech and associate director of the Southern Plains Transportation Center, says that scholarships such as those offered by the DOTD help students leverage their time for educational activities. “Scholarship funds reduce financial stress for students, providing a financial boost that allows them to focus more on their studies and involvement in campus life,” Hall said. “We have worked to expand student exposure to the transportation industry through the TLC, and I am thrilled that our students have the academic background, work experience, and campus activities needed to successfully compete for these scholarships.” The Louisiana Tech applicants’ internship experience and interests in the transportation field, along with their outstanding grade point averages, earned them the awards. 13 2017-02-14 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Concert Association set to raise curtain on ‘Romeo and Juliet’ RUSTON, La. – The Louisiana Tech Concert Association welcomes the American Shakespeare Center’s 2016-2017 Hungry Hearts Tour for their production of William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” at 7:30 p.m. February 21 in the Howard Center for the Performing Arts. With its ravishing language and uproarious comedy, “Romeo and Juliet” celebrates love's triumph and trivialities. Verona's walls embrace the volatility of youth as well as the wisdom and restraint that often escape young and old alike. Thumbbiting dance and swordplay share the stage with sonnets, bawdy wit and soul-searching speeches in this profoundly human and always surprising treasure. Ticket prices for the show are $25 for general admission, $10 for students with a valid ID, $20 for youth under the age of 14 and $20 for seniors age 65 and up. For group rates or to purchase tickets, contact the Box Office at (318) 257-3942. The Box Office is located in the lobby of Stone Theatre. Its hours are from 1:30-4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. Online sales for adult only tickets can be purchased at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com.

The American Shakespeare Center brings a unique performance style to the Howard Center for the Performing Arts, blending the bard’s stage craft with modern sensibility. The company uses Shakespeare’s staging conditions, including universal lighting, minimal sets, doubling, cross-gender casting and music. In Shakespeare’s day, the company couldn’t turn the lights out on the audience; actors and audience shared the same light. The Hungry Hearts Tour leaves the lights on for a type of audience contact rarely seen in modern day theater. Audience members share directly in the action onstage as they become citizens of Verona. Since 1988, the American Shakespeare Center has toured the country with shows incorporating Shakespeare’s staging conditions. Based out of Staunton, Virginia, the company mission is to recover the joys and accessibility of Shakespeare’s theatre, language, and humanity by exploring the English Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education. For more information on the Louisiana Tech Concert Association or the upcoming production of “Romeo and Juliet,” please call (318) 257-3942 or visit www.latechuniversitytheatre.com. 13 2017-02-10 Monroe

Ruston mayor to serve as keynote speaker at Louisiana Tech’s winter commencement Ronny Walker, mayor of the City of Ruston, will serve as the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech University’s winter commencement exercises at 10 a.m. February 25 at the Thomas Assembly Center. Walker has been deeply involved in the economic growth and civic well-being of Ruston and Lincoln Parish, both prior to and during his term as mayor, and has long been an advocate of and supporter for Louisiana Tech. After graduation from Flora High School, Walker earned his bachelor’s degree in education from Mississippi State University and his master’s degree from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. After graduation, Walker served at Temple Baptist Church in Ruston from 1981 to 1989. It was around this time that Walker’s interest in business and the economic future of our community began to grow. For more than two decades, Walker has devoted himself to building a better future for Lincoln Parish, Louisiana Tech, and the City of Ruston. He has held positions at the Ruston State Bank, Community Trust Bank, Louisiana Tech, and First National Bank in Ruston. Walker has applied his skills, knowledge and energy to assisting the community and its people. He has served as president on the boards of the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce, Lady Techsters Tip-Off Club, Louisiana Tech Quarterback Club, Lincoln Parish GIS Commission, Louisiana Peach Festival and ARCO. Walker has also served on the Lincoln Parish Police Jury, Lincoln Parish Library, H.E.L.P. Agency, Ruston-Lincoln Industrial Development Committee, and the Louisiana Tech Alumni Board. In November 2014, Ruston voters put their trust in the leadership strengths of Walker by electing him as their mayor. One of the first calls he made after taking office in January 2015 was to Louisiana Tech President Les Guice, to discuss how to partner with the university to further benefit the community and people of Ruston. The City of Ruston and Louisiana Tech have continued to work together to provide Ruston and Lincoln Parish with new opportunities for business, education and community growth. Following Walker’s commencement address, the graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech. Winter commencement officially marks the end of the winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring quarter classes are scheduled to begin on March 8. 13 2017-02-09 Monroe

Louisiana Tech faculty, student elected to lead national biomedical engineering society RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) – Two Louisiana Tech University biomedical engineering faculty members and one student have been appointed to leadership roles within the Alpha Eta Mu Beta National Biomedical Engineering Honor Society – an organization founded nearly 30 years ago by Louisiana Tech President Emeritus Dr. Daniel D. Reneau. Dr. Teresa Murray, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech, was reelected to a second two-year term as president of AHMB (formerly known as AEMB). Prior to her appointment as president, Murray served in numerous other posts including as a member of the Board of Directors, interim national treasurer, national student president and national student vice president. Under Murray’s guidance, AHMB has established the annual Student Ethics Workshop, which is sponsored by AHMB and held at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting each year. She also established a series of Student Public Policy Sessions relating to topics of high importance to the field. One of these sessions was developed to discuss the implications of the patent law change from “first-to-invent” to “first-to-file” on the field of biomedical engineering.

Dr. Bryant Hollins, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, was reelected to a six-year term on the Board of Directors after previously serving a two-year term. As an undergraduate student at Louisiana Tech, Hollins was the university’s AHMB chapter president and served in leadership roles in other organizations including the Louisiana Tech chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. Shyanthony Synigal, a senior biomedical engineering student at Louisiana Tech, who was inducted into AHMB as a junior, was elected as the AHMB national student treasurer. Synigal will help to make financial decisions for the organization in addition to serving on a national committee to increase AHMB’s presence at international BME conferences. AHMB was founded in 1979 by Reneau, who was a pioneer in biomedical engineering education, as an honor society to recognize and encourage excellence in the field of biomedical engineering and bioengineering. Since its inception, AHMB has grown to over 45 chapters nationwide and is actively seeking to establish chapters at universities in other countries. The AHMB seeks to bring elected students and faculty into closer union in order to promote an understanding of the biomedical engineering profession. “It’s amazing to see just how far Alpha Eta Mu Beta has come and what an outstanding membership it has attracted over the years,” said Reneau in a 2012 interview. “There’s nothing more rewarding for me than to be able to pass along my vision and experiences in biomedical engineering to those who will become its future leaders. “From a trailblazer in the 1970s to a nationally recognized leader today, I’m proud of the reputation that Louisiana Tech has built in the field of biomedical engineering.” Reneau established the biomedical engineering program at Louisiana Tech in 1972. It was one of the first of its kind in the United States and only the fifth undergraduate program in the nation to become accredited. Over the years, other Louisiana Tech faculty have made significant academic and leadership contributions to AHMB. Dr. Paul Hale, professor emeritus of biomedical engineering, and Dr. Stan Napper, currently the vice president for research and development at Louisiana Tech, served in leadership roles in the growing honor society. Hale, who served as the AHMB national president for six years (1992-1998), was later instrumental in reinstating the organization’s IRS non-profit status. He remains the point of contact for this important role. At the local level, Dr. Steven Jones, program chair and associate professor of biomedical engineering, has served as the Louisiana Tech chapter faculty advisor for several years. He also organizes the department honors banquet each year, which is where new AHMB members are inducted. Under the leadership of this year’s chapter president Timothy “Noah” Hutson, the chapter is initiating a new program that focuses on tutoring younger biomedical engineering students at Louisiana Tech to foster a passion and commitment to the field. Seven students were inducted into the society this year, including two graduate students and five undergraduates. 13 2017-02-07 Ruston

Director of A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech elected to national post Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University, has been elected to serve as the State of Louisiana’s representative with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). The NAESP, founded in 1921, is a professional organization serving elementary and middle school principals throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Hood was elected to the NAESP post by the Board of Directors of the Louisiana Association of Principals (LAP), a local affiliate for NAESP. Both organizations advocate for the support of principals and their desire to achieve the highest results for children, families and communities. “I am honored to have been a part of the Louisiana Association of Principals for the past ten years,” said Hood. “It has been so rewarding to serve on the Board of Directors and work with school leaders all across the state. I am humbled to have been selected to serve in this new capacity and am looking forward to being an advocate for all Louisiana administrators.” As the state representative, Hood will participate in the NAESP’s annual convention, national leaders’ conference and will maintain an active role on the LAP executive board. As the liaison between the two agencies, she will also ensure that information provided by the NAESP is disseminated to LAP members. Hood has been a member of the executive board of LAP since 2006 and served as the organization's president from 2012 to 2014. This is her 28th year in education and 16th year as a school administrator. Hood said her desire is to create a lasting foundation for learning, drive school and student performance, and to shape the long-term impact of school improvement efforts to align with the NAESP’s vision. “Following this year’s recognition by multiple, national and state organizations regarding the excellence in education occurring at A. E. Phillips, it seems very appropriate that Hood would be recognized as a national leader in her profession,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I am very proud of her and the accomplishments of the outstanding faculty, staff, and students she guides and directs.” Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment. 13 2017-02-07 Ruston

Director of A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech elected to national post Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University, has been elected to serve as the State of Louisiana’s representative with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). The NAESP, founded in 1921, is a professional organization serving elementary and middle school principals throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Hood was elected to the NAESP post by the Board of Directors of the Louisiana Association of Principals (LAP), a local affiliate for NAESP. Both organizations advocate for the support of principals and their desire to achieve the highest results for children, families and communities. “I am honored to have been a part of the Louisiana Association of Principals for the past ten years,” said Hood. “It has been so rewarding to serve on the Board of Directors and work with school leaders all across the state. I am humbled to have been selected to serve in this new capacity and am looking forward to being an advocate for all Louisiana administrators.” As the state representative, Hood will participate in the NAESP’s annual convention, national leaders’ conference and will maintain an active role on the LAP executive board. As the liaison between the two agencies, she will also ensure that information provided by the NAESP is disseminated to LAP members. Hood has been a member of the executive board of LAP since 2006 and served as the organization's president from 2012 to 2014. This is her 28th year in education and 16th year as a school administrator. Hood said her desire is to create a lasting foundation for learning, drive school and student performance, and to shape the long-term impact of school improvement efforts to align with the NAESP’s vision. “Following this year’s recognition by multiple, national and state organizations regarding the excellence in education occurring at A. E. Phillips, it seems very appropriate that Hood would be recognized as a national leader in her profession,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I am very proud of her and the accomplishments of the outstanding faculty, staff, and students she guides and directs.” Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment. 13 2017-02-03 Monroe

La. Tech lecturer named 2016 Visionary Educator of the Year Jeffrey A. Pike, senior lecturer of civil engineering and construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech University, has been named the Vantage Health Plan 2016 Visionary Educator of the Year.

The honor is awarded to outstanding faculty and staff members who have shown a strong commitment to the field of education through hard work and dedication to the field. Billy Justice, director of marketing and sales for Vantage Health Plan, presented Pike with the award before a crowd of thousands at the Thomas Assembly Center during halftime of the Bulldog’s basketball game against Rice University.

“It was a pleasant surprise and an honor to be recognized in this way,” Pike said of the award. “I get great satisfaction from being an educator at Louisiana Tech because it's such a great place to invest in our future.”

Pike has exhibited leadership and service at Louisiana Tech since becoming a full-time faculty member in 2009. He is a member of the Louisiana Professional Engineering and Land Surveying Board and serves as chair of the Louisiana Engineering Society and Monroe Chapter of the Professional Engineers in Education Committee. He was also awarded the 2016 F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award at Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter commencement ceremony last spring.

Pike earned his bachelor’s degree in engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point, and his master’s degree in engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He went on to teach at the United States Military Academy in its Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering from 1995 to 1998, and Department of Chemistry and Life Sciences from 2001 to 2003. Pike was also the Professor of Military Science at Stephen F. Austin State University from 2003 to 2007.

Pike served as an active duty infantryman in the United States Army for more than 22 years and earned the rank of Lieutenant Colonel before retiring from the armed services in 2007. He has earned professional engineering licenses in Virginia, Texas and Louisiana, and is an active professional engineer in Louisiana.

13 2017-02-02 Ruston

Louisiana Tech’s New Frontiers lecture series to host renowned cancer researcher RUSTON, La. – (KNOE 8 News) Dr. Philip Salem, president of Salem Oncology Centre in Houston Texas, will visit Louisiana Tech University on February 6 as a featured speaker of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series. Salem’s presentation titled “Lessons I Have Learned from Cancer Research and Treatment,” will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by the Lincoln Health Foundation. Salem, who is a physician, researcher, educator and international expert in cancer medicine, is a renowned pioneer in the field of cancer biology. In addition to his role as president of Salem Oncology Centre, he is also director emeritus of cancer research at Baylor-St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston. Salem was one of the first researchers to demonstrate that a chronic infection in the intestine may eventually lead to the development of cancer. His work on intestinal cancer, known as Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease (IPSID), and the relationship between infection and the development of intestinal cancer has become a classic in modern medicine.

“We are tremendously honored to have Dr. Salem on our campus,” said Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice. “I know that our faculty and students will be inspired by his presentation of his research findings. I’d like to offer special thanks to our faculty for organizing this lecture series which we are finding to be most impactful on our campus and in our community.” Salem has been honored with many awards for his contributions to the cancer research and has been invited to serve on the editorial boards of several prestigious cancer research journals. His research on IPSID was recognized by the Nobel Prize Committee as the gateway for research on H. pylori in the stomach, and its causal relationship to peptic ulcer and stomach cancer, which won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 2005. In the early 1990s, Salem served on a healthcare advisory committee to the White House and, in 1994, received the Republican Senatorial Medal of Freedom. In 1998, he was awarded the Ellis Island Medal of Honor for his “exceptional humanitarian efforts and outstanding contributions to American science”. Salem was honored in 2006 as “Scientist of the Year” by the National Italian Foundation for the Promotion of Science and Culture, and was decorated in a special ceremony held in Rome, Italy. As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program at Louisiana Tech strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research. All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free and open to the public. Seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. at University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at [email protected] or Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore at [email protected] 13 2017-02-01 Monroe

Statement from LA Tech President Les Guice re: Executive Order on Immigration RUSTON, La. - Dr. Les Guice, President of Louisiana Tech University, releases statement on executive order on immigration:

The Louisiana Tech campus is home to a unique community of people who use their cultural and life experiences to educate and enrich those around them. From the classrooms and labs to the campus grounds to the residence halls, our university is a place where everyone should feel safe enough to share ideas so that together, we can build a better tomorrow for all. In working and living together, Louisiana Tech essentially becomes a “hometown” to students from every corner of the globe.

As a result of the President’s recent executive order on immigration, many of our international students are facing uncertainties and restrictions in their ability to travel to Louisiana Tech to begin or continue their studies. In light of this situation, I want all our international students, especially those from nations identified in the executive order, to know that Louisiana Tech is united and unwavering in its commitment to them, and will do everything possible to support them during this time of uncertainty. Our international students are an important part of what makes our university special and successful, and they need to know that we will speak in a strong and singular voice on their behalf.

Please keep these students and their families in your thoughts and prayers, and let them know that you support them as valued members of the Louisiana Tech family. Let them know that the Louisiana Tech campus is a place they can call home and that you will be an advocate for them. We will continue to monitor the situation and will provide updates as we learn additional information.

Dr. Les Guice President Louisiana Tech University

13 2017-02-01 Monroe

TECH DOES WELL AT HEALTH CONFERENCE The Louisiana Tech University Department of Kinesiology and the Lincoln Parish School were system represented well at the Society for Health and Physical Education America Southern District conference taking home several awards and making presentations. Department professors recognized were YuChun Chen for the Louisiana Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Ethnic Minority Award; C. Smiley Reeves as the LAHPERD College and University Health Professional of the Year; and Dakota Hill as the Outstanding Major Award recipient.

13 2017-01-31 Monroe

LA Tech Exchange Students Impacted by Travel Ban Exchange Students Worried About Trumps Travel Ban Louisiana tech has more than a dozen foreign exchange students who will be affected. This ban could prevent students from coming to Louisiana for School in the Spring.

Courtesy KNOE Many foreign exchange Students felt sad when they heard the news Friday. Donald Trump is placing a 90 day travel ban on international travel between Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yeman, and Somalia. "I planned to go back to my country to see my mother but I cannot anymore," Said Maryam Sayyahmanesh, who is from Iran. Amirhosein Foulad also hoped to go home this summer but fears if he does he cant get back into America due to visa issues. "I was thinking to go home this Summer but right now it's impossible for us to go home and back here." The news was also hard for Dan Erickson, who's the Director for the International Student office. He says he already recruited six students from those Countries and now they cant come. "It gives off the perception that international students aren't wanted," He Said.

But these students say the opportunity to study in America was great for them."United States has best Universities and i wanted to make a good future." But with this travel ban it's putting them in a tough spot. Either go home or stay here for the opportunity. "I don't know what i should do. I have to chose between going home or staying here to study." A tough choice many will have to make over the next few months. In Ruston Dylan Robichaud KNOE 8 News

13 2017-01-30 Ruston

LOUISIANA DELTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, TECH FORMALIZE PARTNERSHIP Better together” applies to many ventures and it is certainly true when considering higher education institutions and their abilities to serve students, employers, and the region. Louisiana Delta Community College and Louisiana Tech University formalized their commitment to ensure students have pathways from one institution to the other. The agreement address cross enrollment for developmental courses in mathematics and English and is a strong movement toward greater partnership between the two institutions.

13 2017-01-27 Shreveport

BPCC and La. Tech forge new partnership Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech University signed a memorandum of understanding today allowing qualified BPCC employees who wish to enroll at Louisiana Tech University to receive reduced tuition benefits. “We are so grateful to be able to offer our faculty and staff this opportunity to further their education with such an outstanding leader in higher education,” said BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman Jr. “Not only will our employees benefit from world-class instruction at a tier one research university… they will do so at a reduced cost.” Under the agreement, full-time faculty and staff at BPCC will be allowed to enroll at Louisiana Tech University for undergraduate or graduate courses at a reduced rate plus certain applicable fees. BPCC named award finalist for second consecutive year "Louisiana Tech and BPCC have a shared commitment to producing graduates with the skill sets to compete in today's global economy,” said Louisiana Tech President Dr. Les Guice. “Providing BPCC personnel with an opportunity to strengthen their educational credentials will benefit the region and the State. We are honored to partner with BPCC in this new way." Full-time BPCC employees must be a degree-seeking student at Louisiana Tech. They will be able to register for up to six hours per quarter at a reduced rate of $25 per credit hour, not to exceed $75 for any three credit hour undergraduate course and for up to six hours per quarter at a reduced rate of $50, not to exceed $150 for any three credit hour graduate course.

13 2017-01-26 Monroe

LDCC, Louisiana Tech formalize partnership “Better together” applies to many ventures, and it is true when considering higher education institutions and their abilities to serve students, employers and the region. Louisiana Delta Community College and Louisiana Tech University formalized their commitment to ensure students have pathways from one institution to the other. The agreement addresses cross enrollment for developmental courses in mathematics and English and is a strong movement toward greater partnership between the two institutions. “Transitions should be seamless,” said Dennis Epps, acting chancellor for LDCC. “This agreement ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information.” Les Guice, president of Louisiana Tech and Epps signed the Memorandum of Understanding Tuesday on the campus of Louisiana Tech. This provides a richer experience with more options for students desiring to ultimately attend Tech. “We are proud to partner with Tech and look forward to all of the great opportunities we can provide for our students,” Epps said.

13 2017-01-26 Monroe

Small fire closes Tech bookstore The Louisiana Tech University bookstore is closed Wednesday while employees clean up after a small fire. Dave Guerin, director of marketing and public relations for the university, said the cooling pump on a drink cooler caught fire around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday. A student was walking by and alerted campus police, who quickly put out the flames. There were no injuries and no damage to the structure, Guerin said. There was some smoke damage. The bookstore is closed Thursday, and basic supplies, such as test books, are being sold in front of the bookstore. Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.

13 2017-01-25 Ruston

TECH SCHOOL OF ART TO HOST JURIED EXHIBITION At 6 p.m. Thursday, Louisiana Tech University will open the Louisiana Biennial — the School of Design’s fourth national juried exhibition in the F. Jay Taylor Visual Arts Center on Tech campus. This is a multi-media show for two and three-dimensional works, as well as video and installation works exploring any theme, said Nicole Duet, assistant professor of drawing and painting at Tech.

13 2017-01-24 Ruston

TECH’S COLLEGE OF BUSINESS INTRODUCES HYBRID PROGRAM For many business professionals, the opportunity to return to college to obtain a master’s degree is hindered by work schedules. But with the introduction of Louisiana Tech College of Business’s hybrid program, employees will be able to earn a degree while maintaining their current jobs. Doug Amyx, the interim associate dean of graduate programs, said the hybrid program, which will be offered in the spring, is a combination of live and online classes for computer information specialists. 13 2017-01-23 Baton Rouge

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LA Tech students post political signs, campus police respond to conflict Trump sign controversy at LA Tech RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Several strong feelings being expressed today across the country, and here locally at Louisiana Tech, for Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States. Courtesy: Nick Smith Courtesy: Nick Smith Early Friday morning, students posted a large sign on a brick wall outside the student center on campus, which says, "Trump may be president, but hope, equality, peace, opportunity, justice and love still trumps hate". "It shows that we are not apathetic. It shows we actually want to have these hard discussions, be forward and unite," Nick Smith, a senior political science major, said. Smith is one of several students who posted the sign. He says it was meant to start conversations, but instead, it started controversy with other students, one of which posted a sign in response which read,"Make America Great Again". It's a move Caressa Winkler says wasn't needed. "It wasn't against Trump, it was to bring an inclusion of everyone," Winkler said. Students say once campus police arrived, the conflict was resolved quickly, but the signs were taken down.

13 2017-01-18 Regional/National

My Residency Experience: Paying it Forward As a second-year 5th grade English Language Arts and Social Studies teacher at Cypress Springs Elementary in Ruston, Louisiana, I know I owe much of my current classroom success to Louisiana's Believe and Prepare program for providing the support and yearlong residency training that prepared me to be the teacher I am today. I entered the residency program in the summer of 2014 as a "pioneer" of the program. I was a single mom with a two-yearold son, and I was apprehensive because I knew the amount of time and dedication it would require. The decision to participate in the program has been one of the best of my college career. Over the course of the yearlong residency, the mentor teachers, my fellow residents, and I became a team who grew together. The residency program gave me the full-immersion experience that I needed to be successful. Through coteaching with my mentor teacher, I learned how to establish classroom procedures. I experienced the first day of school and the last and all that comes between: field trips, holidays, award ceremonies, class parties. I learned professionalism, planning, instruction, and assessment, and I improved my ability to collaborate with my students' families and my colleagues. Before I even graduated, I had multiple job offers and over 1,000 clinical hours. I was so prepared that it felt great to be in my own classroom. Being hired at my residency school provided a smooth transition into my teaching career with the same support system of mentors surrounding me. As a first year teacher, I scored highly effective on my teaching evaluation. I am grateful that Lincoln Parish and Louisiana Tech University chose to invest in me. I am grateful that Louisiana's Board of Elementary and Secondary Education has ensured that all future teachers will have an experience like mine beginning fall 2018. And, most importantly, I am grateful to have the opportunity to pay the investment forward to my students--Louisiana's future--and in the coming years thousands of Louisiana's new teachers will be able to as well. Shavonda Washington Teacher, Cypress Springs Elementary Lincoln Parish, Louisiana

13 2017-01-12 Monroe

The Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation (RCAF), the official fundraising arm of University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Ragin’ Cajuns Athletics, announce WEST MONROE, La. Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center demonstrate fun science experiments that kids can do at home! Watch the video to see what you can do at home to get your own results. At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults. Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning. Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena. These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics. Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994. Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place. You can find more information online at http://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.

13 2017-01-12 Monroe

Louisiana Tech geographer earns prestigious national honor Louisiana Tech University associate professor of geography Dr. Taylor E. Mack is the latest recipient of a rarely awarded distinction conferred by the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers (CLAG). The CLAG Outstanding Service Award, a highly-prestigious honor which has only been awarded five times since 1970, is given to a member of the association who has earned distinction and performed major service to the organization over a period of years. CLAG is the premier national organization of geography professionals specializing in the study of Latin America. Mack received the honor during a public event at the organization’s general conference held in New Orleans earlier this month.

Among Mack’s many services to the organization cited by the CLAG selection committee was membership on the CLAG Board of Directors from 2003 to 2015, including terms as vice-chair and chair. He also served for almost 10 years as editor of the CLAG newsletter, during which time he achieved conversion of the publication to a new format for digital distribution. Committees Mack has served on include juries for graduate student paper competitions, travel awards and summer field work awards. He has also conducted professional field trips to Guatemala for academic geographers in Chichicastenango and Guatemala City, and has chaired the organizing effort for the CLAG general conference held in Granada, Nicaragua in January 2009. A member of the Louisiana Tech faculty since 2006, Mack holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in geography from the University of Kansas, and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. He is a specialist in historical geography and his research interests include port cities and transportation systems in general, with an emphasis on Central America. Mack’s current projects focus on interoceanic transit projects in Honduras and Nicaragua and agricultural change in north Louisiana since 1950. At Louisiana Tech, Mack teaches a wide variety of geography courses and he also serves as a member of the Honors Program faculty. 13 2017-01-12 Regional/National

Pierry Inc. Opens Innovation Hub at Louisiana Tech University REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Jan. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Pierry, an industry-leading marketing software and solutions company, today announced it has opened an office in Ruston, Louisiana, on the campus of Louisiana Tech University. The office, which is expected to employ a mix of students and full time employees, will serve as an innovation hub for the Company and the University, implementing state-of-the art digital software solutions for a variety of clients in the region and throughout the United States.

"Pierry is extremely pleased to open this office at my alma-mater, Louisiana Tech, as it provides us with on-the-ground implementation resources, establishes a foothold in the Southeastern region of the US, and gives us a first-look at some of the amazing talent coming out of the University," said Ben Lee, Chief Marketing Officer of Pierry (LA Tech '04). "Our LA Tech outpost is also an opportunity to bring a bit of Silicon Valley to North Louisiana, giving the students an opportunity to get real-world experience in the rapidly growing field of digital marketing, and get a taste of what working with a start-up tech company is like." Named the 538th fastest growing company by Inc. Magazine in their 2016 "Inc. 5000" list, and #6 Fastest Growing Company in the San Francisco Bay Area by the San Francisco Business Times, Pierry – which began as a team of 2 people in the emerging digital marketing space in 2008 – now has employees in offices throughout the United States and in Japan, and serves a wide range of clients, from start-ups to multi-billion dollar global brands. Pierry coined the term MaaS (Marketing as a Service) to describe the unique way it helps its clients design, develop and execute marketing solutions that dramatically improve efficiency and impact, and increase ROI. "The partnership between Louisiana Tech University and Pierry Inc. brings together two innovative and entrepreneurial organizations. It's great to see Ben Lee, a Tech grad, reaching back to his alma mater to connect Ruston and Silicon Valley," said Dr. Dave Norris, Chief Innovation Officer, Louisiana Tech University. "We are excited about what a leadingedge company like Pierry can bring to our campus and to the community." About Pierry Ranked #6 in the "2016 Fastest Growing Companies" by the San Francisco Business Times, and #538 in the 2016 Inc. 5000, Pierry helps companies optimize their digital marketing campaigns through Salesforce Marketing Cloud implementations, email campaign creation and management, creative services, and marketing strategy. Founded in 2008 by Josh Pierry, the company has grown into a global preferred digital marketing partner for companies in all sectors, and now has offices in Redwood City, CA, Boulder, CO, Cleveland, OH, Ruston, LA, Albany, NY and Kyoto, Japan. For more information about Pierry, visit www.pierryinc.com.

13 2017-01-10 Ruston

TECH THEATRE TO PERFORM ‘LOVE ... AND MURDER’ Beginning at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Louisiana Tech University’s Theatre Department will raise the curtain on “Love … and Murder,” a mash up of several of Broadway’s most beloved musicals and a famous opera, in Stone Theatre, located in Louisiana Tech University’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts. The performance will be directed by Lisa Maxedon and feature a 15-member cast, said Katie Brumfield, promotions and marketing for Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre.

13 2017-01-10 Shreveport

‘Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder’ set for Tech's Stone Theatre Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre is ready to raise the curtain on its second production of the 2016-17 season, “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder.” The production is directed by Lisa Maxedon, associate professor of music and director of the Opera Workshop at Louisiana Tech. PEOPLE:Rural upbringing provides lessons to aid local youth The 15-member cast will take to the stage of Stone Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11-14 for an exciting mash-up of Broadway hit musicals and a fun night of jazzy dance numbers and iconic songs. The Stone Theatre is in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please contact the Louisiana Tech Theatre Department office at (318) 257-2930. This year’s Opera Workshop is all about love…and murder, as seen through the eyes of musical geniuses through the years. From Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story to John Kander and Fred Ebb's Chicago, “Love…and Murder” will prove to be fun and laughter through the mayhem of tyranny and tender affection. The production will take guests on a journey to see how these two seemingly opposing forces are actually often felt in the same moment. GOLDEN GLOBES:8 moments you may have missed Ticket prices for “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder” are $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old, and $15 seniors (65 and up). To purchase tickets or group rate information, please contact (318) 257- 3942. The box office is located in the lobby of Stone Theatre and is open Monday – Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. IF YOU GO What: “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder," an exciting mash-up of Broadway hit musicals and a fun night of jazzy dance numbers and iconic songs. When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11-14 Where: Stone Theatre at the Howard Center for Performing Arts, corner of Dan Reneau Drive and Adams Boulevard Cost: $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old and $15 seniors (65 and up).

13 2017-01-09 Monroe

La. Tech first-year, senior students highly rate college experience RUSTON – Ninety percent of first-year students and 89 percent of seniors at Louisiana Tech University said they would rate their overall educational experience at the institution as “excellent or good,” according to the National Survey of Student Engagement’s (NSSE) “Engagement Insights – Annual Results 2016” survey report. In addition to their feedback on their overall experience at Louisiana Tech, nearly 90 percent of both first-year students and seniors said that, if given the chance to start over in selecting a college or university to attend, they would “definitely or probably” choose Louisiana Tech again. “Louisiana Tech’s commitment to creating an unparalleled educational experience for every one of our students is at the heart of our role and responsibility as a national research university,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Student engagement and leadership, and the impacts of their success are benefiting people and communities throughout the state. The dedication and tireless efforts of our faculty and staff is clearly translating into student satisfaction, and it is something that continues to distinguish Louisiana Tech.” The objective of the annual NSSE survey is to gauge student opinions and perspectives on all facets of academic and student life for the institution’s undergraduates. Louisiana Tech plans to use this data and other interactions with students to improve the overall educational experience, supplement state accountability and accreditation efforts, and support the mission and vision of its Tech 2020 strategic plan. “Through the collective efforts of our faculty, staff and students, Louisiana Tech has been successful in creating a campus where students are active participants in the growth and governance of our institution,” said Dr. Jim King, vice president for student advancement at Louisiana Tech. “They are partners with us in guiding our institution forward and have embraced the opportunity and responsibility to improve the Louisiana Tech experience for future generations of students.” When evaluating the perceived gains that seniors made in their base of academic knowledge, skills and personal development during their time at Louisiana Tech, 85 percent considered the gains in thinking critically and analytically to be “very much” or “quite a bit.” In working effectively with others, 76 percent said they had gained “very much” or “quite a bit.” Nearly three in four seniors said they had also gained “very much” or “quite a bit” in learning experiences such as speaking clearly and effectively, writing clearly and effectively, and acquiring job- or work-related knowledge and skills. The NSSE survey was administered online to Louisiana Tech first-year and senior level students during the 2016 spring quarter. Students were sent a series of invitation emails soliciting voluntary participation. Both segments of the student body received and responded to the same set of questions. NSSE annually collects information from hundreds of four-year colleges and universities around the nation about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide for their learning and personal development. The results provide an estimate of how undergraduates spend their time and what they gain from attending college.

13 2017-01-05 Monroe

Louisiana Tech's SciTec Center; Home Grown Science Fun! WEST MONROE, La. Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center demonstrate fun science experiments that kids can do at home! Watch the video to see what you can do at home to get your own results. At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults. Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning. Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena. These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics. Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994. Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place. You can find more information online at http://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866. 13 2017-01-03 Monroe

West Monroe High School places in Louisiana Tech High School Quiz Bowl Members of the WMHS Quiz Bowl team recently competed at the annual Louisiana Tech High School Quiz Bowl Tournament where they were awarded Third Place out of 19 teams in attendance. Members competed in 10 rounds of competition, winning 8 of those rounds at the all day tournament. Members of the team are (from L to R): Magi Sumpter, Brian Duke, Connor Wiediemier, Taylor Martin, Grant Martin, and Logan English.

13 2017-01-03 Monroe

Institutional growth, leadership highlights Louisiana Tech’s success in 2016 Ten stories from past year that defined strength of university’s impacts and achievements Institutional growth, strength of leadership and the significant impacts of its regional and national partnerships are just some of the successes that helped to define Louisiana Tech University in 2016. In chronological order, the following are ten of the most impactful stories released this past year by Louisiana Tech’s Department of University Communications. Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 in state in MONEY’s 2016-17 Best Colleges report Louisiana Tech was ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana according to MONEY’s 2016-2017 Best Colleges report. The annual report evaluated the top public and private higher education institutions in the nation to determine those that offered students the best value and return on investment. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 14 in the nation in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for students without aid, and No. 15 nationally in lowest estimated price for students with average financial aid. Louisiana Tech researchers use radar technology to locate post-Katrina damage An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center is helping the City of Slidell to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina. The pipe-penetrating scanning technology, based on ultra-wide band (UWB) pulsed radar, allows for the inspection of buried pipelines, tunnels and culverts to detect fractures, quantify corrosion and determine the presence of voids in the surrounding soil often caused by storm water leaks and flooding. A.E. Phillips Laboratory School named top elementary school in state A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech was been named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq – an international technology company that delivers insights and analyses from worldwide data. StartClass ranked the top elementary schools in every state based on metrics such as exam passing rates, school environment and disciplinary actions. Louisiana Tech cited among global universities that could ‘challenge the elites’ by 2030 Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Louisiana Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030. A study conducted by Firetail, a strategy consulting firm in Great Britain, identified a “Class of 2030” that consisted of an emerging group of “challenger” universities that are quickly rising in the world rankings and “have an opportunity to become globally renowned in the next 10 to 20 years.” PayScale.com ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in state in average mid-career salaries Graduates with a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech earn higher average mid-career salaries than graduates from any other public or private university in the state, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report. In addition to leading the State of Louisiana, Louisiana Tech is ranked No. 57 in the nation in median mid-career earnings among public institutions and No. 81 in the nation in median earnings for graduates from research universities. Louisiana Tech achieves record enrollment, increase in freshman class Louisiana Tech announced that it enrolled more students for the fall term than at any time in its history, and had achieved a nearly 55 percent growth in first-time freshmen since fall of 2012. Tech enrolled 12,694 students for the fall quarter – a 2.3 percent increase over last year and eclipsing the previous record enrollment of 12,414 students set last fall. Louisiana Tech also had an all-time high of 155 incoming students who earned an ACT score of 32 or higher, and met the qualifications for Presidential Scholar or National Merit Scholar designation. Louisiana Tech earns another Tier One ranking from U.S. News & World Report For the sixth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech in its highest tier of “National Universities”, according to its 2017 Best Colleges list. Louisiana Tech and Louisiana State University were the only two public institutions in the state to achieve a Tier One National Universities designation. Louisiana Tech’s overall score increased by six points over last year, primarily as a result of a rise in its peer assessment score and freshman retention rate. Architecture faculty win national film prize for inspirational ‘Rebuilding MedCamps’ Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design, won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.” The film showcases an amazing partnership between the Design Build Studios of Louisiana Tech and MedCamps of Louisiana, and tells the story of how the Tech faculty and students partnered with MedCamps to enrich the lives of young campers through the design and construction projects at the MedCamps grounds. View this inspirational, award-winning film at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4MPd-SpW5w. Louisiana Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students Louisiana Tech and its Office of Multicultural Affairs created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana Tech and will contribute to enriching the cultural and diversity experiences of the university’s campus community. Kiplinger ranks Louisiana Tech as best public university value in Louisiana Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 overall among the Louisiana’s public institutions in its Best College Values 2017 report. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 72 nationally, and was second in the state for in-state students and No. 78 nationally. For the most up-to-date news and information from Louisiana Tech, visit http://news.latech.edu.

13 2016-12-30 Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor named LACUE Post-Secondary Teacher of the Year Dr. Arden Moore, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and nanosystems engineering at Louisiana Tech University’s Institute for Micromanufacturing (IfM), has been selected as the Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators (LACUE) Region 8 Post-Secondary Teacher of the Year. LACUE selects teachers from across the state who push the boundaries of education through the use of technology. Moore was chosen from a pool of accomplished educators from across 14 northeast Louisiana parishes. Moore received the honor for his use of technology in the classroom, including hands-on activities and demonstrations involving engines, heat pipes, thermoelectrics, and high-resolution thermal imaging. He has also worked to integrate advanced technologies such as 3D printing, engineering with sustainable materials, and high-altitude science into realworld problem solving for students. “I was very honored to be nominated for this award, and even more honored to receive it.” Said Moore. “LACUE does great work across the state to promote technology in education. I'm very appreciative of their efforts and am now more motivated than ever to incorporate new technology into all phases of my teaching.” “We are grateful to the LACUE for recognizing Dr. Moore for his innovative teaching methods,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science said. “The College is fortunate to have faculty like him that are passionate about student learning and are engaging students in the classroom with the latest technologies.” Moore was recognized during the 32nd Annual LACUE Conference in New Orleans, held earlier this month. LACUE is a professional, nonprofit organization with more than 10,000 members that recognizes and promotes the use of computers in Louisiana education. The group seeks to share best practices, increase service to members, and strengthen impact in their local education communities.

13 2016-12-22 Monroe

SciTec at the Idea Place; Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Demonstration Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center show us an experiment using Bromothymol blue to demonstrate how oxygen and carbon dioxide work. Watch the video to check out how! At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults. Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning. Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena. These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics. Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994. Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place. You can find more information online at http://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.

13 2016-12-22 Ruston

DOGS WITH A CAUSE PROMOTES STUDENTS TO READ Editor’s note: This is the first part of a two-part series about Dogs with A Cause, a partnership between Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education and Athletics Program, benefiting third- through fifth-graders at Ruston schools. Ruston third- through fifth-graders recently received a surprise chance to not only read and discuss books with Louisiana Tech University athletes, but also learn from the athletes what it takes to be a college student.

13 2016-12-16 Monroe

Kiplinger ranks Louisiana Tech as best public university value in Louisiana Louisiana Tech also among Top 100 in nation for in-state, out-of-state students Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 overall among the Louisiana’s public institutions in its Best College Values 2017 report released Thursday. Based on quality and affordability, Kiplinger’s Best College Value analyzed over 1,200 colleges and universities across the country to determine the top 300 best values. Specifically, they looked at factors such as competitiveness, graduation rates, academic support, cost of financial aid and student indebtedness. The quality measures account for 55 percent of total points with cost measures accounting for 45 percent. Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 72 nationally, and was second in the state for in-state students and No. 78 nationally. Louisiana State University was the only other public institution to make the Best College Value list, ranking No. 65 nationally for in-state students and No. 85 for out-of-state students. “Educational value and a high return on investment have become keystone factors for students and parents when selecting a university to attend,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Louisiana Tech has been focused and intentional in creating value and opportunities for students to attend a top-tier institution in our state and receive an unparalleled education and college experience. “Recognition like this from Kiplinger is great to see and I hope will be a source of pride and inspiration for our campus community. They are the reason we are successful and having such broad and significant impacts on our students and our state.” A total of four Louisiana institutions made the overall list of the best 300 public and private institutions including Tulane University (138), Louisiana Tech (235), Louisiana State (262) and Centenary College (291). Swarthmore College (PA) topped the overall list followed by Davidson College (NC), Princeton University, Duke University, and Washington and Lee University (VA). Kiplinger’s Best College Values Report caps a strong 2016 for Louisiana Tech that included a number of national and international rankings. In addition to its sixth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking from U.S. News & World Report, Louisiana Tech was named Louisiana best higher education institution by MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges Report. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in the state in median mid-career salaries for graduates, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report. Louisiana Tech also received international recognition recently when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030. For the complete list of Kiplinger’s Best College Values, visit http://www.kiplinger.com/links/college.

13 2016-12-15 Monroe

SciTec at the Idea Place; Gravity Demonstration West Monroe, LA Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center have a fun device you can make at home that demonstrates the effects of gravity! Watch the video to check out how! At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults. Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning. Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena. These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics. Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994. Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place. You can find more information online at http://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.

13 2016-12-14 Monroe

Nungesser talks about drawing tourists to NELA Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser shared his office's plans to highlight northeastern Louisiana's assets and draw tourists to the area on Tuesday at the West Monroe Convention Center. Nungesser was the keynote speaker at the West Monroe-West Ouachita Chamber of Commerce's annual banquet, and he discussed how the Louisiana Office of Tourism will work to draw more international tourists once direct flights from Germany and London are coming into New Orleans. International tourists, he said, stay longer and are willing to travel to see several states rather than just one town. He pointed to Poverty Point World Heritage Site as a jewel in need of polishing. He said a team at Louisiana Tech University is working with CenturyLink to provided a high-tech "wow" factor for the site to encourage additional and returning tourism. Nungesser said his department is pulling $1.4 million out of tourism to fund arts in order to keep $500,000 in federal dollars. For the state, tourism offers a $38 return for every dollar spent, he said. Nungesser also highlighted plans for a "staycation" tourism campaign that will encourage Louisianians to see parts of the state they've never visited and a separate push for residents to sign on as ambassadors and upload photos and information about attractions in their area. Chamber President Courtney Hornsby said it's important that we all serve as advocates and ambassadors for our communities. ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads Doug Caldwell accepts the West Monroe-West OuachitaBuy Photo Doug Caldwell accepts the West Monroe-West Ouachita Chamber of Commerce's A.O. Evans Award on Tuesday at the Chamber's annual banquet. (Photo: Bonnie Bolden/The News-Star) The Chamber presented its annual awards to local business leaders. Diplomat of the Year: Stuart Hodnett Entrepreneurial Success Award: Tom Sanders A.O. Evans Award: Doug Caldwell Public Safety Officers of the Year were: West Monroe Police Department — Detective Ray Spoon West Monroe Fire Department — Training Officer Lance Smithson Ouachita Parish Fire Department — Cpt. Mike Jackson Ouachita Parish Sheriff's Office — Lt. Tom Hargrove and Sgt. Johnny Robinson Hargrove and Robinson were shot while serving a warrant in June. Both have returned to work. Hornsby said their recovery was described as "nothing short of miraculous." Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.

13 2016-12-08 Monroe

Louisiana Tech poinsettia auction breaks record, helps fund student scholarships RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - Brightly-colored poinsettias helped Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Agricultural Sciences bring in a lot of green at its annual Poinsettia Show and Auction held recently at Squire Creek Country Club. The auction brought in a record $25,575 that will primarily be used to fund student scholarships for the department. “I was pleased and surprised,” Kennedy said. “I don’t expect it to keep growing and wouldn’t have been shocked if we actually would have dropped from last year’s total, which was $24,830. When we moved the auction out to Squire Creek, my goal that first year was to break $10,000, which we did. And it took bigger jumps every year until coming closer to balancing out this year, although we did set a new record. We also had a $1,000 donation at the end. I don’t know what drives it and even expected it to fall off a little bit this year after it took such a big jump last year.” Proceeds from the auction are used to pay for the event with the remaining being used for scholarships.

“This year we’ll net out about $22,000 for scholarships after paying expenses to hold the auction,” Kennedy said. A stained glass artwork piece featuring a Mama Santa and Papa Santa with a poinsettia in-between them that was created by Louisiana Tech Vice President Emeritus Dr. Virgil Orr earned the highest bid of the night, selling for $2,250. “Dr. Orr said this might have been last year because he said he just can’t do it like he used to,” Kennedy said. “The poinsettia was kind of on a different plane than the Mama and Papa Santa figures. It was kind of 3-D. It was an usual piece — a big piece. The bidding for it got pretty fierce for a while there.” Kennedy said a number of the lots auctioned off sold for $1,000 or more. “We had four lots go for $1,000 each, one for $1,100 and one for $1,200,” Kennedy said. “The last lot of the night sold for $1,400. There were 30 lots we sold with somewhere between three and seven plants each, and the stained glass piece included two poinsettias.” Kennedy said the Tech Farm Sales Room’s supply of holiday poinsettias is already running low for those who which to purchase them. “We’re about out of them quickly,” Kennedy said. “We’re still moving a few out of the Sales Room, but there’s really not much left. Pre-orders this year pretty much did it for us. We’ve had years where we had a lot of poinsettias left after the auction, but that’s not the case this year. People just got them early this year. We’re not usually done by now, but there’s that much left this year. It’s been a really good year.” Proceeds from the Sales Room poinsettia purchases go to the Tech Farm greenhouse fund. “Those proceeds are crucial toward making the greenhouses self-funded,” Kennedy said. “We had somewhere in-between and 4,000 plants to begin with, so it’s been a good year.”

13 2016-12-08 Regional/National

La. Tech's Skip Holtz named Conference USA Coach of the Year Bobby Wilder took an Old Dominion football team picked to finish sixth in Conference USA’s East Division and led the Monarchs to a 9-3 record, a first-place tie with Western Kentucky in the East division and the program’s first bowl game. But the conference’s Coach of the Year award went elsewhere. Skip Holtz, who led Louisiana Tech to the conference championship game and an 8-5 record, was named winner on Wednesday afternoon. +5 Skip Holtz Courtesy of Louisiana Tech Louisiana Tech, which had seven members on the all-league team announced Tuesday, also did well with other C-USA honors. Quarterback Ryan Higgins was named Most Valuable Player and wide receiver and kick returner Carlos Henderson was named Offensive Player of the Year and Special Teams Player of the Year. Florida Atlantic end Trey Hendrickson was named Defensive Player of the Year and Western Kentucky quarterback Mike White was Newcomer of the Year. Texas-San Antonio linebacker Josiah Tauaefa was named Freshman of the Year. Holtz, the former head coach at East Carolina and South Florida, managed to win eight games with a team that lost 13 starters from last season and placed seven players in the NFL.

ODU placed just one player, linebacker T.J. Ricks, on the 30-man All-Conference USA first team. ODU athletic director Wood Selig said that’s an indication of just what a fine job Wilder did this season. “I think Bobby and his staff turned in one of the better coaching jobs in college football considering preseason league rankings and the final standings,” he said. “It was a total team effort this year under outstanding leadership by our head coach.” Wilder came to ODU in 2007 from Maine, where he was offensive coordinator and assistant head coach, to build a program from scratch. The Monarchs were 9-2 in 2009, their first season, and qualified for the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs in 2011, the first season they were eligible. ODU won the Colonial Athletic Association title in 2012, finishing 11-2 and was ranked sixth nationally. The Monarchs then began the transition to the Football Bowl Subdivision, finishing 8-4, 6-6 and 5-7 in the next three years before this season’s breakthrough. Wilder is 66-30 in eight seasons at ODU, with one game left to play: Dec. 23 against Eastern Michigan in the Popeyes Bahamas Bowl.

13 2016-12-06 Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s A. E. Phillips Lab School among Top 25 public schools in state RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University is one of the 25 best public schools in the state, according to its School Performance Score (SPS) released recently by the Louisiana Education Department as part of its 2016 accountability assessment of the state’s publically-funded schools. A. E. Phillips’ SPS of 126.7 is an increase of 3.5 points over last year, earning the school an overall letter grade of “A” and the highest score of any non-magnet school in the northern region of the state. School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such as Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates. “Phenomenal parental support and the family atmosphere at A. E. Phillips contribute to our students’ academic success. The faculty, staff and students continue to amaze me. Each day our teachers come to school prepared to provide the best education possible for our boys and girls,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips. “Our teachers establish a classroom environment where education excellence is expected and they are truly dedicated to preparing our students for the future. A. E. Phillips Laboratory School is a wonderful place to work and learn and I am honored to be part of such an outstanding school.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment. Directed by Hood and her 16 years of experience as an effective educational leader, teachers at A.E. Phillips have received numerous awards and are highly qualified with substantial amounts of experience, and advanced education. The AEP faculty are an integral part of the College of Education as many mentor teacher candidates and serve as adjunct professors. “As a distinguished laboratory school, A.E. Phillips and the teacher preparation programs housed with the College of Education accrue mutual benefit from the research-based collaboration that occurs between the college’s faculty and teacher candidates and AEP’s highly qualified teaching professionals,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “It is a privilege to play a role in providing excellence through education as evidenced by A.E. Phillips most recent School Performance Score. “The score is a tribute to the entire A.E. Philips family – teachers, administrators, staff, parents, community partners, Louisiana Tech University and most importantly, the students of A.E. Phillips Laboratory School.” According to the Louisiana Education Department’s website description of the School Performance Scores, elementary school (K-6) scores are based entirely on student achievement on annual assessments in English language arts, math, science, and social studies. Schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind. Middle school (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student achievement on annual assessments with the final 5 percent based on credits earned through the end of students’ 9th grade year. As is the case with elementary schools, middle schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.

13 2016-12-01 Monroe

Tech president: External focus is key President Les Guice said an external focus is one of the keys to increasing Louisiana Tech University's growth, which he thinks will lead it to compete with elite universities by 2030. In a meeting with The News-Star editorial board on Wednesday, Guice discussed plans to develop partnerships with businesses and maintain high academic quality for the school. In the most recent academic year, the state provided approximately $27 million, or about 25 percent of the university's total budget. A decade ago, the state would have provided about $60 million, which constituted 60 percent of the total budget. That, combined with decreased TOPS funding, has led Louisiana Tech to increase fundraising for scholarships and set aside some money to help students with financial hardships. Guice said Tech has too many students who receive TOPS for the university to pay all of the expected losses. The university won't see the full effect of TOPS cuts until the spring quarter, he said. At Tech Pointe, national technology companies get access to students by having employees working on campus. The university also works with CenturyLink in Monroe, CSRA in Bossier City and other companies along the Interstate 20 corridor. These companies are not only hiring graduated from STEM programs. They're mining talent from communications, graphics and business departments, among others. "This is what needs to be replicated all across this region so that when paper mills collapse, we have a more diverse economy around here that allows us to retain our graduates that come out of our high schools. They can actually stay and work in northeastern Louisiana," Guice, a Bastrop native, said. Read more: CenturyLink CEO on merger: We're staying in Monroe | CSRA leading community into next generation of technology It's important, Guice said, to maintain high academic standards and courses that encourage innovation and interaction. Tech's mission, he said, is to develop students for a diversified workforce while encouraging a broad understanding on a variety of topics that includes the liberal arts. It's important to avoid being seen as a four-year technical school. Guice said the university has a staff that's dedicated to providing students an unparalleled education, and increasing enrollment numbers reflect that. The university is building new student housing, plans to update older dorms and has added parking lots. The next major construction need, he said, is a new engineering and science building. The university has privately raised approximately $9 million toward the effort, and $37 million toward the project is in the state's capital outlay budget but has been delayed. The Wyly Tower demolition project also has been postponed because of a shortage of capital outlay funds. Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.

13 2016-12-01 Monroe

Tech president eyes Dallas as top bowl choice Louisiana Tech can solidify its bowl of choice by winning this weekend's Conference USA football championship against Western Kentucky. The Bulldogs' top selection would be a bowl Tech fans are familiar with from 2014. Tech president Les Guice said Wednesday his top preference is the Heart of Dallas Bowl on Dec. 27 for the Bulldog football team. “We had a great experience there two years ago with a Big Ten opponent,” Guice said during a meeting with The NewsStar’s Editorial Board. “We’re building a lot of momentum with an alumni and recruiting base in Dallas, so our visibility there elevates our presence and it’s an easy trip for our local fans.” Heart of Dallas pits C-USA against the Big Ten. Dallas is last in the pecking order among bowl eligible Big Ten teams, and there's a chance the league can't fill the slot, which would open a spot for an at-large team.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech waiting for bowl picture to take shape Tech beat Illinois at the 2014 Heart of Dallas Bowl. Tech played in the New Orleans Bowl last year, and Guice said fans enjoyed the experience at the Superdome to watch the Bulldogs beat Arkansas State. “I wasn’t sure that they would, but it turned out to be fantastic," Guice said. "Our fans loved it and we made some marketing inroads there.” On Monday, Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland didn't get into specifics about which bowl Tech would prefer if it had its choice. C-USA officials prefer to avoid sending the same team to a bowl game in consecutive years, and McClelland confirmed this notion Monday. C-USA has six primary tie-ins for 2016 via the New Mexico Bowl, the New Orleans Bowl, the Boca Baton Bowl, the Bahamas Bowl, the Hawaii Bowl and the Heart of Dallas Bowl. That numbers is now five after Old Dominion on Monday accepted an invitation to the Bahamas. The conference has a secondary tie-in with the Independence Bowl in Shreveport. Depending on how the College Football Playoff rankings pan out and if the SEC games more than two teams in the playoff system, a spot in Shreveport, which pits the SEC against the ACC, could open up. View image on Twitter View image on Twitter Follow Greg Hilburn @GregHilburn1 LaTech Prez @lkguice on bowl preference: Heart of Dallas #wearelatech 10:14 AM - 30 Nov 2016 13 13 Retweets 13 13 likes Guice weighs in on Holtz contract Tech has a chance to win 10 games this year by beating Western Kentucky and whichever opponent it plays in a bowl game. Whenever the season is over, Tech's primary focus is to lock up coach Skip Holtz for the future. “Obviously, we generally don’t get into contract discussions during the middle of the season, but at the end of the season we’ll sit down with Coach Holtz and begin working on a new contract,” Guice said. At the completion of the 2016 season, Holtz has a year remaining on his original five-year deal that pays $500,000 annually. Holtz has been one of the best bargains in the country operating among the lowest paid coaches in C-USA. He has won 26 games during the past three years with two C-USA West Division championships. “Coach Holtz has been a great coach for us and he’s building the program the right way from the ground up,” Guice said. Gannett Louisiana reporter Greg Hilburn contributed to this report.

13 2016-12-01 Monroe

Ruston officials break ground for new bike and walk trail 00:01 01:33 RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Pieces of railroad track can still be spotted along the former Rock Island Railroad established back in the late 1800's. Ruston officials are trying once again to make it a spot of transportation.

Courtesy: KNOE "The Rock Island Greenway is a one mile shared use path and linear park which is going to connect neighborhoods here in Ruston with downtown Ruston and LA Tech," says Ammond Jordan, director of development. Runners and bikers already take advantage of the picturesque scene and walkway near West Kentucky Ave. Now it will not only be a path for leisure and recreation, but also a way to get around the city. "Our hope is that the citizens of Ruston will want to see the greenway extended both north and south," says Jordan. The path will also be handicap accessible connecting neighborhoods, businesses and Louisiana Tech. "When the construction is complete we envision this being a place where mothers in strollers, dog walkers, birders, cyclist, runners can all enjoy themselves as they get out for recreation or they travel from A to B," says Jordan.

This is all part of Moving Ruston Forward and it's only the first phase. Jordan hopes it becomes the backbone of a citywide trail system. The one million dollar project is being funded through the Moving Ruston Forward sales tax passed in April. 13 2016-11-30 Shreveport

Racist social media post prompts La. Tech investigation Louisiana Tech University investigated a student's social media post this month that made racist and threatening comments. The student's post to the popular social media site Snapchat used a racial slur about another student in a history class. "All I can think of is leaving her half dead," the student wrote in hte post. The post then was distributed more widely on social media. Students took screenshots of the Snapchat post and vented about it on social media. Snapchat is an app for smartphones that permits users to share images and videos. STORY FROM WALGREENS 4 simple steps to a gorgeous matte lip The student who published the racist, threatening post appears in a selfie distributed via social media to be Asian, and his name was attached. The Times is not publishing the name because it has been unable to contact him to confirm that he is the author of the post. ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads University President Les Guice emailed students and faculty on Nov. 11 to address discrimination on campus and the recent social media post. "At the heart of a university is the opportunity for people from different cultures and backgrounds to come together in an open and safe environment to share ideas, perspectives and viewpoints without fear of ridicule or reprisal. However, recent comments made on social media have compromised this security and freedom of expression," Guice wrote. "Given these recent social media comments, I want to be clear that I take any and all reports of intimidation, racially insensitive remarks, or attempts to incite violent behavior very seriously. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community. "Make no mistake, Louisiana Tech does not tolerate students, faculty or staff who deliberately or implicitly threaten others, and will investigate thoroughly any reports of these behaviors. That being said, we have a responsibility as an institution to do our due diligence in any investigation, and to take the necessary time and steps to collect information in order to take the most appropriate actions." A Louisiana Tech spokesman, Dave Guerin, said the university started an investigation but ended the review after determining that the student had not enrolled for the winter quarter, which starts this week. "One thing we have to be careful of is not making a knee jerk reaction before we're able to talk to all students involved, so that (we) can make sure the decision we make is based on all the facts that we have," he said. "With that being said, our university does not tolerate hate speech or individuals who are directly trying to intimidate or incite violence or demean any segment of our campus population." Guerin said the university has a social media policy governing what may be posted on social media accounts tied to the university and university organizations. But there is no policy governing what students, faculty and staff post to individual or private social media accounts, he said. "We certainly respect the rights of free speech and we just hope people use that freedom responsibly, and understand that social media communication can sometimes be incomplete and misconstrued," Guerin said. The Times received an anonymous email from someone identifying himself as a Louisiana Tech student claiming the university was allowing racism to flourish. "David Duke and Phil Roberston have both been invited to Louisiana Tech, and just recently there was an uglier instance of hate speech and racism on our campus, about which nothing was done," the email stated. "Drawing attention to the historical systemic racism at this University is important, as many of the students are black, and do not feel safe at this University." Attached to the email was a screenshot of the racist and threatening post that prompted this month's investigation. Guerin said the university did not invite former Imperial Wizard of Ku Klux Klan David Duke or Duck Dynasty cast member Phil Roberston to speak on campus. He said Tim Wise will be on campus Dec. 1. Wise is a writer and anti-racism activist. Robertson was interviewed by GQ Magazine in 2013, where he made remarks that were interpreted by some as racist and anti-gay. "To our knowledge, we haven't had anybody on the campus, that we know of, who has invited those folks to campus," he said. "Again, we support the opportunity and rights of different folks with different viewpoints. So in no way has our president tried to prevent the Tim Wise visit from happening."

13 2016-11-23 Monroe

Louisiana Tech, CenturyLink partner for regional robotics event RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - Faculty from Louisiana Tech University and CenturyLink employees recently welcomed students from Louisiana and Arkansas for the inaugural Northeast Louisiana Regional Autonomous Robotics Circuit (RARC) hosted at CenturyLink headquarters in Monroe. The event, which was developed as an extension of the Bossier RARC competition developed and hosted by the Cyber Innovation Center’s NICERC division, featured over 20 teams that competed in elementary, middle and high school categories. The inaugural northeast Louisiana competition was hosted by the Louisiana Tech College of Education’s Science and Technology Education Center (SciTEC) and CenturyLink. “The theme for the 2016-2017 RARC competitions is ‘Exploring the Wonders of the World,’” said JoAnn Marshall of NICERC. “The elementary and middle school teams programmed their robots to crisscross a competition mat that resembles a map of the world and accomplish tasks related to three specific Wonders of the World. Meanwhile, the high school teams programmed and designed their robots to survey one of the many uninhabited land masses on Earth and collect resources that will be necessary for future explorations.”

“Opportunities like the Northeast Louisiana RARC competition not only allow students to showcase and refine essential STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills, but more importantly, they foster the use of 21st century skills such as collaboration, perseverance and critical thinking,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of the College of Education at Louisiana Tech. Lindsey Keith-Vincent, director of SciTEC and the Office of Outreach and External Funding at Louisiana Tech said the university is thrilled that SciTEC, NICERC and CenturyLink have the opportunity to support and connect with such talented students and community partners through this effort. “We are hopeful that these talented young people competing will one day be on Louisiana Tech’s campus preparing for STEM related careers in our region at places including CenturyLink.” “This competition shows the impact the technology industry has had along the I-20 corridor and Northeast Louisiana. CenturyLink values our community partners and recognizes the importance of investing in STEM education,” Bill Bradley, senior vice president of cyber engineering & technology services for CenturyLink said. Keith-Vincent said the efforts and support of CenturyLink’s Bill Bradley, Alex Bohl, Kristy LaCroix; Louisiana Tech’s Jaicee Choate; NICERC’s Jo Ann Marshall, and numerous volunteers, coaches, parents and teams contributed to making this event possible. “We also thank BASH Booth’s Sarah Jeffords, Collin Bailey from Louisiana Tech University Admissions and Lisa Dick with AXI Education Solutions for attending and making Saturday a success,” she said. Additional RARC competitions are being scheduled for the winter and spring with dates, locations and times to be posted soon on the NICERC webpage and Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education Facebook site.

13 2016-11-23 Monroe

Masur artist-in-residence, La Tech professor emeritus to open exhibits Nov. 28 Solo exhibitions featuring artists Beili Liu and Dean Dablow will be on display Nov. 28- March 11 at the Masur Museum in Monroe. Liu — the most recent artist in residence at the museum — is a Texas artist known for combining folk craft traditions with a sense of place to create metaphorically rich installations. Dablow is a professor emeritus at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston. Gain insight into the creative process behind the work of these artists at receptions Nov. 28 and Jan. 17. Liu will discuss her exhibit "Sky Well" on Nov. 28, and Dablow will detail his retrospective work in "Everything is Abstract" on Jan. 17. The receptions are 6-8 p.m. with artist talks at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments will be provided at both. Vankaal I is a 2013 work of art by Dean Dablow. A Vankaal I is a 2013 work of art by Dean Dablow. A retrospective exhibit of his work "Everything is Abstract" will be on display at the Masur Museum Nov. 28-March 11. (Photo: Courtesy photo) Liu became entranced by electrified shine of water trapped on top of lily pads while on Black Bayou Lake this spring. Upon touching it, she discovered the bubbling, flashing water flowed like quicksilver. Since hearing about the Louisiana folk crafts, and their ties to the land, Liu has endeavored to capture this fluid relationship in a single work of art. The name of the work of art Liu made for this exhibition is "Sky Well." "Everything Is Abstract"is a retrospective featuring examples of Dablow’s work beginning in 1974, and running through 2016. Dablow purposefully engaged with a variety of media over the course of his career, often mining one for all it is worth before moving on to another for a time. While this progression is sequential and can be tracked chronologically, "Everything Is Abstract" is laid out in our gallery spaces in a non-linear fashion. This is meant to be more indicative of Dablow’s goals as an artist. IF YOU GO What: Solo exhibitions featuring artists Beili Liu and Dean Dablow When: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.Tuesday – Friday and noon-5 p.m. Saturday Nov.28-March 11 Where: Masur Museum, 1400 S Grand St, Monroe Cost: Free

13 2016-11-21 Monroe

Louisiana Tech fall graduates encouraged to ‘enjoy the journey and attack life’ Life is about changes, and learning to roll with them is the most important lesson of all. That was the message presented by William E. Bradley, senior vice president for cyber engineering and technology services at Century Link, to 268 new graduates Saturday morning at Louisiana Tech University’s 318th Commencement Exercise at the Thomas Assembly Center. The group of new graduates included 195 undergraduate degree recipients and 73 graduate degree honorees, including 12 who earned doctoral degrees. Louisiana Tech also honored longtime Ruston resident Benjamin Denny as the 73rd Tower Medallion Recipient and newest member of Louisiana Tech’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni. The award recognizes those exceptional individuals who have brought honor not only to themselves, but also to Louisiana Tech University. Bradley, a 1985 graduate from Louisiana Tech with a degree in computer science, has worked for Century Link for more than 30 years in a number of roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer. One of the new graduates he was speaking to Saturday was his daughter Rebecca, who graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Tech’s College of Business. “It’s been 11,508 days to be exact that’s a long time since I sat in the very seat you sit in today,” Bradley told the new graduates. “And I want to share a few things I learned since sitting there 31 years ago. Graduation is one of the major milestones in your life…it means your life is changing. You’ll never be the same. As a software designer, I never dreamed about being an executive leader. I guess I should have paid more attention in those accounting classes. “Through that time I learned many things. No. 1, change is constant. No. 2, how we embrace change makes all the difference. Some changes are fun, but some are challenging changes like finding a job and setting out on your own. Or perhaps changing careers later in life. You have to own that change. You must determine now how you will react. You must embrace change if you want to be successful. I encourage you to take that one step further. And No. 3, you should create change. Be bold enough to express a new idea. Be persistent enough to see that idea through. Mentor someone younger than you, or help someone in a knowledgeable way with the skills your degree shows you have.” To be successful in the midst of challenges brought about by an ever-changing world, Bradley offered the new graduates three principles to live by and principles to succeed: follow your passion, work hard and give back. Denny, the Tower Medallion recipient and newest member of the Hall of Distinguished Alumni, was recognized during fall commencement for his numerous achievements and tireless service to Louisiana Tech. Established in 1976 by the Louisiana Tech University Alumni Association, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity. Denny holds three degrees from Louisiana Tech, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Data Processing in 1970, and a Master of Business Administration with a Finance Specialty in 1980. He also received an Honorary Doctor of Humanities degree in 2012. A former director of Louisiana Tech’s Alumni Association, Denny received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the College of Business in 1985, the Robert E. Russ Awards for Community Service from the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce in 2010 and the Ruston Civic Leadership Award from the city of Ruston in 2013. He retired as President of Bank of Ruston in 2013 and continues to serve as Director for Bank of Ruston and Century Next Financial Corp. At the close of his remarks, Bradley noted one last change the new graduates should remember. “Today you are an educator, or an engineer, a scientist, nurse or accountant,” Bradley said. “Today you are an alumnus of Louisiana Tech University. But tomorrow is a new day, and I hope you take the same sense of accomplishment that you rightly feel today with you tomorrow. And that you enjoy your journey and attack life the same way you attacked your degree. Your future is bright it belongs to you.”

13 2016-11-21 Monroe

La. Tech’s aviation department receives Top Hawk award RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation was recently named one of five programs in the nation to receive Textron Aviation’s Top Hawk 2017 award. “Our selection as a Top Hawk winner places Louisiana Tech among the leaders in collegiate aviation,” said Jordan G. Lyons, aviation’s department chair. More Tech News: Louisiana Tech professor elected to the National Academy of Construction Louisiana Tech history professor appointed to Oxford editorial board As a result of the award, the professional aviation department will take possession of a brand new, custom-branded Cessna Skyhawk aircraft that is expected to arrive in February, and that the department will be able to use until the end of the academic year. In addition to use of the plane, the Top Hawk award guarantees an internship spot at Textron Aviation for one Louisiana Tech professional aviation student. “The internship opportunity with Textron will be available to both professional aviation and aviation management majors,” Lyons said. “Each applicant will be required to apply and complete an interview unique to the Top Hawk program.” ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads This year is the first year that Louisiana Tech has applied for the award, which seeks to promote collegiate aviation awareness. “Our department submitted an Operations and Marketing Plan to Textron Aviation and was one of five programs nationwide selected for the award,” said Danielle Gray, administrative coordinator for the department. The Cessna Skyhawk does not land in Ruston until next year, but the honor of being the first to test drive and ride in the Cessna Skyhawk may have already been reserved. “Danielle Gray and Kary Randall made significant contributions to the project, I would like to extend the invitation to them first,” Lyons said. Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation provides two accredited professional degree programs in professional aviation and aviation management. Both bachelor degree programs focus on setting a standard of excellence by providing graduates with the knowledge, skills, experience, and attitudes necessary to shape and lead the aviation industry in the 21st century. The department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International.

13 2016-11-16 Monroe

Louisiana Tech history professor appointed to Oxford editorial board Oxford University Press announced recently the appointment of Louisiana Tech University history professor Dr. Stephen Webre to serve as a senior editor of its long-term online reference project, the “Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History.” During his first three years on the project, Webre will be responsible for identifying potential topics for entries, as well as contributors to produce them. Entries differ from those found in conventional encyclopedias in that “they are detailed, documented and intended for a specialist readership,” Webre said. He will be in charge of recruiting entries related to the history of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Belize and Panama. In recommending the appointment, project editor-in-chief William H. Beezley of the University of Arizona stated that he looked forward to working with Webre, whom he described as “an outstanding Central America specialist.” According to Beezley the Oxford University Press’s online research encyclopedias incorporate many of the advantages of Wikipedia, including the flexibility and efficiency of electronic publishing. They differ, however, in that authors are recruited by the editors on the basis of demonstrated expertise, entries are subject to external peer review and the articles are signed. Commenting on his appointment as senior editor, Webre said, “I’m delighted to have been asked to participate in this exciting project, and I expect to learn a lot by working with Professor Beezley and the other highly accomplished members of the editorial board.” A member of the Louisiana Tech faculty since 1982, Stephen Webre holds a Ph.D. in Latin American history from Tulane University. He is a specialist in Central American history and his publications include three books and numerous articles in scholarly journals. Webre is a contributing editor of the Handbook of Latin American Studies and a corresponding member of the Guatemalan Academy of Geography and History. At Louisiana Tech he holds the Garnie W. McGinty Chair in History and serves as associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

13 2016-11-16 Shreveport

Governor: CSRA opening inspires community to 'dream big' The opening of the CSRA Integrated Technology Center in Bossier City on Tuesday was lauded by Gov. John Bel Edwards as the result of a strong community partnership and the foundation for a bright future in the area. “Let that collaboration be our guide for the future as we continue to dream big and continue to build a National Cyber Research Park that will be the envy of the world,” Edwards said. “There is no reason it can’t happen right here in Bossier, none, but we have to remain committed to it, we have to persevere.” A ribbon-cutting ceremony marked the completion of the $39 million, 96,000 square-foot facility on East Texas Street near the Cyber Innovation Center and Bossier Parish Community College. The ITC is expected to bring 800 jobs to Bossier by June 2018, and another 300 jobs are anticipated through CSRA’s engagement contact center on Benton Road. CSRA is a global company that brings next-generation technology services to the federal government. Bossier City was selected out of 134 potential cities to be the site of the ITC. “As someone who has been governor for a rather challenging time for 10 months and four days, it’s a pleasure to be out celebrating,” Edwards said. “The dream was really rather simple – let’s build a foundation for the future. Let’s make technology that foundation and increase our educational capacity to attract technology jobs.” Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn CSRA Grand Opening Celebration Fullscreen Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to the crowd Buy Photo Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to the crowd during the CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening Celebration Tuesday afternoon. Henrietta Wildsmith/The Times Fullscreen Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to the crowd1 of 19 The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening The ribbons fall from the sky in an untraditional ribbon People at the CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand The CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards talks to people Next Slide 19 Photos CSRA Grand Opening Celebration Other officials in attendance included Bossier Mayor Lo Walker, Bossier Parish Police Jury President Wanda Bennett, Northwestern State University President Jim Henderson, Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice and Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson, who said the Northwest Louisiana area is only getting more diverse economically. “The tourism industry is here, you’re a healthcare center, Barksdale Air Force Base [has] very vibrant and robust support, manufacturing activities are still very strong in this part of the state,” Pierson said. “Today at this facility we establish… a new beachhead that makes a new addition to this economy around information technology and jobs of the future and wellpaying jobs. That’s music to our ears.” READ MORE: CSRA aims to attract millennials with innovative design CSRA’s community endeavor agreement partners for the project include the City of Bossier, Bossier Parish and the Cyber Innovation Center, as well as the state and Louisiana Economic Development. Its education partners include Louisiana Tech, Northwestern State and BPCC. CSRA employees, which grew from one person in early 2014 to about 400 today, were housed in the Cyber Innovation Center during the two-year construction period of the ITC. “All this work, all this energy is focused on one thing: delivering tomorrow’s technology today,” said CSRA CIO John Dancy. “We’re excited about this community, we’re excited to be here and we’re looking forward to the opportunities that this grand opening represents.” 13 2016-11-16 Shreveport

La. Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students Minority students attending Louisiana Tech University will now have the opportunity to receive a scholarship dedicated to enhancing student achievement and education. Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. “James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson serve as an inspiration and a clear example of the impacts that people of vision and integrity can have on our history,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Mr. Potts and Mrs. BradfordRobinson truly exemplify the Tenets of Tech, and the strength of character that all of our students and alumni should aspire to emulate. "They are an important part of the Tech Family and our institution’s history, and I am excited by the opportunities this scholarship will provide for future generations of students.” Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later. “I am truly grateful that a scholarship will be created in James Earl Potts and Bertha Lee Bradford Robinson Honor,” said Shirley Potts Hicks, sister of James Earl Potts. “It was a long time coming, but I am glad it came in my life time. This is another history making event.” Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965. Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population continued to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus. “I am deeply honored and grateful to have a scholarship in my name at my undergraduate alma mater, Louisiana Tech University,” said Bradford-Robinson. “The struggle was real, but it was also necessary. To know that my classmate and I affected change so that African-American students could matriculate at this esteemed university is confirmation that our efforts were not in vain.” Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. (Photo: Courtesy of Louisiana Tech University) Students will have to be in good standing with the university, earning a 2.5 or better GPA. This scholarship is available for incoming and current students. Awards will be given in various amounts and will be need-based, Washington said. Since the scholarship was recently created, the school will not be able to award any monies until funding is available, according to Coordinator of Alumni Gifts and Special Programs Jimmy Washington. "We were looking at some opportunities to increase the minority population at Tech and Dr. Guice has given us his blessings to try find ways to do it," Washington said. Alumni and friends of Louisiana Tech can help to support the James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship Fund by contacting Jimmy Washington at (318) 257-2067 or [email protected]

13 2016-11-15 Monroe

Louisiana Tech student elected to lead Louisiana Association of Student Nurses Louisiana Tech University nursing student Caleb Faul has been elected as president of the Louisiana Association of Student Nurses for 2016-17. Faul was elected as he joined nine Louisiana Tech Student Nurses Association members along with chapter advisers Tanya Sims and Melissa Madden, in attending the 62nd annual LASN Convention held recently in Shreveport. “Caleb has already been an outstanding leader on campus,” said Donna Hood, director of the Division of Nursing at Louisiana Tech. “Under his leadership of the Louisiana Tech chapter of the Student Nurses Association, the chapter has grown and has been involved in many outreach projects both locally and across the state. This level of involvement resulted in recognition of Tech's chapter at the state convention.” The convention hosted keynote speakers and nursing focus sessions that included integrative medicine, leadership, healthcare policy, pharmacology, nursing careers and licensure examination preparation. Louisiana Tech's SNA chapter gained statewide recognition by earning four awards: Best Community Health Project, First and Second Place for the Image of Nursing Service Projects, and the SNA with the most School Spirit for the Convention. Hood said Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing congratulates Faul as he leads student nurses across the state throughout the upcoming year. “Caleb is the third Louisiana Tech nursing student to be elected as state president,” Hood said. “This is excellent exposure for our nursing program and is a wonderful opportunity for his personal growth as a leader. Caleb has great vision for the future and knows how to work hard to make that vision a reality.”

13 2016-11-15 Ruston

TECH HONORS FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech.

13 2016-11-14 Monroe

La. Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students RUSTON, La. (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana “I am deeply honored and grateful to have a scholarship in my name at my undergraduate alma mater, Louisiana Tech University,” said Bradford-Robinson. “The struggle was real, but it was also necessary. To know that my classmate and I affected change so that African-American students could matriculate at this esteemed university is confirmation that our efforts were not in vain.” “I am truly grateful that a scholarship will be created in James Earl Potts and Bertha Lee Bradford Robinson Honor,” said Shirley Potts Hicks, sister of James Earl Potts. “It was a long time coming, but I am glad it came in my life time. This is another history making event.”

Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later. Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965. Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population would continue to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus. Bradford-Robinson would eventually earn her degree in early childhood education from Louisiana Tech in 1976. “James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson serve as an inspiration and a clear example of the impacts that people of vision and integrity can have on our history,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Mr. Potts and Mrs. BradfordRobinson truly exemplify the Tenets of Tech, and the strength of character that all of our students and alumni should aspire to emulate. They are an important part of the Tech Family and our institution’s history, and I am excited by the opportunities this scholarship will provide for future generations of students.” Alumni and friends of Louisiana Tech can help to support the James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship Fund by contacting Jimmy Washington at (318) 257-2067 or [email protected] Information on sending financial contributions can be found at http://www.latech.edu/students/multicultural-affairs. 13 2016-11-14 Monroe

Tech Officials investigating threatening social media post allegedly made by student RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News & La. Tech.) – The Louisiana Tech Police Department and university are investigating a social media post allegedly made by a student with racially insensitive and threatening remarks. Louisiana Tech’s Director of Communications says university officials immediately began looking into the source and intent of the message when they were alerted Wednesday night. In the Snapchat post, shared widely on social media, the student made a racial slur against students in a history class and allegedly threatened the life of a black female student. Tech officials say they take these remarks very seriously and they do not tolerate deliberate attempts to intimidate students, faculty or staff. They say they are actively investigating the matter and they will take all necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure they continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for the entire campus community. The following is Louisiana Tech’s official statement re: the social media incident that occurred this week. “Upon learning of this social media post Wednesday evening, the Louisiana Tech Police Department along with university officials immediately began looking into the source and intent of the message. It should be clear that Louisiana Tech University takes racially-insensitive or threatening remarks very seriously and does not tolerate deliberate attempts to intimidate students, faculty or staff, or to incite violent behavior. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community.”

Here’s the Friday morning email from Louisiana Tech President Les Guice to all students, faculty and staff. “At the heart of a university is the opportunity for people from different cultures and backgrounds to come together in an open and safe environment to share ideas, perspectives and viewpoints without fear of ridicule or reprisal. However, recent comments made on social media have compromised this security and freedom of expression. Given these recent social media comments, I want to be clear that I take any and all reports of intimidation, racially insensitive remarks, or attempts to incite violent behavior very seriously. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community. Make no mistake, Louisiana Tech does not tolerate students, faculty or staff who deliberately or implicitly threatens others, and will investigate thoroughly any reports of these behaviors. That being said, we have a responsibility as an institution to do our due diligence in any investigation, and to take the necessary time and steps to collect information in order to take the most appropriate actions. I believe that every student at Louisiana Tech has something special to offer his and her classmates. Through each person’s background and experiences, there are learning opportunities that we are afforded, both in times of agreement and in times of conflict. Thank you for your feedback and for sharing your concerns with me. I am proud to serve you and to work together to create and preserve a peaceful and productive campus environment.” Leslie K. Guice President Louisiana Tech University 13 2016-11-14 Ruston

TECH TO CELEBRATE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AT LUNCHEON Louisiana Tech University will honor some of its most distinguished and faithful alumni today at its annual Alumni Awards Luncheon as part of the university’s Homecoming 2016 celebration. The event, scheduled for noon in the Davison Athletics Complex, will recognize the Alumnus of the Year, Young Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Alumni from each of Louisiana Tech five academic colleges.

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Louisiana Tech research series welcomes precision medicine, healthcare expert Tim Cooley, former executive vice president of operations for molecular health and former director for health outcomes and economics at Eli Lilly, will visit Louisiana Tech University on November 14 to speak to faculty, students and staff as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series. Cooley’s will share his insights and expertise during a presentation titled, “Innovation in Healthcare and the Promise and Challenges of Precision Medicine” beginning at 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Institute for Micro-manufacturing on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and open to the public. “Mr. Cooley’s visit will enlighten our students to innovation in the field of precision medicine and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in that area,” said Dr. Jamie Newman, founder and co-organizer of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series. “This is a critical and growing area of research and development and something many of our students may find themselves a part of in the future.” Cooley is a senior technology leader with extensive experience managing information technology and operations for life science and healthcare organizations. He is recognized for driving business value through strategic vision, innovation and operational excellence. “Today, we are arguably beginning to reap some of the benefits associated with the Human Genome Project and other basic science investments via the concept of precision medicine,” explains Cooley. “However as we move forward, the promise of precision medicine and its cousin ‘consumer driven medicine’ are running into a range of challenges which threaten to limit rapid uptake of these advances. As we move forward, it is important to understand these challenges and encourage rapid adoption of new technology without sacrificing patient safety and quality.” This is the fourth year for the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program. As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, it strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research. The 2016-2017 series continues to expand on critical areas beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education. All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free to attend and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus, and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at [email protected] 13 2016-11-11 Monroe

Louisiana Tech holds homecoming parade LA Tech hosts homecoming parade RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Students and faculty came to Louisiana Tech's Joe Aillet Stadium Thursday night to kick off their homecoming weekend with a parade.

Courtesy: KNOE 8 News The parade started at the stadium, and wound its way all through campus. The band led the way, and was followed by cars carrying student-made floats, and homecoming king and queen hopefuls. The LA Tech cheerleaders and Regal Blues also made an appearance, waving to the crowds who flooded the campus streets.

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TECH CHOIR TO PERFORM AT HOWARD AUDITORIUM The Louisiana Tech University choir, established in 1894, has had a long history of standing out from the crowd. John Petzet, assistant professor of music and director of choral activities, said the upcoming choir concert would be no exception. Beginning at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Howard Auditorium, the event will include selections by Dan Forrest, Ola Gjeilo, Joan Szymko and The Beatles.

13 2016-11-10 Monroe

Louisiana Tech announces the creation of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs will announce the creation of a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana Tech and will contribute to enriching the cultural and diversity experiences of the university’s campus community. Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later. Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965. Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population would continue to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus. If you plan to attend and cover the event for your media organization, please RSVP to Dave Guerin at [email protected] or (318) 257-4854. WHAT: Announcement of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship WHEN: Friday, November 11 – 11:00 a.m. WHERE: Davison Athletics Complex at Louisiana Tech University (access facility through west entrance, take elevator to 3rd floor club level.)

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Louisiana Tech to celebrate distinguished alumni at Alumni Awards Luncheon Louisiana Tech University will honor some of its most distinguished and faithful alumni Friday at its annual Alumni Awards Luncheon as part of the university’s Homecoming 2016 celebration. The event, scheduled for 12 p.m. in the Davison Athletics Complex, will recognize the Alumnus of the Year, Young Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Alumni from each of Louisiana Tech five academic colleges. Tickets can be purchased for $30 per person or $240 for reserved table of 8 by calling the Louisiana Tech Marbury Alumni Center at (318) 255-7950 or visiting www.latechalumni.org/2016alumniawards. Tim Petrus, a 1976 electrical engineering graduate, is being honored as the 2016 Alumnus of the Year and Nathan A. Burkhalter, a 2010 mechanical engineering graduate, will be named the 2016 Young Alumnus of the Year. Petrus currently serves as executive vice president and general partner of MorningStar of Fort Worth, Texas. After graduating from Louisiana Tech, he began career at Exxon Company USA (now ExxonMobil) in Lafayette, Louisiana where he was involved in both reservoir and production engineering. In 1980, Petrus moved to Fort Worth, Texas to work with the Petroleum Lending Department of Texas American Bank where he rose to the position of vice president. In February 1988, he joined the newly formed Cross Timbers Oil Company in Fort Worth as a regional engineer, and later took over the Acquisitions Group of XTO (formerly Cross Timbers Oil Company) and was promoted to the position of executive vice president. Joining three other members of XTO’s executive management team, Petrus formed MorningStar Partners in 2012. MorningStar, a privately held partnership that acquires and manages oil and gas properties, and its team formed a new private equity-backed company in 2015 named Southland Royalty Company which to date has completed $1 billion in oil and gas property acquisitions. Petrus resides in Fort Worth, Texas with his wife Elaine, who is a Louisiana Tech accounting graduate. He is the immediate past president of the Louisiana Tech Engineering and Science Foundation Board, and director of the Louisiana Tech University Foundation Board. Burkhalter is a production engineer for West Africa for ExxonMobil, where he has worked in power plants, refineries, on offshore drilling rigs and production platforms in equipment design, project management and operations support roles. He was recently selected to receive the ExxonMobil “Power On” award for innovation, design, and operational execution excellence for 2015. Burkhalter has appeared as a national finalist and three-time competitor on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior, and was selected to compete on Team Ninja Warrior which will air in February 2017. He is also an active advocate, volunteer, adventurer, speaker, global traveler, church/missions volunteer, and has drilled fresh water wells in around the world as an active member and advocate for a number of non-profit organizations and ministries. Burkhalter is originally from Eunice, Louisiana, and currently resides in Houston, Texas. Brian N. Thomas is the College of Applied and Natural Sciences Distinguished Alumnus for 2016. A 1995 graduate in health information administration, Thomas is senior vice president and chief operating officer for Jefferson Regional Medical Center in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He has served in executive positions for several medical centers and physician practices, including Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama and John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Indio, California. Thomas was appointed to the Governor’s Trauma Advisory Council for State of Arkansas in 2014, and currently resides in Benton, Arkansas with his wife Angela, and their two daughters. The College of Business honors Karen Dyson Taylor, a 1979 graduate in accounting, as its 2016 Distinguished Alumna honoree. Taylor serves as senior vice president of human resources of Enterprise Products, a midstream energy company in Houston, Texas. She has been named an Outstanding Woman in Business by Leadera Consulting Group, and one of the most powerful and influential women in Texas by Texas Diversity Magazine. Taylor was also named one of the “Women Worth Watching in 2006” by Profiles in Diversity Journal. She is a member of the Louisiana Tech College of Business Advisory Board and lives in Houston with her husband, two daughters and son. Jeanette Jarrell Hinckley, a 1978 English education graduate, has been named the College of Education’s Distinguished Alumna for 2016. During her career, Hinckley served as librarian and branch manager for libraries in Palm Beach Gardens and Tequesta, Florida as well as Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. She also served as records manager for Mobil Oil in Lafayette and New Orleans, Louisiana, and later owned and managed Books, Etc. in Pineville, Louisiana. Hinckley is past president and secretary of the Pineville Rotary Club and involved in many community activities and professional groups. She currently lives in Pineville with husband Justin, a Louisiana Tech graduate and 2010 Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year. The College of Engineering and Science recognizes William E. Bradley III, a 1985 computer science graduate, as its 2016 Distinguished Alumnus. Bradley is currently senior vice president of cyber engineering and technology solutions for CenturyLink, where he has served for 31 years in roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer. He also serves on the board of directors of RiskSense and is an active advocate for promoting the growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Bradley has been a director on the Louisiana Tech Engineering and Science Foundation Board and is a director of the Louisiana Tech University Foundation Board. Bradley resides in Choudrant with his wife Lisa. Christopher W. Coe, a 1983 general studies and 1985 architecture graduate, is the College of Liberal Arts’ 2016 Alumnus of the Year. Coe is founder and president of COE Architecture International, a Los Angeles-based design firm recognized for its unique approach to architecture as city-making through its experience designing mixed-use, urban in-fill developments. In addition to his Louisiana Tech degree, Coe earned a Master of Architecture from Yale in 1987, and served as a lecturer in architectural design at the University of Southern California from 1992 through 2009. Originally from Bossier City, Core currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife Sophie Li.

13 2016-11-09 Associated Press

CenturyLink executive to keynote La Tech’s fall commencement RUSTON, La. (AP) - William E. Bradley, senior vice president for cyber engineering and technology services at CenturyLink, will be the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech University’s fall commencement. Bradley, a 1985 graduate from Louisiana Tech in computer science, will address the graduates at 10 a.m. Nov. 19 at the Thomas Assembly Center on Tech’s campus. The Shreveport Times (http://bit.ly/2eKgcEm ) reports Bradley has worked for CenturyLink for over 30 years in a number of roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer to his current post. In addition, Bradley provides expertise to several academic boards at Louisiana Tech and serves on the board of cyber security company RiskSense. Fall commencement officially marks the end of Tech’s fall quarter. Winter quarter classes are scheduled to begin Nov. 30. 13 2016-11-09 Monroe

Retired senior intelligence officer to speak at Louisiana Tech science seminar Ronald I. Miller, retired senior intelligence officer for the United States Department of Defense, will speak at 4 p.m. Thursday in Carson-Taylor Hall 322 as part of the weekly Science Seminars at Louisiana Tech University. As a guest of Louisiana Tech’s physics department in the College of Engineering and Science, Miller will talk about his nontraditional physics career, focusing on work with the U.S. Intelligence Community. He will discuss two unclassified projects on directed energy weapons that he led at the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center. “Dr. Miller’s long service in our nation’s intelligence community is both fascinating and an important example of the career opportunities for math and science majors outside of academia,” Dr. Lee Sawyer, director of chemistry, nanosystems engineering and physics said. “This seminar is a unique opportunity for students and faculty to hear about some of the most interesting and exciting developments in Directed Energy Weapons, as well as a general overview of our nation’s intelligence agencies.” Miller served on the Directed Energy Weapons Staff at the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center (MSIC) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama for 32 years. He also served on the Directed Energy Weapons Subcomittee of the U.S. Intelligence Community in Washington, D.C., which he chaired for eight years. Prior to joining the MSIC, Miller was employed by the Boeing Aerospace Company where he contributed to NASA research in the solidification of materials in micro-gravity environment of space. Experiments on Skylab, the Apollo-Soyuz mission and other sub-orbital rocket flights helped lay the foundation for materials science in space projects currently on the Space Station. Miller is the author of 78 scientific journal articles, books and government reports in the fields of liquid state physics, low temperature physics, electromagnetic field theory and laser science/systems engineering, including the first book covering the history of the development of laser weapons at Redstone Arsenal. He has received numerous NASA, Intelligence Community and United States Department of Defense honors, including the National Intelligence Medal. “Our seminar series has had a very successful quarter with exciting speakers, and we are grateful to Dr. Miller for participating in the last seminar of fall 2016,” said Dr. Neven Simicevic, professor of physics and event organizer. “We are grateful that each of the speakers has offered their time to contribute to the education of anyone interested in science.” Miller earned his bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and physics from Austin Peay State University, a master’s degree in physics from Clemson University and a doctorate in physics from Clemson Southeastern Institute of Technology. The Louisiana Tech Science Seminars are weekly talks offered by the physics program and are free and open to the public. The physics-related talks are geared toward general audiences and begin at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in Carson-Taylor Hall 322 on the Louisiana Tech campus. 13 2016-11-09 Ruston

HOMECOMING WEEK 2016 AT TECH CELEBRATES SCHOOL TRADITION, PRIDE Louisiana Tech University’s Alumni Association, in conjunction with the university’s Student Government Association and various student organizations, academic colleges, athletics department and campus and community partners, has announced its official calendar of events for this week’s Homecoming Week 2016. For more information on Homecoming events and activities taking place on and around the Tech campus, call the Marbury Alumni Center at 255-7950 or visit www.latechalumni.org/homecoming2016. Thursday • Campus Cook-off at noon in Centennial Plaza

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Louisiana Tech accountancy student part of winning team at national competition Darrian Carr, a graduate student in the College of Business’ School of Accountancy at Louisiana Tech University, recently participated in the annual Beta Alpha Psi (BAP) Honor Society’s “Project Run With It” competition and was part of the winning team that analyzed and assisted the Ulman Cancer Fund. Carr, who is from Benton, Louisiana and is the Louisiana Tech BAP chapter president, was selected through a highlycompetitive process to participate in PRWI on behalf of Louisiana Tech. Attendee selections are based on service to BAP, grade point average, research, ability to work well in groups and strength of presentation skills.This is the second consecutive year that a Louisiana Tech student has been selected. After talking with fellow student Jordon Collis, who represented Louisiana Tech in 2015 and was part of the 2015 PRWI winning team, Carr decided to try for a spot in the 2016 competition. “According to Jordon, the competition was high intensity and required a lot of hard work,” said Carr. “Being a part of a winning team is a huge honor for me and for our chapter because only 72 BAP representatives are selected each year. This project required my teammates and me to provide a real-world solution to a real-world problem. I feel the knowledge that I have gained in the Louisiana Tech College of Business really helped prepare me to be successful in this competition.” Carr and his team were assigned the Ulman Cancer Fund as their not-for-profit organization.The Ulman Cancer Fund’s goal is to make sure that no young adult has to face cancer alone. Carr’s team worked to provide the Ulman Cancer Fund with a method of calculating their return on investment and creating the framework for a procedures manual that would ensure the proper usage of organizational resources. The “Project Run With It” competition brings together 72 selected BAP students to analyze and recommend solutions to problems faced by three real not-for-profit organizations, over a three-day period. Student teams are formed with four students per team and are given two days to gain further understanding of the assigned organization, and to develop their recommendations. Teams will present their recommendations on the third day to a panel of judges. Winners of the PRWI competition are announced at the closing ceremonies of the National BAP Annual Conference with each winner’s chapter receiving a $1,000 award. “It was great for Darrian to be selected to participate in this competition,” said Carol Shaver, Burton Risinger Endowed Professor in the School of Accountancy and faculty advisor for BAP. “To have one of our Louisiana Tech students participate on the winning team two years in a row is awesome.” Each year, Moss Adams, LLC, one of the largest public accounting firms in the nation, partners with BAP to offer the “Project Run With It” competition at the annual meeting. Beta Alpha Psi is a premier international honor and service organization for accounting, finance, and information systems students. Its mission is to encourage the study and practice of accounting, finance, and information systems while providing opportunities for service, professional development, and interaction among members. Louisiana Tech’s chapter was founded in 1956 as the nation’s 54th chapter.

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Louisiana Tech Trenchless Technology Center to host municipal forum in Shreveport The Trenchless Technology Center (TTC) at Louisiana Tech University will host a gathering of regional industry professionals working in the water and wastewater sector during the “Shreveport Municipal Forum and Exhibition on Trenchless Technology 2016” on November 10 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center. The Shreveport forum is one of five forums organized by the TTC this fall. The purpose of municipal forums is to educate attendees about trenchless technology basics and the latest developments, and to enable the exchange of information on topics of mutual interest. Louisiana Tech’s TTC has developed the program over the past 15 years with the intent to schedule six to seven highly-educational and non-commercial presentations and one ‘municipal participants only’ discussion session at each forum. “The Shreveport forum is targeted for regional professionals working in the water and wastewater sector, including employees of the City of Shreveport and other municipalities in the area, consultants working on behalf of municipalities, and contractors and vendors within driving distance from the forum location,” said Jadranka Simicevic, assistant director of Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center. “TTC municipal forums offer a unique learning and networking environment where attendees have access to presentations and exhibits in the exhibition hall, and printed resources.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech basketball teams face adjustments The presentations at the Shreveport municipal forum will cover topics such as live water main inspections, engineering design and case studies for spray on geopolymer liners, cured-in-place pipe, and sealing the collection system with focus on main-to-lateral rehabilitation. It will also focus on diverse and evolving private service lateral liner market and lessons learned, and manhole rehabilitation. “The TTC has served as a global leader in education and technology transfer of various trenchless technology methods,” said Simicevic. “The forum program has been running for over 15 years making impact on a large number of people and companies working in water and wastewater industry. A total of 170 forums have been organized in over 30 cities in the U.S. and Canada.” Over the past two decades, Louisiana Tech’s TTC has become a leading research facility for the development of technologies influencing almost every aspect of trenchless construction methods and has served as a point of reference for representatives of the trenchless industry. The TTC evolved from the Trenchless Excavation Center at Louisiana Tech, established in 1989 by Dr. Tom Iseley, with a primary focus on microtunneling and horizontal directional drilling. Expanding its reach to other trenchless technologies, the structure and name was changed to the Trenchless Technology Center in 1991. The Shreveport Municipal Forum and Exhibition on Trenchless Technology 2016 will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. November 10 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center, located at 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport. To register for this forum, please visit http://ttclatech.eventbrite.com. For more information on Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center, visit http://ttc.latech.edu.

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BOARD OF REGENTS GET TASTE OF GSU LIBRARY WOES The Louisiana Board of Regents experienced what Grambling State University students feel and see when they visit the A.C. Lewis Library. During a campus visit Tuesday evening, board members saw mold and felt what amounts to a twotemperature heating, ventilation and air conditioning system. “It’s hot or cold,” GSU President Rick Gallot told the group. “There’s no in between.” Gallot told the visiting board members he wanted them to see the library, built in 1987, so they can better understand why Grambling State students deserve a new library.

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Settlement reached with Louisiana Tech to desegregate A.E. Phillips Laboratory School WASHINGTON (US Atty Office) - The Justice Department announced that it has reached a settlement agreement with Louisiana Tech University to ensure that black students have access to the high-quality education programs at the A.E. Phillips Laboratory School, a K-8 public school operated by Louisiana Tech on its campus in Lincoln Parish. The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana today approved the court-ordered agreement, which will reduce barriers to enrollment for black students and further desegregate A.E. Phillips’ faculty, staff and facilities. A.E. Phillips, which opened in approximately 1910 as a segregated school serving only white students, was first ordered to desegregate in 1984. Following an investigation the Justice Department concluded, and Louisiana Tech agreed, that more work is needed to open up A.E. Phillips’ quality educational program to all students of Lincoln Parish. As a laboratory school, A.E. Phillips is known for its strong academic programs and teaching, and serves as a resource for Louisiana Tech’s College of Education to train future teachers and apply innovative education techniques.

The University of Louisiana System, the Louisiana Board of Regents, the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Louisiana State Superintendent of Education are also parties to the settlement agreement. Under the consent order, Louisiana Tech and A.E. Phillips will do the following: • increase the percentage of black student enrollment so that the percentage of black students enrolled at A.E. Phillips reflects the percentage of black students in grades K-8 enrolled in Lincoln Parish School Board’s schools by the 2020 through 2021 school year; • take steps to expand A.E. Phillips’ existing facilities to two classrooms per grade level to accommodate additional black student enrollment; • develop a comprehensive plan to recruit black students for incoming kindergarten classes and for available vacancies in other grade levels; • offer full and partial tuition scholarships to admitted black students who are eligible for free and reduced price student meals under the federal guidelines; • offer free and reduced price meals to admitted black students who meet the federal requirements for assistance; and • take affirmative measures to recruit black candidates for administrator, teacher, certified staff and other staff vacancies at the school. “We commend the Louisiana Tech community for its firm commitment to make the promise of equal access to education a reality for all children, regardless of the color of their skin,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. “Our consent order establishes long overdue protections critical to increasing the enrollment of – and support for – black students at A.E. Phillips.” “All students should have a quality education and should not be barred from any school that provides them that education,” said U.S. Attorney Stephanie A. Finley of the Western District of Louisiana. “This consent order will have an important and lasting impact for all the students in the Lincoln Parish community. The children of Louisiana should always be the focus. We look forward to continuing to work with Louisiana Tech, A.E. Phillips and the state education agencies to ensure that the order is successfully implemented.” The order dismisses the court’s supervision of the desegregation of A.E. Phillips in the areas of transportation and extracurricular activities. Upon full implementation of the consent order, Louisiana Tech and the state education agencies may seek the court’s approval to dismiss the desegregation case against A.E. Phillips. Promoting school desegregation and enforcing Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a top priority of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. Additional information about the Civil Rights Division is available on its website [link posted in the related links section of this story] ** The full Louisiana Tech University Consent Order has been posted in the related documents section of this story. **

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NORTH LOUISIANA INNOVATORS TO PITCH IDEAS AT TECH ‘WON IN ONE’ COMPETITION Entrepreneurs and innovators from across north Louisiana will be pitching their ideas with the goal of impressing a panel of judges as well as audience members in an attempt to win cash prizes in the Won in One idea pitch competition at Louisiana Tech University at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 in University Hall.

13 2016-10-31 Ruston

Contract talks between Tech, Holtz tabled until after season RUSTON — Skip Holtz is enjoying his time in Ruston as Louisiana Tech's football coach, and the university plans to make every effort to keep Holtz around. Holtz has less than two years left on his original contract that is set to expire following the 2017 season, but any extension talks won't happen until the conclusion of the season. The third-year head coach, who signed a five-year, $2.5 million deal in December 2012, told The News-Star on Wednesday that Tech has discussed a new deal but "nothing has been resolved at this point." "I think the university is making strides in doing what they can do. I'm very appreciative of that. Once we start getting into the season, I'm not looking to do contract negotiations," said Holt, who holds a 27-20 record at Tech. " Now's not the time to do them. Your focus and your energy is what you gotta do on that field right now. "I'm sure we'll sit down at the end of the season and talk again about it. We haven't had any conversations since we went to camp in August." Tech is 5-3 and in contention for the Conference USA West Division crown for the third straight year. The Bulldogs host Rice on Saturday. On Thursday, Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland confirmed there haven't been any contract discussions since the summer. "The last time we had a direct conversation about that was right before camp. We'll have conversations. We'll make sure he understands we desire him to be here whether we're in season or not," McClelland said. "But in terms of being able to 'talk business,' we'll do that whenever he wants. If his preference is after the season then we'll respect that, too. "Our confidence and our feelings and thoughts on coach aren't going to change. We continue to feel great about him. When we get those conversations going, then we'll pick that ball up and start rolling." THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech's Holtz remains one of best bargains in FBS, C-USA Last winter, Holtz said he and McClelland would sit down and talk about a new deal following Tech's second consecutive nine-win season that ended with a bowl win. McClelland declined to go into specifics of how things progressed from the winter to the summer, only adding the talks were "positive" in terms of keeping Holtz at Tech for the "long term." "We had a conversation about what we need to do and had dialogue, and we're going to continue that conversation," McClelland said. Holtz made $540,000 in 2015 when factoring in pay from football camps and a $25,000 bonus for a "non-BCS bowl game." Under the current contract, Holtz receives $200,000 from the school and $300,000 from Tech's athletic foundation. During a 2015 interview, McClelland indicated a raise would come through private donations. "The misconception is the AD sits back and says, you’ve done great, I’m going to put that in the budget. It’s not that easy," McClelland said. "In order to get where I want you to get, I have to make 10 to 15 phone calls. I have people saying ‘yes, let’s do that.’" By 2017, Tech will have pumped in more than $40 million into stadium upgrades, which includes money from private donors. Earlier this week, USA Today Sports released its annual FBS coaches salary database. Holtz's base salary of $500,000 ranks tied for the lowest in Conference USA. The numbers are nothing new. Tech's coaches across all sports regularly rank toward the bottom of conference and national lists. Tech's athletic budget is the lowest in C-USA. But, this year, Holtz is the best bargain in C-USA when digesting the salary numbers. Holtz holds a league-best $55,555 based on price-per-win (base pay divided by total wins from 2015). "I'm not over there after every win going, hey, hey. Once you sign your contract, it's 'Go do your job.' That's the only way I've been looking at this," Holtz said. "I have a job to do and I'm trying to find a way to win games. I haven't looked at mine compared to everybody else — am I getting fair market value, compare me to him, you know what I mean? Or look at my win percentages. I haven't done any of that. At this point I'm trying to win football games. 13 2016-10-28 Ruston

LA Tech's "Rock Steady Boxing" helping people fight Parkinson's Disease RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Deep in the heart of Ruston, Louisiana Tech is offering a program that certainly hits a nerve. Courtesy: KNOE 8 News "If we could help, we felt like it was something we needed to do," Director of Recreation Bobby Dowling said. What they're doing is called Rock Steady Boxing. But why, you ask? "[Because] They go from tremors, to rock steady," Trainer Johnny Mitchell said. An hour and a half of floating like a butterfly and stinging like a bee, for patients who've been stung for life by Parkinson's. But, since they started the program on October first, it's relieved some of the pain, and helped calm their tremors. "They're stronger, their faster, they're more determined," one of the boxers, Dr. Larry Neal said. Neal was an ENT specialist until he got hit by the disease just a few years ago. That's when he started his research, and found Rock Steady Boxing in Indiana. He knew once he saw it, he had to bring it home to Ruston. "Parkinson's steals your confidence, steals your ability to do simple things. unfortunately there's no cure. what we do is reduce symptoms waiting for somebody to find a cure for this thing." From there, it was all about recruitment. Brad Jones was one of those recruits. He's been fighting this for almost four years and says since he started, he's never felt better.. "It gives me a little more energy, which somebody my age probably needs," the 74-year-old Jones said. And that's all the coaches could ask for. "You get to make a difference," Mitchell said. "You're connecting with someone in a way that's truly, truly rewarding from heart to heart." And for these Parkinson's patients, hitting the heavy bag helps just as much mentally, as it does physically. "We all have the same problem, we're all looking for the same solution," Neal said. "Some of us are a little further along the line than others, but the team concept has caught on." A team full of bulldogs fighting to win a round against this debilitating disease. 13 2016-10-25 Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor publishes book on technical communication in global context A new book just published by Louisiana Tech University English professor Kirk St. Amant focuses on preparing technical writers, engineers and technical professionals to communicate effectively in an international market. Co-edited with Professor Madelyn Flammia of the University of Central Florida, the book, “Teaching and Training for Global Engineering: Perspectives on Culture and Professional Communication Practices” (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2016), features contributions from different perspectives written by both industry professionals and academic researchers. Among the issues addressed are language and cultural differences as they affect translated text, visual design, software use and ethical practices. Technology applications for training technical communicators, engineers and technical professionals are stressed as well. According to the publisher, the book will be of use to university and college educators, organizational trainers, industry professionals and graduate and undergraduate students. Kirk St. Amant, who joined the Louisiana Tech faculty this year, is professor of English and holds the Eunice C. Williamson Endowed Chair in Technical Communication. St. Amant earned the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and has worked on international projects for companies such as Medtronic, VERITAS Software, the Braun Corporation, Unisys, the Humanitarian Demining Information Center, and the Consortium for the Enhancement of Ukrainian Management Education. 13 2016-10-24 Monroe

North Louisiana innovators to pitch ideas at Louisiana Tech ‘Won in One’ competition Entrepreneurs and innovators from across North Louisiana will be pitching their ideas with the goal of impressing a panel of judges as well as audience members in an attempt to win cash prizes in the 'Won in One' idea pitch competition at Louisiana Tech University at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 in University Hall. Like “Shark Tank,” the presenters will pitch their idea to a panel of business experts who will select the most appealing opportunity. The audience also weighs in by voting for their favorites. As done in an elevator pitch, competitors have only one minute to share their idea in a way that is exciting, informative and financially appealing. After all have presented, scores are tallied and $5,350 in cash prizes are announced. In addition to competing for prizes, contestants may gain feedback on their venture, identity potential collaborators, attract prospective investors, meet other trendsetters, and connect to resources supporting the development and growth of their ventures. Registration for a limited number of competitor spaces is available at http://woninone2016.eventbrite.com. Audience guests who also register in advance will be eligible for door prizes. By also competing in the Delta Regional Authority’s Delta Challenge on the same day, entrepreneurs may vie for one of three positions to represent Louisiana delta businesses at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in the spring. Challenge winners receive intensive technical assistance training, business development resources, mentoring and networking, plus travel and lodging for NOEW. Contestants must submit a written application for the Delta Challenge by October 28 at http://dra.gov/. Any pitch competitors who want to improve their presentation can schedule a rehearsal time for Tuesday, October 25 and receive feedback on how to persuasively and convincingly convey their message and introduce their enterprise. For more information on the Won in One competition, email [email protected] or call 318 257-3537.

13 2016-10-21 Ruston

TECH BASKETBALL TEAM READS TO ELEMENTARY STUDENTS Qiydar Davis, left, a senior guard for the Louisiana Tech University basketball team, reads “What Do You Do With a Problem?” by Kobo Yamada with Kristie Braud, standing, a Tech education major, to more than 30 Ruston Elementary students in Jillian McAlpin’s fifth grade class Wednesday. Those students included, from left, S’aryiah Andrews, 10, Ja’Tyler Johnson, 10, Myson Jackson, 10, Bryant Crook, 10 and Bridger Allen, 11. Davis was part of a collaborative effort between the Louisiana Tech University’s TEAM Model Clinical residency program and Tech athletics called “Dogs with a Cause.”

13 2016-10-20 Baton Rouge

College of Business at Louisiana Tech to host annual Banker’s Day Local and regional banking executives will share their expertise on a variety of topics during the 12th annual William D. Tindol Banker’s Day on Friday, October 28 in Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business. “We are honored to have professional leaders in the world of banking and finance come to campus and participate in Bankers Day,” said Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “I strongly encourage your attendance at the afternoon presentation by economists from the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, as this always proves to be highly informative for our students, faculty, and external stakeholders.” Among the executives scheduled to speak are Bill Hogan, president of Bank of Ruston; Harold Turner, chief corporate development officer of Red River Bank; Ryan Kilpatrick of Origin Bank and several Louisiana Tech alumni including Greg Lott, David Darland, Stan Elkins, Nick Oliver, and Jeff Parker. The morning guest lectures will be followed by a presentation by Princeton Williams and Thomas Siems from the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas. “Our annual Bankers Day activities provide a unique experience for our students as we host leaders in the banking industry from around the state in our classrooms,” said Dr. Otis Gilley, head of the department of economics and finance. “This personal contact always excites and enlightens our students.” The afternoon presentation is open to the public and will take place at 1:30 p.m. in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) in the College of Business Building. Banker’s Day is made possible through the generosity of the Tindol family. College of Business officials said this support of Banker’s Day allows the memory of William D. Tindol to continue to impact the future of banking by educating the next generation of banking executives. Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical, and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace.

13 2016-10-18 Monroe

Louisiana Tech English instructor publishes novel Genaro K Ly Smith, a Louisiana Tech University instructor of English, will read from his new novel, “The Land South of the Clouds,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 1, in Room 105 of George T. Madison Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The new work, which will be released by University of Louisiana at Lafayette press Oct. 25, will be available for purchase and signing after the reading which is free and open to the public. According to Neil Connelly, author of “The Midlife Crisis of Commander Invincible,” “Buddy Cooper Finds a Way” and “St. Michael’s Scales,” Smith’s novel is a “part coming-of-age, part historical family drama, part love story, and all good. Smith bravely tackles the tribulations of being biracial, the impact of a mother’s abandonment, and the far-reaching consequences of war.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Three takeaways from Tech's win over UMass The press describes the novel in its publicity: It is the summer of 1979, the year of the film “Apocalypse Now,” long lines at the gas pumps and American hostages in Iran and our 10-year-old narrator, Long-Vanh, is burdened with the secret his mother, Vu-An, entrusted him to keep: not to tell anyone of her desire to return to Vietnam to be with her father who is serving hard labor in a reeducation camp. As a con lai half Vietnamese, half black Long-Vanh struggles to see his place in “Asia Minor,” an enclave of Los Angeles comprised of veterans and their foreign war wives. He sees his inability to speak or read his mother’s native language, or even maneuver chopsticks properly, as flaws, and that if he can compensate for them, his mother will stay in America to keep the family intact. Eric Nguyen, diacritics.org, said, “Genaro K Ly Smith skillfully balances the philosophical and the surreal in a powerful novel that explores identity in post-Vietnam War America. His unforgettable cast of characters ache with life and humanity as they struggle to find a place where they belong and the love that they deserve.” “The Land South of the Clouds” serves as the companion piece to “The Land Baron’s Sun: The Story of Ly Loĉ and His Seven Wives,” Smith’s first book of poetry, also published by ULL Press. Smith was born in Nha Trang, Vietnam. He earned an M.A. and M.F.A. in creative writing from McNeese State University in Lake Charles. He has numerous works of poetry and fiction published in a number of journals and magazines. Smith has taught composition, literature and creative writing at Louisiana Tech University since 1999.

13 2016-10-18 Monroe

Tech athletic department prepared to host possible C-USA title game in Shreveport Louisiana Tech is once again in the thick of a Conference USA West Division race for the third consecutive year, and the athletic department may soon need to prepare to possibly host the C-USA title game, although this year that would come in Shreveport instead of Ruston. Tech's existing press box and sky box at Joe Aillet Stadium will be demolished Nov. 14 to make way for a new press box and suites, which forced Tech to secure a site in the offseason in the event of hosting a championship game at Independence Stadium. With five games to play, Tech (4-3, 2-1) is amid a three-way tie with Southern Miss and UTSA. Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland said last week the hosting process — assuming Tech keeps winning — would begin to pick up at the end of the month, possibly after an Oct. 29 date with Rice. "We'll receive an email from the conference office that begins basically saying, a generic email, saying you're still in contention for hosting the title game," McClelland told The News-Star. "You have to fill out these forms. We would go through that. We've done that the past two years, so it's an easier process for us, but it will be different this year with the way we fill out it will have to be with Shreveport and Independence Stadium as the host." McClelland said information provided to the conference includes signage and measurements. The league would wrap Independence Stadium with C-USA marketing material. Preparation for securing hotels, transportation and standard normal home game measure, like ticket tackers, security, game event staff, would also occur.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box Tech's chances of hosting received a boost over the weekend when Western Kentucky knocked off Middle Tennessee. The team with the highest winning percentage hosts, and the first tiebreaker is head-to-head record. If Tech and WKU win out and finish at 7-1 in league play, Tech would host due to its 55-52 win earlier this month. McClelland explained how the league owns the C-USA title game, so the operation would be similar to how Tech has previously hosted NIT basketball games. "We're putting forth the execution of the game from an event management and facility and those things. Our resources would be used," he said. "My guess is we'd be allowed, since we pay ourselves back, we wouldn't have any expense, but the money that's made off of it goes to the conference. You also have to fly in a team, put them up in a hotel. The conference owns that game whether we host it at Joe Aillet or we host it at Shreveport." Tech played for the C-USA title at Marshall in 2014 and headed into the final week of the 2015 season in a tie for first with Southern Miss. The Golden Eagles ran through the Bulldogs to secure a spot against WKU in the championship. This year, the West Division crown could come down to the final weekend again. Tech plays at USM on the Friday of Thanksgiving weekend. Press box, suites construction on schedule As for the actual construction of the press box, McClelland said everything is "going well" and on schedule. Construction on Tech's new press box started in August, and the school will demolish the existing building in November following its home finale against UTSA. "Everything is moving forward. People may think nothing's happened. Again, nothing was supposed to happen," he said. "We can't do anything about the structure until the end of the season and then people will start to see things happen. It's on target, it's on pace. They're moving forward. They're doing a lot of the grunt work, a lot of things people don't necessarily see or know what goes into it. It's all positive." The new press box and suites will run $16.7 million with an additional $2.1 million invested toward stadium improvements like LED lighting, a permanent west side ticket booth, renovations to the bathroom and "aesthetic" improvements to stadium entrances. Plans for production upgrades still ongoing When C-USA's new TV deal was announced in the summer, Tech, along with several other member schools, explored the option of in-house production for sporting events in order to create its own telecasts. McClelland called those plans "ongoing" after Tech brought in outside parties to assess and determine how much it would cost to upgrade equipment. The costs to have a studio and upgrade camera equipment would run several hundred thousand dollars, McClelland said.

THENEWSSTAR.COM New proposal would give Tech more options to stream sporting events "Obviously, we knew it would be expensive and that's what we got. From our standpoint, what we're trying to do is work with our local multimedia rights partner, which is Learfield Sports, and try to figure out a way where we can maybe partner for them in order to launch this platform," he said. "Those conversations are going. It's not something that's going to be up and running for this basketball season. It's not something we've put on the back burner, it's just we're still trying to strategize on a way to get it done." McClelland indicated if Tech will do it the right way and not cut corners, which is why securing a partner is important. "With the projects we have with the press box, it's a little bit probably too high for us to just go out there and do a complete ownership on it, which I think we'll be successful in, but we're hoping to be able to partner with our multimedia rights partner to help kind of bridge that and get a co-owner if you will, for a lack of a better term, to help launch this," he said.

13 2016-10-18 Monroe

Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy diagnosed with cancer RUSTON — The Louisiana Tech football program will be playing the rest of the 2016 season with heavy hearts. Tech coach Skip Holtz announced Monday that sophomore running back Jaqwis Dancy has been diagnosed with Stage 3 Hodgkin's Lymphoma, a type of of cancer that starts in white blood cells. Dancy, who was sidelined with an ankle injury for the start of 2016, complained about a lymph node while he was recently rehabbing. Tests came back positive Oct. 7, the morning after Tech's win over Western Kentucky, and Holtz informed the team that weekend. "What they're going through is traumatic. It is hard to deal with," Holtz said of what Dancy and his family are dealing with now. "I've sat in those meetings when you hear that c (cancer) word and how has that is to deal with especially when you're a 19-year-old sophomore in college athletics who is fit and healthy with what he's battling. Jaqwis is in a different battle right now. "For everybody on this team, it has brought a real sense of togetherness and really an appreciation for the blessings we have on a day-to-day basis. We find a way to complain, moan and groan over some of these issues we have, but it's real easy when something like this close to home, one of your teammates, is fighting a battle for his life. He's in our thoughts and prayers in everything he's going through." Dancy spent last week at St. Jude's hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and the Junction City, Arkansas, native is headed back Monday to start a treatment program.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Football community reacts to Dancy's cancer diagnosis Since the diagnosis, Holtz has kept the team up to date with daily news about Dancy's status. Dancy has been inundated with calls and texts of support from Bulldog players. "It's been hard because when you first told them of the diagnosis, shock, like, big eyes, wide open mouths," Holtz said. "We have looked at statistics, numbers, survival rate, you know everything we can that we have talked with this team about. The hard part the day you told them is it's cancer. And let me tell you, I've sat in that meeting when that's what the doctor tells you and you don't hear anything else they say. You just heard cancer and you just walk out and you're like, What else did he say? He talked to me for 30 minutes and I heard the "c" word.'" The five-year survival rate for Stage 3 Hodgkin's Lymphoma is 80 percent, according to cancer.org. Dancy played in all 13 games as a true freshman in 2015 as a reserve running back and kick returner. He was expected to play a role in the backfield before he injured his ankle in fall camp. Tech honored Dancy over the weekend at UMass by wearing a blue decal with Dancy's No. 20 that read "compete." Holtz said the leadership council, led by senior safety Xavier Woods, came up with the idea to support Dancy and his fight. A photo a decal honors Louisiana Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy A photo a decal honors Louisiana Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy during Saturday's game against UMass. Dancy was recently diagnosed with cancer. (Photo: TOM MORRIS/LATechSportsPix.com) There are two well-documented cases of Hodgkin's Lymphona that prominent football players have beat. Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry overcame cancer and is now back playing in the NFL. Pittsburgh running back James Conner was diagnosed with Stage 2 Hodgkin's Lymphona in 2015. He beat cancer in time for the 2016 season opener. Cancer has directly affected several members of Tech's staff. Holtz's mother has dealt with numerous cancer battles, and his wife is a breast cancer survivor. Offensive coordinator Todd Fitch defeated a bout of testicular cancer in 2004. However, just because cancer is common doesn't make it an easier pill to swallow. Holtz's message to the team is one of a learning experience — always let people know how much you appreciate them. "(Cancer) doesn't care about your race, your color, your political views, your socio-economic status. It doesn't care about any of that, white, black, old, young. It attacks everybody," Holtz said. "It's unfortunate we're dealing with what you're dealing with, but it is something as a football team I'm really proud of the leadership and kind of the way they circled the wagons and to really appreciate what we have and the great opportunity we have to play this game, to be together as a family, to represent Louisiana Tech; things that you take for granted on a day-to-day basis."

13 2016-10-14 Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH FACULTY EARN RECOGNITION Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, have won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.” Deal’s production was selected as the Grand Prize winner from a field of 47 participants from across the United States. The film also took home the 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award with over 43,000 votes from the public and industry professionals across the country. 13 2016-10-12 Ruston

La. Tech's live mascot retires RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University's mascot, Tech XXI, is retiring from active service, according to the university. The university announced on Tuesday that the live English bulldog mascot will retire from sideline duties and public appearances. Tech's retirement comes after a recommendation by veterinarians and guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Tech's retirement, according to university officials, follows Louisiana Tech's length-of-service protocol for the live mascot, developed before Tech's XXI's selection in 2013. Tech will be transferred to a veterinary family where he will live out his retirement as a family pet, university officials say. The decision and process for replacing Tech XXI will be determined by Louisiana Tech officials. There is currently no time frame on finding a replacement. Tech XXI retirement was announced the same day that LSU's live mascot, Mike VI, passed away following his battle with cancer.

13 2016-10-11 Ruston

Louisiana Tech architecture faculty win Grand Prize in national film challenge RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, have won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.” Deal’s production was selected as the Grand Prize winner from a field of 47 participants from across the United States. The film also took home the 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award with over 43,000 votes from the public and industry professionals across the country. “Rebuilding MedCamps” is a three-and-a-half minute film showcases Deal’s work with Brooks and the partnership between the Design Build Studios of Louisiana Tech and Medcamps of Louisiana, a non-profit organization that provides free summer camp experiences to children with chronic illnesses and disabilities. It tells the story of how the faculty and students from Louisiana Tech’s School of Design partnered with MedCamps to enrich the lives of campers through the design and construction projects at the MedCamps grounds.

“Our partnership with Medcamps has not only been mutually beneficial, it has exceeded everyone’s expectations,” said Deal. “MedCamps mission is to provide transformative and empowering experiences for those they serve, and at its core, that is the same goal of great architecture. MedCamps’ mission is highly motivational to our students, allowing them to serve a marginalized community and to see their design take shape in the real world for the first time and change the lives of children. It’s a powerful formula.” The projects captured on film and that emerge from the Design Build Studio experience at Louisiana Tech create engaging and meaningful learning experiences for students. Three projects have been completed thus far with one project, the Larkin Gibbs Memorial Pavilion, winning the AIA Louisiana Merit Award and the Members’ Choice Award at the annual AIA Louisiana Design Awards Ceremony. New plans are already being made for a new project set to begin next spring. “It was our hope that the film would capture a few things,” said Brooks. We hoped it would capture our belief that design can be humble yet mighty, that education outside of the traditional design studio is not only worthwhile, but inwardly meaningful and outwardly powerful, and that design can represent that which we aspire to as compassionate and hopeful educators of the next generation of architects.” The 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge, which seeks to shine a light on the stories of architecture and design through the power of film, presented Deal and Brooks with the Grand Prize during the AIA Architecture and Design Film Festival held last week in New York City. Deal and Brooks have been invited to screen the film at the SXSW Eco Conference in Austin, Texas later this month, and at the Architecture and Design Film Festival in Washington D.C. next spring. “What the School of Design’s collaboration with MedCamps offers and what this film communicates are how profoundly people’s lives can be impacted through our empathy, our time and our talents,” said Karl Puljak, director of the School of Design at Louisiana Tech. “Through this single architecture course and this three minute film, people have experienced how powerful design can be when it serves us well. Perhaps no group is more transformed more by the experience than our own students and faculty.” Louisiana Tech’s architecture programs seek to provide a comprehensive and uncompromising, balanced and demanding education in the art, craft and practice of ethical building through the polytechnic tradition of “hands-on” experiences and empirical learning that prepares students to be an architect in the fullest sense of the term. The School of Design offers three undergraduate degree programs (Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies, Bachelor of Interior Design and Bachelor of Fine Arts) and two graduate degree programs (Master of Architecture and Master of Fine Arts).

13 2016-10-10 Ruston

FFA HOSTS FORESTRY CONTEST AT TECH Photo 13 2016-10-05 Monroe

Tech’s research society announces Science Café series The Louisiana Tech University chapter of the Sigma Xi research society Chapter is launching its 2016-2017 Science Café discussion series at 5:30 p.m. October 11 in the community room at Gibson’s Natural Grocers in Ruston. Sponsored by Sigma Xi, Science Café is a series of public “chats” with researchers during the fall, winter and spring academic quarters where members of the campus and local communities can have a conversation with a scientist about their work. All sessions are free to attend. IN THE NEWS DA Jerry Jones announces resignation BRF, state finally strike deal on hospitals LSP trooper, motivational speaker dead at 63 “One of the main goals of Sigma Xi is to promote scientific communication and we’d love for everyone to have the opportunity to learn about the exciting research that’s happening at Louisiana Tech,” says Sigma Xi Chapter President Dr. Terri Maness, assistant professor of biological sciences at Louisiana Tech. “We’re really excited to start this program and, with the diversity of research happening at Louisiana Tech, I’m sure everyone in the community will find topics of interest to them.” Maness says the idea is for the Science Café to be less formal than a typical lecture, so that people can really engage and feel comfortable asking questions. Dr. Lee Sawyer, Charles and Newllyn Spruell Endowed Professor of Physics and academic director of chemistry and physics at Louisiana Tech, will kick off the 2016-2017 series on October 11 with a discussion titled, “From Quarks to the Cosmos (Q2C)” which is also the theme of this year’s American Physical Society’s annual meeting. Sawyer’s discussion will be followed by a discussion with Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences; Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering; and Nick Bustamante, chair and associate professor of studio art, on January 24, 2017. They will hold a session titled, “Visual Integration of Science Through Art (VISTA): Medical Illustration at Louisiana Tech,” which is a very exciting collaborative program between the arts and sciences. Dr. Heidi Adams, assistant professor of forestry, will conclude the 2016-2017 Science Café series on April 11, 2017 with her discussion titled, “Are Your Deer Picky Eaters? An evaluation of white-tailed deer preference among commercial food plot seed mixes.” All talks will be in the community room at Gibson’s Natural Grocer located at 1305 Commerce Street in Ruston and begin at 5:30 p.m. For more information, contact Dr. Terri Maness at [email protected]

13 2016-10-03 Monroe

Tech to launch Biomedical Research series Louisiana Tech University is set to launch the 2016-2017 edition of its highly-popular New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series, featuring interdisciplinary collaborations and research discussions with some of the nation’s most renowned scientists and speakers. The 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series schedule continues to expand on critical areas beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education. Over the past three years, the program has continued to grow and demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical research. The seminar series now involves four of the academic colleges at Louisiana Tech, with 11 individual programs participating, creating a truly interdisciplinary seminar experience. IN THE NEWS Maness calls debate snub 'un-American', pollster a liar The success of the seminar series has led to wide recognition within academia of Louisiana Tech and its co-organizers, Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences and the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor of Zoology and Premedicine, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the College of Engineering and Science. Newman and Caldorera-Moore presented on the development and success of the series at the 2016 American Society of Engineering Education conference held this summer in New Orleans. “We are excited about the continued popularity and growth of the series and incorporating more departments and programs at Louisiana Tech,” said Newman. “The enthusiasm for the series across campus and the community has been great for the success of the series and, in turn, the success of the students and faculty involved. We are especially proud this year to have original student art work featured on the cover of our program brochure.” Newman, Caldorera-Moore and Nicholas Bustamante, associate professor and program chair of studio art at Louisiana Tech, have also been invited to present at the 2017 Louisiana Academy of Sciences meeting in March 2017, on the new digital painting course that has introduced students to medical illustration and the development of a curriculum track for students interested in pursuing this field. “This past year, with the collaboration between biology, engineering and art, we saw the series become more than we had imagined,” said Caldorera-Moore. “We now work with four colleges on the Louisiana Tech campus to demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical research and science, bringing together students and faculty to form novel collaboration that benefits the university.” Two lectures during the 2016-2017 series will highlight the interdisciplinary nature of the seminar program. In collaboration with Louisiana Tech’s Waggoner Center for Civic Engagement and Public Policy, and Sigma Xi scientific research society, the series will host Dr. Karen Kashmanian Oates, dean of arts and sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, who will speak on her involvement in promoting civic engagement and responsibility of scientists. In partnership with Louisiana Tech’s School of Design, the series will also feature Natalie Doolittle, director of medical animation, high impact and syntropy studios, who will present on the professional field of medical illustration and the need for visual communication of science. The 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series will begin at 3:30 p.m. October 24 with Dr. Claude Bouchard, the John W. Barton Sr. Chair in Genetics and Nutrition at the Human Genomics Laboratory and the Pennington Biomedical Research Center. Bouchard will share his research on “Physics, Physiology, and Behavior as Drivers for the Obesity Epidemic” in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Louisiana Senate race offers unpredictability — and plenty of drama The series continues to benefit from support from a number of community and university organizations. The Lincoln Health Foundation (LHF) which seeks to improve health outcomes for members of the community has been a long-time advocate for the series and will continue its support throughout the year. Support is also provided by Louisiana Tech University’s Office of the President, College of Applied and Natural Sciences, College of Engineering and Sciences, and Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Sciences. “I am very pleased with the impacts this seminar series is having on our campus,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “The leadership provided by our faculty in organizing meaningful seminars from such renowned researchers is truly appreciated. This is stimulating new collaborations and ideas for research that we had never anticipated.” All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free to attend and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus, and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at [email protected]

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Lincoln Parish developed during Reconstruction Editor’s note: One in a series of history pieces published in conjunction with The News-Star’s 125th anniversary. This story by Art Taylor originally ran in July 1976 and has been edited. RUSTON — Lincoln Parish was the child of the Reconstruction period. Although the product of that turbulent era, the parish is an educational and industrial leader in north central Louisiana. Lincoln was incorporated in the Territory of Orleans in 1803 following the Louisiana Purchase. When the Orleans Territory was admitted to the union in 1812 as Louisiana, the northern part of the state was divided into Natchitoches and Ouachita parishes. The area was largely unexplored wilderness of dense forests abundant with wildlife — deer, turkey, buffalo, wolf, bear, wild horses and cattle, panther and waterfowl. Tracts of virgin timber continued for miles, interrupted only by the streams and bayous. The only people within the area were the original Caddo tribes and French and Spanish explorers raising the Bourbon flag. These coureurs de bois (forest runners) seldom ventured from waterways in their quest for furs and trade with Native Americans. When the infant state created Claiborne Parish in 1812, named in honor of Gov. William C.C. Claiborne and carved from Natchitoches Parish, the first settlement believed to have been made in Lincoln was at a site near the present village of Vienna. Few settlers Few settlers entered the area following the Louisiana Purchase, but those who did were Anglo-Scotch from Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama. ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads Following the Civil War, the Reconstruction administration in 1873 created the parish from portions taken from Jackson, Union, Claiborne, Bienville and Ouachita parishes. Named after Abraham Lincoln, the parish suffered indignities and corruption in the person of Allen Greene, a Vienna man. Backed by Gov. William P. Kellog's administration, which had the support of federal authority and troops, Greene was seated as state senator from Jackson and Union parishes after claiming victory over E.M. Graham of Vernon. Graham contested the election on the grounds that he had received the majority of the votes, but Greene was recognized as senator. Together with his son C.J. Greene, the Jackson Parish representative, Greene ruled with dictatorial whim and removed government officers as he pleased. With popular support behind them, the deposed officials refused to vacate their offices when Greene's appointees came to assume their positions. This action resulted in the illegal removal of court records to Greene's home and suspension of regular parish and district court sessions. The possibility of revolt by the people was quelled with the lawful support of a petition calling for the resignation of Greene and his three sons. Ruston's origin In 1883 construction of the Shreveport, Vicksburg & Pacific Railroad was begun in the parish. The next year saw the beginning of Ruston as a way-station. That followed the establishment of the stations of Shuder (now Choudrant) and Simsboro, which was already an established community. Land for the establishment of Ruston was donated by Robert E. Russ, a prominent landowner after whom the town is named. The rail route provided transportation, commerce and industry. The town and parish prospered, and Lincoln Parish today has a diversified economic base, with agricultural heritage and the progress of industry. Among the agricultural activities are cattle raising and truck farming. The peach has been a leading crop in the parish. Each year, the parish celebrates with the Louisiana Peach Festival in June.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Peach Festival and pageant history book released Education The parish is the home of Louisiana Tech University and Grambling State University. Louisiana Tech University was founded in 1894 as the Louisiana Industrial Institute. Today, the university is noted for its innovative technology and cyber programs. Founded in 1901, Grambling State University was created to offer higher education for African-Americans. While these institutions stand as beacons of higher education, the early history of the organized education was tied to Chautauqua. Started in 1891, this religious and educational organization helped develop Ruston as an entertainment and intellectual center for the area. On a 15-acre tract north of town, the Chautauqua Springs hotel offered lectures by noted personalities in education, literature, religion, politics and ethics. It also provided community songfests. The property later became known as Toma Lodge and is currently part of Toma Lodge Community Estates.

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LOYAL BLUE WEEKEND SET Loyal Blue Weekend events celebrating Louisiana Tech’s home football game begin at 5:30 p.m. Friday in Railroad Park with kids’ activities, including inflatables and face painting. Tech spirit groups perform at 6 p.m. From 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Code Blue and Flatliners perform on the Railroad Park Stage.

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Louisiana Tech theater professor publishes directing textbook RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Press Release) - Paul B. Crook, a professor in Louisiana Tech University’s department of theater, has published a new directing textbook, “The Art and Practice of Directing for Theatre.” The text helps young directors learn how to discover, harness and meld the communication and vision of a production. Providing both a practical and theoretical foundation for directors, the book explores how to craft an artistic vision for a production and sparks inspiration in directors to put their learning into practice. The textbook was published by the Focal Press imprint of Routledge publishing and can be purchased from the Routledge site or from Amazon. Crook teaches undergraduate and graduate acting and direction courses and supervises all student directing projects. He also directs for the university theater and serves as a director of recruiting for the university theater. He has served as associate artistic director for the Oklahoma Shakespearean Festival, a summer rep theater in Durant, Oklahoma, and currently serves as the artistic director of The B & B Theatre, a company that he formed with his wife, Mary Fran, a theater professor at Grambling State University. Two of the plays Crook has written: “Brit Lit, OR All You Need to Know to Survive Senior English but Were Afraid to Ask” and “AMLIT!” were commissioned for production by Stage Centre, an educational touring theater company and toured across the state of Alabama.

Two of his ten-minute plays: “Front Porch Requiem” and “LAVALOOOOO!!!” were selected for performance at the nationally known Kentuck Festival of the Arts Ten Minute Play Festival. Crook is also a member of the Southeastern Theatre Conference, where he is a past-chair of the College and University Division, the Leighton Ballew Scholarship Committee, the KEAP Award, the Publications Committee, and the Acting/Directing Committee. As part of his work for SETC, Crook writes occasionally for the “SETC News” and Southern Theatre magazine. He also is a past-chair for the state of Louisiana for the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival, Region VI. 13 2016-09-27 Ruston

GUICE CONGRATULATES STUDENTS, TEACHERS Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice spoke to students at A.E. Phillips Laboratory School this morning about the school’s being named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq — an international technology company that delivers insights from worldwide data.

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FORMER TECH COACH JIM MIZE DIES AT AGE 99 Longtime Louisiana Tech University track and field coach Jimmy Mize died Sunday at the age of 99 in Baton Rouge. Mize began coaching at Ruston High under L.J. “Hoss” Garrett after graduating from Louisiana Tech in 1938. After two years, Garrett insisted Mize take the vacant coaching job at Arcadia High, 20 miles west, and in that year, 1940, Arcadia won the Class B state championship.

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Tech College of Business receives funds for student managed investment fund The College of Business at Louisiana Tech University has received over $100,000 of contributions and pledges to create a Student Managed Investment Fund (SMIF) that will be managed by undergraduate finance students who will be responsible for all investment research, portfolio positions and reporting. With initial seed capital provided by Louisiana Tech College of Business graduates Randy (‘78) and Ann Fowler (‘81) of Houston, Texas, the SMIF will provide real-world experience in managing a long-term investment portfolio with an annual growth objective relative to appropriate benchmarks. The portfolio will be governed by an advisory board comprised of industry professionals. Student managers will provide performance reports to the board and make a formal presentation to the board each year. IN THE NEWS St. Francis to close north campus 500 million Yahoo accounts breached Spring rescue for TOPS unlikely, governor says In addition to providing real-world experience for students, the SMIF’s spending rule will provide the College of Business with funds for technology upgrades, student travel and other program enhancements. “We are delighted to support the College of Business’ effort to substantially enhance the learning experience for finance majors at Tech through the creation of the Student Managed Investment Fund,” said Randy and Ann Fowler. “This fund enables Louisiana Tech students to have a ‘hands-on’ experience in researching capital markets, allocating and investing actual money as opposed to simulated computer investing. The Student Managed Investment Fund will provide students with a great springboard into investing whether they become professional money managers, financial advisors or simply managing their own personal investments.” Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Techs College of Business said he is honored and thankful to receive this support from Randy and Ann Fowler for the students. “Their gift contributes greatly to our commitment of providing a world-class education to our students,” Martin said. “The Student Managed Investment Fund will provide the framework for the growth of applied investing education and experiential learning in the College of Business.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Spring rescue for TOPS unlikely, governor says Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical, and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace. For more information on how you can support the College of Business, please contact Mary Susan Britt, director of development at [email protected] or 318-257-3741.

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PayScale.com ranks Tech No. 1 in state in average mid-career salaries RUSTON – Graduates with a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech University earn higher average mid-career salaries than graduates from any other public or private university in the state, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report released Tuesday. Louisiana Tech graduates, who have earned a bachelor’s degree as their highest degree, rank No. 1 in Louisiana with median mid-career salaries of $88,000. Tech is followed in the rankings by graduates from Tulane University earning an average of $87,800 and Louisiana State University graduates earning $82,800. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 3 in the state for early-career salaries with graduates earning an average of $46,900. The University of New Orleans was first in the early-career category with $47,700 followed by Louisiana State at $47,000. IN THE NEWS WMPD prepares for Ledoux's return to patrol It’s Ark-La-Miss Fair time! 41st fair is Thursday-Oct 2 Woman accused of carrying 2 lbs marijuana in luggage In addition to leading the State of Louisiana, Louisiana Tech is ranked No. 57 in the nation in median mid-career earnings among public institutions and No. 81 in the nation in median earnings for graduates from research universities. “We have a responsibility, as a national research university, to prepare our graduates to compete and to become leaders in their fields,” says Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “National rankings like this one from independent organizations like PayScale.com help to highlight the efforts of our faculty and staff, and how valued and sought after Louisiana Tech’s graduates have become. “As we continue to recruit the best and brightest students to Louisiana Tech, we will continue to focus on our mission to provide them with an unparalleled educational experience that positions them for personal and professional success.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Are you fan enough? Enter USA Today's Best Fan Ever contest PayScale.com defines early career graduates as those who are employed full-time with five years of experience or less in their career or field, and who hold a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees. Mid-career graduates are employed full-time and have at least 10 years of experience in their career or field, and who hold a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees. According to PayScale.com, the 2016-2017 College Salary Report includes nearly 1,000 schools, which is representative of institutions that enroll nearly 75 percent of the estimated undergraduates in bachelor’s degree programs in the U.S. Louisiana Tech’s No. 1 ranking from PayScale.com is preceded by recognition from MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges Report which named Louisiana Tech as the state’s top institution. Earlier this month, Louisiana Tech earned its sixth consecutive Tier One National University ranking from U.S. News & World Report. Tech also received international recognition last month when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.

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La. Tech achieves record enrollment RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University has enrolled more students this fall than at any time in its history, and has achieved a nearly 55 percent growth in first-time freshmen since fall of 2012. According to its fall 2016 headcount announced Wednesday, Louisiana Tech has enrolled 12,694 students for the fall quarter – a 2.3 percent increase over last year and eclipsing the previous record enrollment of 12,414 students set last fall. Along with the record number of students attending Louisiana Tech, the quality of students in the freshman class has continued to increase. This year’s first-time freshmen have an average ACT score of 24.7 – a significant increase of twotenths of a point over last year. A further indication of Louisiana Tech’s incoming student quality is reflected by an all-time high of 155 incoming students who have earned an ACT score of 32 or higher, and meet the qualifications for Presidential Scholar or National Merit Scholar designation. “The incoming freshman class of 2016 represents one of the largest and certainly the most academically accomplished in the history of Louisiana Tech,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Student recruitment, retention and engagement is something our entire campus community promotes throughout the year, and we could not have achieved this milestone in quantity and quality without them. The growth of our institution and its high-caliber student body is a credit to the tireless efforts of our faculty and staff.” At the college level, Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences had the largest overall enrollment increase (amongst those who have declared a major) followed by the College of Engineering and Science, College of Business, College of Liberal Arts, and College of Education. “The campus-wide commitment to recruiting and retaining good students is a cornerstone of Louisiana Tech’s strategic plan and growth strategies,” said Dr. Jim King, vice president for student advancement. “Led by our admissions staff, we will continue to seek the best and brightest students, and provide them with educational opportunities and experiences they can find only at Louisiana Tech.” The record enrollment was accompanied by a slight increase in the retention of students to Louisiana Tech, from the 2015 freshman cohort. 80.6 percent of first-time, full-time freshmen from fall 2014 returned to Louisiana Tech this year, which is an increase of one-tenth percent increase over last year.

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Tech College of Education dean to serve as president of state association Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education, has been elected to serve as president of the Louisiana Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (LACTE). “I am very honored and humbled to be entrusted with this leadership role by representatives of the higher education teaching programs throughout Louisiana and I will earnestly strive to function as a collaborative catalyst for raising the level of achievement, productivity and prestige of teacher education,” said Schillinger of his election as president of the LACTE. In addition to his leadership of LACTE, Schillinger serves as the Louisiana representative to the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, which represents more than 800 postsecondary institutions across the nation. MORE NEWS Neville linebacker adopted from Russia Shelling resigns as school board VP America's most educated states: Louisiana ranks at bottom As President of LACTE, Schillinger represents other educational leaders from Louisiana institutes of higher education that offer teacher preparation programs. Prior to becoming dean of the College of Education at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger had served as an associate professor in the College since 2006. He also served as associate dean of undergraduate studies and director of clinical and field experiences in the College of Education from 2009 to 2012, and director of assessment and accreditation (IT supervision) from 2012 until he assumed the COE interim deanship in 2014. Schillinger took over the role of permanent dean on July 1, 2015. During his tenure at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger has been honored with the College of Education’s Outstanding Service Award (2009) and Outstanding Faculty Grants Award (2008) as well as the College’s Outstanding Grantsmanship Award in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (2008.) He is a member of the State of Louisiana ACT Council and the Advisory Board for L-STEM: The Louisiana STEM Initiative. Prior to joining the faculty at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger was a department head in McNeese State University’s Burton College of Education. He came to Louisiana from Mississippi where he served as co-director for assessment for the Center for Educational Research and Evaluation at the University of Mississippi, and director of the Teach Mississippi Institute 13 2016-09-19 Monroe

Louisiana Tech CBERS to co-host Industry Day 2016 The Louisiana Tech University Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) will co-sponsor Industry Day 2016 along with the Center for Cardiovascular Diseases and Sciences at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northern Louisiana (BRF) in Shreveport. The Industry Day 2016 conference will take place on October 1 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center, located at 8028 Shrevepark Drive. Students, trainees, scientists and clinicians are encouraged to attend and learn more about ongoing research in the biomedical industry. MORE ON TECH Louisiana Tech earns another Tier One ranking from US News & World Report Tech AD McClelland receives new 5-year deal Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, director of CBERS and professor and Rhodes Eminent Chair of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech, said that Industry Day helps foster collaboration between biomedical engineering experts in industry and academia, and aids in sparking new ideas and their translation into commercial biomedical products for the betterment of human health and services, as well as the creation of start-up biomedical companies that would contribute to the economic development of the region. “We are very pleased with the participation of our students and faculty and our collaboration with local and national leaders from the biomedical industry in the organization of this important event for Northern Louisiana,” Iasemidis said. “Following the successful completion of Industry Days 2014 and 2015, Industry Day 2016 is geared to offer a display of current translational research in nanobiotechnology and drug delivery, as well as talks by keynote speakers and feedback from prominent panelists of global healthcare companies, like Sanofi S.A., Dow Chemical and Google Life Sciences.” The event’s keynote speakers include Dr. Yuri Lvov, professor of chemistry and T. Pipes Eminent Endowed Chair of micro and nanosystems engineering at Louisiana Tech; Dr. Oswald Crasta, genomic breeding lead and research and development fellow at DOW AgroSciences in Indianapolis, Indiana; Dr. Rona Scott, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the LSUHSC-S and the Feist Weiller Cancer Center; and Dr. Mehdi Keddache, sequencing specialist for Illumina, Inc.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Shelling resigns as school board VP In addition to the keynote speeches, the conference will feature a poster session where local investigators, faculty and students, will present their work, a panel session with industry experts that will entertain questions from the audience on optimization of the relation of academia with the industry, and company exhibits in parallel with the poster session. For complete information about Industry Day 2016, as well as a downloadable event schedule, please visit http://coes.latech.edu/cbers/industry-day-2016/index.php. 13 2016-09-16 Monroe

Educators, education secretary talk teacher training Shannon Glover teared up as she told a story about how Louisiana Tech education major Adriane Meggs noticed one of her third grade English Language Arts students at Sallie Humble struggling on a test during the second week of school. Meggs took him out into the hall and read the test to him. He wound up with a B on the test. Meggs, a college senior, is a clinical resident in the Believe & Prepare yearlong teacher residency. It differs from a traditional teacher training program in that residents spend a year working in a classroom with a mentor. This year, Glover is one of those mentors. It was the moment she started to think of Meggs as a co-teacher, not as her student teacher. Glover and Meggs shared their experiences as participants in the Believe & Prepare teacher residency program during a discussion the U.S. Secretary of Education John King facilitated. Three Louisiana Tech students teach at Sallie Humble as part of the residency program. One Louisiana Tech student is a resident at Neville High School. They participated in the discussion along with their mentors, Louisiana Department of Education staff, Louisiana Tech faculty, Sallie Humble’s principal and Monroe City Schools Superintendent Brent Vidrine. The panel discussion was part of the education secretary’s annual Back-to-School Bus Tour. The tour left Washington, D.C., on Monday and visited other cities in the south. It will stop in Baton Rouge and New Orleans before heading back to Washington at the end of the week.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Education secretary to visit Sallie Humble All of the panelists agreed that the investment – of time on the part of residents and teachers, of money on the part of school districts and state and federal government – was worthwhile. The program is funded by local school districts, state and federal government, as well as the residents’ universities. Monroe City Schools Superintendent Brent Vidrine said that retaining teachers can be a challenge because they start out underprepared. Teacher turnover is a national problem. School districts retain teachers who are better prepared when they start their careers, King said. Hannah Dietsch, an assistant at the Louisiana Department of Education, said that the Louisiana Board of Education and state legislature have raised expectations for both teachers and students. She compared training teachers to training doctors, dentists and architects, all of whom go through a residency or apprenticeship as part of their education. “I do think one of our national challenges is this question of are we willing to invest what it takes to make the profession stronger,” King said. “Too often there’s this conversation where we say, ‘Yes, residencies work. Yes, residencies make a difference for the teacher candidates. Yes, they are a learning and growing opportunity for the mentors. Yes, they’re better for students long term. But, we’re not willing to commit the resources.”

Subscribe now for $9.99 FOR A YEAR for a limited time only TOUCHDOWN! King said he would take the stories the panelists told back to Washington. Don Schillinger, Dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, said that education students miss out on building a partnership with their mentor teacher when they experience a traditional student teaching, which is a shorter period of time. Glover said that students miss out, too. She isn’t sure if she would have picked up on her struggling student’s inability to read if it weren’t for Meggs. She might have had too many students with different needs to have noticed. Now, that student is getting extra help with his reading skills.

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StartClass names A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech top elementary school in state RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University has been named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq – an international technology company that delivers insights and analyses from worldwide data. StartClass released its findings Wednesday, ranking the top elementary schools in every state based on metrics such as exam passing rates, school environment and disciplinary actions. According to the study, exam passing rates include math proficiency rates and reading and language arts proficiency rates, over the last three years. School environment consists of factors such as the student-teacher ratio, teacher experience and teacher absence rate. Disciplinary actions measures take into account the school’s retention rate, in-school suspension rate and out-of-school suspension rate. “It is such a blessing to be a part of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School where educational excellence has been the focus for ninety-nine years,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, principal of A.E. Phillips. “The combination of great students, great faculty, great parents and a great university all play a part in our school's success. We take pride in the various educational opportunities we can offer our students and are honored to have been recognized as the top school in Louisiana.”

The StartClass study analyzed data from the National Center for Education Statistics and the Civil Rights Data Collection to determine the top schools in every state. “This high ranking is a testimony to the leadership provided by Dr. Joanne Hood, the school's director, our dedicated teaching professionals, quality staff, and of course, the exceptional students and their families who all contribute to Excellence Through Education,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. In Louisiana, A.E. Phillips achieved a School Performance Score of 123.2 in the most recent assessment by the Louisiana Education Department, earning the school an overall grade of “A” which was the highest of any school in north central Louisiana, and one of the highest in the northern region of the state. Louisiana’s School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates. Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.

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COLLEGE FAIR HELD IN RUSTON The Lincoln Parish Career night for area high school juniors and seniors was held Tuesday at Louisiana Tech University. More than 75 colleges, universities, vocational/technical schools, businesses and branches of the armed forces were represented at the fair. Pictured, from left, is Leslie Brister, Louisiana Tech University admissions recruiter, answering questions from Christine Strebeck and her son Thomas Strebeck, a Ruston High School senior, at the fair. Thomas will be attending Tech as a history major in the fall. 13 2016-09-14 Monroe

Louisiana Tech is recognized among top National Universities RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - U.S. News & World Report has ranked Louisiana Tech University in its highest tier of “National Universities” for the sixth consecutive year, according to its 2017 Best Colleges list released Tuesday. Louisiana Tech and Louisiana State University were the only two public institutions in the state to achieve a Tier One National Universities designation. Tulane University (private) also earned a Tier One National University ranking. Louisiana Tech landed at No. 202 out of the over 230 institutions to achieve Tier One status on the 2017 Best Colleges list. Louisiana Tech’s overall score increased by six points over last year, primarily as a result of a rise in its peer assessment score and freshman retention rate. Princeton University retained the No. 1 spot on the National Universities list followed by Harvard University, Yale University and University of Chicago (tied for No. 3), and Columbia University and Stanford University (tied for No. 5). “The recognition we continue to receive from organizations like U.S. News & World Report is a strong indication of the national impacts we are making and the unparalleled educational experience we are providing for students that enroll at Louisiana Tech,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “The foundation of these achievements is our faculty and staff who have embraced our vision for the future and dedicated themselves to serving our campus community.

“I am grateful for all their contributions and their commitment to graduating students who will represent Louisiana Tech and the next generation of leaders and innovators for our state and nation.” Louisiana Tech’s Tier One National University ranking comes on the heels of being named Louisiana’s best institution by MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges report released in July. Louisiana Tech also received international recognition last month when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030. In addition to its overall U.S. News & World Report ranking, Louisiana Tech’s place among the nation’s Top Public Universities rose from No. 119 last year to No. 110. Tech also earned national rankings for its undergraduate engineering programs (No. 135) and undergraduate business programs (No. 248). U.S. News & World Report assessed more than 1,600 four-year colleges and universities across the country, and classified over 300 as “National Universities.” Based on categories developed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, “National Universities” include institutions that offer a full range of undergraduate majors, plus master’s and Ph.D. programs, and emphasize faculty research. The Carnegie classification has served as the basis for the Best Colleges ranking category system since the first rankings were done in 1983. Several key measures of quality are used to analyze and rank schools including assessment of excellence as defined by feedback from academic peers and high school guidance counselors, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, graduation rate performance which is defined by the difference between actual and predicted graduation rates, and alumni giving. Scores for each measure are weighted to determine a final overall score.

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LOYAL BLUE WEEKEND A SUCCESS Several hundred Louisiana Tech Bulldog fans turned out for the first Loyal Blue Weekend Friday evening in Railroad Park. Clockwise from top, Tech President Les Guice, left, gets a visit from Champ, the university’s athletic mascot; Tech cheerleader Kellie Webb, right, teaches Esther Allen, 2, how to make the Bulldog hand sign; bottom left, Parker Sutton, 9 months, enjoys the evening from her stroller. 13 2016-09-12 Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY INTERNS LEARN FROM MENTORS IN CLASSROOM The 2016-17 school year at Glen View Elementary is off to a fantastic start. Throughout the month of August and the beginning of September, many wonderful happenings have taken place. From the first Boo Hoo Breakfast, to Open House nights for first and second grade and even the first Independence Day for Kindergarteners, there has been quite a bit to be excited about.

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Toyota executive, Tech alumnus to launch College of Business lecture series Dr. Cole Napper, Talent Analytics Manager at Toyota North America and Louisiana Tech University alumnus, will present the 11th annual Marbury Lecture at 6 p.m. on Sept. 27 in Room 111 of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business Building. The lecture, open to all Louisiana Tech students and the public, is part of the annual William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and Virginia Lomax Marbury Lecture Series hosted by the College of Business and Cedar Creek School. MORE FROM TECH One year later: A look at the DAC's impact at Tech Abraham announces $6 million for Louisiana Tech Louisiana Tech celebrates The Happening 2016 Prior to his evening lecture, Napper will make a presentation at Cedar Creek School at 9 a.m. to Cedar Creek High School students, Future Business Leaders Club members and to all faculty members. “Growing up in north Louisiana, and having known Mr. and Mrs. Marbury, it is a great honor to speak on their behalf to the community’s high school and university students,” said Napper. “I intend to stress how the importance of business acumen and integrity, which were embodied by the Marbury’s, play a role in future success. I look forward to reflecting on my experiences in the business world, as well as how my upbringing and education still shape my aspirations and achievements. “Although my career is far from over, I hope others can glean wisdom from my learnings in the private sector, consulting and teaching. It is an honor to have a platform in which to invest and embolden Louisiana’s future leaders.” Napper serves as the Talent Analytics Manager at Toyota North America based at Toyota’s US-based headquarters in Dallas suburb in Plano, Texas. Napper has also served in an internal consulting role for other Fortune 500 companies, including PepsiCo-Frito Lay, Anadarko Petroleum and north Louisiana’s own CenturyLink. Napper received his bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees from Louisiana Tech. He continued on to earn his Ph.D. in the burgeoning field of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Napper was born and raised in Monroe, Louisiana, and has been a lifelong Louisiana Tech fan and supporter. The William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and Virginia Lomax Marbury Lecture Series began in 2006 and is named for William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and his wife Virginia. The couple, both Louisiana Tech graduates, established William A. Marbury & Company, Inc., a managing general insurance agency. This corporation grew to be the largest agency in Louisiana and one of the largest in the South. The general agency was sold in the 1950s to Commercial Union Insurance Company with the Ruston branch remaining the company’s largest in the country. In 1959, the Marburys and their associates founded Bankers Life of Louisiana, which became the largest credit life insurance writer in the state. Today the Marbury Companies continue to thrive in Ruston, serving the banking, investment, and insurance sectors. The companies founded by the couple continue to have had a major impact on the economy and the community. 329 CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN COMMENT EMAIL MORE 13 2016-09-08 Ruston

TECH STUDENTS PREPARE FOR SCHOOL Macey Roark, left, a Louisiana Tech University sophomore nursing major, buys her textbooks from Barby Meyers, a junior speech pathology major, at the Tech bookstore Tuesday. Tech officially starts the 2016-17 school year Thursday.

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GUICE HIGHLIGHTS TECH ACHIEVEMENTS, PRIORITIES Academic and research achievements, institutional growth and progress, and providing students with an “unparalleled and integrated educational experience” served as the theme for Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice’s presentation during the annual Fall Faculty and Staff Convocation.

13 2016-09-06 Monroe

LA Tech may give athletic director new contract, raise RUSTON, La. (AP) - Louisiana Tech wants to give its athletic director a new five-year contract and a $23,000 raise. The News-Star reports that the Louisiana Tech Foundation would supply the proposed raise for Tommy McClelland, bringing his pre-bonus total to $248,000 a year. Tech says the school would still pay $140,000 a year, while the foundation's share would rise to $108,000. McClelland could earn up to $40,000 in bonuses for bowl games, tournament appearances and fundraising. It's one of three Tech contracts the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors is to consider Sept. 9. Men's basketball coach Eric Konkol is being offered a one-year extension to the five-year contract he signed in 2015. He'd still get a $400,000 salary. New women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr would get $175,000 a year for six years, plus foundation additions rising from $31,000 to $71,000. She could also earn up to $135,000 in bonuses. 13 2016-09-06 Monroe

Tech hoops to bring in more than $200K in game guarantees Louisiana Tech's men's basketball program will receive more than $200,000 via a pair of game guarantees for the 2016-17 season. Tech will bring in $105,000 for a road game at South Carolina on Nov. 11 and $100,000 for a road game at Nebraska on Nov. 19, according to documents obtained by The News-Star on Thursday through an open records request. Additionally, Tech will pay $70,000 to play in the California Bears Classic, a multi-team event similar to the one Tech participated in 2016 with Memphis, Ohio State, UT-Arlington and Grambling. In that tournament, Tech received $125,000 for playing three games with just one home game coming against UTA. This year, Tech travels to California on Nov. 30 to play the Golden Bears. In return, Tech will host Maryland Eastern-Shore on Nov. 27, Southeastern on Dec. 3 and Alcorn State on Dec. 5. The contract lists Basketball Promotions and Events, LLC out of Tennessee as the organizer of the tournament. The agreement states Tech is responsible for all travel expenses for the Nov. 30 game at Cal. The organizer is responsible for travel costs for the three teams playing in Ruston. Tech is entitled to sell tickets and retain all revenue for the three home games. To put the $70,000 payment in perspective, Tech dished $180,000 for three home games against HBCU schools in 2016. A typical Power Five game guarantee runs brings in anywhere from $90,000 to $100,000 to make up for those costs. Tech has yet to release its entire 2016-17 schedule. The Bulldogs travel to UL Lafayette on Dec. 10 and host Florida Gulf Coast on Dec. 29, both of which are part of return games from a home-and-home agreement GUARANTEE GAMES NEBRASKA Tech receives: $100,000 Buyout: $100,000 Tickets: 50 complimentary (34 behind opponents' bench, 14 elsewhere in the arena) SOUTH CAROLINA Tech receives: $105,000 Buyout: $100,000 Tickets: 75 complimentary, 75 additional for purchase CALIFORNIA BEARS CLASSIC Tech pays: $70,000 Buyout: $100,000 Tickets: Visiting teams receive 50 complimentary passes 13 2016-09-06 Monroe

Tech AD McClelland to receive new 5-year deal Louisiana Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland is set to receive a new five-year deal equipped with a salary raise. Tech has requested approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors for a proposed five-year contract that would pay McClelland an annual salary of $248,000. McClelland, who enters his fourth year at Tech, signed a three-year deal in 2013 that expired July 31, 2016. The contract is set for approval at a Sept. 9 board meeting. McClelland is one of three department employees whose contracts are up for approval, joining men's basketball coach Eric Konkol and new women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr. The new deal for McClelland, which would run Aug. 1, 2016 through July 31, 2021, includes the same $140,000 base pay from the school. However, his salary from Louisiana Tech University Foundation increases from $85,000 to $108,000, good for a $23,000 raise. The $108,000 is described as McClelland's "role as a fundraiser for the Foundation, and to promote Louisiana Tech athletic programs." In addition, McClelland can earn $15,000 for participation in a New Year's Six Bowl and $5,000 each for a men's NCAA Tournament appearance, a women's NCAA Tournament appearance and an NCAA baseball tournament Super Regional appearance. McClelland can also earn up to $10,000 a year if certain fundraising goals are met. The original contract from 2013 had bonuses of $20,000 for a BCS bowl bid or a similar playoff game, $5,000 for a bowl game and $5,000 for a men's or women's NCAA Tournament appearance. Specific details of McClelland's buyout weren't listed in the executive summary, only stating he would pay "certain amounts stipulated for each year in the contract. Per his old contract, McClelland's buyout started at $50,000 and went to $25,000 in year two and $20,000 in year three. The new deal stipulates Louisiana Tech's foundation would owe McClelland 18 months salary if he was terminated prior to the last 18 months of his contract, which amounts to $372,000.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Details on Brooke Stoehr's salary at Tech Konkol received a one-year extension, effective Aug. 23, on his original five-year deal he signed in 2015 when he took over for Mike White. Konkol's $400,000 annual salary doesn't change, nor do his bonuses. Konkol led Tech to a 23-10 season. Stoehr's salary was previously reported in May as part of a six-year, $1,376,000 deal. Stoehr, who was hired in April, will receive a base salary of $175,000 per year plus $31,000 in the first year from the foundation for her role in the Louisiana Tech Radio Network and as a fundraiser for the program, per the executive summary. That amount will increase by $10,000 a year until Stoehr reaches a maximum of $71,000. Stoehr's buyout starts at $350,000 prior to April 18, 2017 and decreases by $50,000 per year until 2021 when it drops to $150,000. Prior to April 18, 2022, Stoehr would owe the lesser of $100,000 or the portion of remaining sums until April 18, 2022. There are a laundry list of incentives as part of the contract, which went into effect April 18. The maximum bonuses Stoehr can earn in one season is $135,000. They include: $50,000 — NCAA championship $20,000 — regular season conference championship $20,000 — conference tournament championship $10,000 — NCAA Tournament appearance $10,000 — NCAA Tournament second round appearance $10,000 — Sweet 16 appearance $10,000 — Elite 8 appearance $10,000, — Final 4 appearance $10,000 — National Coach of the Year $5,000 — Conference Coach of the Year $2,500 — APR higher than national average (beginning in spring 2017) 13 2016-09-06 Ruston

TECH CITED TO POSSIBLY “CHALLENGE THE ELITES” Times Higher Education and World University Rankings have identified Louisiana Tech University as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.

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TECH EARNS RECOGNITION FOR VALUE, LOW STUDENT DEBT Students at Louisiana Tech University incur less average student loan debt than students attending any other four-year institution in the State of Louisiana, according to LendEDU’s “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016.” LendEDU ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state among the four-year schools with students averaging $18,284 of debt for their college educations. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 25 in the nation in a list of least average debt for students at public colleges and universities.

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Louisiana Tech to host DRA entrepreneur contest Entrepreneurs from across the Delta region will have the opportunity to win $40,000 in small business training – and access to national and international investors – as part of the Delta Regional Authority's third annual Delta Challenge pitch competition. The entrepreneurial competition, which will begin the second week of September and run through November, will select 20 entrepreneurs and 16 support organizations to be a part of the DRA's Delta Entrepreneurship Network. The pitch competitions will include resources and a small business fair. The winners will have the opportunity to pitch investors during New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in March 2017. The Delta Challenge kicks off with a full-day kickoff event in North Little Rock, Ark. and over the course of the six competitions will identify up to twenty entrepreneurs and sixteen entrepreneurship support organizations. The final competition will be Nov. 1 at Louisiana Tech University in Rustion. "Our message today is simple: if you're an entrepreneur in the Delta – or you are someone with an idea of launching a start-up – sign up for the Delta Challenge and give your dream a shot," DRA Chairman Chris Masingill. "We created the Delta Challenge and the Delta Entrepreneurship Network because we dream of a day when our part of the world, like Silicon Valley, is synonymous with entrepreneurship. Our region has low taxes and low energy costs, we have access to ports and natural resources – all essential components for attracting and growing businesses. Now we need our hardworking people to step up and test their ideas." "Entrepreneurs need to know they don't have to leave home to find funding or assistance – we will provide them with the funding, the support, and the mentorships they need to grow their business right here in the Delta," Chairman Masingill added. Entrepreneurs interested in competing can register for each competition at www.dra.gov/entrepreneur, where they must submit a business summary at least a week before the competition they plan to attend. If selected, entrepreneurs will: Receive a fellowship in technical assistance and training to enhance their entrepreneurship capacity and opportunities Participate in special investor meetings in New Orleans Entrepreneur Week Access engaging workshops and mentorships from panelists and other industry experts. "We are thrilled to once again partner with the Delta Regional Authority on the Delta Challenge to support entrepreneurship and innovative thinking in New Orleans and across the region," Emily Madero, Acting CEO of The Idea Village, said. "Our work focuses on the power of entrepreneurship to strengthen our local economy and transform our community, and the Delta Entrepreneurship Network helps apply this principle across the entire Delta Region. We look forward to meeting this year's cohort when they join us at the 9th annual New Orleans Entrepreneur Week." "The Delta Regional Authority has been a steadfast catalyst in expanding access to the types of services and resources that founders from the Delta need to successfully launch new companies," Codefi Founder James Stapleton said. "Increasingly, entrepreneurs in the Delta and those we are attracting to our region find resources and talent that rival anywhere in the U.S. The Delta Challenge is another example of an amazing opportunity for local entrepreneurs to connect to individuals and resources that may make the difference between failure and success, or success and giant success." Want to compete? The regional pitch competitions will identify two types of entrepreneurs, those that are in their "idea" or pre-revenue phase, and those entrepreneurs that have highly scalable, investable ventures throughout the region, or are in the "post revenue" phase. The deadline for ESOs will be midnight Nov. 1. Entrepreneurship support organizations that serve communities and entrepreneurs in the 252 counties and parishes within the DRA's footprint must submit an application online at dra.gov/entrepreneur outlining the current services they provide and their expectations for utilizing DEN technical assistance and programming. 5 CONNECT TWEET 1 LINKEDIN COMMENT EMAIL MORE 13 2016-08-30 Monroe

Tech has lowest student debt in state Students at Louisiana Tech University incur less average student loan debt than students attending any other four-year institution in the State of Louisiana, according to LendEDU’s “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016.” LendEDU ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state among the four-year schools with students averaging $18,284 of debt for their college educations. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 25 in the nation in a list of least average debt for students at public colleges and universities. The LendEDU recognition is just the latest in a series of national rankings that Louisiana Tech has earned over the past year for education value and graduating student with some of the lowest average loan debt totals in the United States. Last September, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the nation among national public research universities for graduating students with the least average debt. Business Insider followed in November ranking Louisiana Tech the sixth most underrated college in the nation, according to its list of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America for 2015. In December, Louisiana Tech earned recognition from Kiplinger who ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation in its Best College Values 2016 report, for in-state students at public institutions. “Given the financial challenges all students and parents are facing in our state, Louisiana Tech is proud of the fact that it is providing students with one of the best educational values in the nation and a diploma from a top tier, national research university,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Our faculty and staff continue to dedicate themselves to the growth and success of our students. I am proud to serve them and support their tireless efforts to advance Louisiana Tech locally, regionally and nationally.” According to their “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016,” LendEDU says students currently attending college in the United States are leaving campus with an average of over $28,000 in student debt. As a state, institutions in Louisiana ranked No. 39 in the nation in average student loan debt at $25,452. This latest ranking is the second time this calendar year that LendEDU has recognized Louisiana Tech for value. In March, LendEDU ranked Louisiana Tech No. 35 in the nation according to its 2016 College Risk-Reward Indicator (CRRI) list. Louisiana Tech had the highest CRRI of any public or private university in Louisiana, and is one of only two schools in the state to earn a spot in the Top 100. The University of New Orleans was the other Louisiana institution, coming in at No. 81. The complete Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016 can be viewed at http://lendedu.com/blog/student-loandebt-statistics-by-state-by-school#interactivemap. The school-level rankings can be found by visiting http://lendedu.com/blog/student-loan-debt-ranking-college-level-statistics#tab-con-5 13 2016-08-26 Monroe

La. Tech researchers use underground radar to locate post-Katrina damage RUSTON, La. (KNOE & La. Tech) - An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech University is helping the City of Slidell in south Louisiana to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina. This radar technology is a pipe-penetrating scanning system based on a new technology called ultra-wide band (UWB) pulsed radar. UWB allows for the inspection of buried pipelines, tunnels and culverts to detect fractures, quantify corrosion and determine the presence of voids in the surrounding soil often caused by water leaks and flooding. Developed at Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center, this technology incorporates leading-edge simulation, electronics, robotics, signal processing and three-dimensional (3-D) renderings in a package that can be mounted on existing pipe-inspection robots. Dr. Arun Jaganathan, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech, began developing this technology as the basis for his Ph.D. dissertation research.

Partnering with fellow Louisiana Tech researcher Dr. Neven Simicevic and others, his vision was to eventually develop it into a tool that municipal engineers can use for their routine pipeline condition assessment. “Our UWB technology was based on recognizing the need within the trenchless industry for an advanced pipeline inspection tool that can quantify the structural integrity of buried municipal pipes like sewers and storm drains, and be able to see through the pipe wall,” said Jaganathan. “The radar system emits ultra-short electromagnetic pulses from inside of a sewer pipe and captures the signals ‘back-scattered’ from the pipe to determine the condition of various layers hidden behind the wall which we cannot directly see using visual tools such as a camera. The radar is integrated into a robot which crawls through a pipe and relays the data back to the operator in real time.” Jay Newcomb, City of Slidell Council Member for District F and a Louisiana Tech alumnus, learned of this technology and the possibilities for partnership through his connections with his alma mater. “During my campaign for City Council, myself and many others all espoused a need in the city for small, high tech, clean industry,” said Newcomb. “I was already well aware of what Tech was doing with the business incubator on campus and, though we have no university to attach an incubator to, we took a trip to Tech in September of 2010 to check things out and make ourselves be known to any interested companies. “At that time, Louisiana Tech’s radar technology was still in the developmental stages, but the research team said that if the innovation proved useful in lab tests, Slidell would be used as a Beta site in actual field studies.” Following successful testing and development, Jaganathan and other researchers came to Slidell in the summer of 2013 to pinpoint the spots in the city that would be most beneficial for using the UWB, and to test and investigate the underground infrastructure issues. As had been predicted by the group in their initial research, compromised infrastructure was able to be seen using the UWB technology and, most importantly, became provable. “While we were aware of the depth and breadth of the problems that plagued our underground utilities and we knew surrounding communities had experienced similar problems, I believe it wasn't until we made the trip to Ruston in 2010 and then saw the results of the UWB investigation that we actually realized we could have quantifiable evidence of the scope of that damage,” said Newcomb. As a result of the work of Jaganathan, Simicevic and the Louisiana Tech researcher team, and consultations with other engineering firms, the City of Slidell was able to secure $75 million in funding from FEMA to begin the underground utility restoration process. “Our FY2017 total budget for the City of Slidell is just under $43 million,” said Newcomb. “We have almost two whole budgets to spend on streets, drainage and sewer thanks to the collective efforts of many, beginning with the research conducted by Louisiana Tech University.” “This technology is unique in its capability to generate high resolution images which allow engineers to inspect a particular spot in detail,” Jaganathan said. “Unlike many other radars, our system does have to be in contact with the pipe wall and this provides capability for rapid inspection to finish scanning a long pipe in a timely manner.” Jaganathan says this project demonstrates the value of academic research at Louisiana Tech. “What started as an academic research ultimately led to the development of a practical tool that our municipal engineers can use on a daily basis for the betterment of our infrastructure and society, as a whole,” says Jaganathan. “The sophistication and complexity of electronics involved in this system speaks to the capability of Louisiana Tech researchers to design and develop advanced sensing technologies.” “As for the State of Louisiana, I think they would be wise to look closely at what is going on at such a dynamic institution as Louisiana Tech and its dynamic leadership team,” Newcomb says. “I truly believe that far too municipalities’ first response to problems is, ‘Who do we hire to consult/fix this?’, instead of asking, ‘I wonder if any of our public universities have researched this topic or have any prior experience dealing with a similar situation?’” “I am glad the City of Slidell asked for help from Louisiana Tech. All we had to do was just ask!”

13 2016-08-24 Monroe

Abraham announces $6 million for Louisiana Tech WASHINGTON – Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, announced Monday that Louisiana Tech University has received a $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant will focus on understanding the initiation of epileptic brain seizures and longer-term impacts of brain function, such as memory. The project will use minimally invasive implantable sensors to monitor brain activity before, during and after seizure events. The study will result in new jobs, new equipment and new courses of study for undergraduate and graduate students. Leonidas Iasemidis will serve as the lead investigator, and co-investigators Mark DeCoster, Teresa Murray, Jerzy Szaflarski and L. John Greenfield will join him. Louisiana Tech Louisiana Tech (Photo: Courtesy) Abraham toured the research facility this spring. He also wrote a letter to the NSF in support of the grant application. “This is a tremendous win for Louisiana Tech’s students, faculty and staff. As a doctor, I have worked with many patients who suffer from epilepsy. I’m proud to have supported this grant application because it represents not only an investment in Tech, but also an investment in the futures of all of those who suffer from these seizures,” DrAbraham said. The project is projected to begin in September and run through the end of August 2020.

13 2016-08-23 Ruston

Tech professor receives NSF grant to advance brain research in epilepsy RUSTON – The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a team led by Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Scholar Chair and professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, a $6 million grant over four years to investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures associated with epilepsy. Through its Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), NSF announced 11 awards totaling $55 million aimed at building research capacity to address fundamental questions about the brain and develop new innovations at the intersection of food, energy and water systems. Iasemidis’ project titled, “Probing and Understanding the Brain: Micro and Macro Dynamics of Seizure and Memory Networks,” seeks transformative advances and understanding of the brain’s function, in particular the explanation of the foundations of transitions of brain networks from normal states into crises such as seizures. MORE FROM TECH Tech players affected by flooding in south Louisiana Louisiana Tech historian honored at Central American conference Louisiana Tech celebrates The Happening 2016 “Epilepsy can serve as a unique window into the brain function because it causes impairment of functions depending on the location of the epileptogenic focus and the extent of the seizure networks in the brain,” said Iasemidis. “In this project, our team will conduct and analyze long-term, in-depth, electro-encephalographic (EEG) and electrochemical recordings, longterm in-depth optical imaging, and short-term magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from the brains of animal and human subjects with epilepsy to uncover the causes of seizures, as well as their impact on higher brain functions such as memory. “Completion of the scientific goals of the project would significantly advance the state-of-the-art in probing the brain at multiple levels at once and the mathematical study of spontaneous brain transitions to crises, as well as contribute to novel applications in epilepsy.” Iasemidis is leading a team of investigators that includes Dr. Teresa Murray, Dr. Mark DeCoster, Dr. Prabhu Arumugam, Dr. Katie Evans and Dr. Ioannis Vlachos from Louisiana Tech; Dr. Jerzy Szaflarski, Dr. Sandipan Pati, Dr. Timothy Gawn and Dr. Roy Martin from the University of Alabama; and Dr. John Greenfield, Dr. Linda Larsen-Prior, Dr. Jennifer Gess and Dr. Jennifer Kleiner from the University of Arkansas. The collaborative effort will investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures – a disorder affecting approximately one percent of the global population. Iasemidis, who also serves as director of Louisiana Tech’s Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS), is the founder and director of Louisiana Tech’s Brain Dynamics Lab, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE) and the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), closely aligned his team’s proposal with NSF’s “Understanding the Brain” initiative, focusing on neuroscience and cognitive science, and which supports the BRAIN initiative announced by the White House in April 2013. “Louisiana Tech is playing a key role in Understanding the Brain, a key Presidential Priority for President Barack Obama and for many federal agencies,” said Dr. Stan Napper, vice president for research and development at Louisiana Tech. “Led by Dr. Iasemidis and joined by active researchers at Louisiana Tech, the University of Arkansas and the University of Alabama, this research will lead to new knowledge about how to detect and resolve epileptic seizures and memory deficits.” As part of EPSCoR’s Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) Track2 investment strategy, the four-year NSF awards announced Monday support 27 institutions in 18 jurisdictions and build national research strength by initiating collaborations across institutions in two or more EPSCoR jurisdictions. The RII Track2 awards support research while also requiring award recipients to invest in developing a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce particularly of early career faculty researchers. “These awards represent a tremendous value for the scientific community, as they foster research into some of the most pressing issues facing U.S. society while simultaneously supporting collaborative research programs and workforce development,” said Denise Barnes, head of NSF EPSCoR. “Whether by expanding our knowledge of the brain, or by improving how our water, food and energy systems work efficiently together, these projects hold the promise of transforming our daily lives.” Iasemidis is an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear dynamics and the detection, prediction and control of crises in complex coupled systems. He is also one of the founders of the field of seizure prediction, is a co-founder of two companies involved in neuromodulation and control of epilepsy, and is the co-author of 10 patents in this area. Iasemidis has had nearly 5,000 scholarly citations and his research has been highlighted in multiple forums, including the New York Times, Discover magazine, the Teaching Company, and the American Society for the Advancement of Science.

13 2016-08-19 Monroe

Owens congratulates Louisiana Tech graduates, reminds them that ‘words matter’ RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - “Words matter. You have to connect with people before you can communicate, persuade, understand, inform, influence and much more.” That was the message presented to 267 new Louisiana Tech University graduates by keynote speaker Dr. Reginald Owens during the school’s 317th commencement ceremony held Thursday morning at the Thomas Assembly Center. Owens, who retires at the end of the month as the former department head for journalism and F. Jay Taylor Endowed Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech, said the theme of his speech was inspired by something Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said in the first news conference following the horrific police killings in his city this summer. “(Rawlings) said at his first news conference ‘Words matter, leadership matters at this time.’ Over the period of this tragic event consumed our attention, Mayor Rawlings shortened the phrase to ‘words matter,’” Owens said. Yes, words do matter, Owen added. “I have known that for a long time,” Owens said. “I have known, too, that we can’t solve anything if we are screaming at each other. How can you hear? How do you know what is being said? Are you listening? Yes, listening is the major factor in communication. The phrase ’words matter’ here, therefore, is a metaphor, actually, for the ultimate perception of communication meaning.”

Owens told the graduates that it is crucial that they build a proper bridge from interpersonal to mediated communication. “This is essential in today’s intersection of words and technology,” Owens said. “In digital communication, words can be more powerful — and more ambiguous — because the receiver can’t hear the inflections in voice delivery and can’t see the body language of the sender delivering the message apparent face to face. “I am talking about such platforms as email, Facebook, Integra, Pinterest, Snapchat and Twitter, among others.” Owens told the gradate that in order to help prepare future Tech graduates about our new world of words, the university has put a new emphasis on teaching communication skills beginning with the fall 2016 freshman class. “As the university’s new curriculum evolved over the past few years, I often heard the former vice president of advancement, Corre Stegall, tell the story about the recruiter moaning that too many graduates don’t have proper communication skills,” Owens said. “The recruiter noted that it was easier for his company to hire someone who could communicate and then teach them engineering, rather than the other way around. Employers consistently rank communication skills as one of the most important when hiring graduates.” Before introducing Owens, Louisiana Tech President Les Guice told the graduates it was a day they’ll always remember. “Many of those who started Louisiana Tech with you aren’t here today,” Guice said. “Despite the challenges you faced, it was you who set goals and worked tirelessly to achieve them. It was you who showed perseverance and dedicated countless hours to study, research and attending class. “You have made many memories that will truly last a lifetime. Today is truly a milestone in your life’s journey.” Jeffrey Scott Arney of Floydada, Texas, was the top graduate as he picked up a Bachelor of Science degree from Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, graduating summa cum laude with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. Arney is also a military veteran. There were 162 undergraduate, 110 graduate and 21 doctoral degrees conferred in all. As Owens began his speech, he did so by offering his signature greeting he’s opened each class he has taught over the past 40 years. “Greetings! Salutations! Exultations! As-salamu alaykum! Muli Bwanji! Muli shani! Dobre utra! Konnichiwa! Guten Morgen! Bonjour! Buenos dias! Habari gani!,” Owens said. “I started this greeting for two reasons: First, to get students’ attention. Secondly, a goal was to engender some empathy and understanding of their diverse culture and this multicultural world. “In this class introduction, besides English, students were introduced to greetings in these languages: Arabic, Bantu and Bemba languages spoken in southern Africa, Russian, Japanese, German, French, Spanish and Swahili, the lingua franca language spoken throughout Africa. The point of this greeting as a teaching tool is this: You have to connect with people before you can communicate, persuade, understand, inform, influence and the list can go on and on.” And Owens closed his speech in much the same way. “Let me part as I began: in English, Arabic, Bantu and Bemba, Russian, Japanese, German, French, Swahili and Spanish,” Owens said. “See you later. Commence your journey. Maa salama. Salani. Chisuma. Da sveedaneeya. Sayonara. Auf wiedersehen. Au revoir. Kwaheri. Adios. “That’s the final word. Peace.”

13 2016-08-16 Monroe

Tech players affected by flooding in south Louisiana RUSTON — Louisiana Tech coach Skip Holtz said Monday the families of about a third of the football roster has been impacted in some way by the devastating floods in south Louisiana. Holtz said in-state players from Baton Rouge and surrounding areas had their families "picked up, moved, driven out of their homes" over the weekend as heavy rainfall forced massive flooding in the southern portion of the state. Baton Rouge and areas along I-12 like Walker and Denham Springs were hit hard. Holtz said a few unnamed players went home for two days to help their families but have since returned to practice. "They don't have phone service down there to their families. They are communicating through pictures and comments through Facebook," Holtz said after Monday's practice. "It's hard for them right now because they're out here practicing, going through meetings but everybody is worried about the safety and health of their families right now." More than 12,000 people were in shelters, 40,000 homes and businesses were without power and 20,000 high-water rescues have been made since Friday, Gov. John Bel Edwards said Monday.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Stranded I-12 motorists finally reached, rescued, governor says The federal government declared Tangipahoa, St. Helena, East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes as major disaster areas. Tangipahoa includes Hammond, while Livingston covers Walker and Denham Springs. Tech's roster lists more than 20 players from the Baton Rouge, Lafayette and Northshore area in east Louisiana. Players from either Baton Rouge or surrounding areas include Jonathan Barnes (Baton Rouge), Reggie Cleveland (Baton Rouge), Donald Freeman (Baton Rouge), Deldrick Canty (Baton Rouge), Matthew Ydarraga (Baton Rouge), Clayton Landry (Denham Spring), Shane Carpenter (Walker), Boston Scott (Zachary), Kam McKnight (Ethel), Russell Farris (Ventress), Willie Baker (New Roads), Cee Jay Powell (Maringouin) and Dominique Williams (Gonzales). Walker and Denham Springs were especially hit hard. On Saturday, Carpenter, a sophomore offensive lineman, asked for prayers to those who had been affected by the flooding.

Players from east Louisiana include Conner Smith (Covington) Marcus Gaines (Covington) and Charles Adeola (Slidell). O'Shea Dugas (Lafayette), Rhashid Bonnettee (Loreauville) and Taylor Fondal (New Iberia) are from areas that were affected. A 60-plus mile stretch of Interstate 12 from Baton Rouge to Covington was closed over the weekend. "It definitely puts things in perspective with where our values are and what we're doing right now," Holtz said. "We're trying to do everything we can to help them make sure they are in communication with their families and their families are safe. They can't do anything there. As long as their families are safe. It's a hard lesson to learn and hard to go through at 18, 19, 20 years old."

THENEWSSTAR.COM Gov. Edwards to tour Acadiana flooding today The devastating images and videos were picked up nationally as television and camera crews embarked on south Louisiana to report on the matter. Holtz said the impact of the flooding goes beyond what the public sees on TV. "It's a terrible thing because the national news puts their television cameras on their for this week while the waters are up and everything is flooded, but then all of a sudden the TV cameras and everybody goes away because the water rescinds but there's still not electricity for a month, nobody has air conditioning units, everybody is trying to get water damage back," he said. "They can't move back into their homes, their jobs are on holds, they have mortgages to pay. "It's a tragedy right now."

13 2016-08-16 Monroe

Tech's latest upgrades a reminder of facility arms race in athletics Tommy McClelland remembers how frequently donors and supporters of Louisiana Tech would come up to him last fall to mention how poor the school's press box at Joe Aillet Stadium looked. In his mind, the fourth-year Tech athletic director considered the obvious: The structure, which opened in 1968, has looked bad for the last 15 to 20 years. But even as recent as 10 years ago, college fans and supporters in north Louisiana would be hard pressed to find notable facility upgrades on their campuses. In 1989, 7,000 more seats were added as part of Tech's stadium expansion. The next major upgrade came in 2009 with a video board — Tech installed turf in 2006. Years went by without change at schools like Tech, ULM, Grambling and Northwestern State. Within the past two weeks, Tech and ULM, two of the largest colleges in north Louisiana Tech, continued to up the ante. ULM debuted a 11,750-square foot, $4.1 million dollar field house as the first new athletic building on campus since 1983. A week later, Tech unveiled plans for $18.6 million worth of upgrades to Joe Aillet Stadium, the second major upgrade within the past year after the school opened the $22 million Davison Athletics complex in 2015. "The old adage is you're either growing or you're dying," Tech coach Skip Holtz said last week. "It's hard to say Louisiana Tech is not on a pretty big growth spurt right now." Programs across the country are trying to position themselves in the best possible light. For name-brand programs, millions are poured in to keep up with the Joneses . Now, the trickle down effect has hit programs in the area. "It's a sign of the times. Everybody talks about the quote, unquote arms race at the Power Five level. It definitely has become a factor at the other levels of Division I," Northwestern State athletic director Greg Burke said. ULM's $4.1 million, 11,750-square foot field houseBuy Photo ULM's $4.1 million, 11,750-square foot field house includes a new locker room and coaches offices. (Photo: Adam Hunsucker/The News-Star) A race that won't end Few knew what started with a video board in 2009 would turn into three sides of Joe Aillet Stadium seeing upgrades by 2017. Count Tim Fletcher among those folks. Fletcher, who covered Tech for 18 years at KTBS in Shreveport and is now host of the Tim Fletcher Show, remembers how the addition in 2009 was "cool" and "unique." "I don’t think I would have ever thought they would have this kind of improvements, especially the press box. The easy way to do the press box is to refurbish it and make some more room," Fletcher said. "To do what they’re doing is beyond what any of us who covered Tech would have expected." Tech has strong alumni and donor support and has capitalized on a rejuvenation of sorts under McClelland and president Les Guice, Fletcher said. What started with winning under former coach Sonny Dykes has continued under Holtz.

THENEWSSTAR.COM How Tech is pulling off 2 big stadium upgrades for $40 million At ULM, the Warhawks battle the lowest athletic budget in FBS football while trying to compete with both regional peers and conference foes. "I’m going on 20 years in college athletics. When I was at the University of Missouri (as assistant athletic director) in 19992000, facilities weren’t that important," ULM athletic director Brian Wickstrom said. "Now that I’m in the Sun Belt, we’re competing against everyone in our conference to have great facilities and that isn’t going away any time soon." Grambling has yet to make a splash in the facility race as it transitions through new leadership. That doesn't mean Broderick Fobbs, who enters his third year as football coach, isn't keeping tabs. "I’m very happy for those programs and the strides in which they are making. They are good programs and successful programs," he said. "We’re well on our way as well." Not chasing anybody All four schools in the area all in four separate conferences. Two are FBS, two are FCS. "We pay attention to those we consider our peers in certain areas. I think it’s also important we reiterate we have a vision that is put forth for the university and we’re following the plan," said Brooks Hull, Tech's Vice President of University Advancement. "These things are part of that overall plan. We do keep our tabs on what’s going on at other institutions, but we’re not chasing anybody. Louisiana Tech University is its own entity." McClelland echoed Hull's comments, indicating Tech prefers to say in its own lanes while "running our race." It's certainly a talking point, though. While competition between local schools may not be at the forefront, bragging rights among conference members exists. “It has absolutely become a race,” said Marco Born, Tech's associate athletic director for external affairs, in a recent interview with the Denton Record-Chronicle when discussing Conference USA facilities.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box And it's not limited to football, either. A $500,000 donation is being used to upgrade the reserved chair back seats on the lower deck of stands along the west side at Northwestern State's Turpin Stadium, but NSU has plans for $1.7 million worth of upgrades to baseball complex, tennis and track and field. NSU also spent $1.5 million on a new parking lot between their facilities. Burke also said there's a new $35 million arena in capital outlay, although the future plans are unclear with the state's budget tightening. When completed, it will be "a jewel in our crown," Burke said. Tech pumped in $1.2 million for new turf fields for baseball and softball last fall. Upgrades to the basketball arena included a new $1.2 million video board and sound system in 2013. A new indoor facility is likely the next task for Tech's football program. At ULM, Wickstrom indicated a new training room, a new track at Brown Stadium and upgrades to the restrooms and concession areas at Fant-Ewing Coliseum are among his future priorities. ULM also wants to close in the end zone at Malone Stadium. Grambling put $30,000 into a new weight room in 2013 and has aspirations of making improvements to Eddie Robinson Stadium. "You’re definitely seeing an evolution and it’s something that all of us, Monroe, Tech, Grambling, us, like institutions ... it’s something that has to be on your radar," Burke said. The proposal for the NSU baseball complex includes The proposal for the NSU baseball complex includes a concession stand and public restrooms. (Photo: Demons Unlimited Foundation) An everyday dialogue Fobbs had a vision ever since he stepped foot on Grambling's campus in December 2012. He knew what he wanted his program to look like, the university to look like, the athletic department to look like and facilities to look like. The right leadership must be in place, and Fobbs thinks Grambling has it with Rick Gallot as the new president. Back in 2014, then interim president Cynthia Warrick said one of her priorities was to renovate Robinson Stadium with a Jumbotron, new turf, a new drainage system. "Everything is going to be focused on that stadium," she said in 2014. So far, it hasn't happened. Fobbs stressed those improvements are still in the future plans. However, he stressed a foundation needs to be implemented and the right people need to be hired before change can come. "We want to build it the right way and we want to take our time and build it from the inside out. Eventually things will start to come to surface and people will see the changes we’re making," he said. "You have to ask yourself the question of who’s going to run the scoreboard? There’s certain things that come before that. There’s foundation we’re doing now that will show up later on."

SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM NSU Demons may get new basketball arena While Grambling is starting from the ground up, NSU is making strides with fundraising and support, but Burke said it's not enough. "It’s a fact of life here that we have to put more effort into that," he said. "The facility subject has got to be a part of your every day dialogue as well." Burke used the word "ambitious" to describe what NSU has done. It's a common theme for schools around here. All four programs have among the lowest athletic budgets in their respective conferences. And some, like Tech, have larger donor bases. But Burke said he hopes the power moves made by Tech and ULM set in with NSU supporters. "Quite honestly, you kind of hope in my shoes, you say to yourself that our people, who I know do a lot for us already, some maybe more than others, they see what’s going on around north Louisiana, let alone our conference and across the country, and becomes an inspiration to them," he said. Keeping an edge The new facilities at Tech and ULM have helped rejuvenate interest in athletics. The real boom has come with attracting new coaches and recruits to campus. Last summer, Tech was able to land a commitment from Willie Baker, who compared the new end zone facility to what some schools in the Southeastern Conference have. It was as glowing of an endorsement as Tech could receive. ULM has seen recruiting pick up, too. The Warhawks have nine verbal commitments, which is unheard of for the program at time of year.

THENEWSSTAR.COM ULM unveils much-anticipated football facility "If you talk to (football coach Matt) Viator, the biggest thing for the recruits that have taken visits here are taking their selfies in the building and in the uniforms," Wickstrom said. "That’s what this is, college football is an arms race now. You could have a great coach, but to maximize your chance to get good players, you have to have facilities." Places like NSU and Grambling may be behind on the times, but they've managed to stay competitive. NSU upset Tech in Ruston in 2014, while Grambling played for the Southwestern Athletic Conference title in 2015. "We’ve done some nice things here and we’ve seen some very nice things that have been done and are being done at other schools," Burke said. "It definitely helps you keep your edge, that’s for sure. You don’t lose an edge when you see what’s going on at other places." The News-Star sports reporter Adam Hunsucker and The Times sports reporter Luke Thompson contributed to this report.

13 2016-08-16 Shreveport

How La. Tech is upgrading stadium for $40M RUSTON — Momentum is contagious. That's what Louisiana Tech is using to label how it was able to announce plans for $18 million more in stadium upgrades less than a year after the school opened a $22 million end zone facility at Joe Aillet Stadium. Tech plans on pumping $16.7 million into new suites and a new press box and an additional $1.9 million in stadium enhancements. The new upgrades will begin in November with a completion date for September 2017. "To be honest with you, when you complete a building like this (the DAC) and you're able to deliver, and probably maybe to some degree over deliver, people trust you," Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland said last week.

SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box Tech originally announced plans to begin fundraising for the DAC in 2010. It took four years to break ground and five years for the completed project. Since Tech started construction on the end zone facility in April 2014, new turf projects for baseball and softball were spawned. Once the DAC opened last fall, interest in athletic improvements was booming. That's when Tech capitalized. This new project will mark four separate improvements totaling more than $40 million in the past few years. "Momentum is so key, particularly in this economic climate, and so we wanted to stay on a path where we had a lot of momentum right now as an institution," said Brooks Hull, Tech's Vice President of University Advancement "It really gave us an opportunity to reach further into our plans and bring this project up to a fast pace but not to big of a rush where we weren’t prepared to go into this project fully knowing the level of commitment it was going to take to get it done." Hull came aboard last fall just after the DAC was completed. He said Tech was still in the early stages of raising money for the west side stadium upgrades at the time of his hiring. The public may view this announcement as a quick turn, but McClelland said the planning for the stadium upgrades was 18 months in the making. Contributions picked up within the last three or four months to where Tech felt comfortable announcing the project. With the DAC, Tech used a quarterly $50 student fee passed in 2014 along with private donations, most notably from the Davison family, for whom the building is name after, to fund the project. "In a project like this you have to get as much heavyweight lifting up front," McClelland said. "The reality is if you go around and trying to do it with $100 here and there, you might get a lot of people, but the net gross is not enough to actually get the thing off the ground. We've been focused on making sure we can make the progress we need to get there. The back end of this is where everybody's got to help, too."

Subscribe now for $9.99 FOR A YEAR for a limited time only UNLOCK MY $9.99 OFFER SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM Area college athletic departments part of arms race Million dollar gifts from multiple people, according to Hull, helped catapult the project forward. Hull, members of his team, McClelland and even Tech coach Skip Holtz spanned the country during the summer to help secure contributions. "Part of my role in this, my small role, was to provide support and vision on where we want to build this athletic department and this football program and this university," Holtz said. Holtz said he and McClelland were on "a lot of planes" traveling to see donors. They explained the vision and the role the new suites would have. McClelland said earlier this week the DAC and the new suites will help generate more than $1 million in annual income for the athletic department. The pitch centered around how their contributions can make a difference and how it will change the way Tech is perceived as an athletic department. "We have teams coming in and fan bases coming in and you want them all to walk out and go, wow, Louisiana Tech is firstclass now ... You go over there now and it's amazing. It's a hidden gem over there on I-20 that a lot of people don't know about," Holtz said. 13 2016-08-12 Shreveport

La. Tech adds hoops assistant coach RUSTON – Louisiana Tech head coach Eric Konkol announced on Thursday that Yaphett King will be joining the men’s basketball staff as an assistant coach. King comes to Tech after recently serving four years as an assistant coach at Texas A&M—Corpus Christi. “Yaphett King is a talented coach and skilled recruiter with an energetic personality,” Konkol said. “He has tremendous experiences as a player, junior college head coach and has been an integral part of building successful programs. Yaphett is a relentless recruiter with ties to this region and our recruiting areas. Our student-athletes will benefit from his genuine interest in their development and his ability to help them become their best. We are very happy to welcome Yaphett and his family to the Ruston community and to Louisiana Tech University.”

SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM A ‘buzz’ fills the air at La.Tech’s ‘The Happening’ While at A&M–Corpus Christi, King played a key role in turning the Islanders program around. The team posted a 12-win improvement from 2012-13 to 2013-14, the third most improved program in the nation. The Islanders went from finishing ninth in the Southland Conference to finishing second and making a postseason appearance in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament. They followed that up with a 20-win season and another berth in the CIT. “I would like to thank coach Eric Konkol for giving me the opportunity to work here at Louisiana Tech University which has a proud basketball tradition,” King said. “Coach Konkol is an outstanding person of great integrity and character. I look forward to helping him execute his vision of bringing championships to Ruston.” This past season, the program had one of its most successful years in school history. A&M-Corpus Christi registered 25 victories, the second most in program history, while also reaching the league championship game for the first time since 2007. The Islanders ended up making the postseason for the third straight season, a first in school history. Part of the A&M-Corpus Christi’s success stemmed from King being instrumental in landing and developing forward Rashawn Thomas who was Southland Conference Defensive Player of the Year and named to the Lou Henson Mid-Major All-America team this past season after averaging 16.6 points and a league-best 8.0 boards per game. He also finished with a school record 75 blocks. Prior to joining the Islanders, King spent four years as head coach at Redlands Community College where he led the squad to 72 wins during his tenure, highlighted by a 21-win season and a trip to the National Junior College Athletic Association Tournament in 2010-11.

SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM Tech hoops begins ‘passing of the torch’ On the court, King was an All-American as a freshman at Redlands in 2001-02 while leading the team to the NJCAA Division II national title.

He went on to play at Cal State Fullerton where he helped the Titans to postseason play for the first time in 15 years, advancing to the Round of 16 in the National Invitation Tournament. After playing professionally in Austria for two years, King returned to Redlands as an assistant coach in 2007. Redlands finished the season as regional runner-ups with a 31-2 overall record. Seven players went on to attend Division I programs. The following year he joined Cowley College as an assistant coach, assisting the team to a 31-2 overall mark in route to an appearance in the regional championship game. King is a native of St. Petersburg, Florida. He and his wife, Charlena, have a daughter, Caydance. The hiring of Yaphett King is subject to final approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

13 2016-08-11 Monroe

Louisiana Tech historian honored at Central American conference RUSTON – Dr. Stephen Webre, the Garnie W. McGinty Chair in History and interim associate dean for Louisiana Tech University’s College of Liberal Arts, was recently honored for distinction at the 13th Central American Historical Congress held in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In presenting the certificate of recognition on the behalf of congress authorities, Professor Rolando Sierra Fonseca, director of the Honduras branch of the Latin American College of Social Sciences, and Dr. Mélida Velásquez Lambur, director of history majors, recognized Webre’s long record of contributions to the field of Central American history and his many activities over the years in support of the biennial academic meeting. MORE ON TECH Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box Owens to serve as Tech summer commencement speaker The Central American Historical Congress is the single most recognized gathering for area specialists. This year’s event drew some 400 researchers, teachers and students from 13 different countries to participate in a program featuring more than 200 original papers, plus featured lecturers, workshops, round tables and book launches. Active in the organization since its founding in 1992, Webre has served as coordinator of the program section devoted to the history of the Spanish colonial period. At this year’s meeting, he presented a research paper titled “The Misfortunes of Doña Bárbara del Castillo,” in which he reconstructed the life of a widow in seventeenth-century Guatemala, demonstrating how she found ways to survive, despite repeated tragedies and acts of betrayal. Webre received his doctorate at Tulane University and been a member of the Louisiana Tech faculty for the past 34 years. He is a specialist in Latin American history with a special interest in Central America. Webre’s publications include three books and multiple articles in academic journals.

13 2016-08-10 Shreveport

Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box RUSTON — The latest makeover to Joe Aillet Stadium is set to begin following the 2016 season. Louisiana Tech unveiled plans Tuesday for a new press box and suites as part of $18.6 million worth of total stadium improvements at Joe Aillet Stadium. The new press box and suites will run $16.7 million with an additional $2.1 million invested toward stadium improvements like LED lighting, a permanent west side ticket booth, renovations to the bathroom and "aesthetic" improvements to stadium entrances. The project will be funded through private donations with an expected completion date of September 2017 in time for Tech's home opener against Northwestern State. Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland says the new facility will bring in more than $1 million annually. The facility is four times larger than the current structure and will stretch from the 10-yard line to the 10-yard line of the stadium. The first floor of the facility includes 13 suites plus a presidential suite. Each suite can hold 20 people with 12 outdoor seats.

SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM What impact will La. Tech’s football facility have? Demolition of the existing structure begins Nov. 14, which coincides with the final home against against UTSA. The November start date means if Tech were to host the C-USA championship game, it would be played in Shreveport at Independence Stadium. Tuesday's announcement means that Tech has raised enough private funds to move forward and announce the project. McClelland previously said that number was 70 percent. In April, Tech requested permission and received approval from University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to enter a ground-facility lease for an estimated $11.5 million project to expand the press box and build new suites to replace the existing Sky Box. New lighting and other factors brought the total from $11.5 million to $16.7 million. Tech's Sky Box was constructed in 1985 above the press box, which opened in 1968, to provide additional seating. 13 2016-08-09 Monroe

Tech loses new hoops assistant to SMU Louisiana Tech is suddenly in search of a new assistant men's basketball coach less than two months away from the start of preseason camp. CBS Sports reported Monday that new assistant coach Shawn Forrest is leaving to join the staff at SMU. It marks the second Tech assistant to leave this offeseason. Forrest, a former Western Kentucky and Texas-San Antonio assistant replaced Corey Barker in May. Barker, who was hired by Tech coach Eric Konkol as a Texas recruiter in 2015, left for TCU. This is Forrest's third job within the past few months. He spent the 2016 season at WKU and was hired by UTSA on May 9. He was at Tech by the end of the month and went through summer workouts with the program.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech fills hoops vacancy with former WKU, UTSA assistant Barker and Forrest both have ties to Texas, which is what made them targets for the staff at TCU and SMU. This marks Konkol's third departure in a little more than a year at Tech. Matt McMahon accepted a job with Tech in 2015 only to return back to Murray State to become the new head coach. Barker, Tony Skinn and Duffy Conroy were Konkol's first three assistants he hired. Skinn and Conroy are still on staff, as is Andy Fox, the director of basketball operations. It's not often to see coaching movement in August, but SMU is in a unique situation with new coach Tim Jankovich. Former SMU coach Larry Brown announced he was resigning on July 8. Jankovich earned the promotion to head coach and had to finalize his staff.

13 2016-08-09 Monroe

Owens to serve as Louisiana Tech summer commencement speaker RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - Dr. Reginald Owens, former department head for journalism and F. Jay Taylor Endowed Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech University, will serve as the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech’s summer commencement exercises at 10:00 a.m. August 18 at the Thomas Assembly Center. Owens, who retired last month after a distinguished 19-year career at Louisiana Tech, is also the former director of Louisiana Tech’s News Bureau and member of the University Communications Department. He worked closely with and mentored students of The Tech Talk student newspaper, Lagniappe student yearbook and SPEAK Magazine, all of which were nationally award-winning student media. As a student at Louisiana Tech in the late 1960s, Owens was one of the founders of the university’s first African American student organization, Soul Tech, and served as its first president. He was also instrumental in bringing to campus the first black fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. Owens went on to earn a Ph.D. in journalism from the University of Texas-Austin and a master's in advertising from the University of Illinois-Urbana following his bachelor's in journalism from Louisiana Tech.

Owens began his professional career as a police reporter at the Houston Post and later worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. in Houston in public relations and advertising, where he was associate editor of Telephone Times, a publication serving some 15,000 Bell employees in Southeast Texas. Owens was managing editor of The (Houston) Informer, the third oldest black newspaper in the nation, and was a founding vice president of the Houston Association of Black Journalists. Owens teaching career began at Grambling State University where he was newspaper publication director for The Gramblinite, an award-winning student newspaper, before coming to Louisiana Tech in 1997. He has also taught in Houston at Texas Southern University, and in Austin, Texas at Huston-Tillotson University and Austin Community College. Owens has been a visiting professor at the University of Texas-Austin, Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida, Southern Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation Traveling Campus, and Zambia Institute for Mass Communication (ZAMCOM) in Lusaka, Zambia. Owens has written, edited, published and presented more than 100 scholarly articles on the topics of African American publications and the communication environment in which they operate, and on journalism pedagogy. He serves on the boards of directors for the Dow Jones News Fund, the Shreveport Journalism Foundation, and the Greater Grambling Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the Friends of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum Committee, where he has served as editor for major museum publications. During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech. Summer commencement officially marks the end of the summer quarter at Louisiana Tech. Fall quarter classes are scheduled to begin on September 8. 13 2016-08-09 Ruston

› home › ACCIDENT CLAIMS LIFE OF TECH STUDENT A Louisiana Tech University student is dead and two other people are injured as a result of a single-vehicle crash at approximately 3 a.m. Sunday morning on the Tech campus. Omar Rashad Khodr-Agha, 23, of Ruston, died at the scene after being ejected from the vehicle, police said. Khodr-Agha was the front-seat passenger in a vehicle driven by Turki Mohammed Qaramish, 23, a Grambling State University student from Saudi Arabia. Qaramaish and a second passenger, Elise Salsberry, 50, of Ruston, were taken to Northern Louisiana Medical Center for treatment of their injuries. Salsberry was transferred to LSU University Health Center in Shreveport. Officials say Qaramish was driving westbound on Bulldog Drive at a high rate of speed when he apparently lost control of his vehicle, first hitting a fence, then a steel pole and finally, a tree. Alcohol use is suspected, Ruston Deputy Police Chief Clint Williams said. Toxicology reports are pending, he said. Authorities have not been able to determine if any of the three were wearing seat belts. Both Ruston and Tech police worked the accident. Tech police will handle any further criminal investigation into the case, university police Chief Randal Hermes said this mornin 13 2016-08-03 Monroe

Education residents get school assignments The Louisiana Tech University College of Education's Clinical Residency Research Center hosted more than 60 educators Monday for Big Reveal Day. Members of the research-based Teacher Educators and Mentors Model gathered in Woodard Hall so clinical residents could meeting the trained mentors and school leaders from their assigned teams and prepare for the beginning of school.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Schools adopt teacher training program The residents (early childhood, elementary grades 1-5, and dual 1-5 majors) will directly affect schools in Lincoln Parish, Ouachita Parish and Monroe City through their involvement in classrooms. Classrooms will have mentors and residents co-teaching together throughout the academic year offering multiple opportunities for learning. This year, all Ruston elementary schools are hosting clinical residency teams. 13 2016-07-29 Ruston

TECH’S ‘THE HAPPENING’ SET FOR AUG. 4 IN MONROE It’s always the biggest Happening for Louisiana Tech University before the start of a new academic and athletic school year, and it’s only a week away. The Happening XXXV, presented by Argent Financial, will take place at 6 p.m., Aug. 4 at the Monroe Civic Center and will again feature a relaxed and casual tailgate-style atmosphere with remarks by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and Athletics Director Tommy McClelland, who will also hold a question and answer session with football coach Skip Holtz and Bulldogs basketball coach Eric Konkol and new Lady Techsters basketball coach Brooke Stoehr. Catering by Catfish Charlie’s, music by Code Blue and the Flatliners and a cash bar will open beginning at 6 p.m. with featured guests addressing the gathering starting at 7 p.m. “Louisiana Tech had an amazing year last year, both academically and athletically,” said Wes Cavin, director of alumni relations at Tech. “It’s hard to beat a second-straight bowl victory and an outstanding academic year. Those are the kinds of accomplishments that make you really proud to be a member of the Tech family. The Happening provides us with a great opportunity to celebrate the success we’ve had but also to talk about the future. “As great and exciting as the past year was, I think the future is going to be even better for Louisiana Tech. It’s a great time to be a Bulldog and it’s always fun to get together with other alumni and friends of the University to talk about Louisiana Tech.” Argent CEO and Louisiana Tech alumnus Kyle McDonald said his company is always proud to sponsor the annual Happening. “The Happening serves as the kick off for the new school year and the new tailgate atmosphere format will connect Tech alumni and supporters with that spirit,” McDonald said. “Excitement about the upcoming athletics year and the continued announcements of high academic and value rankings of the university should make this a powerful event.Argent and our many Tech alumni staff members are proud to again sponsor the Happening.” Individual tickets are available for $30 while packages of 10 tickets are $250. A limited number of reserve tables (40), seating eight people, are also on sale for $500. For more information or to make reservations, call the Marbury Alumni Center at 255-7950 or go online to www.latechalumni.org/Happening2016. Bookmark and Share 13 2016-07-25 Monroe

The IDEA Place: Nurturing love of science Sometimes you are just looking for a fun and educational getaway that can entertain the kids while maybe teaching the kid inside all of us a thing or two. Ruston is home to just the place to expand your love and knowledge of science. This is the IDEA Place. A division of Louisiana Tech University, The IDEA Place is a top destination to take children of all ages as they engage in interactive science exhibits. The IDEA Place offers interactive lessons and has delighted thousands of children and their families since opening in Ruston in 1994. Children can see how tornadoes and clouds form in the atmosphere as well as the different types of artificial lighting and an earthquake simulator. The IDEA Place also offers opportunities for birthday parties, sleepovers and private shows at our Planetarium. Children are also invited to the NASA-related day camps that are scheduled this summer. For more information on all exiting activities at The IDEA Place call 318-257-2866. 13 2016-07-25 Ruston

TECH PAVES THE WAY FOR NEW LOT Construction crews began demolishing Louisiana Tech University’s old natatorium building Wednesday. Demolition of the old natatorium will pave the way for a new student parking lot.

13 2016-07-22 Monroe

Tech’s “Bulldogs Without Borders” restores water desalination system in Haiti RUSTON – A team from Louisiana Tech University’s “Bulldogs Without Borders” (BWB) student-led service organization recently traveled to Sous-a-Philippe, Haiti, where they began restoration on a water desalination system that was destroyed by a cattle stampede more than 40 years ago. Ryan Joseph (mechanical engineering), Kendra Britton (accounting), Logan Caskey (mechanical engineering), Blaine Johnson (civil engineering), Uriel Salazar (mechanical engineering) and Savannah Burch (animal science) worked with the Louisiana Tech University Wesley Foundation to develop and implement an economically sustainable solution that will serve the community. MORE FROM TECH Louisiana’s general contractors make donation to La. Tech AT&T contributes to La. Tech scholarship program Schools adopt teacher training program During the summer trip, the BWB and Wesley Foundation teams used skills developed at Louisiana Tech to reverse engineer the system to understand what critical repairs were required and how to deliver materials to the village. They worked to ensure that the majority of the materials were available in Haiti and to educate the community on how to construct future solutions and make repairs. “We had to do a lot of reverse engineering to understand how this system worked,” said Joseph. “To do that, we had to use skills we learned from our classes.” Although a team of six members traveled to Haiti, the entire organization was involved in the project. Before the summer trip, members of the organization brainstormed, researched and prepared plans to be implemented during the restoration. Additionally, the organization raised more than $15,000 through grants, fundraisers and donations to cover travel expenses for the six-member team. “It is always rewarding to see our students put their knowledge and skills to work to help improve the lives of other people,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said. “Programs like Bulldogs Without Borders offer special opportunities to truly enhance our students’ learning experiences and prepare them to have productive careers.” Bulldogs Without Borders is a student-run organization that is open to students of all majors. BWB strives to improve the quality of life for communities both locally and worldwide.

13 2016-07-20 Monroe

Louisiana’s general contractors make donation to La. Tech RUSTON – The Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors and the Contractors Educational Trust Fund (CETF) have made donations totaling over $362,000 to Louisiana Tech University in support of the construction engineering technology program in the College of Engineering and Science. Representatives of these and supporting organizations visited Ruston last week to present Louisiana Tech President Les Guice with the generous gift during a ceremony in his office in Wyly Tower on the Louisiana Tech campus. “Louisiana’s construction industry has been highly supportive of construction education for many years and we are grateful for their continued financial investments in Louisiana Tech University,” said Guice. “Their gift is enabling us to enhance support of our students and faculty. Through the industry’s guidance, we are making curriculum improvements and offering excellent career opportunities for our graduates here in Louisiana.” The donations to Louisiana Tech were made possible through the generosity of the state’s general contractors who voluntarily assesses themselves a fee during the licensure application or renewal process. The funds collected from these fees are awarded to Louisiana universities with accredited construction programs in an effort to enhance these programs and provide opportunities to educate and prepare students to contribute to the construction industry in Louisiana. READ:Report: La. Tech ranked no. 1 in state for value “The timing of these contributions could not be better,” said Steve Terrill, area manager for Louisiana Associated General Contractors, which is instrumental in creating the funding mechanism for these donations. “As the State of Louisiana struggles to provide needed funding for higher education, the Louisiana Associated General Contractors, State Licensing Board for Contractors and the CETF are able to step forward and support quality programs such as construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech that will produce the next generation of construction professionals and leaders in our state.” The Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors was created in 1956 for the purpose of protecting the general public from incompetent and fraudulent acts of a contractor while promoting the integrity of the construction industry. The State Licensing Board for Contractors consists of 15 Commercial members appointed by the Governor representing all segments of the contracting industry, and five Residential Subcommittee members. Louisiana Tech’s construction engineering technology program provides students with a background in math, science, engineering, construction and business to prepare graduates for leadership positions in the construction industry. The program prepares graduates for the responsibility of managing and supervising activities related to converting the plans and specifications prepared by engineers and architects into finished facilities. For more information on Louisiana Tech’s construction engineering technology program, visit coes.latech.edu/construction-engineering-technology

13 2016-07-18 Alexandria

What's happening in Cenla education Louisiana Forestry Foundation awards scholarships to local students The Louisiana Forestry Foundation awarded 45 scholarships to college students for the 2016-2017 academic year totaling $54,500. Seven of those went the following students from right here in Central Louisiana: Auston Aymond, Pollock. Brandon Blackmon, Leesville. Matthew Carlin, Dry Prong. Koby Garrett, Anacoco. Nicholas Goins, Winnfield. Tristen Nicholas, Anacoco. Christopher Cook, Boyce. All of the scholarships went to forestry majors attending either Louisiana Tech University, Louisiana State University or the Oakdale Technical College in the fall. Cook is a Oakdale Technical College student, and the rest of the Cenla recipients attend Louisiana Tech in Ruston. According to a release, the Louisiana Forestry Foundation has awarded about $819,000 in scholarships since 1969.

13 2016-07-18 Ruston

NUNGESSER VISITS TECH, LEARNS ABOUT SCITEC Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser visited Louisiana Tech University Wednesday to learn more about Sci-TEC, the school’s Science and Technology Education Center and efforts by Tech’s College of Education in partnering with outside organizations for mutual benefits.

13 2016-07-13 Associated Press

John Bel Edwards cuts $44M from Louisiana construction budget BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Gov. John Bel Edwards stripped $44 million in projects from the state's multiyear construction budget, saying Tuesday that Louisiana can't afford them amid its continuing financial struggles. Twenty-five projects were struck from the bill by the governor, including money for LSU Eunice, Louisiana Tech University, a recreational complex in Iberia Parish, natural gas system improvements in Grant Parish, renovations to a New Orleans playground, roadwork in Caldwell Parish and water system improvements in Columbia. The two largest items cut from the construction budget were $15 million for a road project in the city of Scott and $11 million for an arts district in St. Tammany Parish. Both projects are in areas with Republican lawmakers who voted against some of the governor's tax proposals in two special sessions aimed at raising more money for the state budget. ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads The Democratic governor has sought to shrink the size of the construction budget, known as the capital outlay bill. In a statement, Edwards said he wanted to "be realistic with the limited financial resources we have at our disposal." "For too long, the capital outlay process gave false hope to the people of Louisiana that construction dollars were on the way when, in fact, they were not. I've promised to budget openly and honestly with the people of Louisiana, and this capital outlay bill is representative of that approach," he said. But even with the vetoes, the construction budget still contains more projects than Louisiana can afford. The $4.4 billion, multiyear budget contains $1.6 billion in projects with cash earmarked for them, like federal and state highway dollars that pay for road and bridge work. Another $2.8 billion in projects are slated to be financed with state borrowing through bond sales. Louisiana is so over-committed in projects financed with borrowing it would take years to pay for everything with state lines of credit. Meanwhile, the state also faces stricter limits for the next few years on how much money it can borrow because of its financial problems. Bond-financed projects that weren't vetoed still aren't assured to receive money because the budget bill contains more items than available money. The State Bond Commission will vote on which ones advance, largely based on the governor's recommendations. Edwards wants to steer the limited money available mainly to port improvements, roadwork and a backlog of deferred maintenance on state-owned and college campus buildings.

13 2016-07-13 Monroe

AT&T contributes $25,000 to benefit first-generation college students at Louisiana Tech RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - AT&T announces a contribution of $25,000 to Louisiana Tech University to support its scholarship program for students who are the first in their family to attend college. These scholarships will be based upon financial need and will serve to recruit predominantly minority students to the university. “Higher education is essential to creating an advanced workforce that is critical to Louisiana’s success, and I applaud universities like Louisiana Tech for playing a pro-active role in fueling the economic engines in our state,” said State Representative Rob Shadoin. “Our university and my alma mater supports the state economy and workforce, and this continued financial support is critical to help students close the gap as tuition costs increase.” “Historically, first-generation students represent demographics which are underrepresented in colleges and universities. A top priority for us is to continue to provide valuable tuition assistance for capable students who have the skills to succeed in college, but don’t necessarily have the family resources to allow them to further their education,” stated Dr. Les Guice, Louisiana Tech University President. “We greatly appreciate the support from policy makers and education advocates like State Representative Rob Shadoin who understands the critical role that higher education plays in developing students for success in life.”

In 2015-16, 644 first-generation students enrolled in Louisiana Tech University, with the average out-of-pocket expenses owed per student coming in at more than $9,000 annually. Funds from AT&T will help alleviate some of these costs for students in addition to providing assistance beyond their freshman year. “Creating a culture of diversity and inclusion in the workplace is vital to understanding all of our customers’ needs and developing solutions for continued business growth and innovation in our global economy,” said AT&T Regional Director Robert Vinet. “It’s exciting for AT&T to be a part of giving first-generation college students the resources they need to receive the best education opportunities to reach their career goals.”

13 2016-07-12 Ruston

Report: La. Tech ranked no. 1 in state for value Louisiana Tech University has been ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana according to MONEY’s 2016-2017 Best Colleges report.

The report, released Monday, evaluated the top public and private higher education institutions in the nation to determine those that offered students the best value and return on investment. Louisiana Tech earned the state’s highest national ranking at No. 235, followed by Louisiana State University (349), University of Louisiana-Lafayette (521), Tulane University (601) and Loyola University-New Orleans (649).

Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 14 in the nation in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for student without aid, and No. 15 nationally in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for student with average financial aid.

“Providing our students with an exceptional value and our graduates with an excellent return on their investment in their Louisiana Tech educations is a cornerstone of our commitment and contributions to the citizens of our state,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Our faculty and staff take pride in embracing the responsibility we have to our students to prepare them for success and to position them to become leaders and innovators in their respective fields. “National recognition such as this from MONEY is encouraging and motivating for our campus community, and shows that we are clearly ‘walking the walk’ when it comes to creating value and graduating quality people and professionals for Louisiana.”

MONEY analyzed and ranked the institutions in the 2016-2017 Best Colleges report using measurements of education quality, affordability and outcomes-based metrics such as graduates’ earnings and “job meaning” which came from PayScale.com’s survey, “Does your work make the world a better place?” MONEY also measured comparative value by assessing how well students at each school did vs. what’s expected for students with similar economic and academic backgrounds, and the institution’s mix of majors.

To compile the final group of 705 colleges and universities ranked in the 2016-2017 Best Colleges report, MONEY eliminated those institutions that had less than 500 students, graduated less than the median for its institutional category (public or private), those without sufficient data to analyze and institutions that had been identified as in financial difficulty by the U.S. Department of Education or bond ratings agencies.

Princeton University earned the top spot in this year’s Best Colleges list followed by the University of Michigan, Harvard University, Rice University and the University of California-Berkeley and Brigham Young University tying for fifth.

This is the second time in the past week that Louisiana Tech has been recognized nationally for educational quality and superior return on investment. Last Thursday, Louisiana Tech was ranked among the best higher educations in the nation according to Forbes’ list of America’s Top Colleges 2016. Forbes ranked Louisiana Tech No. 122 in the nation among all public universities and No. 161 in a list of all research universities.

The complete MONEY 2016-2017 Best Colleges report can be viewed here. MONEY has also compiled its list of “The Best Colleges in Every State” which can be viewed here.

13 2016-07-12 Ruston

CITY COMPLETES WATER TOWER LOGO Motorists along Interstate 20 on both the east- and westbound approaches to Ruston and well as drivers southbound on U.S. 167, have a new high-in-the-sky sign that the city is home of Louisiana Tech University. The municipal water tower adjacent to the interstate has been repainted with the same joint Ruston-Louisiana Tech logo that’s seen on the downtown tank. Crews completed the work Friday.

13 2016-07-11 Monroe

Louisiana Tech mechanical engineering student awarded honor society scholarship Luke Villermin, a Louisiana Tech University senior mechanical engineering student from New Iberia, Louisiana, has been awarded a $2,000 scholarship from the engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi for his senior year in 2016-2017 academic year. Tau Beta Pi Scholarships are awarded to junior members on a competitive basis of scholarship, leadership and service, and promise of future contributions to the engineering profession. Along with a strong academic record, Villermin has also held a number of leadership roles and has conducted research in the Caldorera-Moore Biomedical and Nanosystems Lab at Louisiana Tech for three years. Villermin has been a leader and an exemplary student within the College of Engineering and Science, serving as president of the Engineering and Science Association and treasurer of Tau Beta Pi, as well as participating in the American Society of Civil Engineers Concrete Canoe team, apprenticing with the University Grand Challenge Scholars program and performing research. “Luke is one of the brightest and most industrious undergraduate researchers I’ve had the privilege to mentor. His enthusiasm, attitude, leadership, and diligent work ethic make him stand out as an undergraduate student and researcher,” said Luke’s research advisor, Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. “Luke has not only excelled academically but is also very active in research,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the College of Engineering and Science and advisor for the university chapter of the Tau Beta Pi society said. “Luke is an excellent choice for the scholarship.” Villermin says that he is grateful for the scholarship and for the support he’s received from Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science. “Since my first day on campus, Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science has equipped me with all of the support that I need to be a nationally competitive applicant for this scholarship,” Villermin said. “Approachable faculty, oncampus research, and ample opportunities for college involvement and leadership experiences have all made my acceptance of this award possible.” Tau Beta Pi is the world’s largest engineering society. Membership represents the highest honor to be obtained by an engineering student and is awarded on the basis of high scholarship and exemplary character. “It is always great to have one of the best engineering honor societies recognize the achievements of our outstanding students,” Tims said.

13 2016-07-08 Monroe

Forbes ranks Louisiana Tech among top universities in nation RUSTON, La (La Tech News Release) - Forbes’ list of America’s Top Colleges 2016 has once again ranked Louisiana Tech University among the top higher education institutions in the nation. Only the top 660 public and private higher education institutions in the United States make the Forbes Top Colleges report. Louisiana Tech came in at No. 392 in the nation with only LSU (171) ranked higher among Louisiana’s public universities. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 122 in the nation among all public universities and No. 161 in a list of all research universities. Other Louisiana institutions to make the Forbes Top Colleges 2016 list included Tulane University (129), Loyola University-New Orleans (486), Centenary (490), University of Louisiana-Lafayette (531), University of New Orleans (577) and Southeastern Louisiana University (626). “The Louisiana Tech community has committed itself to providing students with an unparalleled educational experience and building a nationally-respected research university to serve the State of Louisiana,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “I am pleased to see these efforts being recognized and would like to sincerely thank the faculty and staff of Louisiana Tech for their dedication to our institution and the positive impacts they have on our students. We will continue to focus on elevating our university and the graduates and leaders we produce.”

According to Forbes’ methodology for its America’s Top Colleges 2016 report, the list of 660 schools distinguishes itself from competitors by “our belief in ‘output’ over ‘input.’” Forbes says it is not interested in what gets a student into college, but has set their sights directly on ROI and what are students getting out of college. Specifically, the 2016 list focuses on measurements of post-graduate success, student debt, student satisfaction, graduation rate and academic success. Forbes utilizes resources such as the Center for College Affordability and Productivity, the Department of Education database (IPEDS) and PayScale.com to calculate its rankings. “College has become one of the biggest financial decisions students and their families make,” says Forbes’ Caroline Howard in her release of the America’s Top Colleges 2016 list. “They deserve all the information they can get on the questions that directly concern them: Are current undergrads satisfied? Is it likely I’ll graduate on time or incur a ton of student debt? Will I get a good job and be a leader in my chosen profession?” Stanford University topped the America’s Top Colleges 2016 list followed by Williams College (Massachusetts), Princeton University, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The U.S. Military Academy at West Point ranked as the highest public institution in the nation. Forbes’ America’s Top Colleges 2016 report is the latest in a list of recent national rankings for Louisiana Tech in measures of quality and value. In addition to a fifth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking last September, U.S. News & World Report placed Louisiana Tech at No. 1 in the nation among pubic institutions for graduating students with the lease average amount of debt. PayScale.com also ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 70 in the nation in its 2015-2016 College Salary Report for average mid-career salaries for graduates.

13 2016-07-07 Baton Rouge

Students take part in cybersecurity program Juniors from Ascension Christian High School and their teachers recently took part in a weeklong cybersecurity program at Louisiana Tech University. The program, called Analysis and Investigation through Cyber-Based Scenarios, was supported by the Cyber Innovation Center and a U.S. Department of Homeland Security grant, a news release said. Activities included mock scenarios, engineering and computer science labs, film sessions, interactive discussions on history, ethical issues and theory and a presentation by Daniel Stein, program director of the National Cybersecurity Training and Education Program for the Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C. The program culminated with a realistic 24-hour simulation of a national emergency. Teams watched news briefings, searched for clues and chased down leads as new information arrived throughout the day. Afterward, the teams presented their findings and recommendations to a panel and answered questions. Participating teachers also attended a professional development workshop prior to the program.

13 2016-07-01 Monroe

LA Tech students host candlelight vigil to honor Orlando victims RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Students from Louisiana Tech held a candlelight vigil Thursday night, to remember those who lost their lives in the Orlando shooting, and to show support for the Ruston LGBT community. The ceremony was held at the Lady of the Mist on Tech's campus. It was a solemn moment for both students and faculty members. They lit candles, and read the names of all 49 victims aloud. They also took turns speaking, sharing their emotions about the shooting, and how it's impacted them. Even though she waited a few weeks to organize the ceremony, Mallory Garza, saw it necessary to show the LGBT community, the student body at Tech is here to support them. "We want to make sure that our community knows that regardless of their multi-culture background that they have individuals and a community that supports them," Garza said. Other Tech students, like Taylor Michiels, said it was great to see the that many people from the university gathered in one place. "I think it's really reassuring that I go to a university that does care about this and they care about people like me," Michiels said.

13 2016-06-30 Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech University announces spring quarter honors students Louisiana Tech University announced the names of students on its spring quarter president’s and dean’s honor lists. Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s list, a distinction that signifies achievement of at least a 3.8 GPA for a minimum of nine semester hours completed with no grade lower than a B. To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for a minimum of nine semester hours completed. Students earning the honors include: East Feliciana Parish JACKSON: Norman Frank Cook IV* and Sydney C. Womack SLAUGHTER: Thomas Denison Arnett, Lawrence Harvey Dautel IV* and Quinton L. Townsel* West Feliciana Parish ST. FRANCISVILLE: Russell L. Biggs, Callie A. Bujol, Rosa Catherine Schellinger and James Maxwell Slezak*

13 2016-06-30 Shreveport

La. Tech Shreveport Center to host information session The Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Leadership at Louisiana Tech University will hold an informational meeting at 6 p.m. July 14 for individuals interested in pursuing a Doctor of Educational Leadership Degree (Ed.D.) in either PK-12 Educational Leadership or Higher Education Administration. T This Informational Session will be held at the Louisiana Tech – Shreveport Center Auditorium – 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport. All interested individuals are strongly encouraged to attend. Representative from Louisiana Tech University, along with 2015 Ed.D. Cohort Members and recent program completers will be available to answer questions and provide more information about this exciting educational opportunity for area educators who wish to advance their careers.

This session is part of the College of Education’s Teaching, Leading and Learning Initiative (TLLI) - a program designed to deliver advanced educational programs to individuals in the Caddo/Bossier area who wish to enhance their preparation, credentials and leadership skills to meet their career goals in local school districts and area institutions of higher education. “We are very pleased with the growth and success of this initiative as it provides enhanced service and support to current and future members of our Northwest Louisiana Tech family” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I look forward to meeting and visiting on the evening of July 14 with anyone interested in this innovative program.”

“The TLLI program is delivered through the Louisiana Tech University Shreveport Center utilizing a combination of online, face -to-face at the Center and hybrid course meeting formats which ensure the delivery of high quality, rigorous and appropriate program content. This is an excellent opportunity for the development and preparation of a new cadre of educational leaders to help meet needs of the area school districts and higher education institutions “said Dr. Randy Parker, Director of Leadership Programs for the CIL Department.

Individuals interested in attending should RSVP to Dr. Randy Parker at [email protected] or 257-2834 by July 11. 13 2016-06-27 Alexandria

Marcase: La. Sports Hall turns spotlight on Central Louisiana NATCHITOCHES — The 2016 induction ceremony Saturday night at the Natchitoches Events Center may have been unlike any of the previous 56 Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremonies. First, a poem was recited, followed by a quote from another famous poet. It also had to be the first Hall ceremony in which there was a slide presentation dealing with the brain. And Winnfield Senior High School became the first public school to boast two inductees in the same class. The class itself boasted of a Central Louisiana connection never seen before as six of the 10 men and one woman honored hail from Cenla. “Fifty-four years ago, my parent loaded me into the back of a ’59 station wagon and drove me through the woods to be the first member of my family to go to college,” said longtime voice of LSU athletics, Jim Hawthorne, a native of Anacoco in Vernon Parish. “Through the love and support of my family, I was able to get that degree.” That degree from Northwestern State led to radio work in Natchitoches, Shreveport and finally Baton Rouge, where Hawthorne called LSU football, men’s basketball and baseball for 36 years before retiring in March upon the conclusion of the basketball season. Hawthorne was one of two recipients of the Louisiana Sports Writers Association’s Distingushed Service Awards, the other being longtime Town Talk sportswriter Bob Tompkins. By Hawthorne’s count, he called more than 3,000 LSU games, and “I’m right back where I started in Natchitoches,” he said. “I am humbled to be here.” Tompkins, who not only chronicled the careers of numerous members of the Hall of Fame — former and 2016 inductees — he also had a hand in choosing many of them as a member of the LSWA Hall of Fame selection committee for decades. After 43 years in the business, including the last 38 at The Town Talk, Tompkins took his place in the Hall, joining two former Town Talk colleagues, the late Bill Carter and the late Al Nassif. “In humility, I stand in the shadows of those who came before me,” Tompkins said. Neurosurgeon Julian Bailes is one of the leaders when it comes to studying the impact of concussions on the brain. He currently serves as a medical advisor to the NFL Players Association and chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of Pop Warner Football. In last year’s movie, “Concussion,” starring Will Smith, Bailes was portrayed by Alec Baldwin. Bailes, who attended medical school at LSU, was honored with the David Dixon Louisiana Sports Leadership Award. “I was born in Alexandria and grew up in Natchitoches,” he said. “I always looked at the Hall of Fame in Prather Coliseum and dreamed of being in it.” No one who saw her play doubted that one day two-time Louisiana College All-American Janice Joseph-Richard would take her place in the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. The debate may have been whether she would be enshrined as a coach or player. As a coach, she went 159-34 at Xavier of New Orleans before winning WAC Coach of the Year honors at San Jose State, and finally leading her alma-mater to its first NCAA Division III regional appearance. Sadly, JJ never got a chance to witness her induction, passing in December 2010 at 46 after waging a public battle with breast cancer. “I’m truly humbled and grateful to know her legacy lives on,” said an emotional Pam Jones, Joseph-Richard’s sister. “This would be her dream come true.” For Anthony Thomas, his dream was to provide a better life for his mother, Helen. After a stellar high school career at Winnfield in which he set a state record with 106 touchdowns to go with more than 7,500 rushing yards, he took off for Michigan. “Anthony was always a guy you could count on,” said former Michigan coach Loyd Carr in a video introduction before Thomas’ acceptance speech. Thomas left Michigan with 15 school records, a national championship and something else far more valuable by the time he was named the 2001 AP Offensive Rookie of the Year for the Chicago Bears. “I was a kid when I went to Michigan,” Thomas said. “Coach Carr and Coach (Fred) Jackson said if I stayed four years, I’d get a great college degree. That was something I promised my mother.” The other half of the Winnfield duo was 15-year NBA veteran and Louisiana Tech standout P.J. Brown. Brown began his acceptance speech by quoting Maya Angelou: “You are the sum total of everything you’ve ever seen, heard, eaten, smelled, been told, forgot.” Brown gave credit to everyone who influenced him, including his high school, his large family and to fellow Hall of Famer Willis Reed. The Naismith Basketball Hall of Famer was in attendance Saturday despite it being his 74th birthday. As general manager of the Nets, Reed selected Brown in the second round of the 1992 NBA Draft. “Willis Reed, you saw something in a long, tall drink of water that 28 other teams didn’t see,” said Brown, who would go on to be named to three NBA all-defensive teams and win a championship with the Celtics in 2008. “I do not go into this Hall of Fame alone,” Brown said. “We all go in together.” 5 CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN COMMENT EMAIL MORE 13 2016-06-27 Monroe

New proposal would give Tech more options to stream sporting events Conference USA's long-discussed television media deal announced in May could give prognosticators even more to talk about in the coming months. But this time, it may be in a positive light depending on from which vantage point it's viewed from. To keep up with the times in the digital age, C-USA is trending in the direction of distributing more of its content in ways other than traditional television like streaming to computers, mobile devices, tablets and digital media players. To distribute more content first means it must be produced. The conference has started a proposal where each school will be audited to see what on-site improvements and equipment upgrades need to be made to meet broadcast standards, in turn transforming the school into its own mini gameday production operation. By doing so, C-USA can get access to more quality games to distribute for fees. Schools like Tech would also have newfound options when it comes to marketing their own telecasts, according to Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland, to help offset losses in revenue with C-USA's new TV deal. McClelland said last week there's already been a conference call with ESPN3 with subsequent communication to come in regards to what technology is needed to meet the production standards. "It would give us a report to say at Louisiana Tech, you’re 75 percent of what you need or whatever the percentage would be for what you would need to have all the equipment and software and technology to broadcast a game to where we would just take and put on ESPN3," McClelland said. "That’s something we’ve not done before. We’ve not necessarily had to do that since we haven’t had the infrastructure or the equipment. We’re not far from there now. With the new requirements it will put us there, and once we have it in place, then the conversations needs to happen with those distributors."

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years' McClelland said there's no timeline when Tech will hear back on what upgrades it needs or how much it would cost. Depending on the potential improvements, it appears Tech wouldn't be ready to produce a game on its own until basketball season. The obvious question is where does the money to upgrade such technology that would normally be produced by staff at ESPN, CBS, Fox Sports or American Sports Network for a linear broadcast. Additional cameras would be needed to capture the action, although the in-house broadcast would eliminate bringing in a production truck to pull off a game. "How we go about doing that is one of two ways in my opinion," McClelland said. "One would be to go out and fund raise for it to donors, or the other way is an opportunity to be with a multimedia rights partner here on our campus and say can we partner and maybe share some of the cost and in doing so now we have baseball product that is great and basketball that may or may not get picked up on certain day." Therein lies where Tech could potentially recoup some of the deficit it will incur from the new TV deal that will drop by 60 percent to 80 percent. As McClelland explained, national TV might not be interested in a midweek baseball game against UL Lafayette, but if Tech produces it, packages it and sells it, the revenue could be worth it in the long run. "Is it going to be hundreds and hundreds and thousands of dollars and millions of dollars? No. But you’re not paying a truck. When you can take out the production truck and you can do it on your own and it’s quality enough that someone else can pick it up, that’s where your expense is," he said. "Even if you’re making a few thousand dollars or a few tens of thousands of dollars a broadcast and you do that enough throughout the season, then you probably have enough to bring in a couple hundred thousand dollars for the year based on your own selling of your games."

THENEWSSTAR.COM New C-USA TV deal includes ESPN, beIN SPORTS Another example would be any potential televised football games like an FCS team that doesn't garner interest from national TV. Tech would have the ability to produce it and sell it to a network through its multimedia rights partner. "I think there is an opportunity there for Louisiana Tech to carve out its own dollars and help mitigate some of the conference’s decrease," McClelland said. Additional costs would come from increased staff to put on such a production. McClelland said it wouldn't necessarily mean an increase in full-time employees. Tech has a video coordinator for the entire department and could feasibly hire students to fill in the gaps. McClelland noted Tech doesn't have a broadcasting school to pull workers from, but a pool of 12,000-plus students to pull from does exist. "We’ve got great student help as it relates to game day workers, ushers, ticket takers and event staff. They obviously can’t do everything but as it relates to the human resources to get something going like this would be through students," he said. "Pay them an hourly wage. We have the human resource on our campus to do this."

13 2016-06-27 Monroe

Cyber Security camp wraps up at Louisiana Tech RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - A cyber security camp is wrapping up at Louisiana Tech, giving students and teachers a real world perspective on protecting computers from outside threats.

Groups worked through real world, cyber scenarios with the Cyber Innovation Center- a group based out of Bossier City. Teams gave presentations to a mock panel, which included a U.S. Department of Homeland Security representative, to learn what it takes to stay secure on the internet "Today, our nation faces a great challenge and a great defense net of of cyber based employees, cyber based workforce. Just in cyber security alone, there are 380,000 cyber security jobs available," Kevin Nolten, with the Cyber Innovation Center, said. This was also an outreach program, encouraging others to look for cyber security jobs. Nolten says most graduates that go into a similar career can come out of college making more than $80,000 a year.

13 2016-06-27 Monroe

Green to lead Tech’s School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry RUSTON – William Green, professor of agricultural sciences and interim director of the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry at Louisiana Tech University, will assume permanent leadership of the unit as its new director, effective July 1. Pending approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors, Green will take the reins of the newlyformed School, which is part of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. The School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry was established in December 2015 through a merger of the Department of Agricultural Sciences and School of Forestry. The merger of these two units, which were closely aligned in academic areas related to natural resources and consolidation, created a number of new learning, research and collaboration opportunities for both students and faculty. It also encourages strong interdisciplinary interactions in teaching and outreach, and allows for greater efficiencies in administrative and staffing costs. Tech news: Abraham announces nearly $1 million grant for Louisiana Tech “I am humbled by the selection as director,” said Green. “I welcome the opportunity to serve as director of agriculture and forestry as we move forward to make both programs stronger by being combined into one unit.” Green holds a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech, his master’s degree from LSU and a doctorate in veterinary medicine from Auburn University. After graduating from Auburn, he owned and operated a veterinary hospital for 27 years in Dubach. During this time, he accumulated stories about unusual events that occurred as he worked to prevent and treat diseases in animals. These stories make up the content of his recently published book, “Doc, Did I Wake You Up?” Since 1980, Green has served Louisiana Tech as a professor of agricultural sciences, university veterinarian and an advisor for numerous pre-veterinary medicine students. Green has served on the Board of Veterinary Medicine and is a lifetime member of the national, state, and local veterinary associations. He has been honored with numerous teaching, advising and service awards at Louisiana Tech as well as the Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award for North Louisiana. Tech Athletics: Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years' “The School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry is extremely fortunate to secure Dr. William Green as Director,” said Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. “With more than 20 years of experience in serving as an accomplished faculty member at Louisiana Tech, Dr. Green has been recognized for his excellence in teaching, research and service to the university and to his profession and community by being selected for numerous university faculty awards. “His experience, combined with a career as a practicing veterinarian and a highly respected and accomplished professor, makes Dr. Green the ideal person to lead the recently combined areas of agricultural sciences and forestry.” Green says the new School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry is a benefit to the university and the students, and that combining the resources of these two complex units should result in more efficient use of personnel, equipment, and facilities by the university and the students. “I believe the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry will become recognized for identifying, recruiting, retaining, educating and developing agriculture and forestry students so they can become positive additions to society,” Green said.

13 2016-06-27 Monroe

LA high school students investigate global problems using tech Cars in Washington came to a stop this morning, causing crashes all over the city. At least, that's what the faculty at a weeklong cyber engineering camp taking place at Louisiana Tech University told 72 high school students and teachers from around the state. The camp, Analysis and Investigation through Cyber-based Scenarios, is designed so students use technology to solve problems. The scenarios are made up — cars in Washington did not come to a stop this morning. But such scenarios that take place in a realistic, global context force students to use technology, social media and other information they are provided to figure out what happened, who or what caused the problem and why it happened. Were the cars hacked? By whom? Was it an accident? Why? And what should the government do about it? "They're like analysts trying to figure out what happened," Heath Tims, associate dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said. Basically, the students work together to build a case for what they think happened based on the information they have. On Saturday, the students will present their solutions to the Washington traffic problem to a panel of judges, including a representative from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Because the students are still trying to solve that scenario, The News-Star cannot give the answer. AICS is hosted by Louisiana Tech's cyber engineering program, which is the first of its kind. The program graduated its first five graduates in 2015. It makes sense that Louisiana Tech is the home of the program, Tims said, because the school is known for having integrative curricula and trying new things. There is a need for people who understand cyber security and cyber engineering to work in Louisiana — at companies like IBM and Century Link — and nationally, including in federal jobs. The skills the students learn and use don't apply only to technology or cyber engineering, however, Ruston High School teacher Kim Goree, who taught in the school's New Technologies program, said. She attended the workshop with a group of incoming juniors. "Everybody's talents are utilized," Goree said. Some of the kids were better at research, some were better at presenting their case and some were whizzes at writing and understanding computer code.

13 2016-06-27 Monroe

Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years' Conference USA member schools are in for at least two years of budget tightening with the latest news of a drastic decrease in television revenue. For Louisiana Tech, which already operates with the lowest budget in C-USA, the recent statewide budget crisis and the additional pricetag of this summer's implementation of cost of attendance has the athletic department about to set sail on trying times. "The reality is next year is going to be one of the more fiscally challenging years for Louisiana Tech athletic department, not only because conference revenue is going down but because of the increase in expense as it relates to the cost of attendance, which starts July 1 for us," Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland told The News-Star during a recent interview. "It’s going to take a lot of hard work from certainly our coaches and administration and certainly our fans and donors. We’ll be asking more for them as we continue to have success and want to continue to have success in order to get us through these tough times." There's no positive way to spin a recent Virginian-Pilot report that indicated C-USA member schools will be faced with a decrease from $1.1 million to around $200,000 as part of the new TV deal announced last month with ESPN, CBS Sports, American Sports Network and beIN Sports.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech implementing partial cost of attendance payments for 4 sports And no member institution will be hit harder than Tech. In the latest USA TODAY Sports database released in April, Tech's athletic department remained at the bottom of Conference USA and ranked 124th nationally with a revenue stream of $22.2 million for 2014-15. Tech privately raised money to cover cost of attendance across four sports in 2016-17 and is prepared for a 60 percent or 80 percent decrease from the $1.1 million dished out per school under the previous deal — that number didn't come strictly from the previous TV deal. It also included exit fees from departing member schools like Memphis and Houston, among others. In other words, McClelland is expecting to receive between $220,000 and $440,000, which is at least a decrease of $660,000. And even though cost of attendance is primarily coming from private funds, it's still a new cost in the sense that the money could be used elsewhere. The reason a total amount isn't settled yet, according to McClelland, is due to part of the new TV deal that allows C-USA to sell sponsorship's for football and basketball championships.

13 2016-06-23 Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech announces spring quarter honor students Louisiana Tech University announced the names of students on its spring quarter president’s and dean’s honor lists. Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s list, a distinction that signifies achievement of at least a 3.8 GPA for a minimum of nine semester hours completed with no grade lower than a B. To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for a minimum of nine semester hours completed. Students earning the honors include: BAKER: Erika Wittenburg GREENWELL SPRINGS: Charlotte Elaine Murphy*, Cole Clint Rankin* and Kristen Nicole Shaffer PRIDE: Garret Louis Broussard, Blanton J. Burgess and Payton David Mangham* ZACHARY: Andrew R. Albritton, Brittany Nicole Castello, Preston T. Danielson, Matthew Michael Flanders*, Kyle David Gordon*, Kaylan Brianna Hebert*, Kaitlin Marie Maloy*, Seth A. McReynolds*, William J. Reily and Stephen T. Samuel*.

13 2016-06-23 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Receives $1 Million STEM Grant RUSTON, La. As Louisiana's second special session winds down, the state's education budget is still on the chopping block. But some Louisiana Tech students can breathe a sigh of relief after the school received a major financial boost. The National Science Foundation awarded the school's engineering department a $1 million grant to focus on retaining students in science, technology, engineering, and math. The funds will be used to help these students complete classes the summer after their sophomore year. This will allow them to transition smoothly into more rigorous upper-level classes during the fall semester of their junior year. One biomedical engineering student says she moved from California to enroll in Tech's engineering program and is relieved to see the department get this boost. "I think it's important to students to know that there are going to be additional funding that can potentially help them, whether it be potential jobs, internships, or work study, or whatever it could be., says Justyce Brown. "It's gonna help us improve our retention and help our students be more successful, help them graduate on time and that will really, really help them save money. ", explains Dr. Hisham Hegab, who is the Dean of the College of Engineering and Science. Sophomore engineering students who are low-income and academically talented will be some of the first to benefit from this additional funding.

13 2016-06-22 Monroe

Vitter Announces Nearly $1M in STEM Scholarship Grants for LA Tech Students RUSTON, La. (Press Release) -U.S. Senator David Vitter (R-La.) today announced that the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be awarding a $999,234 grant to Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, La. These funds will benefit sophomore students in the fields of mechanical, biomedical, and civil engineering. “Louisiana’s young folks are generating some exciting, new ideas, particularly in the fields of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering,” said Vitter. “This STEM grant for students at Louisiana Tech in Ruston will go a long way toward encouraging them to continue their important work to keep Louisiana at the forefront of innovation and technology.” This grant is awarding under the NSF’s Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) and through Louisiana Tech University’s “Sophomore Fast-Forward: A Summer Bridge Program to Support Retention in Engineering” program, whose goal is to boost graduates entering the fields of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM). Direct beneficiaries of this grant include sophomore students majoring in the fields of mechanical, biomedical, and civil engineering, particularly low-income and academically talented students. Funds will provide for professional development, academic support, and mentoring programs. Copyright 2016 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistrib 13 2016-06-17 Monroe

Tech's Goff leading candidate for Alabama's opening, but no deal is in place Louisiana Tech baseball coach Greg Goff has emerged as a leading candidate for the Alabama vacancy. On Thursday, the Goff era at Tech appeared to be over after a report by TideSports.com Thursday indicated the Bulldogs' second-year head coach is expected to be named the new coach at Alabama. But Goff to Alabama is far from a done deal. There is mutual interest between the two sides, but no offer had been made as of late Thursday afternoon. As of Thursday night, Tech hadn't been informed that Goff is leaving or plans to leave. "It is not our policy to comment directly on coaching searches and it's not our place to comment on the speculation of the Alabama search," Tech associate athletic director of communications Malcolm Butler said. "At this time Greg Goff is still Louisiana Tech's baseball coach." Early Thursday, Goff became one of Alabama's top candidates after a pair of candidates reportedly dropped out of the running to replace Mitch Gaspard, the former coach of the Crimson Tide who resigned last month. Rick Pendley, who is the vice president of Alabama's baseball booster club, tweeted out the following Thursday about Goff being introduced Friday. View image on Twitter View image on Twitter Follow Rick Pendley @alagrandslammer Welcoming to Tuscaloosa new Alabama Head Baseball Coach Greg Goff 5:44 PM - 16 Jun 2016 19 19 Retweets 40 40 likes If offered, Alabama would be a tough job to turn down for Goff despite he and his family's affinity for Ruston and the community. Goff got his head coaching career started at Division II Montevallo, which is about an hour east of Alabama's campus in Tuscaloosa. Goff led Montevallo to the Division II College World Series in 2006. Reports surfaced Thursday afternoon that Goff, who just finished his second year at Tech and led the Bulldogs to a 42-win season and an appearance in the NCAA Regionals, is in the mix for Alabama's opening. D1baseball's Kendall Rogers tweeted Tulane coach David Pierce and East Carolina coach Cliff Godwin were no longer in the mix at Alabama and "all signs pointed" to Goff as the latest option for the Crimson Tide's new coach. There was word around Tech's athletic department is Goff has had conversations with Alabama this week and as recently as Thursday. Gaspard, the former Northwestern State coach and UL Lafayette assistant went 234-193 in seven seasons, although the Crimson Tide failed to make the NCAA Tournament in each of the past two seasons. It's unclear how much Alabama would pay for its next coach. A 2013 article by AL.com listing the salaries of Southeastern Conference baseball coaches indicated Gaspard was under contract for $300,000. Goff's salary and exact terms at Tech are unclear. He signed a five-year in 2015, but the University of Louisiana System told The News-Star in an email last week they didn't have a contract on file for Goff. Goff is a hot name in college baseball due to his rapid turnaround at Tech. He inherited a 15-win program in 2014 and showed a 10-win improvement in 2015 (25-27) before becoming one of the biggest surprises in Conference USA this past year.

THENEWSSTAR.COM 'Miracles can happen': Greg Goff has helped make Tech baseball relevant again Prior to his time at Tech, Goff coached at Campbell for seven seasons, logging three consecutive 40-win seasons in his final three years. The 40-win threshold in 2016 at Tech was the program's first since 1988. He also spent fours year at Kentucky from 1999 to 2003 as the Wildcats' pitching coach. Goff was briefly linked to Kentucky for its recent vacancy — reports listed him as a name to consider — although UK ended up hiring Mississippi State assistant Nick Mingione earlier this week Goff has been busy since Tech's season ended almost two weeks ago in a loss to Mississippi State. The entire staff ran a team camp last week, and Goff was in Ruston this week to put on a youth camp while some of his staff went out recruiting. The one area in Tech's corner is the immediate future with the program. Tech returns a majority of the roster and will add several key pieces to make another run at the NCAA Tournament. Former Bulldog basketball coach Mike White was faced with a similar decision in 2014 when he was courted by several teams before deciding to return with a talented roster at his disposal. Tech ended up winning the regular season league title in 2015, the program's first outright championship since 1999. White's patience paid off when he accepted the Florida job a few months later. 13 2016-06-16 Ruston

TECH HOSTS INAUGURAL CLINICAL RESIDENCY CONFERENCE More than 100 Lincoln, Claiborne and Ouachita parish educators, Monroe City and Caddo Parish School Board Leaders and Grambling State University faculty attended the inaugural Louisiana Tech University Clinical Residency Conference. The purpose of the conference was to update local educators on the Teacher Educators and Mentors model, Amy Vessel, clinical residency research center director and director of professional and clinical experiences, said. The TEAM Model transforms traditional student teaching into a mentor and intern approach. Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here. 13 2016-06-15 Monroe

La. Tech graduates complete medical school at LSUHSC-Shreveport RUSTON – Thirteen recent Louisiana Tech University graduates have earned their Doctor of Medicine degrees after graduating this spring from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine in Shreveport. All 13 of these students successfully gained admission to medical school upon graduation from Louisiana Tech, applying the skills and the quality educational and research experiences each of them received while at Tech. Each graduated Louisiana Tech between the winter 2011 and winter 2012 quarters. “The Department of Biology at Louisiana Tech fosters an environment that offers key advantages to medical school applicants,” said Dr. Kevin Hebert, a 2012 graduate of Louisiana Tech who will be doing his residency at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “Small class sizes and approachable world-class professors are two unique qualities Louisiana Tech provides. These characteristics were instrumental in learning a solid biology foundation needed to success in medical school and beyond. 13 2016-06-13 Shreveport

Could Shreveport be the future home to C-USA hoops tournament? For the first time in three years, Louisiana Tech, in conjunction with the Shreveport-Bossier City Sports Commission, never submitted a bid for the Conference USA men's and women's basketball tournament. That's because Tech's potential bid didn't meet the requirements of having a secondary site to accommodate both the men's and women's side. Or, as Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland put it, Tech's hands were tied. Earlier this week, Conference USA approved a return to Birmingham, Alabama, for the third straight year. Tech threw its hat in the ring for the 2015 and 2016 tournaments. UAB and UTEP were the only two schools to bid for 2017. If the current format continues, the C-USA Tournament won't be coming to north Louisiana, but that could soon change. "Moving forward, there's a larger conversation that needs to take place and that's, how we're going to do this? What's our plan? What's our strategy? I think there's going to be conversations that are going to take place about a true neutral site, separating the tournament and having a women's tournament the week before and having the men's tournament the next week," McClelland told The News-Star on Friday. "If the format changes, it certainly opens up a beautiful arena sitting right there in Bossier City with some of the greatest hospitality in the entire country to allow me to present the CenturyLink Center as a host site for the Conference USA Tournament if there's one venue involved." Separate sites for the men and women would allow Tech to bid for either one or for both since it will only need one facility — the 14,000-seat CenturyLink Center.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech loses bid to host 2016 C-USA hoops tourney In previous years, the CenturyLink Center was proposed as the primary site with Centenary College as a secondary site for the first few rounds of the women’s tournament. "We didn't bid on it because we didn't meet the requirements anymore," McClelland said. "It wasn't going to get off the ground. "Overall, the condition of the facility. The size. Being on another university's campus that is not in our league was an issue." Presented with El Paso, Texas, or Birmingham, McClelland voted for Birmingham again since it is easier for fans to travel to. McClelland said all 14 athletic directors plan to meet in the fall to discuss future conference tournament sites and where the league goes from here. Boosting the league's RPI via scheduling, conference scheduling and the possibility of creating divisions will be discussed. "All 14 athletic directors are really going to roll up our sleeves. We have to," McClelland said. But the main priority is coming up with some sort of plan to avoid having yearly last-minute meetings to determine where the tournament will be held. "First of all, we cannot just keep waiting every year to figure out where we're going to play the tournament for the following year," said McClelland, noting it would have been difficult for Tech to host in Shreveport since the turnaround from May to March is so quick. "We need to have a long-term plan. We need to have at least a three-year plan, whether that is at one location for three years or whether that is this location in year one, this location in year two and this location in year three. We need to know the places we're going. You can't just keep waiting every year to decide what you're going to do with your tournament. There is certainly a growing frustration to have a better plan and to be better planned out for the future." A move to a neutral site could help prevent small crowds A move to a neutral site could help prevent small crowds like this one back in March for the C-USA title game between Middle Tennessee and Old Dominion. (Photo: Marvin Gentry, Marvin Gentry-USA TODAY Sports) McClelland's frustrations and concerns aren't new. He expressed the same viewpoint last year when Tech lost out to UAB as the host site. He also said last May he thought a neutral site format would be on the agenda, but that idea has yet to pick up steam. He's all for changing the format to either a neutral or separate sites. The first option is his preference. The second would potentially benefit the school and Shreveport-Bossier City. "My personal view on it is to try and have it at a true neutral site and then spend your energy on marketing. You can't just pick a neutral site and have it there one year. You have to try and get some traction and build some momentum," he said. "To me, that's a true championship, a place people can anticipate going, go to New Orleans for a week or the weekend to watch basketball and it's a destination we know is there for three years. To me, that would be the number one. I know there's challenges associated with that, finances being one with the cost of those arenas. If we do these types of things then fans have to come." McClelland then referenced how UAB was eliminated early from the tournament this past year, which made attendance suffer for the championship game between Middle Tennessee and Old Dominion. He said that scenario wouldn't be any different than having it in Nashville or New Orleans. "I don't know if we can get there as a group, but I do think it's going to change moving forward. I don't think it will be the same format and I think it will be a different location," he said.

13 2016-06-10 Ruston

TECH HOSTS HONOR STUDENT ORIENTATION Through a partnership between the city of Ruston, Louisiana Tech University Orientation and the Meet Me on Main Street Alliance, incoming honor students were welcomed with a concert Wednesday evening in Railroad Park. After orientation leaders led students in a few spirit chants and community leaders introduced themselves to the newest Tech undergraduates, a local band, Chief and the Hounds, took the stage. 13 2016-06-09 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech announces spring quarter graduates Louisiana Tech University’s summer quarter commencement exercises were held May 21, with diplomas awarded to 861 graduates. Commencement marked the close of summer quarter activities at the university. Area graduates – listed by state, city and degree – are as follows: Alabama Clay Jon David Perry- Bachelor Of General Studies Dadeville Chase Youngblood- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Florence Benjamin C. Vanveckhoven- Bachelor Of Science Madison Casey Wojnar- Bachelor Of Science Muscle Shoals Nicholas Thomason- Bachelor Of Arts Arkansas Arkadelphia Dalton Daniel Champagne- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Bentonville Jennifer L. Tubre- Master Of Arts In Teaching Camden Emory Brook Clayborn- Master Of Arts Donaldson Brett W. Chancellor- Master Of Business Administration El Dorado Kanedria L. Andrews- Bachelor Of Arts Alyssa R. Dupree- Bachelor Of Arts Savanna R. Langston- Master Of Professional Accountancy Dylan L. Lawrence- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Kassidy Meshell- Bachelor Of Arts Steven John Reinhardt- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Matthew Ryan Roberts- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Juan Manuel Rodriguez- Bachelor Of General Studies Micah D. Sanford- Bachelor Of Arts Octavius D. White- Master Of Business Administration Eldorado Margaret Marie Burchfield- Bachelor Of Science Emerson Cody R. Samples- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Fort Smith Maggie Elizabeth Chamberlain- Graduate Certificate Hot Springs Katherine Lee Lybrand- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Michelle Aurora Oliva- Master Of Arts Junction City Courtney Nicole Lowe- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Little Rock Justin Ray Rollans- Bachelor Of Science Mabelvale Elizabeth Nichole Crane- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Magnolia Mason Allan McCrary- Bachelor Of Science Morgan Lee McDonald- Bachelor Of Arts North Little Rock Daley Lynae Johnston- Master Of Arts Arizona Gilbert Tyler James Clancy- Bachelor Of General Studies California Beaumont Jennifer Ann Threlkeld- Associate Of Science Nursing Chowchilla Katelynn B. Cook- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Lincoln Margaret Aileen Macdonald- Master Of Science Rancho Cucamonga Michael Anthony Deceglie- Bachelor Of General Studies Santa Monica Sean Turrell Berman- Master Of Science Tehachapi Meagan Kilchrist Arflin- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Connecticut New Milford Zachary David Burger- Bachelor Of General Studies Plantsville Devin Nickole Van patten- Bachelor Of Arts Florida Cape Coral Daniel Rivera- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Coral Springs Nicole Lauren Poirier- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr Delray Beach Chelsea Marie Ferrell- Master Of Science Gulf Breeze Blake J. Meredeth- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Palm City Cory A. Kaplan- Master Of Science Weston Courtney Lynn Frank- Bachelor Of Science Georgia Cumming Kelly Christine Batte- Graduate Certificate Leesburg Sanford Seay- Bachelor Of Arts Mansfield Celeste B. Rosebrock- Bachelor Of Science Richmond Hill Cody Shea Wyatt- Bachelor Of Science Snellville Kevin Octavious Gary- Bachelor Of Arts Illinois Chillicothe Austin L. Youngman- Graduate Certificate Geneva Ashley Santos- Bachelor Of Arts Normal Parker W. Spears- Bachelor Of Science Rockford Allison Kristine White- Bachelor Of Science Roscoe Chad Ryan Lee- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Woodstock Laura Tibbs Lefevour- Bachelor Of Arts Indiana Columbus John Basile- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Indianapolis Lindsay Ann Dirlam- Master Of Science Kansas Pratt Merrill Abdul-jabar Holden- Bachelor Of General Studies Kentucky Oak Grove Gustavo Adolfo Cabrera- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Louisiana Abita Springs Stephen Taylor Allison- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Alexandra Olivia Nicole Loewer- Bachelor Of Science Jacob L. Newton- Master Of Fine Arts Alexandria Ragan Lee Bonnette- Associate Of General Studies Ashley E. Clarke- Master Of Arts Elizabeth Anna Dixon- Bachelor Of Arts Kelsie M. Field- Bachelor Of Science Amber Nicole Jurgensen- Bachelor Of Arts Morgan Elizabeth Kee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Photography Krishna K. Patel- Bachelor Of Science Evan H. Pringle- Master Of Architecture Lillian Dare Rozanski- Graduate Certificate Daniel Mark Seeser- Bachelor Of Science Margaret Elizabeth Williams- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Arcadia Melanie Kate Brown- Master Of Professional Accountancy Darrien M. Harris- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Whittney Lee McDonald- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Brooke Ellen Moore- Bachelor Of Science Alyssa D. Patterson- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Ruby Johannah Richie- Bachelor Of Science Ball Austin Lee Engen- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Troy Hickman Prestridge- Bachelor Of General Studies Baskin Lane David Robertson- Bachelor Of Science Bastrop Taneka R. Bradshaw- Master Of Arts In Teaching Heather Nicole Deshazo- Associate Of Science Nursing Colton Michael Moore- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Albert Berton Sisson- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Zachary Taylor Stephenson- Bachelor Of Science Tanner White- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Baton Rouge Michael Anthony Aguillard Jr.- Bachelor Of Arts Kelby Blaine Blalock- Bachelor Of Arts Luke Martin Bosse- Master Of Science Engineering Sarah Taylor Chenevert- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Keely S. Davis- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Curtis T. Ellis- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Frances Elise Ewing- Bachelor Of Science Ryan Joseph Frick- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Keller Anthony Hanegan- Bachelor Of Arts John T. Hitt- Bach Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt Lauren N. Janway- Bachelor Of Science Maurice I. Kelly- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Tyre Anthony Kenney- Bachelor Of Science Shelby A. Lewis- Bachelor Of Science John Michael Long- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Megan Nicole Lowe- Bachelor Of Science Alexander Nicholas Monistere- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Olivia F. Parsons- Master Of Arts Kyle Edward Robichaux- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Kyle Andrew Stephens- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Bailey M. Thibodeaux- Bachelor Of Science Belle Chasse Anesu Samuel Chigumira- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Belle Rose Dashia De'shell Myles- Bachelor Of Science Benton Darrian Shuntetric Carr- Bachelor Of Science Thomas Peyton Cockrell- Bachelor Of Science Lacy Breann Culver- Bachelor Of Science Ashleigh Renae Dodds- Bachelor Of Science Seth G. Doughty- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering Nicholas Ryan Fulco- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Tyler M. Harrell- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Leslie B. McKeever- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Michael Austen Murray- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Jason Lee Porter- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr Cody W. Sanderlin- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Taylor L. Smith- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Mason Lee Stearns- Bachelor Of Science Bernice Jordan Lee Pixley- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Bossier City Karen G. Arbuckle- Master Of Education Trinity Lerae' Bruno- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Tanya N. Corbett- Bachelor Of General Studies Joshua Cox- Associate Of General Studies Derrick Davenport- Bachelor Of General Studies Anna Caroline Davis- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Michelle Lynn Dillon- Bachelor Of Science Cynthia Dorfner- Bachelor Of General Studies Kyle P. Fohrman- Bachelor Of Science Kellie Elizabeth Frizzell- Master Of Arts In Teaching Gabriel Cornelius Gafford- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Sherri Kay Harmon- Bachelor Of Science Nicholas A. Henry- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr Christina Suzanne Hobart- Master Of Arts In Teaching Darrell Wayne Johnson- Bachelor Of General Studies Donna Johnson- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership Amanda N. Kage- Bachelor Of Science John Frederick Kitchens- Bachelor Of Arts Richard Gordon Laframboise- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr Patrick A. Larkin- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Johnathon W. Marley- Bachelor Of Arts Blaine C. Mire- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Meredith Eloise Nelson- Bachelor Of Science Teresa Marie Parks- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Ashley Faye Penrod- Bachelor Of Science Cori Elizabeth Prater- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Alaina Kathleen Proctor- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Kristen Joyce Puzio- Bachelor Of Arts Amy Claire Rabinowitz- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Tabitha Renee Rawls- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Dorothy Ray- Bachelor Of General Studies Lori C. Ross- Graduate Certificate Jesus David Santillan- Bachelor Of General Studies Hilary Joyce Sears- Bachelor Of General Studies Sarah Elizabeth Slack- Bachelor Of Arts Tyler Brennan Smith- Bachelor Of Arts Hannah Marie Spence- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Sarah A. Thomson- Master Of Architecture Raymond Chase Vallery- Bachelor Of Science Michelle Villaflor- Bachelor Of General Studies Peter C. Wrzesinski- Bachelor Of Science Boyce Cullen David Pearce- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Breaux Bridge Nia B. Potier- Doctor Of Audiology Bush Paul Daniel Dauterive- Bachelor Of Arts Calhoun Dakota Charles Morgan- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Center Point Steven D. Scanlan- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Choudrant Rachel Lynn Abel- Bachelor Of Arts Samantha Leeann Cone- Bachelor Of Science Dennis E. Puckett- Bachelor Of Science Kaitlin M. Robinson- Bachelor Of Science Anne Dennis Summitt- Master Of Science Courtney Fewell Wade- Master Of Arts In Teaching Chourdrant Brenner Alan Mabry- Bachelor Of Science Whitney Wheelis- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Columbia Matthew Cole McIlwain- Bachelor Of Science Kimberly Jade Pilcher- Master Of Architecture Savannah Elizabeth Steele- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Covington John David Owens III- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Crowley Amy Lynn Walton- Associate Of Science Nursing Delhi Ladarian Keron Clay- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Randi Erin Hammons- Bachelor Of Science Clarrissa Lea Johnson- Bachelor Of Science Denham Springs Karen Marie Rispone- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering Melanie Maree Wascom- Bachelor Of Science Dequincy Jacob M. Rhodes- Master Of Architecture Deridder Kendra D. Britton- Master Of Professional Accountancy Des Allemands Erik P. Beadle- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology Deville Elliott Joseph Ayo- Bachelor Of Arts Jannah Nicole Ayo- Bachelor Of Science Tyler Moses- Bachelor Of Science Jamie G. Price- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Emily Rose Smith- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Dodson Lauren Walker Emmons- Bachelor Of General Studies Downsville Allison H. Hopper- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Adam Reese Taylor- Bachelor Of Arts Kyle Michael Temple- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Doyline Zachary D. Spurgin- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Dry Prong Zachery Ty Hernandez- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Dubach Zachary Bentley- Master Of Arts Hyun Chul Cho- Doctor Of Business Administration Kirby Brooks Colvin- Master Of Arts Traci Michelle Evans- Bachelor Of Science Benjamin Hunter Fulton- Bachelor Of Science Keeley Carter Layfield- Doctor Of Audiology Hannah Cooper Lee- Master Of Business Administration Summer Roberson Miller- Associate Of Science Nursing Lauren Marie Vann- Bachelor Of Arts Effie Hannah Kursten Moreau- Bachelor Of Arts Elm Grove Rebecca Lynn Huston- Bachelor Of Arts Grant Bartlett Little- Bachelor Of Science Elton Laura Guidry- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Eunice Morgan Mary Bollich- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Michael Dwayne Zaunbrecher- Bachelor Of Science Extension John Thomas Sadler- Bachelor Of Arts Farmerville Timothy S. Allred- Bachelor Of Science Sarah Blazier- Bachelor Of General Studies Melanie J. Chapman- Master Of Arts In Teaching Tori Danae Constant- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3 Brittany Gray Durr- Bachelor Of Arts Lauren Dianne Guillot- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3 Destiny Michelle Maxwell- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk Kasey Lauren Nance- Bachelor Of Science Erin Danielle Nevala- Master Of Science Daniel Martell Ouchley- Bachelor Of Arts Kelli N. Palmertree- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Amy R. Royal- Bachelor Of Arts Tyler J. Spence- Master Of Science Engineering Morgan Lefaye Sutton- Bachelor Of Arts Haley Savannah Temple- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion John S. Terral- Bachelor Of Science Thomas Michael Terral- Bachelor Of Science Ferriday Kaitlyn C. Fletcher- Bachelor Of Science Benjamin Troy McDonald- Master Of Professional Accountancy Evan M. Roberts- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Fort Necessity Kody A. Beavers- Bachelor Of Science Franklinton Brad Alan Cooper- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 David J. Stafford- Master Of Science Emily Charlotte Varisco- Bachelor Of Arts Glenmora Jeremy Adam Rollins- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Gloster German Velazquez- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Gonzales Laticia Watson- Bachelor Of Science Grambling Maryann Ada-nta- Bachelor Of Science Tyler Cherelle Hawthorne- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Aisha D. Jackson- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Gray Benjamin Joseph Ford- Master Of Architecture Greensburg Lakeyvion Tyrell Womack- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Greenwell Springs Alexa Noelle Salamoni- Associate Of Science Nursing Greenwood Warren D. Clardy- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Kylin T. Thomas- Bachelor Of Arts Hahnville Wesley Robert Hoggard- Bachelor Of Science Hammond Christopher William Boyle- Bachelor Of Science Hanna Nicole Harris- Bachelor Of Arts Todd Richard Tijerino- Bachelor Of Science Spencer D. Wyld- Bachelor Of Science Harrisonburg Pamela Ruth Hamilton- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Harvey Daniel Evan Borders- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Nathan E. Jordan- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Haughton Darren Keith Alderman- Bachelor Of Science Alicia Bailey- Bachelor Of Science Brandon Michael Bonar- Associate Of General Studies Heather Marie Casil- Bachelor Of General Studies Lauren Feliciano- Bachelor Of Science Stephanie Nicole Fink- Master Of Business Administration Kiley Kathleen Gregory- Bachelor Of Science Christopher A. Meshell- Bachelor Of Science Dawson James Shannon- Bachelor Of Arts Catherine A. Thomas- Bachelor Of Science Haynesville James Wesley Harris- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Heflin Cristal Soto Torres- Bachelor Of Science Maria Guadalupe Soto Torres- Bachelor Of Science Homer Demetra Aeisha Allen- Master Of Business Administration Shalaina L. Jenkins- Bachelor Of General Studies Tanner Devin Ponder- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design James Taylor Tuggle- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Houma Hunter Benjamin Boudreaux- Bachelor Of Science Adrian Edgardo Guzman Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Jackson Marye Elisabeth Hooker- Graduate Certificate Jamestown Rachel Ham Mathews- Master Of Arts In Teaching Jefferson Christopher Clary- Graduate Certificate Jena Dewey M. Amyx- Bachelor Of Science Forestry Cartez Sawatski Jack Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Chelsea D. Juarez- Bachelor Of Arts Trent L. Norman- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Emmalee Jill Smith- Bachelor Of Science Cameron G. Windham- Bachelor Of Science Jonesboro Allison B. Gilbert- Associate Of Science Nursing Douglas Harvey- Master Of Business Administration Courtney Jade Paul- Bachelor Of Science Amy Kathryn Richards- Bach Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt Misti Renee Wilkerson- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3 Keithville Alex Delton Green- Master Of Architecture Kenner Dasia Simone Canales- Bachelor Of Arts Caroline Rose Hymel- Master Of Arts Lafayette Sabrittany Savannah Angelle- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Christen Jude Boyer- Doctor Of Philosophy Taylor J. McMahon- Bachelor Of Science Courtney Nicole Nowosiwsky- Associate Of General Studies Josh C. Pearce- Master Of Business Administration Lake Charles Madison Clare Blackwell- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Kaleb G. Bonvillain- Master Of Architecture Bradley M. Burkart- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Garrett Jay Davis- Bachelor Of Science Devin H. Dronett- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Jennifer Hammack- Bachelor Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt Matthew Payne Jester- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering William Harrison Lorio- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Chaz Michael Oubre- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Valaree P. Rachal- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Alexander Douglas Shows- Master Of Architecture Theresa E. Stickney- Master Of Fine Arts Jonathan Peter Vogel- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Lake Providence Joseph Tyler Whatley##Bachelor Of Science Leesville David Blaine Brister- Bachelor Of Science Forestry Adam Cole Woods- Bachelor Of Science Lena Robin Kathleen Parker- Master Of Arts In Teaching Luling Bethany C. Eppling- Master Of Arts Alyssa Nicole Simon- Bachelor Of Science Lutcher Daniel Christopher Wahl- Bachelor Of Arts Mandeville Kyle A. Anderson- Bachelor Of Arts Andy Bajnauth- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Justin Robert Coe- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Scott Allen Eberhart- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Abdullah Nammari- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering Elise Claire Van Zandt- Master Of Health Informatics Marion Jake Hunter Auger- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Claire Goudreau Cox- Bachelor Of Science Jared Alan Williams- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Marksville Colin D. Dunbar- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Marrero Christopher P. Lomonaco- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Metairie Amanda M. Abadie- Bachelor Of Interior Design Caroline P. Bell- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Jessica Marie Borne- Bachelor Of Science Ashley Anne Kettenring- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Nicole Marie Rusck- Bachelor Of Arts Minden Natalie Danielle Bullock- Bachelor Of Arts Jake D. Landry- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Katherine Leigh Mixon- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Jordan Lethommius Perry- Bachelor Of Arts Joni L. Prince- Graduate Certificate Maggie E. Siler- Master Of Arts Katlyn Brooke Watson- Bachelor Of Science Jimmy Yocom- Bachelor Of Science Monroe Meghan A. Austin- Master Of Arts In Teaching Michael Wayne Blackson- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Almira Kathryn Bradford- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Braden James Bristo- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Erin M. Browning- Master Of Arts In Teaching Lillie Caitlin Burroughs- Bachelor Of Arts Whitney Trisler Causey- Master Of Fine Arts Caleb L. Collins- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Mallory Marie Danna- Bachelor Of Science Kiersten Leah Farlee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Dustin Allen Hatten- Master Of Arts In Teaching Anna L. McCarter- Bachelor Of Science Vincent C. Moore- Bachelor Of Science Meredith Pate- Bachelor Of Science Margaret L. Quillman- Bachelor Of Science Early/Elementary Education Grades Pk-3 Philip A. Raeisghasem- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Lauren Elise Slaughter- Bachelor Of Arts Gertie Alexis Woods- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Alison Nicole Wyant- Bachelor Of Arts Moreauville Luke Wilkes Hess- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Natchitoches Catherine Jean Burke- Bachelor Of Arts Kristen M. Chatelain- Bachelor Of Science Kelsey K. Woodard- Bachelor Of Science New Iberia Kimberly Elizabeth Garb- Bachelor Of Science New Orleans Joseph Theodore Hagensee- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Karen Marie Lawless- Master Of Education Bien Duc Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science Colin Wade Rousset- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Abdul-rasheed Adetkunbo Sadiq- Bachelor Of Science Brianna Michele Skinner- Bachelor Of Science Oak Grove Jonathan Nelson Cox- Bachelor Of Science Lauren A. Eubanks- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio James Tyler Hughes- Bachelor Of Arts Dylan Ray Jones- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology John Robert Warner- Master Of Arts In Teaching Oak Ridge Zack A. Henry- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Oakdale Clayton W. Monk- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Haylee Thornhill- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Zachary Lane West- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Olla Leeann Jones- Bachelor Of Arts Hannah Elizabeth Ruddell- Bachelor Of General Studies Macy Jean Tullos- Bachelor Of Science Pearl River Cady Anne Harris- Master Of Arts Michael R. Meltz- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Pineville Casey Leeann Chaudoir- Bachelor Of Arts Logan Kyle Corley- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Adam M. Farque- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Felix Rhodes Moran- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Bryce Dylan Pfeiffer- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Brittany L. Pippen- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 John R. Vercher- Bachelor Of Science Forestry Kasia L. Washington- Bachelor Of Science Pitkin Seth T. Anderson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Taylor Breann Standish- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Jonathan Bradley West- Master Of Professional Accountancy Plain Dealing Tyler C. Wallace- Bachelor Of Science Plaquemine Eric D. Bucholtz- Bachelor Of Science Pollock Billy D. Smith- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Ponchatoula James G. Delatte Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Theresa Pevey Derenbecker- Master Of Science Phillip Michael Ernst- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Dana Leanne Reno- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Prairieville Dillan Michael Boudreaux- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Alex Michael Fortenberry- Bachelor Of Science Sierra Grace McGraw- Bachelor Of Science Jordan E. Toepfer- Master Of Health Informatics Provencal Emily Elizabeth Vice- Bachelor Of Science Quitman Larkin B. Culpepper- Master Of Arts Rayne Adrienne Claire Dailey- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Rayville Emily Diane Douciere- Bachelor Of Science Katie M. Miller- Master Of Arts Orie O'briant Morris- Bachelor Of Science Charles R. Wilkerson- Bachelor Of Science Ruston Kehinde Chibuzor Adedeji- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Ross H. Adelsperger- Bachelor Of Arts Joshua Aaron Adkinson- Master Of Science Khadeejah Mohammed Alghadeer- Doctor Of Philosophy Amer Abdulhadi Alirq- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Salah El-deen Alzghoul- Doctor Of Philosophy Jeffery J. Ambrose- Doctor Of Philosophy Christian J. Amos- Bachelor Of Arts Shravan Rakesh Animilli- Doctor Of Philosophy Lakisha Lashae Atkins- Master Of Business Administration Anna Hannibal Baines- Master Of Arts In Teaching Bikash Baraily- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Bibhuti Baral- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Chad Preston Barnhill- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Arun Basker- Master Of Science Engineering Dilip Basnet- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Calyn Yvette Bennett- Associate Of Science Nursing Ihsan Adel Benten- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Kirsten Elizabeth Blake- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Chase Parker Borden- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Laura Leigh Bostick- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership Matthew Homer Brewer- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Kentrell Montez Brice- Bachelor Of General Studies Brandon K. Bruce- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion James K. Bruce- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Justin R. Bruner- Bachelor Of Science Katelyn Marks Burkholder- Bachelor Of Science Cassia Carmichael- Master Of Arts Kyle Hardy Carter- Bachelor Of Science Sarah Parker Carwile- Bachelor Of Arts Eunice Chendjou Tchakui- Bachelor Of Science Mahjabin Chowdhury- Master Of Arts In Teaching Brennan Noel Confer- Bachelor Of Science Kenneth Lane Cox- Bachelor Of Science Forestry Alexandra Crain- Bachelor Of Arts Ruzova Dahal- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Mariel A. Davenport- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Photography Jessica Marie Davis- Master Of Arts Mason R. Dean- Bachelor Of Science Johnathan Trey Dees- Associate Of Science Nursing Jigar Mahendra Dhimmar- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Jacob Duke- Bachelor Of Science Divya Narayan Elumalai- Doctor Of Philosophy Aaron J. Evans- Bachelor Of Science Pamela Farell Rivero- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Mercedes Kathryn Fife- Bachelor Of Arts Colton G. Franklin- Master Of Architecture Brooke Ashley Frasier- Bachelor Of Arts Anna Kathryn Fuller- Bachelor Of Science Fang Gao- Master Of Science Computer Science Fang Gao- Master Of Science Engineering Jonathan Goertz- Bachelor Of Science Maegan Ashlei Goss- Bachelor Of Science Nicholas David Groden- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology Chythanya Gudla- Master Of Science Computer Science Dalane Rose Guidry- Bachelor Of Arts Grace E. Guillot- Master Of Fine Arts Anna Whitley Hall- Bachelor Of Arts Jamella Saporia Hamilton- Bachelor Of Arts Zachary Daniel Hannibal- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Sarah Raye Hays- Bachelor Of Science Brandon S. Hearn- Bachelor Of Science Breanna E. Hebert-Griffin- Bachelor Of Science Farid Heidarnejad- Master Of Science Engineering Elizabeth Phillips Henley- Bachelor Of Arts Thomas J. Himel- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr Taylor Christine Hogan- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Joshua W. Horne- Bachelor Of Science John Mark Howard- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Lauren M. Ingram- Bachelor Of Arts Mohammad Readul Islam- Doctor Of Philosophy Laquanda S. James- Bachelor Of Arts Shakya D. Jayakody Arachchige- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Nadini Ivanthi Jayathilaka- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Vipasana Kansakar- Bachelor Of Science Anish Karki- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Sonali Jayant Karnik- Doctor Of Philosophy Shree Ram Khatri- Bachelor Of Science Christian Kane Killen- Bachelor Of Science Kirstie Shane Killen- Bachelor Of General Studies Breshon Ashtin Kimbell- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Abbie R. King- Bachelor Of Science Ashley L. Kober- Bachelor Of Arts Dinuka Kuruppu Arachchilage- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Victor Stephen Lange- Bachelor Of Science D. Andre Lee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Zachary Tyler Levesque- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Bochun Liang- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Nicholas Logan Liberatos- Bachelor Of Science Juan Lin- Master Of Science Engineering Dan Liu- Bachelor Of Science Xueqian Liu- Master Of Science Engineering Lanadia O. Lloyd- Bachelor Of Science Virginia Lauren Logan- Bachelor Of Arts Morgan Elizabeth Lolley- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Michael Eric Lord- Master Of Business Administration Pabitra Malla- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Mapa M. Mapagunarathne- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Monique Waguespack Mapes- Master Of Arts Daniel Mark Mayer- Master Of Arts In Teaching Joseph McAlpin- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Patricia Riley McEacharn- Bachelor Of Arts Sean Patrick McGowan- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Taly Louise Merker Pinoargote- Bachelor Of Science Breanne Adele Mertz- Bachelor Of Science David Christopher Milam- Bachelor Of Science Olivia Lorraine Miles- Bachelor Of Arts Mary Margaret Morgan- Bachelor Of Science Camille Mosley- Bachelor Of Arts Sammy Githuku Muriithi- Doctor Of Business Administration Aaron Lynn Napper- Bachelor Of Science Brody Clay Neal- Bachelor Of Science Brandon Newton- Bachelor Of Science Lindsey Taylor Neyland- Bachelor Of Arts Elizabeth Catherine Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science Daniel Joseph Nichols- Bachelor Of Science Nicole Nwoha- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Ngozi Ogbonnaya- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology Joseph Ian Orten- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Jyotsaana Parajuli- Master Of Professional Accountancy Seongjin Park- Bachelor Of Science Lauren Olivia Pate- Bachelor Of Science Nehalkumar Rajnikant Patel- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology Samman Paudel- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Katie Michelle Payne- Bachelor Of Science Sandeep Perla- Master Of Science Computer Science Dinesh Poudel- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Shane Alexander Puckett- Doctor Of Education Leadership Lori Null Rash- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Heather Hay Reeder- Master Of Arts Shanda E. Reid- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Boyuan Ren- Master Of Science Engineering Breanna Reshawn Riggins- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Jamie Nicole Roberie- Master Of Arts Jeanetta Heustess Roberson- Master Of Arts In Teaching Sheri Renee Robken- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership Laura Catalina Rodriguez- Bachelor Of General Studies Hillary F. Roser- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology Donya Salomon-Ali- Bachelor Of Arts Matthew Andrew Sanders- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Keshab Sapkota- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Ashish Sharma- Master Of Science Manufacturing Systems Engineering Colby W. Sharp- Bachelor Of Science Forestry Sangeet Shrestha- Master Of Science Engineering Neesha C. Siriwardane- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Samuel Patrick Stocker- Bachelor Of General Studies Amanda Leigh Stogsdill- Bachelor Of Arts Thomas Peter Stringer- Bachelor Of Science Taylor L. Stroud-Woods- Bachelor Of Arts Rebecca A. Sutherland- Master Of Education Nathan Allen Swaim- Bachelor Of Arts Catlin E. Tatum- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Shannon Brashear Tatum- Master Of Education Thomas Gray Taylor- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Rawieh Telfah- Bachelor Of Arts Michael D. Thompson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Haiding Tian- Master Of Science Engineering Joshua Tully- Bachelor Of Science Stephen L. Turner- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Akpofure Ogheneochuko Unukpo- Master Of Business Administration Pranay Uttamchandani- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Amara Ijeoma Uyanna- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Adam Mitchell Vandenlangenberg - Bachelor Of Science Courtney Jane Vaneaton- Bachelor Of Arts Douglas Austin Vidrine- Bachelor Of General Studies Miguel Angel Villarreal Jr.- Master Of Business Administration Katerina Voziyanova- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Jelena Vucinic- Master Of Science Nicholas Kyle Walker- Bachelor Of Science Carol Pasche Ward- Master Of Arts In Teaching Kendell Knight Webb- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies David West- Bachelor Of General Studies Shelby Williams- Associate Of Science Nursing Darick Ray Williamson- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Ainsley E. Wilson- Bachelor Of Science Mariah Lynn Winegeart- Bachelor Of Arts Brandy Lynn Winfree- Graduate Certificate Chenhao Wu- Master Of Science Computer Science Xuanchen Yan- Master Of Science Engineering Xuxiao Yin- Master Of Science Computer Science Dezhi Zhang- Doctor Of Philosophy Saint Francisville Courtney L. Jennings- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Saint Gabriel Alphonse Bienvenue Coco III- Bachelor Of Science Sarepta Jayde Elaine Long- Master Of Arts Shongaloo Hunter Cheyenne Baker- Bachelor Of Science Shreveport Garrett Alan Anderson- Bachelor Of Arts Rosa C. Anderson- Graduate Certificate Michael P. Bacon- Bachelor Of Arts Yorel Anthony Baker- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Adam Thomas Barker- Bachelor Of Science Kadavien R. Baylor- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Ideal Bekteshi- Bachelor Of Science Lonnie Martin Bennett II- Master Of Architecture Sarah Catherine Bryant- Bachelor Of Arts Darrell K. Burgess Jr.- Master Of Architecture Jessica Lenore Carscadden- Master Of Education Kdarious R. Cash- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Nicholas Lee Collins- Bachelor Of Science Dawn M. Cook- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Abbrianna M. Cooney- Bachelor Of General Studies Stephanie C. Cromwell- Master Of Arts In Teaching Alana Jeanete Crump- Master Of Arts Victoria Page Culbertson- Master Of Arts Samuel Dwayne Curtis- Master Of Business Administration Laura Kay Davidson- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Kimberly Brushan Dennis- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Liniqua Nicole Douglas- Graduate Certificate Rodney C. Doyal- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Mikaela F. Fitzwater- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Hayden Flint- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Devin Lane Ford- Bachelor Of Science Jacquelyn D. French- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Matthew C. Gandia- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Trineisia M. Golston- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Stefanie P. Gordon- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3 Michael Ryan Green- Bachelor Of Arts Kelsee Elizabeth Hall- Bachelor Of Arts Mack Arthur Hall Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Amy Nicole Harper- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Aakilah Gwenae Harris- Bachelor Of Arts Morgan A. Harris- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering John K. Hawley- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Amy Elizabeth Horne- Master Of Education Catherine E. Humble- Master Of Arts In Teaching Samuel Nathan Hussein- Bachelor Of Science Kristin Paige James- Bachelor Of General Studies Julie Ann Jobe- Associate Of Science Nursing Marshall John- Bachelor Of Science Alice Thea Johnstone- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Elizabeth Marie Jones- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Brittany Karen Kaja- Bachelor Of Science Madison G. Kane- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design Haley Katherine Kinder- Bachelor Of Science Ryan Hardy Kinel- Bachelor Of Science Reginald Renard Lars- Bachelor Of General Studies August Lashley- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Jonathan D. Long- Master Of Arts In Teaching Andrew Jonathan Lopez- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Hannah Kate Lowry- Bachelor Of Science Amanda M. May- Bachelor Of Science Collin Robert McDonald- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Ronald Ross Meikle- Master Of Arts In Teaching Jerrod T. Miller- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Janequa Tramone Mitchell- Bachelor Of Science Pearl Lee Mixon- Bachelor Of General Studies Christopher Ferrell Morgan- Master Of Arts In Teaching Keaira Nicole Musgrove- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Frederic Paul Nelson- Bachelor Of Arts Mitchell Warren Pabst- Bachelor Of General Studies Adam Fisher Parker- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Jennifer Kaitlyn Paulovich- Bachelor Of Science Jason B. Poole- Bachelor Of Science Karie Leigh Pope- Bachelor Of Science Emily Margaret Prestridge- Bachelor Of Arts Tobin Brooks Pritchard- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Robert Lewis Rollins- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Tenitra C. Rye- Bachelor Of General Studies Ryan A. Schuler- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Faith Shipley- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance John B. Slattery- Master Of Arts In Teaching Erin C. Smith- Master Of Arts Jonathan Mark Soenksen- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Hunter Saxon Spillers- Bachelor Of Interior Design Trenton M. Stevens- Master Of Architecture Stephen Michael Stuckey- Bachelor Of Science Anthony R. Taliaferro- Bachelor Of Interior Design Christina Terry- Bachelor Of Science Xavier Louis Theriot- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Michael Garrett Thomas- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Holly Marie Thurman- Bachelor Of Science Cricket Blake Thurmon- Bachelor Of Science Nathaniel Kenneth Tichenor- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Lakeisha Myles Towner- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Madeline Frances Wafer- Master Of Arts In Teaching Brittany Nicole Walker- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Jonathan J. Wall- Bachelor Of Science Jon Cameron Watson- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Kiah S. Whitfield- Associate Of General Studies Terris Whitlock- Master Of Arts Sarah Elyse Williams- Master Of Professional Accountancy Anna C. Yates- Bachelor Of Science Sibley Kali Rebecca Killian- Bachelor Of Arts Simsboro Emily D. Choate- Bachelor Of Science James Delony- Associate Of Science Nursing Sismboro Jaymes Hunter Collins- Doctor Of Philosophy Slidell Juan Chen- Doctor Of Philosophy Jacob Christopher Griffin- Master Of Architecture Patrick K. McClain- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Joshua Luke Robert- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr Jean-paul Sandrock- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering Chastin Dean Seeby- Bachelor Of Science Andrew Brenden Spencer- Bachelor Of Science Spearsville Dana Donnette Bennett- Master Of Arts In Teaching James Tyler Lawson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Jeremy Russell Rockett- Bachelor Of Science Health And Physical Education Sterlington Richard Eric Collins- Bachelor Of Arts Joani Allen Hodnett- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Jesse Milton Suggs- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio Sulphur Tylor J. Baus- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Chaseland C. Cox- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Hunter A. Patton- Master Of Science Tallulah Ramarius Rashoon Dockery- Bachelor Of Science Katerri McWright- Bachelor Of Science Sebron L. Wise- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Theriot Hunter J. Breaux- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Trout Logan R. Evans- Bachelor Of Science Tullos Macy L. Mills##Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Vidalia Thao Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science Ville Platte Rebecca N. Orlando- Graduate Certificate Vivian Monique Lachell Brown- Bachelor Of General Studies Trevion Trenick Hill- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Dakota Scott Oxford- Bachelor Of Science Walker Mitchell Harrison Odom- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology West Monroe Taylor M. Ainsworth- Master Of Arts In Teaching David T. Burdeaux- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Jacob Andrew Cagle- Bachelor Of Science Nicholas Kyle Clampit- Bachelor Of Science Tommie Ray Cooper- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Cole Shane Craighead- Bachelor Of Science Brandi Michelle Downs- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Luke Owen Dulaney- Bachelor Of Science Ahmed Emad El-Giar- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Ann Marie Faile- Master Of Business Administration James Justin Frasier- Bachelor Of Science Hannah Jane Gissendanner- Bachelor Of Arts Taylor Mckenzie Guillot- Bachelor Of Science Laken Michelle Hampton- Bachelor Of Interior Design Claire Elise Hannah- Bachelor Of Science Andrea Jean Harris- Bachelor Of Science Gregory Allen Hill Jr.- Master Of Arts In Teaching Madeline Claire Hogg- Associate Of Science Nursing Victoria Ashlyn Johnson- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Daniel K. Johnston- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Madeline Rayne Kent- Bachelor Of Science Ashley Elizabeth Linden- Bachelor Of Science Amanda C. McFarland- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Brooklyn J. Morris- Bachelor Of Science Madelyn A. Mull- Bachelor Of Science Gary Lane Newman- Bachelor Of Science Robert Reid Newsom- Master Of Arts In Teaching Jessica D. Patrick- Master Of Science Cody W. Phipps- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Janet Rausch Platt- Master Of Arts In Teaching Sean M. Powell- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Mary E. Riggs- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Summer Celeste Risinger- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Katie L. Rountree- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design Dustin Thomas Savage- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Beverly Katherine Strode- Bachelor Of Interior Design Jamye S. Taylor- Graduate Certificate Madison Elizabeth Vige- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12 Jamie Lee Weems- Bachelor Of Science Kacie Amanda Wilber- Associate Of Science Nursing Shelby Leigh Yarbrough- Associate Of Science Nursing Westlake Devin J. Osbourn- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Winnfield Michael Warren Clark- Bachelor Of General Studies Megan Jordan Crenshaw- Bachelor Of Arts Jason Michael Howell- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management Matthew Todd Martin- Bachelor Of Science Winnsboro Nicholas Thomas Marchand- Bachelor Of Science Woodworth Christin Danielle Stehr- Bachelor Of Science Rebecca R. Switzer- Master Of Science Zachary Collin Harrison Gordon- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology Mason Chandler Pace- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Layne T. Shelton- Master Of Science Lindsay Mcgehee Young- Doctor Of Audiology Zwolle Keunta D. Epps- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Lawrence Joseph Pastureau- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology Maryland Beltsville Callie Gwinn Betman- Graduate Certificate Columbia Brandi Wingate- Bachelor Of Arts Michigan Battle Creek Talise Vanessa Wesley- Master Of Business Administration Commerce Township Taylor A. Parker- Bachelor Of Arts Muskegon Andrea Kay Cherney- Graduate Certificate Sault Ste. Marie Kaylee A. Laitinen- Doctor Of Audiology Ypsilanti Andrew Tyler Hunt- Bachelor Of Arts Missouri Ozark Gunner Smith Fritsch- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Mississippi Indianola Lauren Carol Simmons- Master Of Arts Iuka Sommer Nicole Thornton- Master Of Arts In Teaching Sumrall Hannah Lauren Cooper- Master Of Fine Arts Zachary Gene McCauley- Master Of Fine Arts Tillatoba Tavasha D. Anderson- Master Of Arts In Teaching Vicksburg Christopher Sean Luke- Bachelor Of Science Waynesboro Skylar M. Dailey- Bachelor Of Arts North Carolina Charlotte Chandip Maskey- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering Leon Jarrett Samuels- Bachelor Of General Studies Highlands Stephanie Marie Smart- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion New Jersey Franlinville Andrew Ralph Rigley- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering Manahawkin Tyler Andrew Wilk- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering New Mexico Albuquerque Tara Harmon- Doctor Of Audiology Albuqueruqe Kiva Marie Gresham- Master Of Arts In Teaching Nevada Las Vegas Clay Dante Derogatis- Bachelor Of General Studies Ohio Pickerington Ani Alise Manukian- Graduate Certificate West Chester Leana Michelle Massimini- Master Of Arts Oklahoma Choctaw Ryan D. Semple- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Sean M. Semple- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Edmond Trenton Colston Davis- Bachelor Of Science Oregon Portland Amy Erin O'Brien- Master Of Science Puerto Rico Juncos Adria Surei Morales- Bachelor Of Arts South Carolina Catawba Katy E. McFadden- Bachelor Of Science North Charleston Robert S. Westley- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering Tennessee Cordova Madison T. Ellison- Bachelor Of Science Texas Amarillo Samuel James Helman- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Arlington Ian Connor Arnot- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Austin Evan Zachary Warnick- Bachelor Of Science Beach City Meghan Brooke McEachern- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr Burkburnett Emily Frances Salas-Groves- Graduate Certificate Carrollton Haley Anne Cordray- Bachelor Of Arts Cypress Bryce Austin Stark- Bachelor Of Arts Daingerfield Matthew Lane Moore- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Edgewood Kyle D. Thompson- Bachelor Of Arts Flower Mound Taylor Douglas- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Fort Worth Kaitlan Nicole Beretich- Master Of Science Gladewater Cory Robert Caton- Bachelor Of Science Grandview Hunter Garrett Tipps- Master Of Architecture Greenville Brenna Dee Tull- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering Hallsville Alayna Michelle Fritz- Master Of Architecture Brandon Derrick Petersen- Bachelor Of Science Heath Abigail P. Scallan- Bachelor Of Science Hempstead Joshua Kaleb Trammell- Master Of Science Hockley Mayra Rodriguez- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Houston Hilary Jean Broussard- Master Of Arts Huffman Erin Elizabeth Baker- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Hurst Deepika Manandhar- Master Of Health Informatics Katy Evelyn R. Skinner- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5 Kingwood Kyle David Hunt- Bachelor Of Science Lindale Samuel Robert Saunders- Bachelor Of Science Longview Kimberly Diane Luensmann- Master Of Arts Evan David McDougall- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Marshall Kelly A. Bullis- Bachelor Of Science Trent Alexander Harrison- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Maud Kimberly Paige Parker- Master Of Science McKinney Kyle Matthew Fischer- Bachelor Of Science Jasmine Domin Hale- Bachelor Of General Studies Ryan James Joseph- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Autumn Rachelle Matthews- Bachelor Of Science Nash Lauren Michelle Caswell- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies Panola Rachel N. Burroughs- Master Of Arts Plano Joshua James- Bachelor Of Science Megan Lyn Landis- Master Of Fine Arts Kristen Miles- Bachelor Of Science Red Oak Joshua Jerrell Robinson- Bachelor Of Arts Richardson Anna Mozelle Whitaker- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science Roanoke Angela Jayne Niemirowski- Master Of Arts Rockwall Ashley Kathleen Cunningham- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion Spring Kipp Peter Swannie- Bachelor Of Science Texarkana Anna Elizabeth Ward- Master Of Arts Tioga Brittany N. Beddow- Bachelor Of General Studies Waco Cody J. Stidham- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering Wills Point Terry W. Day- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering Virginia Forest Jamie Lyn Irwin- Master Of Science Washington Kenmore Nicole Geertje Rajchel- Master Of Architecture Redmond Naeemah Abdus-Salam- Bachelor Of General Studies Spokane Jodi Kay Shipley- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance Tumwater Anne Marie Armstrong- Bachelor Of Arts Wisconsin Eau Claire Tyler J. Sonsalla- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology West Virginia High View Casey O. Orndorff- Master Of Science

13 2016-06-06 Ruston

TECH PROFESSOR SHOWS WORK Sensation,” an exhibit featuring the works of Nicole Duet, an assistant professor of drawing and painting at Louisiana Tech University, opens today at Studio 301, located at 301 N. Trenton St. Her work springs from inspiration around her, Duet said. “I draw and paint out of fascination with the idea that every observable phenomenon is a reflection back onto the viewer,” she said. “The act of painting is a way to explore the question of whether circumstances and things exist because we are aware of them.” In her artist’s statement, she explains the inspiration for her art. 13 2016-06-02 Ruston

La. Tech serves as one of five national host sites for Children’s Choices RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education was recently selected as one of just five host sites in the nation for the Children's Choices Program – a joint project between the Children's Book Council and the International Literacy Association (ILA.) Dr. Amy Massey Vessel, director of Louisiana Tech’s Clinical Residency Research Center and interim director of professional and clinical experiences, applied last year to serve as a host site and was selected to serve as a team leader on ILA's Children's Choices Committee. Lincoln Parish School district leaders Lisa Mangum and Sherry Boyd also played an integral role in supporting the establishment of the Children's Choices Program in area schools, and will continue to support this three-year program. MORE ON TECH Tech ends 29-year drought for NCAA baseball tournament Tech spring graduates learn balance, expand worldview Tech inducts new Order of the Engineer members “Bringing the Children's Choices Program to Lincoln Parish was a dream come true,” said Vessel. “Some things cannot be captured with a photo or put into words, like the excitement of delivering new books to the hands of a child. We look forward to watching this partnership continue to reach additional schools in the next year.” More than 2,500 students at Hillcrest Elementary, Ruston Elementary, Glen View Elementary and Cypress Springs Elementary School submitted votes from August 2015 through January 2016 after having the opportunity to choose books to read and share their reviews. Those votes were compiled and submitted to the Children's Book Council to create the 2016 award winning reading lists that were released recently during National Children’s Book Week. Teachers from across the country use Children’s Choices, Teachers’ Choices and Parents’ Choices recommended book lists to select new books for their classroom libraries. Lincoln Parish Schools dedicated many hours to this project and earned an entire set of almost 1,000 books for their school libraries. Teachers had the opportunity to see these published books from the many national publishing companies, sometimes even weeks before they were available in local bookstores. Since 1974, Children’s Choices has been a trusted source of book recommendations used by teachers, booksellers, librarians, parents, caregivers – everyone who wishes to encourage young people to read for pleasure – and children themselves. Each year, over 36,000 children from different regions of the United States read newly-published children’s and young adult trade books and vote for the ones they like best. These Children’s Choices, selected from more than 900 titles, can be counted on as books children really enjoy reading. Vessel is currently collaborating with Dr. Bryan McCoy, chair of the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Leadership at Louisiana Tech, to establish a children's library in Woodard Hall for teacher candidates and the community. The 2016 Children's Choices winners are currently on display in the Clinical Residency Research Center in Woodard Hall 214. 13 2016-06-01 Ruston

La. Tech College of Education to offer new pathways to teacher certification RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education is set to launch two new alternative teaching certification programs next month that will provide authentic classroom experience and a pathway for new educators to begin teaching in less than a year. The first program, a Master of Arts in Teaching, will lead to teacher certification as well as a master’s degree in education. The second is a post-baccalaureate program, which will lead to teacher certification only. Both programs will be offered for middle grades and secondary concentrations, and will begin with three days of summer workshops designed as hands-on, collaborative experiences to help prepare teachers for the responsibilities they will encounter beginning with the first days of school. MORE ON TECH Tech ends 29-year drought for NCAA baseball tournament Tech spring graduates learn balance, expand worldview Tech inducts new Order of the Engineer members Other topics to be covered in these programs include instructional strategies, differentiation, lesson planning and types of assessment. The certification programs are designed to be completed in one year or less with modules that will combine the best of face-to-face and online teaching. According to Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, its new alternative certification programs are grounded in authentic classroom teaching and facilitated by master teachers and university faculty. Candidates will be immersed in authentic classroom experiences from the beginning of the program with the support and assistance of mentor teachers and clinical university faculty. Course objectives will be accomplished through a year-long internship for those already in a teaching position and in their own classroom, or a year-long student teaching for those not currently teaching. Scholarships may also be available for those who qualify. An information meeting is scheduled for 3 p.m., June 9 in Woodard Hall, room 130 on the Louisiana Tech campus. For more information, contact Melanie Gleason, director of alternative certification in the College of Education, at [email protected] or 318-257-2849. 13 2016-05-31 Ruston

FIRST OF KIND INTERNS GRADUATE The College of Education’s Clinical Residency Research Center had its first cohort of TEAM Model clinical interns graduate from Louisiana Tech University’s spring commencement. This was the second year pilot of the elementary clinical residency program and the first pilot year to have full-year clinical residencies, formerly student teaching, at the secondary level. Amy Vessel, Director of the CRRC, said the establishment of education clinical residencies is growing rapidly across our country. “This year, we wanted to make certain our teacher candidates were acknowledged for the groundbreaking efforts they have made for the state of Louisiana, so they were honored as Clinical Residency Fellows by the CRRC in a small ceremony,” she said. “It’s quite remarkable that there are approximately 100 clinical residency interns from universities across state, and 20 of those undergraduate teacher candidates are at Louisiana Tech University.” Eighteen spring graduates wore a distinctive fellow honor cord with their graduation cap and gown, and the remaining two will be honored at the fall commencement in November. Lisa Mangum, former clinical residency principal and LPSB district liaison for the TEAM Model program, said hiring a graduate from a clinical residency program is hiring someone with a full-year of teaching experience. “We are receiving a first- year teacher beginning a second year of experience,” she said. “Ultimately, the benefits of clinical residencies for our K-12 students are endless. It will completely transform how we prepare new teachers and train teacher leaders in our schools.” Vessel said Tech’s College of Education began research in the fall of 2014 with 11 first-year pilot interns at Cypress Springs Elementary and Glen View Elementary and continues to lead the state in clinical residency graduates. Ruston Elementary Principal Amy Brister said she experienced four TEAM Model classrooms at her school this year. “These clinical interns certainly sought-after hiring prospects walking into our classrooms as first year teachers with more than 1,000 clinical hours of August-May experiences,” she said. “Our Clinical Interns have participated in staff meetings and studied our student data with their mentors. “We’ve interacted informally during playground duty and in the teacher’s lounge. So when I’m hiring a new teacher, I’m much more comfortable hiring a teacher candidate from the TEAM Model Clinical Residency Program. Being able to experience the classroom from August to the very last day, they know what to expect when they’re in their own future classroom. It’s the most invaluable experience they could have.” Don Schillinger, Tech College of Education Dean, said the department is proud of what these teacher candidates have accomplished in being the second cohort of the elementary education and the first cohort of secondary education graduates to complete a full-year clinical residency in teaching. “They have demonstrated their commitment to the teaching profession and have provided considerable evidence of being highly qualified and ready for the next step in their career trajectory — full-time teaching,” he said. “This new and innovative teacher preparation process, which combines a TEAM approach of exemplary Mentor Teachers from our partner schools collaborating for a full-year with our teacher candidates, requires a greater commitment of time, increased dedication to excellence, and more personal sacrifices than the traditional method of teacher preparation. “But the results are enhanced partnerships between K-12 schools and preparation programs, and most importantly, teachers candidates that are truly ready to instruct the students of Louisiana.” Vessel said more than 100 mentors in Lincoln, Ouachita and Claiborne Parish were trained this spring to host future TEAM Model clinical residency interns in their classrooms through the Cohort 3 Louisiana Believe and Prepare Funded Program. In the 2016-17 academic year, 30 teacher candidates from elementary through secondary have already committed to the clinical residency program with more signing up daily. The majority of those candidates have already requested to be placed in Lincoln Parish Schools in for the 2016-17 academic school year. 13 2016-05-26 Monroe

Louisiana Tech computer scientist to present groundbreaking research RUSTON — Dr. Ben Choi, associate professor of computer science at Louisiana Tech University, will present his research on a groundbreaking new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the computing industry during a keynote speech next month at the International Conference on Measurement Instrumentation and Electronics. Choi will present on a foundational architecture for designing and building computers, which will utilize multiple values rather than binary as used by current computers. The many-valued logic computers should provide faster computation by increasing the speed of processing for microprocessors and the speed of data transfer between the processors and the memory as well as increasing the capacity of the memory. This technology has the potential to redefine the computing industry, which is constantly trying to increase the speed of computation and, in recent years, has run short of options. By providing a new hardware approach, the technology will push the speed limit of computing using a progressive approach which will move from two values to four values, then to eight values, then to 16 values, and so on. Future computers could be built using this many-valued approach. “Advances in the foundational design of the computer are needed in business and research applications as well as at the foundation of cyber security efforts across the nation,” said Dr. Galen Turner, director of computer science, cyber engineering, electrical engineering and electrical engineering technology at Louisiana Tech. “Dr. Choi’s invitation to present at the upcoming conference has increased interest in this foundational architecture.” Louisiana Tech and Choi have filed a U.S. patent application for this groundbreaking technology titled “Method and Apparatus for Designing Many-Valued Logic Computer.” “If this is successful, computers in the future will be based on our technology,” said Choi. In addition to the keynote speech, Choi’s research will be released in a publication in the related journal. Choi earned his Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees from The Ohio State University, specializing in computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering. His research focus areas include Humanoid Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Intelligent Agents, Semantic Web, Data Mining, Fuzzy Systems, and Parallel Computing. Prior to coming to Louisiana Tech, Choi served as a visiting research scholar at DePaul University, University of Western Australia and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He has also worked in the computer industry as a System Performance Engineer at Lucent Technologies (Bell Labs) and as a private computer consultant. 13 2016-05-25 Ruston

861 BECOME TECH ALUMNI Louisiana Tech University closed out its spring quarter Saturday with keynote speaker John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, reminding the 861 graduates that receiving their degrees from Tech has helped shape their worldview, their flow with life and their balance. “The world is a huge, evolving and churning set of opportunities, rife with challenges, of course, but the opportunities matter most,” Hofmeister said. “From today, use a native Louisiana gift. You cannot see the fullness of the Louisiana landscape if your eyes are open but a slit. You also can’t see the world that way. ‘Eyes wide open’ is necessary to see and value your beautiful region and state and is also practical advice to keep your worldview as real as you can. If you can somewhat see the entire world from the base of Louisiana Tech, imagine what more you can see now that you are moving beyond the periphery of this gateway to the world.” Hofmeister said their flow was the dynamic that enabled the graduates to be whatever they wanted to be while maintaining their energy and constancy for the whole of their lives. “You likely learned it here, even if you didn’t know what to call it,” he said. “It is the capacity to not only run the race but to enjoy running. It is the capability to read everything you need to read to complete that last research paper and to wake up tomorrow and read some more. “Flow is the intention to earn not just this degree today, but your determination to also earn the next one, or to take on the challenge of the new job awaiting you, or finding that job, or the next promotion and the next step in life. It is the power to face the Louisiana weather, climb the next hill, walk down the aisle, get up and go to work, get out and go to vote, love your loved ones, raise your family, overcome all obstacles that come your way. Louisiana Tech is alive with flow. It’s capable of infecting you forever, and you’ll be forever grateful.” Hofmeister said the graduates had learned how to keep balance in school, which would help them keep their balance in life. “Keeping your balance in life is also the foundation of success in life,” he said. “But let’s take it a step deeper. You’re now on your own, not on campus. What balance do you keep? Let’s focus on the four that matter: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. You have but one body; take care of it. Your mind is your best friend, your judge and life-long companion. Your emotions keep you whole. Your spirit keeps you strong. Together they keep you together, for the rest of your life.” Tara Harmon-McElheney, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, maintained her balance throughout studying for her doctorate in audiology, which she received Saturday. A week before her Ph.D. program began, she discovered she was pregnant with her first child. Her daughter is now three, and she is expecting her second child in September. “My husband and I were like, ‘What are we going to do?’ But he said, ‘This is something you’ve always wanted,’” HarmonMcElheney said. She said it hadn’t always been easy, but the reward was worth the effort. “It’s been hard,” she said. “I had her on a Thursday and went back to school on a Monday. (My classmates) helped, and my professors helped tremendously.” She said she would advise other students, undergraduate and graduate, to continue to persevere with their studies. “If you want it badly enough, with dedication, you can do it,” she said. “It takes a lot of discipline, but it’s worth it.” Nick Fulco, of Benton, also learned balance while at Tech. He graduated with a bachelor of science with a major in kinesiology and plans to attend physical therapy school. “It was close to home,” he said. “My stepfather was deployed, and it was easy to drive back and forth to take care of my mom and little sister.” Fulco’s stepfather, Major Christopher Summers, is also a Tech graduate and is currently deployed to Qatar. However, he was able to watch Fulco graduate on a live stream through www.latechtv.com. “The hardest part was keeping a high GPA while trying to take care of family and social responsibilities,” he said. “I did it by a lot of studying and time management. It’s hard work, but it pays off in the end.” 13 2016-05-23 Monroe

Louisiana Tech spring graduates learn balance, expand worldview RUSTON — Louisiana Tech University closed out its spring quarter Saturday with keynote speaker John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, reminding the 861 graduates that receiving their degrees from Louisiana Tech has helped shape their worldview, their flow with life and their balance. “The world is a huge, evolving and churning set of opportunities, rife with challenges, of course, but the opportunities matter most,” Hofmeister said. “From today, use a native Louisiana gift. You cannot see the fullness of the Louisiana landscape if your eyes are open but a slit. You also can’t see the world that way. ‘Eyes wide open’ is necessary to see and value your beautiful region and state and is also practical advice to keep your worldview as real as you can. If you can somewhat see the entire world from the base of Louisiana Tech, imagine what more you can see now that you are moving beyond the periphery of this gateway to the world.” Hofmeister said their flow was the dynamic that enabled the graduates to be whatever they wanted to be while maintaining their energy and constancy for the whole of their lives. “You likely learned it here, even if you didn’t know what to call it,” he said. “It is the capacity to not only run the race but to enjoy running. It is the capability to read everything you need to read to complete that last research paper and to wake up tomorrow and read some more. “Flow is the intention to earn not just this degree today, but your determination to also earn the next one, or to take on the challenge of the new job awaiting you, or finding that job, or the next promotion and the next step in life. It is the power to face the Louisiana weather, climb the next hill, walk down the aisle, get up and go to work, get out and go to vote, love your loved ones, raise your family, overcome all obstacles that come your way. Louisiana Tech is alive with flow. It’s capable of infecting you forever, and you’ll be forever grateful.” Hofmeister added that the graduates had learned how to keep balance in school, which would help them keep their balance in life. “Keeping your balance in life is also the foundation of success in life,” he said. “But let’s take it a step deeper. You’re now on your own, not on campus. What balance do you keep? Let’s focus on the four that matter: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. You have but one body; take care of it. Your mind is your best friend, your judge and life-long companion. Your emotions keep you whole. Your spirit keeps you strong. Together they keep you together, for the rest of your life.” Tara Harmon-McElheney, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, maintained her balance throughout studying for her doctorate in audiology, which she received Saturday. A week before her Ph.D. program began, she discovered she was pregnant with her first child. Her daughter is now three, and she is expecting her second child in September. “My husband and I were like, ‘What are we going to do?’ But he said, ‘This is something you’ve always wanted,’” HarmonMcElheney said. She said it hadn’t always been easy, but the reward was worth the effort. “It’s been hard,” she said. “I had her on a Thursday and went back to school on a Monday. (My classmates) helped, and my professors helped tremendously.” She said she would advise other students, undergraduate and graduate, to continue to persevere with their studies. “If you want it badly enough, with dedication, you can do it,” she said. “It takes a lot of discipline, but it’s worth it.” Nick Fulco, of Benton, also learned balance while at Louisiana Tech. He graduated with a bachelor of science with a major in kinesiology and plans to attend physical therapy school. “It was close to home,” he said. “My stepfather was deployed, and it was easy to drive back and forth to take care of my mom and little sister.” Fulco’s stepfather, Major Christopher Summers, is also a Louisiana Tech graduate and is currently deployed to Qatar. However, he was able to watch Fulco graduate on a live stream through www.latechtv.com. “The hardest part was keeping a high GPA while trying to take care of family and social responsibilities,” he said. “I did it by a lot of studying and time management. It’s hard work, but it pays off in the end.” 13 2016-05-23 Ruston

EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER TO BE DEMOLISHED The Louisiana Tech University Early Childhood Education Center is scheduled to be demolished at a later date this year to accommodate the construction of new housing and related site development. Tech Public Relations Director Dave Guerin said the new Childhood Education Center will be located at the AROS Center.

13 2016-05-23 Shreveport

72-year-old woman graduates from Louisiana Tech RUSTON-72-year-old Pearl Mixon says she lived a pretty normal life. " I was working for a credit union," says Pearl Mixon, Louisiana Tech Graduate. That was until she put in her letter of resignation and decided to go back to school. " I decided on Louisiana Tech because it's close to me. They have the Barksdale campus which is right across the river," says Mixon. Mixon says the journey to graduation was not an easy one. "It was a struggle this time last year. I had some setbacks. I had two major strokes and it left me with dimmed vision," says Mixon. But adds it was definitely worth it. "My source of making it was I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. That would be in my study time, that would be in my down time time when I wasn't feeling well. I felt wonderful yesterday being able to walk across that stage to receive that degree," says Mixon. Family members share in Mixon's excitement. "It was so surreal to see her walk across the same stage that I walked across to receive my degree," says Angela Hannon, Mixon's Daughter. Her next step, grad school. "The sky is the limit. All it takes is just that determination," says Mixon. Unlike many of us, Mixon says she is graduating debt free. She hopes to use her general studies degree to aid veterans. 13 2016-05-19 Ruston

Tech inducts new Order of the Engineer members RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University and its College of Engineering and Science has inducted 62 new members into its chapter, “Link” of the “Order of the Engineer” – a national organization established and dedicated to upholding devotion to the standards and dignity of the engineering profession. During the ceremony, initiates received a stainless steel ring to wear on the fifth finger of the working hand and accepted the Obligation of the Engineer, a code of ethics that promotes honesty and integrity in engineering professions. MORE ON TECH La. Tech students present research, prototypes at Senior Projects Conference TOP DAWG winners announced ExxonMobil makes generous donation Seniors who are within one year of graduation from an accredited engineering program are eligible to join the Order and make the commitment. “The Order of the Engineer ceremony is a great milestone for many of our graduating Engineers,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and Science. “It is a representation of the academic accomplishments of our students, as well as their commitment to upholding the ethical standards that are expected from the Engineering discipline.” “We are very pleased to have a large number of our engineering seniors recognize the importance of their decisions as engineers will have on society,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science added. “Their induction into the Order of the Engineer is a statement of their commitment to honesty and integrity and is a pledge to serve humanity and make the best use of our natural resources.” New members of the Order of the Engineer are listed below. Seth Thomas Anderson, mechanical engineering, Pitkin, La. Giovanni Aviles, mechanical engineering, Mandeville, La. Andy Bajnauth, civil engineering, Mandeville, La. Zachary Belton, mechanical engineering, Simonton, Texas Morgan Mary Bollich, chemical engineering, Eunice, La. Daniel Borders, electrical engineering, Harvey, La. Dillan M. Boudreaux, mechanical engineering, Prairieville, La. Hunter Breaux, electrical engineering, Theroit, La. Matthew Brewer, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La. David Tyler Burdeaux, mechanical engineering, West Monroe, La. Dalton Champagne, civil engineering, Arkadelphia, Ark. Anesu Samuel Chigumira, mechanical engineering, Belle Chase, La. Warren Dante Clardy, chemical engineering, Greenwood, La. Ishani Colombage, biomedical engineering, Batuwatta, Sri Lanka James Gary Delatte, Jr., mechanical engineering, Ponchatoula, La. Jigar Dhimmar, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La. Ahmed Emad El-Giar, chemical engineering, West Monroe, La. Matthew Charles Gandia, industrial engineering, Shreveport, La. Joseph Theodore Hagensee, mechanical engineering, New Orleans, La. Morgan Adam Harris, civil engineering, Shreveport, La. Samuel James Helman, mechanical engineering, Amarillo, Texas Cartez Sawatski Jack, Jr., mechanical engineering, Jena, La. Nadini Ivanthi Jayathilaka, electrical engineering, Malabe, Sri Lanka Courtney Jennings, chemical engineering, Saint Francisville, La. LeDarious Keyun Jones, mechanical engineering, Shreveport, La. Ryan J. Joseph, mechanical engineering, McKinney, Texas Dylan Levi Lawrence, mechanical engineering, El Dorado, Ark. James Tyler Lawson, mechanical engineering, Spearsville, La. Katherine Lee Lybrand, civil engineering, Hot Springs, Ark. Pabitra Malla, electrical engineering, Ruston, La. Mapa M. Chethiya Mapagunarathne, mechanical engineering, Santa Cruz, Calif., Chandip Maskey, nanosystems engineering, Charlotte, N.C. Evan McDougall, chemical engineering, Prairieville, La. Leslie Buffington McKeever, mechanical engineering, Benton, La. Alexander Nicholas Monistere, mechanical engineering, Baton Rouge, La. Matthew Lane Moore, electrical engineering, Daingerfield, Texas Chaz Oubre, mechanical engineering, Lake Charles, La. Adam Fisher Parker, industrial engineering, Shreveport, La. Cullen David Pearce, mechanical engineering, Boyce, La. Jordan Lee Pixley, mechanical engineering, Bernice, La. Nicole Poirier, cyber engineering, Coral Springs, Fla. Jason Porter, cyber engineering, Benton, La. Dinesh Poudel, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La. Nathaniel Joseph Pruden, industrial engineering, West Monroe, La. Valaree Rachal, mechanical engineering, Lake Charles, La. Karen Rispone, nanosystems engineering, Denham Springs, La. Daniel Alexander Rivera, biomedical engineering, Cape Coral, Fla. Joshua Roberts, cyber engineering, Slidell, La. Cody Samples, electrical engineering, Emerson, Ark. Jean-Paul Sandrock, Jr., civil engineering, Slidell, La. Ryan Dakota Semple, electrical engineering, Nashville, Ark. Sean Morgan Semple, electrical engineering, Nashville, Ark. Zachary Dakota Spurgin, mechanical engineering, Doyline, La. Xavier Theriot, mechanical engineering, Shreveport, La. Michael Thompson, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La. Haylee Thornhill, mechanical engineering, Oakdale, La. Amara Ijeoma Uyanna, chemical engineering, Amuwo-Odofin, Nigeria German Velazquez, civil engineering, Gloster, La. Zachary Lane West, mechanical engineering, Oakdale, La. Robert Sims Westley, industrial engineering, North Charleston, S.C. Tyler Wilk, Manahawkin, mechanical engineering, Manahawkin, N.J. Victor Eduardo Zumaran Justiniano, civil engineering, Santa Cruz, Bolivia The Louisiana Tech inductees join a dedicated and prestigious group of engineers from across the nation, which includes a number of Louisiana Tech graduates. Louisiana Tech has been a member in the organization since 2005. 13 2016-05-18 Ruston

MAN TAKES LEAP OF FAITH TO LOSE WEIGHT When Dave Guerin took a “leap of faith,” he set out to shed around 130 pounds. After two years, Guerin finally reached his ideal weight of 190 pounds. “I feel great,” he said. “I feel and look a lot better than what I did two years ago and it was something I needed to do.” Guerin, who serves as Louisiana Tech University’s director of public relations, said he began his weight loss journey after feeling tired, sluggish and kept buying clothes at big and tall stores for many years. 13 2016-05-17 Monroe

La. Tech representatives selected to attend National Security Forum RUSTON – Dr. Stan Napper, vice president for research and development, and Dr. Jeremy Mhire, associate professor of political science and director of the Waggonner Center for Civic Engagement and Public Policy, represented Louisiana Tech University at the 63rd annual National Security Forum (NSF) held last week at the Air War College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama. Napper and Mhire received and accepted personal invitations from the Secretary of the Air Force to attend the exclusive event where approximately 160 civilian leaders in business, education and government from all over the U.S. met with senior military leaders to explore current and future national security issues facing our nation. MORE ON TECH La. Tech students present research, prototypes at Senior Projects Conference La. Tech TOP DAWG winners announced Louisiana Tech engineering student awarded prestigious internship, scholarship The NSF, which began in 1954 as an expansion of the Civilian Outreach Seminars held from 1947 through 1949, provides opportunities for an open and candid exchange of ideas among these guests, senior military and civilian leaders, and Air War College students. “We are meeting with members of the Air Force command structure, military leaders from our national partners around the world, civilians from large and small businesses, and community leaders from all over the United States,” said Napper during the event. “We are learning how our future military leaders are prepared to make difficult and strategic decisions. “The theme for this year’s Forum is Competition, Conflict and Constraints, all of which were addressed candidly by Secretary of the Air Force, the Honorable Deborah James, in the opening session of the Forum.” The Air War College (AWC) is the senior professional development school in the Air Force officer education system as a part of Air University. AWC educates selected senior officers to lead at the strategic level in the employment of air and space forces. The AWC curriculum focuses on coalition warfighting and national security issues, with emphasis on the effective employment of aerospace forces in joint and combined combat operations. “This opportunity has proven invaluable,” said Mhire. “It is both stimulating and insightful to attend seminars in which the future leaders of the armed services discuss and debate issues of foreign policy, national security, and military strategy. The Air War College model is truly impressive.” Local ties to the AWC include General Robin Rand, commander of the Air Force Global Strike Command at Barksdale Air Force Base. Rand had previously been the commander of the Air Education and Training Command, which oversees the Air War College. Air University is a major component of Air Education and Training Command and the intellectual and leadership center of the Air Force. Air University’s eight colleges and schools provide the full spectrum of Air Force education, from precommissioning to the highest levels of professional military education, including degree granting and professional continuing education for officers, enlisted and civilian personnel throughout their careers. For more information on Air University and Air War College, visit www.au.af.mil. 13 2016-05-16 Monroe

La. Tech students present research, prototypes at Senior Projects Conference RUSTON – Senior class students from Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science showcased their solutions to real-world problems at the College of Engineering and Science Senior Projects Conference held recently on the Louisiana Tech campus. The students presented studies and designs as well as simulations illustrating solutions that could aid in international research and regional industrial applications. The nearly 100 projects presented included aerial unmanned vehicle prototypes, studies of hydronic jets at the Large Hadron Collider, plans for construction and solutions to save time and money in industry and health care. MORE ON TECH Hofmeister to serve as La. Tech spring commencement speaker TOP DAWG winners announced See who applied for Tech's women's basketball opening The Senior Projects Conference is the culmination of the College of Engineering and Science senior capstone experience – a yearlong project in which student teams work to solve problems, develop new products and perform leading edge research. “The Senior Projects Conference is a great display of the innovative solutions that our students develop for real-world problems,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science said. “It represents many long hours of hard work that students and faculty advisers devote during the year. We are extremely proud of their work and the impact it has on many local industries which sponsor the projects.” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean for undergraduate studies with the College of Engineering and Science adds that the conference is a chance for students to exhibit the work they have put in with research as well as the final product. “The Senior Projects Conference is really a celebration of the great work that our students have done throughout the year. Most of the projects are sponsored by industry in our region, and our students are tackling these real problems that ultimately result in a major economic impact for our state’s economy,” he said. Along with the real-world learning experiences gained by the students, the 2016 senior projects saved industrial partners a substantial amount of money. In addition to individuals, professors and programs, Senior Projects Conference sponsors included Central Louisiana Surgical Hospital, Holy Angels Residential Facility, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Louisiana Tech Chemistry Program, the National Science Foundation, Bar J Ranch, WestRock Paper Mill, Louisiana Purchase Council of the Boy Scouts of America, Aldea Services LLC, Anvil Attachments, Vacant Property Security LLC, Mojo Outdoors, A.J. Weller Corporation, Cameron Corporation, NASA LA-Space Program, Bill Lewis Outdoors, American Ingenuity, LLC, SWEPCO Power Plan, Con-Fab Engineering and Welding, T.L. James Cub World Lake Pedestrian Bridge, Haynes International, ConAgra Foods, Manitowoc, Frymaster, Weyerhauser and Mojo Outdoors. 13 2016-05-13 Ruston

Hofmeister to serve as Tech commencement speaker Louisiana Tech University will hold its spring commencement ceremony at 10 a.m. May 21 at the Thomas Assembly Center with John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, serving as keynote speaker. Hofmeister, who retired from Shell in 2008, works through Citizens for Affordable Energy to promote sound energy solutions for our nation. He has held executive leadership positions in General Electric, Nortel and AlliedSignal, which is now Honeywell International, and also served as the chairman of the National Urban League and chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee. Hofmeister serves on the boards of the Foreign Policy Association, Strategic Partners, LLC; the Houston Technology Center and the Gas Technology Institute, and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. He is a past chairman and Director Emeritus of the Greater Houston Partnership and is the author of “Why We Hate the Oil Companies: Straight Talk from an Energy Insider.” Currently, Hofmeister serves as a Wrigley Scholar/Executive in Residence in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University and is also a lecturer at the University of Houston. Hofmeister earned bachelors and master’s degrees in political science from Kansas State University. In May 2010, he was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Houston and from Kansas State University in 2014. During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Tech. Spring commencement will serve as the official end to Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter and the 2015-16 academic year. Summer quarter classes will begin June 1. 13 2016-05-12 Ruston

School of Design at Louisiana Tech partners with Ruston Farmers Market May 7 was the opening day for this season’s Ruston Farmers Market, and with a new location came a new design, courtesy of Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design. The Farmers Market partnered with the School of Design for a service-learning project that included students from a studio art class creating a mural on the outside wall of the Farmers Market’s new location, 220 E. Mississippi Ave. in Ruston. “The mural will be part of revitalization and beautification of the space,” said Nicholas Bustamante, chair of studio art, who teaches the class. “The project began in early March when students met with the Ruston Farmers Market to talk about design ideas. It was important to showcase the items that would be available at the market.” 13 2016-05-10 Monroe

Hofmeister to serve as Louisiana Tech spring commencement speaker RUSTON (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University will hold its spring commencement ceremony at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 21 at the Thomas Assembly Center with John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, serving as keynote speaker. Hofmeister, who retired from Shell in 2008, works through Citizens for Affordable Energy to promote sound energy solutions for our nation. He has held executive leadership positions in General Electric, Nortel and AlliedSignal, which is now Honeywell International, and also served as the chairman of the National Urban League and chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee. Hofmeister serves on the boards of the Foreign Policy Association, Strategic Partners, LLC; the Houston Technology Center and the Gas Technology Institute, and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. He is a past chairman and Director Emeritus of the Greater Houston Partnership, and is the author of “Why We Hate the Oil Companies: Straight Talk from an Energy Insider” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). Currently, Hofmeister serves as a Wrigley Scholar/Executive in Residence in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University and is also a lecturer at the University of Houston. Hofmeister earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in political science from Kansas State University. In May 2010, he was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Houston and from Kansas State University in 2014. During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech. Spring commencement will serve as the official end to Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter and the 2015-2016 academic year. Summer quarter classes will begin Wednesday, June 1. 13 2016-05-09 Monroe

La. Tech engineering team places in top 20 at regional competition RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s SAE Baja team finished in the top 20 of nearly 100 collegiate teams competing in the suspension course at the Collegiate Design Series held recently at Tennessee Tech University. The objective of the SAE Baja competition is to provide students with a challenging project that involves the design, planning and manufacturing tasks found when introducing a new product to the consumer industrial market. Teams compete against one another to have their design accepted for manufacture by a fictitious firm. MORE FROM TECH: La. Tech team uses 3D printing, sustainable materials to create custom UAV Students must function as a team to not only design, build, test, promote, and race a vehicle within the limits of the rules, but also to generate financial support for their project and manage their educational priorities. The Louisiana Tech team had to design and build an off-road vehicle that could make laps in rough terrain using an engine bought from the organization. The overall competition is judged on commercial criteria. In addition to their top 20 finish, the Louisiana Tech team, consisting of Josh Chopin, Austin Delaune, Blaire Eidt, Garrett Gibson, Nicholas Hayes, Kayleigh Jowers, Chris Kotar, John Kraft, Matthew Lacrouts, Cody Maricelli, Dillon Morvant, Johnny Negrete, Brice Soignier, Lucas Waldron, Tyler Walsh, Nicholas Winters and Wilson Wise, also dropped 100 pounds from the total weight of the car, doubling their sales presentation score and completing the four-hour endurance race. The team from Louisiana Tech was one of only 16 to complete the suspension course. They also received the highest score in team history for their cost report and prototype cost. Dr. Niel Crews, director of the Institute for Micromanufacturing and associate professor of mechanical engineering and SAE team sponsor says that organizations like Baja SAE help students get real-world experience necessary for success after college. “I am very proud of these students,” Crews said. “They have worked hard to be competitive in the Baja SAE competition, while continuing to perform well in the classroom. This really represents the best experience for college students: real hands-on engineering combined with a solid academic education. “This makes such a big difference in the quality of the engineers that graduate from Louisiana Tech University. For this reason, we make it possible for all our mechanical engineering students to get involved in engineering clubs like Baja SAE.” The Louisiana Tech team is an interdisciplinary organization that includes students from across the College of Engineering and Science, and even includes a student from agricultural business and one from architectural studies. SAE International is a global association of more than 128,000 engineers and related technical experts in the aerospace, automotive and commercial-vehicle industries. The Louisiana Tech team works throughout the year to build a vehicle that is durable and cost efficient. 13 2016-05-09 Ruston

LEGAL SCHOLAR TO VISIT TECH The international history of a contentious contemporary issue will be featured as the department of history at Louisiana Tech University continues its annual International Affairs Speaker Series at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 10 at the Lincoln Parish Library. The visiting speaker will be Anna Su, an assistant professor on the faculty of law at the University of Toronto. Su will speak about the subject of her recent book, “Exporting Liberty: Religious Freedom and American Power,” published earlier this year by Harvard University Press. The event is free and open to the public. 13 2016-05-06 Monroe

ExxonMobil makes generous donation to Louisiana Tech RUSTON – ExxonMobil has donated more than $130,000 to Louisiana Tech University as part of ExxonMobil’s Educational Matching Gift Program to support engineering and science education opportunities for faculty and staff. Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science alumnae and ExxonMobil Slurry Process Technology Manager Jennifer Johnson recently presented the donation to Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and College of Engineering and Science Dean Hisham Hegab. The donation is part of ExxonMobil’s Educational Matching Gift Program, in which the company matches the donations of employees, their spouses, retirees and surviving spouses on a three-to-one basis, for up to $22,500 to U.S. colleges and universities. In addition to the Educational Matching Gift Program, ExxonMobil provides support to the College of Engineering and Science through donations of money and time to academic programs and student organizations, such as the Society of Women Engineers and the National Society of Black Engineers. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, says that donations from companies like ExxonMobil help provide materials and opportunities for engineering and science faculty to engage students in real-world experiences, including hands-on activities and travel to competitions and conferences. “We greatly appreciate ExxonMobil’s support for the College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech,” Hegab said. “Support from corporate partners like ExxonMobil is essential to helping us produce graduates with the technical and leadership skills that industry demands.” 13 2016-05-06 Monroe

Details on Brooke Stoehr's salary at Tech Louisiana Tech is investing more money and time for rebuilding with new women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr. Stoehr, the former Northwestern State coach who was hired last month to replace Tyler Summitt, is set to make north up $1.3 million over six years, according to a memorandum of understanding signed April 17 that was obtained by The NewsStar this week through an open records request. Stoehr will earn $206,000 in 2017 and receive annual salary increases of $10,000 until her salary maxes out at $246,000 in year six for a total of $1,376,000 over the life of the contract. Summitt, who resigned last month due to an inappropriate relationship with a player, signed a five-year deal worth $175,000 annually in 2014. The increases for Stoehr are expected since she has four years of head coaching experience to her name. At the time, Summitt had just two years as an assistant and was 23 years old. Stoehr made a base salary of $85,000 at Northwestern State after inking an extension last summer that ran through 2020. The base salary, coupled with money from NSU's Demons Unlimited Foundation, pushed her annual salary to around $115,000. Stoehr also had a $25,000 buyout if she left before April 30, 2016.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Emotions flow as Brooke Stoehr is introduced at Tech According to the memorandum, Stoehr and Tech will come to a formal contractual agreement within 30 days, which would be May 18. The final contract will include buyout details and cause for termination, among other things. In addition to the salary increase and additional year, Tech is also increasing the assistant coaches pool from $265,000 to $300,000. The base pay from the university remained the same as Summitt's deal at $175,000, but the Louisiana Tech Athletic Foundation will fork up the additional dollars to compensate for the remainder of Stoehr's annual salary. Additionally, the memorandum specifically states "when, and if," Stoehr hires her husband, Scott, to Tech's coaching staff, she will become co-head coach and he will become co-head coach due to Louisiana's state nepotism laws.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Co-HC title an interesting, unique dynamic for the Stoehrs By law, Stoehr became co-head coach April 21 when Tech announced the additions of Scott Stoehr and Lindsey Hicks to the staff. Tech is also expected to hire Southern Miss assistant Alaura Sharp. The News-Star requested a memorandum of understanding for Scott Stoehr, but the school doesn't have one on file and therefore his salary is unknown. Brooke Stoehr compiled a 71-58 record during her four years and made consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances in 2014 and 2015. Northwestern State finished 19-12 in 2016 and third place in the Southland Conference with a 13-5 record. She has roots with Tech's program, having served as a two-year captain for the Techsters as part of a 119-16 career record. 13 2016-05-06 Monroe

Outreach specialist selected as 2016 Outstanding Educator of the Year RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Sheena Manuel, an outreach specialist for Louisiana Tech University’s Professional Development and Research Institute on Blindness (PDRIB), has been selected as the 2016 Outstanding Educator of the Year by the Louisiana chapter of the National Federation of the Blind. Manuel’s work for the PDRIB led to this honor and her immeasurable contributions to educating blind children at public schools in Webster, Lincoln, and Bienville Parishes, and helping them to develop life skills such as reading braille and personal orientation and mobility. The PDRIB, founded in 1996 and housed in Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, was originally established to create the first non-discriminatory program in equipping people interested in teaching cane travel and braille to blind students. “This has been the most challenging year of my career so far, but this award lets me know that the people who matter the most appreciate my time, talent, and efforts to change what it means to be blind and to ensure that kids know blindness is a nuisance, but not a defining characteristic,” said Manuel during her award acceptance speech. “I am only the educator I am with the help of my team at the Professional Development and Research Institute on Blindness, Dr. Ruby Ryles, and all the blind people I have met here and at national convention who continue to tell me their stories and dreams for blind children. It’s also with the help of my students and their families for allowing me to fight for their rights to a free and appropriate public education, and my family and friends who continue to support my dreams and believe that I can change the world.” Manuel’s service and advocacy for blind children have included helping to coordinate monthly activities that often take place on the weekends for children and their families, which she led along with other staff members of PDRIB and the Louisiana Center for the Blind. In November 2015, she was also chosen to be a part of an exclusive cohort of teachers from around the country for training in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields specifically for blind and visually impaired children. “Sheena is beloved by everyone who works with her,” said Dr. Edward Bell, director of the PDRIB at Louisiana Tech. “The children she teaches love her, the families depend on her, and all of us respect her tremendously. Sheena, without a doubt, is one of the best things we have going on here at PDRIB.” Manuel has earned a bachelor’s degree in general studies from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and a master’s degree in teaching from Louisiana Tech. She also earned an MBA from the University of Phoenix and holds a National Certification in Literary Braille, a National Orientation and Mobility Certification, and a National Certification in Unified English Braille. 13 2016-05-05 Lafayette

Louisiana Tech Admissions Wants To Be Your Lady Baby Cajuns fans are usually looking for reasons to talk trash to programs they don’t root for. While this video wasn’t released by Louisiana Tech athletics, it’s still worth viewing. Louisiana Tech Admissions released a short video on social media that has drawn up a simple debate among some of us at the office. Are they attempting to be serious, or funny? When you channel INOJ’s “I Want To Be Your Lady Baby”, no one can be too sure. Is this video to be laughed at, or laughed with? Judge for yourself.

Read More: Louisiana Tech Admissions Wants To Be Your Lady Baby [Video] | http://espn1420.com/louisiana-techadmissions-wants-to-be-your-lady-baby-video/?trackback=tsmclip 13 2016-05-05 Ruston

Louisiana Tech farm sale to support agricultural sciences, forestry students RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Animals suitable for raising, breeding, riding and consumption will be featured during Louisiana Tech University’s 46th Annual University Farm Production Sale, scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday at Tech Farm located on Louisiana Tech’s South Campus. Included in the sale will be 20 Black Baldy heifers and 20 F-1 (Brahman/Angus) heifers that will be exposed to a Hereford bull. Additional cattle include a registered Polled Hereford heifer and other crossbred heifers. Consumers can take advantage of finished market steers, hogs and even a lamb. Those market animals will be processed at the Tech Meat Science Laboratory at no additional cost to the buyer. The sale will also offer five Quarter Horses, including riding horses, a broodmare and other prospects. Organized by the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry's faculty, staff and students, the sale raises money for the program as well as offering “an excellent learning experience for the students involved," said Dr. William Green, Interim Director of the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry. More information is available from Green at 318-257-3275, by email at [email protected] or on the sale's website at www.livestocksale.latech.edu. 13 2016-05-04 Monroe

Tech to build new press box, suites at Joe Aillet Stadium When Louisiana Tech held a ribbon cutting ceremony last September to announce its new $22 million end zone facility at Joe Aillet Stadium, athletic director Tommy McClelland viewed it as a game. The project, or game, was over and it was time to move on to another with the focus centered on improving the current press box and adding suites. That game was set in motion in 2015 and continued in April when Tech requested permission and received approval last Thursday from University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to enter a ground-facility lease for an estimated $11.5 million project to expand the press box and build new suites to replace the existing Sky Box. The estimated completion date for the privately funded project is Aug. 31, 2017, according to a letter dated March 31 from Tech president Les Guice to the board. Updated restrooms and traffic flow are "other repairs and modernization" included in the project. On Tuesday, McClelland described last week's approval as "preliminary" and said the 2017 date is given as the earliest possibly completion date in order to start the process.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech’s $22 million facility serves as ‘missing link’ However, the new construction project may not be finished until 2018 depending on how quickly Tech can secure the necessary funds. Construction would need to take place between seasons, so Nov. 13, 2016, the day after Tech's final home game of the season, is the earliest the project could start. "People may read that as something different but that's part of our procedure to say we're going before the board and we're letting them know that this is a project we intend to do in the future and we'd like you to be aware of it and get your approval. That's what that was," he said. Terms for the lease begin July 16, 2016 and run through Dec. 31, 2017, or when the "donation of improvement is executed," whichever occurs first. Tech's new project, which includes tearing down the old press box and Sky Box and building a brand new structure, is a design-build, which means the intent is to include everything at one price. Tech's $22 million end zone facility started as an $18 million construction project but didn't include furnishings like graphic packages and furniture. "The next step for us is to continue to put the team together and contractors and those types of things," McClelland said. "We're in a quiet phase of trying to gain support for it financially because this is going to be a fully funded private dollars. We are in the mode of trying to secure funds. Once we get to a point where we feel like we got the funds we need, the percentages we need, then we'll move forward." McClelland declined to offer any details on the press box or suites. Louisiana Tech added the $22 million Davison AthleticsBuy Photo Louisiana Tech added the $22 million Davison Athletics Complex to Joe Aillet Stadium last year. (Photo: MARGARET CROFT/THE NEWS-STAR) In the letter from March, Guice wrote the press box, which has been in use since 1969, "has little or no modernization." The space is old, outdated and in need of an upgrade. "The space does not meet accessibility standards, nor does it meet functional requirements of the media and game production," Guice wrote. Tech's Sky Box was constructed in 1985 above the press box to provide additional seating. Like the press box, Guice said the Sky Box doesn't meet current code or expectations. McClelland used similiar words to describe the state of the press box and Sky Box. "Number one, it's practical," he said. "Number two, quite frankly is aesthetic now that we have a brand new building and it reflects the disparity between the two buildings if you will. The difference between age and structure. "Third, and most importantly, is it's a source of revenue for us that we're currently not tapping into."

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech begins turf installation at Joe Aillet Stadium The 2015 renovations to the south end, now called the Davison Athletics Complex, was several years in the making. The DAC houses a new locker room, weight room and meeting rooms along with new offices for coaches and a third-floor clublevel for banquets and events that features 302 seats overlooking the field. Discussions for the latest west side renovations also go back several years. In a July 2014 interview with The News-Star, McClelland said he hoped to improve its football press box with additional funds. Last September, McClelland reiterated there are several areas of need on campus that need to be addressed during the next three to five years including the press box and improvements to the backside of the old Joe Aillet Stadium field house. 13 2016-05-04 Ruston

La. Tech chemical engineering students win at national design competition RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University chemical engineering students Evan McDougall, from Prairieville, La., and Dustin Savage, from West Monroe, La., won first place in the 2016 Best Senior Design Competition at the AIChE Spring Meeting and 12th Global Congress on Process Safety held recently in Houston, Texas. McDougall notes the importance of collaboration and mastery of multiple disciplines in the success of the project. McDougall and Savage represented Louisiana Tech’s student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at the conference and presented their “Economic Optimization and Hazard Analysis of a Sulfuric Acid Catalyzed Alkylation Process” design to a panel of judges composed of professors and industry representatives. MORE FROM TECH: La. Tech TOP DAWG winners announced “Dustin and I received a great deal of advice on improving our presentation from Dr. (James) Palmer, our fellow chemical engineering seniors and my technical presentations teacher, Christine Strebeck,” McDougall said. “In the last four years, we have had countless presentations and team projects. I am grateful that our curriculum requires such an intense, comprehensive study of numerical techniques, which feedback from the audience suggested was one of our greatest strengths.” Savage says that the hands-on focus of the Louisiana Tech engineering curricula helped prepare the team for performing the research and presenting it. “Louisiana Tech’s heavy emphasis on communication and teamwork displayed throughout our curriculum also allowed Evan and me to deliver the winning presentation at the recent AIChE Conference,” Savage noted. “We have worked together on projects in the past and used our familiarity to graft our individual strengths into the alkylation design. From presenting on basic freshman engineering designs to more complex topics in our junior and senior classes, we were fully prepared to represent Tech in Houston.” Competing teams worked on their project for most of the academic year, while the Louisiana Tech team had only three months. Palmer, Louisiana Tech’s AIChE faculty sponsor and director of biomedical engineering and chemical engineering, said that this event highlights the success of the chemical engineering program at Louisiana Tech and the opportunities for Louisiana Tech chemical engineering students. “Attracting outstanding students such as Evan and Dustin, and providing them an effective learning environment are critical factors that make Louisiana Tech University such a quality institution,” Palmer said. “We are pleased to have them represent the institution and are proud of what they have achieved.” READ MORE: Barker leaving for TCU In addition to winning the competition, Savage and McDougall are both members of Omega Chi Epsilon, and gave presentations on behalf of organization for Louisiana Tech’s 69th Engineering and Science day on April 11, before leaving to compete in the 2016 Best Senior Design Competition. This event was AIChE’s third national design competition. Louisiana Tech also won first place two years ago. The AIChE is the world’s leading organization for chemical engineering professionals. The AIChE Spring Meeting is the annual technical conference for practicing chemical engineers and addresses a wide range of subjects relevant to the current needs of industry. 13 2016-05-03 Monroe

Louisiana Tech TOP DAWG New Venture Championship winners announced RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - A total of $12,500 in cash and prizes were awarded last week to the most innovative, student-developed product and service ideas at the 2016 TOP DAWG New Venture Championship at Louisiana Tech University. Awards were presented to the top three finishers in the competition with the “EZ Read Monitoring System” team (mechanical engineering majors Rhodes Moran and Ryan Frick, and entrepreneurship majors Fran Ewing and Vincent Moore) earning first place honors and $3,000 for their easy-to-use devices that wirelessly transmit water level data to customers. The team also won the Innovation Enterprise Fund award of $1,000 given for entrepreneurial spirit. Second place and a $1,500 award was presented to Bharat Karumuri (biomedical engineering graduate student) for his new venture “IntelliPace,” which is developing an embedded software module that enables programmable implantable brain stimulators to stimulate with high therapeutic efficiency and fewer side effects. “Hea ng Movement” (entrepreneursh p ma ors S erra McGraw and Logan Evans, nanosystem/e ectr ca eng neer ng ma or Abdu ah Nammar , nanosystem/chem ca eng neer ng ma or Dust n Savage, and nanosystem/m cromanufactur ng ma or Seth Doughty) earned th rd p ace honors for deve op ng a se f-powered dev ce des gned to be p aced ns de a denta mp ant screw to produce e ectr c st mu at on to the aw to promote bone growth around denta mp ants. The $2,000 Jones Wa ker Entrepreneur a Sp r t Award, funded by Jones Wa ker and recogn z ng the team w th the most entrepreneur a sp r t, went to “B ke-n-Br ght” (entrepreneursh p ma or Andrea Harr s and nanosystems eng neer ng ma ors Zachary Hanson, Andrew R g ey and Karen R spone) for the r ghtwe ght, easy-to-use, ow ma ntenance b ke ght power supp y system. In add t on to the cash awards, the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center sponsors s x months of bus ness ncubator space to the w nn ng teams, va ued at $4,500. Seven mu t -d sc p nary teams earned a spot n the 2016 New Venture Champ onsh p f na round. Teams were scored on the qua ty of the r new venture nvestment deck and presentat on as we as the overa v ab ty of the r bus ness concept. The TOP DAWG was estab shed n 2002 and s coord nated by Debb e Inman, d rector of the Center for Entrepreneursh p and Informat on Techno ogy. Members of Bu dog Entrepreneurs, the student organ zat on wh ch empowers entrepreneurs and promotes nnovat on on the Tech campus, serve as fac tators for the event. The New Venture Champ onsh p s he d each spr ng quarter and prov des an opportun ty for students to create bus ness nvestor decks based on deas presented dur ng the fa quarter TOP DAWG Idea P tch. Dur ng the compet t on, each team s mentored by bus ness experts and attends tra n ng sess ons des gned to he p teams bu d the r nvestor decks. The compet t on s an ntegra part of the Enterpr se Campus focus at Lou s ana Tech. Judges for the TOP DAWG New Venture Champ onsh p nc ude M chae Leachman, partner w th Jones Wa ker; B a r Su re, assoc ate w th Jones Wa ker; Ammen Jordan, C ty of Ruston; and Adam O Nea , bus ness deve opment/commerc a portfo o manager for Or g n Bank. Support ng sponsors for the TOP DAWG nc ude the Lou s ana Tech Co ege of Bus ness, Lou s ana Tech Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Center for Entrepreneursh p and Informat on Techno ogy (CEnIT), the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center, the Innovat on Enterpr se Fund and the Techno ogy Bus ness Deve opment Center (TBDC). 13 2016-05-02 Monroe

La Tech College of Engineering and Science honors outstanding students, faculty Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s proud to announce ts 2016 Outstand ng Students and Facu ty. Each year, facu ty and staff from the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence (COES) se ect outstand ng un ors and sen ors who have exce ed n academ cs and eadersh p for the Co ege. Graduat ng sen ors vote on the two facu ty members who most nf uenced the r educat ons at Lou s ana Tech. These se ect ons are announced at the annua Spr ng Re ease event. The 2016 Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence Outstand ng Sen ors are Jake Auger (mechan ca eng neer ng), Morgan Bo ch (chem ca eng neer ng), Sam He man (mechan ca eng neer ng), Evan McDouga (chem ca eng neer ng), John Owens III (computer sc ence) and Joshua Tu y (chem stry). Outstand ng Jun ors for 2016 are John Jacob Kraft IV (construct on eng neer ng techno ogy), Grant Reddoch (chem ca eng neer ng), Arthur Hart e Spence II (b omed ca eng neer ng), Ethan Su van (nanosystems eng neer ng), Cay n VanHook (e ectr ca eng neer ng and phys cs) and Luke V erm n (mechan ca eng neer ng). A e De Leo, student success spec a st for the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, says that these students exh b t academ c exce ence and are act ve n commun ty bu d ng act v t es outs de the c assroom. “We are very proud of these students and the r accomp shments. These outstand ng un ors and sen ors not on y perform we academ ca y, but they are a so very nvo ved around campus, w th n our co ege and n the commun ty.” “These students serve as examp es to current and future students n how they perform both n the c assroom and n the r serv ce,” added Dr. Heath T ms, assoc ate dean of undergraduate stud es for the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. “We are proud of the r accomp shments and are exc ted to be ab e to honor the r work. We ook forward to how they w further represent Tech n the future.” Outstand ng Facu ty n the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence for 2016 are Dr. Brad C cc are , sen or ecturer of chem ca and mechan ca eng neer ng, and Dr. M chae Swanbom, sen or ecturer of mechan ca eng neer ng. “Th s award s very spec a for facu ty because t s dec ded by the students themse ves,” T ms sa d. “It s very reward ng to be chosen from so many outstand ng facu ty n our Co ege.” In add t on to outstand ng un ors, sen ors and facu ty, the Eng neer ng and Sc ence Assoc at on awarded the COES Cup to the Nat ona Soc ety of B ack Eng neers (f rst p ace), the Amer can Soc ety of C v Eng neers (second p ace) and the Soc ety of Phys cs Students (th rd p ace). The ESA awarded po nts toward the compet t on to student organ zat ons that part c pated n the most commun ty outreach, attendance of nat ona conferences and part c pat on n spec a compet t ons hosted by the ESA Freshman Counc throughout the academ c year. In add t on to the troph es, each organ zat on that p aced rece ved a monetary award to put toward future events. 13 2016-05-02 Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH HOSTS I-20 TOP 20 Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty showcased new techno og es, nnovat ve products and serv ces and entrepreneur a deas from across the Interstate 20 corr dor. P ctured s the UTeachTech booth. UTeachTech pa rs Tech s eng neer ng and sc ence programs w th t teach ng preparat on programs, resu t ng n a s ng e, nterd sc p nary degree program. 13 2016-05-02 Ruston

TECH LEADS CYBER EDUCATION PROGRAM he Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center n the Co ege of Educat on w ead an on ne Cyber Educat on program for K-12 educators. In a partnersh p w th the Cyber Innovat on Center, 5013c nonprof t corporat on ded cated to cyber research n Boss er C ty, the 100 percent on ne program w he p teach future computer sc ence teachers. Twenty-seven teachers from Lou s ana, Arkansas and South Caro na have enro ed n the f rst course offer ng th s spr ng. The courses meet computer sc ence cert f cat on requ rements and program part c pants w ga n cont nu ng educat on un ts as we as graduate course cred ts that w count toward a master of educat on degree, a Cyber Educat on Cert f cate or a master p us 30, a rank 1 cert f cat on. “Computer sc ence educat on s becom ng more preva ent n K-12 and an ncreas ng y ntegra component of a student s educat ona career,” G.B. Cazes, v ce pres dent of the Cyber Innovat on Center, sa d. “Th s course sequence prov des teachers w th the foundat ona know edge, sk s, and ab t es needed to become cert f ed computer sc ence teachers n K12 c assrooms.” Don Sch nger, dean of the Co ege of Educat on at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, sa d th s type of program w he p not on y the country, but L nco n Par sh tse f. “The grow ng need for computer sc ence educators cont nues to grow everywhere,” he sa d. “Th s certa n y benef ts the commun ty and the r cont nued efforts n (sc ence, techno ogy, eng neer ng and mathemat cs) educat on.” Sch nger sa d Tech w be one of the nat on s eaders n computer sc ence educat on when the program beg ns. “W th that grow ng need, peop e w recogn ze Tech as the ones who w be the forefront of mak ng computer sc ence educators,” he sa d. “The add t on of the Cyber Educat on course sequence furthers our comm tment to prov d ng educators know edge, sk s and understand ng needed to educate the next generat on earner and eader.” 13 2016-04-29 Monroe

Vernon Butler drafted by Panthers in first round to etch name in Tech history Vernon But er made h story for Lou s ana Tech s footba program, becom ng the schoo s f rst defens ve p ayer to ever be se ected n the f rst round of the NFL Draft. But er, a standout defens ve tack e who p ayed for the Bu dogs from 2012-15, was drafted by the Caro na Panthers w th the No. 30 overa p ck at the end of Thursday s NFL Draft. He s Tech s h ghest defens ve p ayer drafted s nce defens ve end Fred Dean (No. 33 overa ) n the 1975 draft and the h ghest p ayer drafted from Tech s nce w de rece ver Troy Edwards (No. 13 overa ) n 1999. But er (6-foot-4, 323 pounds) was one of 25 p ayers n Ch cago for the draft. H s fam y, most notab y h s parents, and members of h s management team at Pro Source Sports, o ned h m for the tr p. He became the f fth f rst-round p ck n Tech h story, o n ng Edwards, w de rece ver Roger Carr and Ha of Famer p ayers Terry Bradshaw and W e Roaf. "It fee s great. I m ust honored and rea y b essed r ght now. I thank God," But er sa d dur ng a te econference w th reporters, v a the team s webs te. Dressed n a b ack su t, b ack bow t e and b ack-r mmed g asses — much ke the g asses he wore four years ago when he s gned w th Tech — But er wa ked on stage and gave comm ss oner Roger Goode a hug before putt ng on h s new cap.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Chron c ng Vernon But er s attempt to make h story at NFL Draft The Panthers were one of severa teams But er v s ted dur ng the draft process. He sa d ast week he met w th the B s, L ons, Texans, Bucs, Seahawks, Panthers, T tans and Fa cons. He a so rece ved nterest from the Ra ders, Benga s and Broncos. "I cou dn t he p my hog mo y se f," Panthers genera manager Dave Gett eman sa d, v a the Assoc ated Press. "We were rea y k nd of shocked that he was there. I don t know why he fe (to No. 30). It was ke my f rst draft here and watch ng Star (Lotu e e ) fa to us. But the va ue was too good. He s b g and powerfu and ath et c and has a of the stuff." Before the draft, But er to d The News-Star he thought he wou d go between p cks 14 to 23. However, there were severa tw sts and turns to the draft that f pped team s draft boards, ke a run on w de rece vers and the fa ng stock of offens ve tack e Laremy Tuns . "A tad b t, I was," But er sa d when asked f he was surpr sed. "But I m at a good home w th the Caro na Panthers so t works out good." R ght as the draft started, the Detro t Free Press reported But er sa d the L ons to d h m they wou d take h m w th the 16th p ck f he was st ava ab e. However, Detro t went w th offens ve tack e Tay or Decker. Lou s ana Tech s Vernon But er poses for a photo n Lou s ana Tech s Vernon But er poses for a photo n the green room of Thursday s NFL Draft n Ch cago. (Photo: Courtesy ProSource Sports Management) "That s what they sa d, but they say a ot of th ngs," But er sa d on the conference ca . But er w w nd up mak ng around $8 m on for go ng ate n the f rst round, accord ng to spotrac.com, a webs te that pro ects draft contract. Last year, Demar ous Randa s gned a four-year dea worth $7,915,734 as the 30th p ck. Ear er n the n ght on the red carpet, But er was featured n a br ef NFL Network nterv ew w th h s parents Vernon Sr. and Bever y. But er s p ace n the f rst round comp etes a four-year ourney where he morphed from a two-star defens ve end prospect out of North P ke H gh Schoo n Summ tt, M ss ss pp , nto one of the h ghest-rated defens ve tack es. "The f rst tape I put n was Kansas State ... and th s k d got n there and ran s de ne-to-s de ne, made p ays a day ong and never came of out the game," NFL Network draft ana yst M ke Mayock sa d on the a r. "He s 6-4, 325. Th nk L nva Joseph, th nk M chae Brockers, that k nd of p ayer. B g, powerfu p ayer and Caro na Panthers ove that k nd of p ayer." But er was a two-year starter at Tech, a stretch that he ped generate buzz fo ow ng h s un or year when he f n shed w th 56 tack es and 13.5 tack es for oss. He f rted w th the NFL Draft, but dec ded to come back after rece v ng a fourth- or f fth-round draft grade. The dec s on proved to work out ust f ne for But er. He had 50 tack es, 10 tack es for oss, e ght quarterback hurr es and three sacks to earn F rst-Team A -Conference USA honors. But er s season ed to nv tes at the Sen or Bow , NFL Comb ne and f na y the NFL Draft n Ch cago. Teams and scouts are ntr gued w th h s potent a and versat ty. But er won t turn 22 unt June and he has the ab ty to p ay a three pos t ons on the defens ve ne. "He s exp os ve and powerfu at the po nt of attack," Panthers coach Ron R vera sa d, v a the AP. "We most certa n y do see the ups de." Lou s ana Tech s Vernon But er rece ves a phone ca Lou s ana Tech s Vernon But er rece ves a phone ca Thursday from the Caro na Panthers nd cat ng they had chosen h m w th the 30th p ck n the 2016 NFL Draft. (Photo: Courtesy ProSource Sports Management) The buzz surround ng But er p cked up after the season was over and ga ned momentum at the Sen or Bow when he was among the top defens ve tack es n Mob e, A abama. But er d dn t test out as we as he wou d have ked at the comb ne, but mproved on h s numbers at Tech s Pro Day n March by runn ng a 5.05 40-yard dash, post ng a 33.5- nch vert ca ump and 9-3 n the board ump. In a deep defens ve tack e draft c ass, But er was the fourth p ayer off the board. She don Rank ns went No. 12 to New Or eans, Kenny C ark went No. 27 to Green Bay and Robert Nkemd che to Ar zona at No. 29. But er went ahead of b gger-named prospects ke A abama defens ve tack es A Shawn Rob nson and Jarran Reed and Bay or s Andrew B ngs. But er wa ks nto a s tuat on at Caro na where the Panthers are com ng off a tr p to the Super Bow as NFC champ ons. He o n a oaded defense that nc udes nebacker Luke Kuech y and defens ve tack es Star Lotu e e and Kawann Short and defens ve end Kony Ea y. "Th s s a guy, honest y, you cou d put a f m together and th s s the best defens ve tack e n the draft," Stanford coach Dav s Shaw sa d on the NFL Network broadcast. "I m mpressed by th s k d. I ke h m." 13 2016-04-28 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Golf Claims Conference USA Championship TEXARKANA -- The Bu dogs upset the No. 38 ranked team n the country, UAB, and won the r f rst ever Conference USA go f t t e on Wednesday afternoon n Texarkana, Arkansas. The on y other t me Lou s ana Tech won a conference t t e s when they were a member of the South and Conference n 1980. Tech s Ben Rob nson sunk the 15 footer on the f na ho e to secure the 3-2 upset over the B azers. W th the w n, the Bu dogs have an automat c b d to the NCAA Reg ona s on May 16-18. 13 2016-04-27 Monroe

Local students win top prizes at Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2016 DETROIT (Ede man News Re ease) - After months of bu d ng an u tra-energy eff c ent veh c e and a weekend of ntense compet t on n Detro t, students from Ruston H gh Schoo and Lou s ana Tech exceeded expectat ons at She Ecomarathon Amer cas 2016, a g oba energy eff c ency compet t on that was he d th s past weekend, Apr 22-24, n Detro t. P ease see the fu compet t on press re ease be ow. Ruston H gh Schoo took home second p ace pr ze n the UrbanConcept, A ternat ve Fue category for record ng 98 mpg – the r f rst t me bu d ng an UrbanConcept veh c e. The team a so came n 10th p ace n the Prototype, Gaso ne category w th 681 mpg – an ncred b e ach evement g ven that they were one of the few teams that made 90 percent of every part n the r superm eage veh c e. By compar son, today s most fue eff c ent veh c e ach eves 37 mpg, accord ng to the U.S. Department of Energy. Lou s ana Tech were one of the two teams to make t past techn ca nspect ons for the UrbanConcept, CNG category, and one of s x to pass techn ca nspect ons n the UrbanConcept, D ese category. A though the team d d not ach eve the r hopes for a trophy f n sh, the students – most of whom are non-trad t ona students pursu ng second degrees or chang ng careers – ga ned techn ca sk s, such as des gn ng and manufactur ng, as we as va uab e exper ence n eadersh p, teamwork and network ng. More than 1,000 h gh schoo and co ege students from a record 124 teams represent ng seven countr es – Braz , Canada, Ecuador, Guatema a, Mex co, Puerto R co and the Un ted States – competed at She Eco-marathon Amer cas 2016 after des gn ng, bu d ng and test ng the r most energy-eff c ent veh c es. 13 2016-04-27 Ruston

Louisiana Tech engineering student awarded prestigious internship, scholarship B a ne Rut and, a un or phys cs ma or n Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, has been awarded a B ue Waters Internsh p Scho arsh p (BWIS) to part c pate n a two-week ntens ve h gh-performance comput ng workshop. B ue Waters Scho ars rece ve a st pend of $5,000 to part c pate n a H gh-Performance Comput ng (HPC) summer tra n ng program at the Nat ona Center for Supercomput ng App cat ons and comp ete an HPC research pro ect at the r home nst tut on. Rut and s research pro ect, performed n the Theoret ca Mo ecu ar B o ogy Lab at Lou s ana Tech and mentored by Dr. Thomas C. B shop, assoc ate professor of chem stry and phys cs, uses HPC to nvest gate how the mater a propert es of DNA on the atom c sca e affect genom c funct on on coarse-gra ned sca es, see mages. Character z ng re at onsh ps between DNA s atom c structure and DNA sequence s an essent a step to advanc ng our understand ng of persona zed genom cs and ep genet cs.

B shop notes that the nternsh p prov des students w th tra n ng and network ng opportun t es mportant for students work ng n genet cs. “The computat ona mode ng of genet c mechan sms n my Theoret ca Mo ecu ar B o ogy Lab requ res tremendous comput ng resources,” B shop sa d. “Members of my ab rout ne y ut ze wor d-c ass h gh-performance comput ng resources ava ab e from the Lou s ana Opt ca Network In t at ve (LONI), the Nat ona Center for Supercomput ng App cat ons and the Extreme Sc ence and Eng neer ng D scovery Env ronment. “The B ue Waters Internsh p Program prov des my students un que opportun t es for tra n ng on the wor ds fastest academ c supercomputer and for network ng w th renowned computat ona sc ent sts and eng neers. It s an ncred b e exper ence for Lou s ana Tech students.” B ue Waters sponsors 20 undergraduate research nterns each year. The nterns engage n petasca e comput ng research and deve opment pro ects, and trave to The B ue Waters Sympos um at the Nat ona Center for Supercomput ng App cat ons. STUDENT AWARDS: Lou s ana Tech h story students honored for research Th s award marks the second year n a row that a student from Lou s ana Tech has been awarded the scho arsh p. Last year two students, An k Karan, graduate student n b omed ca eng neer ng, and Ran Sun, graduate student n chem ca eng neer ng, rece ved BWIS. 13 2016-04-26 Monroe

Student art exhibit, auction at Tech showcases interdisciplinary creativity RUSTON -- Facu ty from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng programs teamed up w th art facu ty from the Schoo of Des gn to prov de students w th a un que opportun ty to use the r ta ents to promote Lou s ana Tech s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es. The apex of th s nterd sc p nary exper ence was the Apr 14 open ng of an art exh b t at the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center to showcase creat ve works of the 14 students tak ng part n the co aborat on through Assoc ate Art Professor N ck Bustamante s ART 320 D g ta Pa nt ng c ass. The open ng of the exh b t was fo owed by an act on of the top studentcreated works that w he p to support next year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es and the cont nuat on of th s un que opportun ty for students. The f na pro ect for the students n Bustamante s course was to des gn the cover of next year s ecture ser es promot ona mater a s.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech h story students honored for research “The d g ta pa nt ng and ustrat on pro ect resu ted from the nterd sc p nary co aborat on of facu ty from three d fferent co eges,” sa d Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. “Th s co aborat on gave students a un que opportun ty that goes we beyond the typ ca c assroom. I found t h gh y reward ng to hear the students descr be the r work and to see the r faces as the top four pro ects were auct oned off, averag ng more than $1,000 each. The exh b t on showcases the efforts of both the students and the facu ty.” Throughout the course, Bustamante worked w th Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and an ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng, to he p students create or g na cover art and magery to be used n program advert s ng and g ft presentat ons to the guest speakers. Newman and Ca dorera-Moore are the co-organ zers of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es that has grown nto one of Lou s ana Tech s prem er nterd sc p nary programs. The art exh b t at the Enterpr se Center featured not ust the f na p eces, but a so showcased the earn ng process as many students n the c ass had never used some of the d g ta des gn programs needed to create the art, pr or to the course. In ust a few weeks and n work ng w th Bustamante, the students became prof c ent and mastered many of the d g ta des gn techn ques. In the ast ha f of the quarter, Newman and Ca dorera-Moore worked w th the students to ustrate four b omed ca concepts: ant body-ant gen nteract on, ce s gna ng, c rcu at on, and nanopart c e-based drug de very. Each of the students ustrated one of these concepts and the f na p eces were udged by a mu t d sc p nary pane from around Lou s ana Tech. The top four mages were auct oned to ra se money to cont nue th s program and a d students n the purchase of equ pment that w he p them pursue the r career goa s n d g ta pa nt ng and sc ent f c ustrat on. As a resu t of the c ass exper ence, A m ra Bradford, who was the w nner of the compet t on, p ans to pursue a career where d g ta pa nt ng s her ma n med um. The auct on ra sed over $5,000 wh ch w he p ma nta n and grow the co aborat on between the arts and sc ences at Lou s ana Tech.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech hosts naugura Maker Month to ce ebrate makers, creat v ty “The d g ta des gn c ass was an exce ent opportun ty for the students and facu ty from three d st nct co eges to work co aborat ve y together,” sa d Dr. Don Kaczv nsky, dean of the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech. “Our art students ga ned a greater apprec at on of the sc ence that went nto the r pa nt ngs and the new poss b t es for art n the d g ta age. “The students a so earned to work w th c ents, meet dead nes and work across d sc p nes n a team effort. I be eve the c ass exemp f es the qua ty and nterd sc p nary nature of the educat ona exper ence at the un vers ty. I rea y en oyed the exh b t on and I ook forward to deve op ng s m ar c asses n the future.” The New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es s a year- ong sem nar ser es that br ngs nternat ona y recogn zed b omed ca researchers to Lou s ana Tech to nteract w th students, facu ty and adm n strators. These nteract ons w th wor d-c ass sc ent sts have ed to adm ss on of Lou s ana Tech students nto compet t ve summer programs and graduate programs, created new co aborat ons for facu ty, generated an expand ng network of contacts for a of those who part c pate, and ntroduced Lou s ana Tech to a number of research facu ty across the country. 13 2016-04-26 Ruston

WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN TOP DAWG COMPETITION The w nner of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s TOP DAWG New Venture Champ onsh p and $4,000 fund ng was EZ Read Mon tor ng. EZ Read Mon tors are easy-to-use dev ces that can w re ess y transm t water eve data to customers. The EZ Read Mon tor ng team nc udes Tech students Ryan Fr ck, Rhodes Moran, Fran Ew ng and V ncent Moore. Moran sa d the dea came from the work of a four team members. “We were so re eved to w n,” he sa d. “We worked ong n ghts to get th s dea go ng.” Fr ck sa d the EZ Read Mon tors work through sonar. 13 2016-04-25 Monroe

LA Tech Celebrates 400 Years of Shakespearean Comedy W th Spr ng n the a r, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty br ng to fe "Love s Labours Lost." The age ess com c ta e penned by Shakespeare over 400 years ago has de ghted aud ences for centur es. In the p ay, the K ng of Navarre and the men of h s court swear off a women for three years n an effort to ded cated themse ves to study ng. A goes we unt the Pr ncess of France arr ves w th a of her ad es- n-wa t ng. H ar ous h nks ensue as the men are forced to rearrange the r pr or t es. Th s performance w not be your typ ca Shakespeare p ay, as LA Tech has chosen to portray a "steampunk" nterpretat on. Even n th s modern zed vers on, the actors had to take the preparat on ser ous y. "Shakespeare s ust a who e d fferent monster n tse f. It s a about research. If the actor understands what they are say ng, then the aud ence w understand as we ," says actress Ash ey Dav s. A though Shakespeare can have a reputat on for be ng hard to understand, cast members have worked hard to capture the essence of the nes. "I th nk t wou d be a e to say you don t strugg e a tt e at f rst-- ust because the anguage s so r ch. So, as an actor, you have to rea y d g n, and have a fu understand ng of what you re say ng," exp a ns cast member Courtney VanEaton Theodos The p ay runs from Tuesday Apr 26 to Apr 30 w th perfor.mances at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday May 1 at 2 p.m. For more nformat on or t ckets, v s t Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Theatre. 13 2016-04-25 Shreveport

Dr. B: He’s just what the patient ordered If you re a fr end of Dr. B y Bundr ck s, you a ways fee better after see ng h m than before see ng h m. But that s got noth ng to do w th whether or not you need an orthoped c surgeon, a though the man everybody ca s “Dr. B” has been one of the best of those for near y a ha f century. Dr. B was honored recent y by h s a ma mater, Lou s ana Tech, w th a “Dr. W am S. Bundr ck Day,” organ zed by one of h s b ggest fans, NBA Ha of Famer Kar Ma one. Ma one rem nded the packed house at Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex on that Apr Saturday that t s been 46 years s nce former Tech footba ass stant coach (and ke Ma one, a Lou s ana Sports Ha of Famer) Pat Co ns asked Bundr ck to f n when the prev ous team doctor cou d no onger serve. “L ke he wou d do tens of thousands of t me n h s fe, Dr. B sa d “Yes, I w , ” Ma one sa d. Let s see f we can st tch the decades together here n ust a coup e of m nutes, and at east attempt to sew up some of the forever reasons why Dr. B means so much to the heart not on y of Lou s ana Tech — not to ment on her knees, wr sts, ank es, shou ders, backs, co arbones, gaments and tendons — but a so of a north Lou s ana ath et cs. Much of h s best work has been done beh nd a mask, e ther a footba he met facemask or a surgeon s mask. St , he gets not ced. Bundr ck was a two-sport a -state ath ete at C.E. Byrd H gh Schoo ; he s n the schoo s Ha of Fame. He was capta n of the 1959 Bu dog footba team that went 9-1. He s rece ved — he s earned — every honor the Un vers ty can g ve h m; he s been the speaker at graduat on, a um of the year, a Tech Sports Ha of Famer. Profess ona y, he s rece ved — and earned — the h ghest honor poss b e from the Amer can Orthoped c Soc ety for Sports Med c ne. He s a Founders Award rec p ent, g ven by the North Lou s ana Fe owsh p of Chr st an Ath etes. Aga n, an organ zat on s h ghest honor goes to Dr. B. He wasn t 35 yet when he began qu et y push ng h s v s on of what orthoped c med c ne shou d be, and there s no way to measure the s ze of pos t ve effect that s had on the sports we ve so en oyed watch ng and p ay ng n north Lou s ana these past four-p us decades. Every ath ete of every age has heard of — and thousands have been he ped by — The Bone and Jo nt C n c, now w th W s-Kn ght Hea th System. Those who know h m we agree that there s no way to measure how much money he s eft on the tab e, how far beyond the ca of duty he s gone, ust for Tech ath etes a one. There s no te ng how many t mes, n the two ath et c tra n ng rooms named for h m at Tech — tra n ng rooms he for the most part equ pped — somebody has sa d, “We re gonna need to get h m to Dr. B,” or “Let s see what Dr. B says,” or “Wh ch one of you can dr ve her over to Dr. B s?” He went through a he copter phase back n the day. For those of us who were around then and were ucky enough to work w th h m, ust to see what ooked ke a g ant grasshopper and ng on the pract ce f e d to de ver Dr B. each week was noth ng short of oy. From a the thousands who ve been seen and sewn by th s compass onate man, we rea y need to say thank you, Dr. B, for your examp e of a ways show ng up, of be ng qu et y eff c ent, of see ng th ngs through to the end. Thank you for the st tches and the shots, but a so for the encouragement, for the fee ng you rad ated that Everyth ng Wou d Be A R ght. F tt ng that he s a ways been Dr B, wh ch cou d stand for Best or for Bu dog. We ve a ways fe t better after see ng you than before, and that s whether we had an appo ntment or were a mended up. Just to see you Dr. B, ust to know you are our fr end, and to know that what an app e a day cou dn t prevent, you cou d f x. Thank you for a ways do ng your best to g ve us the chance to do our best. Contact teddy at [email protected] atech.edu 13 2016-04-22 Monroe

ouisiana Tech to support enrollment growth, student life with new Greek organizations RUSTON, La (Lou s ana Tech) - As a resu t of the s gn f cant enro ment growth at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, four new Greek organ zat ons have been approved to create chapters on the schoo s campus. The four new organ zat ons that were nv ted are De ta De ta De ta soror ty, Kappa Kappa Gamma soror ty, Zeta Ph Beta soror ty and Ph Beta S gma fratern ty. The Nat ona Panhe en c Conference, wh ch oversees 26 nat ona groups, nv ted De ta De ta De ta to create a chapter th s fa and for Kappa Kappa Gamma to do so no ear er than 2019 and no ater than 2020. Jason Gomez, pub c re at ons manager for Tr De ta, sa d the organ zat on s honored to be nv ted to o n Lou s ana Tech s campus. “We tru y see th s as a partnersh p between our organ zat on and the un vers ty,” Gomez sa d. “It s an opportun ty for Tr De ta to engage w th the amaz ng students at Tech and prov de another strong soror ty exper ence w th n the thr v ng fratern ty and soror ty commun ty. W th the support of our staff and ded cated area a umnae, we are eager for Tr De ta to be a contr butor to Tech and a ow a new chapter of Tr De tas ve, earn and ead w th purpose.” Ash ey A en, Panhe en c adv ser for Lou s ana Tech, sa d she fe t th s fa s co on zat on of Tr De ta wou d be benef c a for students and for the commun ty. “We are conf dent that the r strong nat ona brand, the r eager oca a umnae and exper enced nat ona eadersh p w a ow for a strong co on zat on th s fa ,” A en sa d. “We be eve that they w br ng strength to our a ready grow ng commun ty and each of our current groups s thr ed to we come them to the Lou s ana Tech Greek fe fam y.” Zeta Ph Beta and Ph Beta S gma are part of the “D v ne N ne” groups; the Nat ona Pan-He en c Counc oversees the r organ zat ons. Sam Speed, ass stant dean of student fe, sa d the benef ts of hav ng these two groups on campus wou d be a cont nuat on of the r r ch h story. “Be ng an a umnus of Lou s ana Tech and an adm n strator for the past 25 years w th fr ends, assoc ates and former students who were members of these organ zat ons, I was rem nded at the reun on they he d a few weeks back of how mpactfu these nd v dua s have been to the Lou s ana Tech campus commun ty,” Speed sa d. “As t re ates to the Afr canAmer can student popu at on, these are groups that can prov de greater support for the overa m ss on of the nst tut on. After ta k ng w th the r a umn , I be eve they are on board to ass st us n enhanc ng the d vers ty on Lou s ana Tech s campus, wh ch s a goa of (Tech Pres dent) Dr. Gu ce.” 13 2016-04-21 Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s department of music honors students, alumnus RUSTON, La (Lou s ana Tech) - Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty sDepartment of Mus c has announced the se ect on of ts A umnus of the Year and honor rec ta so o sts. For the A umnus of the Year, the department has chosen Sean Carr er, who earned a bache or of mus c educat on degree n 1994 and comp eted h s master s n educat ona eadersh p at Hard ng Un vers ty. A nat ve of Cabot, Arkansas, Carr er now ves n Fort Sm th, Arkansas, and s n h s 14th year as the band d rector at Souths de H gh Schoo . For the 2014-2015 academ c year, the Souths de band was honored as the Nat ona Band Assoc at on Nat ona B ue R bbon Band of the Year. Carr er was a so recent y se ected as a Laureate n the John Ph p Sousa Foundat on Leg on of Honor and was appo nted to the M dwest C n c Board of Adv sers. The department w honor Carr er at ts annua Honors and AwardsRec ta at 7:30 p.m. May 6 n Howard Aud tor um. The Honors and Awards Rec ta w a so h gh ght the 2015-2016 honor rec ta so o sts. The Honors Rec ta features se ect students who have exce ed n the area of performance throughout the r t me at Tech. Th s year s so o sts are Br an Sm th, saxophone; Em y Lancon, soprano; Mary Rudd, p ano; and Cody Ford, euphon um. The Honors and Awards Rec ta s free and open to the pub c and w a so recogn ze assoc ate professor of mus c Lawrence G bbs, who s ret r ng. A recept on w fo ow the event. 13 2016-04-21 Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s department of music honors students, alumnus RUSTON, La (Lou s ana Tech) - Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty sDepartment of Mus c has announced the se ect on of ts A umnus of the Year and honor rec ta so o sts. For the A umnus of the Year, the department has chosen Sean Carr er, who earned a bache or of mus c educat on degree n 1994 and comp eted h s master s n educat ona eadersh p at Hard ng Un vers ty. A nat ve of Cabot, Arkansas, Carr er now ves n Fort Sm th, Arkansas, and s n h s 14th year as the band d rector at Souths de H gh Schoo . For the 2014-2015 academ c year, the Souths de band was honored as the Nat ona Band Assoc at on Nat ona B ue R bbon Band of the Year. Carr er was a so recent y se ected as a Laureate n the John Ph p Sousa Foundat on Leg on of Honor and was appo nted to the M dwest C n c Board of Adv sers. The department w honor Carr er at ts annua Honors and AwardsRec ta at 7:30 p.m. May 6 n Howard Aud tor um. The Honors and Awards Rec ta w a so h gh ght the 2015-2016 honor rec ta so o sts. The Honors Rec ta features se ect students who have exce ed n the area of performance throughout the r t me at Tech. Th s year s so o sts are Br an Sm th, saxophone; Em y Lancon, soprano; Mary Rudd, p ano; and Cody Ford, euphon um. The Honors and Awards Rec ta s free and open to the pub c and w a so recogn ze assoc ate professor of mus c Lawrence G bbs, who s ret r ng. A recept on w fo ow the event. 13 2016-04-20 Monroe

Journalist, PolitiFact editor to speak at La. Tech RUSTON – “Fact-check ng the 2016 Pres dent a E ect on” w be the top c when ourna st Ang e Drobn c Ho an addresses Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty students, facu ty, staff and members of the genera pub c at 10 a.m. Apr 26 n Wy y Tower Aud tor um. The event s free and open to the pub c. A wr ter for the Tampa Bay T mes, Ho an s a so ed tor of “Po t Fact,” a web s te devoted to eva uat ng the accuracy of po t ca statements. She was a member of the “Po t Fact” team that won the Pu tzer Pr ze for ts coverage of the 2008 pres dent a e ect on. Pr or to o n ng the T mes, Ho an was emp oyed at newspapers n A abama, F or da, Lou s ana and New Mex co. Accord ng to Ho an, n 2016 fact check ng “has become a ma or part of how the med a cover the pres dent a race, nc ud ng the cand dac es of Dona d Trump, H ary C nton, Ted Cruz, and Bern e Sanders.” In her presentat on, she p ans to d scuss fact check ng the pres dent a contest, nc ud ng how fact checkers do the r obs and the react on of voters to the r f nd ngs. A nat ve of Patterson, Lou s ana, Ho an graduated from the Lou s ana Schoo for Math, Sc ence and the Arts n Natch toches. She rece ved her bache or s degree from the Un vers ty of Texas at Aust n and ho ds master s degrees n ourna sm from Co umb a Un vers ty and brary sc ence from the Un vers ty of South F or da. “Fact-check ng the 2016 Pres dent a E ect on” s sponsored by the Lou s ana Tech departments of h story and commun cat on and med a stud es, the Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy, and the Lou s ana Tech chapters of the Amer can Assoc at on of Un vers ty Women and Ph A pha Theta H story Honor Soc ety. 13 2016-04-19 Baton Rouge

Summit seeks to improve economic development ties in Louisiana Wh e Lou s ana faces cha enges w th state budget shortfa s and ow o pr ces, the bas c strengths of the economy rema n constant, the head of Lou s ana s econom c deve opment department sa d Monday. The state st has an abundance of natura resources, access to the M ss ss pp R ver and a network of ports and ra nes, sa d Don P erson, LED secretary. “These are cha eng ng t mes n Lou s ana,” P erson sa d at the Statew de Econom c Deve opment Summ t he d at L Auberge Cas no Hote . “You fee th s n reg ons across the state, and you fee t n the Leg s ature, but what we do s we face those cha enges together.” Harken ng back to h s days as a U.S. Army paratrooper commander, P erson sa d the key to success s work ng as a team. “You don t w n when you cross the f n sh ne, you w n when the team crosses the f n sh ne together,” he sa d. The summ t brought together about 400 peop e from across Lou s ana, represent ng the state s e ght econom c deve opment partners, e ected oca off c a s, representat ves from co eges and un vers t es and pr vate bus ness eaders. Adam Knapp, pres dent and ch ef execut ve off cer of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, sa d s m ar meet ngs were he d about 10 years ago. Reg ona econom c deve opment eaders dec ded they aga n needed to get together to ta k about cha enges, opportun t es and how to make Lou s ana a better p ace to work and ve. “It s t me for us to be stronger n our partnersh ps,” P erson sa d. LED s goa s to have more Lou s ana c t zens than ever work ng — earn ng wages that are h gher and match ng sk sets that are h gher than ever before to good obs. “The workp ace of tomorrow w be dom nated by ta ented, educated, we -tra ned peop e,” P erson sa d. “We want to attract sk ed peop e to we -pay ng obs.” To that end, oca econom c deve opment eaders need to work w th un vers t es, co eges, commun ty co eges and techn ca schoo s n the r area. Those assets are a cr t ca part of how c t es ure econom c deve opment pro ects today. Ruston Mayor Ronny Wa ker sa d Lou s ana Tech he ped attract Monster Moto, a manufacturer of m n b kes and go-carts. Monster Moto announced a year ago t w move ts headquarters and manufactur ng fac ty from the Da as area to Ruston, a trans t on that w create 287 obs over the next decade, w th an average annua sa ary of $46,800, p us benef ts. Wa ker sa d Monster Moto off c a s met w th Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce and spent three hours ta k ng to eng neer ng students before mak ng the r dec s on to move the r headquarters. Chr s Mas ng , cha rman of the De ta Reg ona Author ty, a federa -state partnersh p that prov des opportun t es across the M ss ss pp R ver De ta, sa d there needs to be greater co aborat on between educat ona nst tut ons and econom c deve opers to make sure there s a p pe ne of sk ed workers. “It s about K through J, k ndergarten through obs,” he sa d. “Not K through 12 or K through 14 or 16.” Fo ow T mothy Boone on Tw tter, @TCB_TheAdvocate 13 2016-04-18 Ruston

› home › TECH HISTORY DEPARTMENT TO HOST LECTURE BY NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR At 6 p.m. th s even ng, Bruce Baker, a ecturer n Amer can H story at Newcast e Un vers ty n the Un ted K ngdom, w g ve a ecture, “How To Own A the Cotton In the Wor d: W am P. Brown and Cotton Futures Trad ng n New Or eans at the Turn of the Century” at the L nco n Par sh L brary Events Center. “Bruce Baker as he exp a ns how brokers n New Or eans managed to buy a the cotton n the wor d and set ts pr ce far beyond what t had been,” accord ng to an art c e n the “Between the L nes,” a news etter created by the LPL staff. “In the 1890s, the pr ce that farmers earned for the r cotton was determ ned by the cotton futures contracts traded on the New Or eans Cotton Exchange and the New York Cotton Exchange.” The market d dn t work we because of bad nformat on and de berate man pu at on, keep ng pr ces art f c a y ow, the art c e read. “A group of cotton brokers n New Or eans ed by W am P. Brown — once a res dent of Ruston — managed to corner the wor d supp y of cotton n 1903, earn ng m ons of do ars and doub ng the pr ce of cotton.” Th s ta k, s drawn from Baker and Barbara Hahn s new book “The Cotton K ngs: Cap ta sm and Corrupt on n Turn-of-theCentury New York and New Or eans,” sa d Dav d Anderson, an assoc ate professor n the Department of H story at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. “He partnered w th Barbara Hahn to wr te th s book on a part cu ar segment of the cotton ndustry at the turn of the century,” he sa d. “It s about commod ty trad ng, and t s s m ar to what happened n 2008 w th the Great Recess on. In 1903, W am Brown tr ed to corner the market on cotton, Anderson sa d, caus ng the pr ce of cotton to soar, wh ch resu ted n Brown mak ng m ons of do ars. Brown was once a res dent of Ruston, he sa d. “Th s character ved n Ruston for a t me, so he s a oca n a sense, who affected wor d commod ty markets,” he sa d. Baker s on a tour for th s book, and after h s ecture th s even ng, he w make h s way to Da as to g ve other ectures on h s work. In the ntroduct on of h s book, Baker wrote that h s work wou d feature “dramat c commerc a confrontat ons where m ons of do ars are made and ost n a day. “It conta ns corrupt on ntr gue and abuse of power at the h ghest eve s of government. It s a story of men and the r w ves, of the soc a t es that nk peop e together and the networks they create. It s a so a story of conf ct … It s an econom c drama enacted on stages from cotton f e ds and country stores to the cotton exchanges of New Or eans, New York and L verpoo and the boardrooms of banks.” For those w sh ng to purchase h s book, t s ava ab e for purchase on ne. The event s free and open to the pub c. For more nformat on about the event, or future events contact Sarah Creekmore, adm n strat ve ass stant at 251-5030 or ema her at [email protected] p .org. 13 2016-04-15 Monroe

La. Tech, MedCamps break ground for ‘Hero’s Launch’ RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Schoo of Des gn, together w th MedCamps of Lou s ana, has partnered together to break ground on the “Hero s Launch” – a fu y-access b e canoe aunch as an exc t ng act v ty for the campers that w dramat ca y mprove canoe ng and padd e boat ng at MedCamps. For severa years, students n Lou s ana Tech s Arch tecture 335 c ass have partnered w th var ous organ zat ons n L nco n Par sh to des gn and bu d structures rang ng from homes for Hab tat for Human ty to park pav ons around Ruston. The des gn bu d program, now n ts th rd year of partnersh p w th MedCamps, w des gn and construct the new amen ty. Accord ng to the des gn team s Facebook s te, the “Hero s Launch” des gn s “based on the not on of the hero s ourney. The camper s ourney beg ns on the known s de of the camp that they are the most fam ar w th and takes them to the unknown s de, where they can exp ore the unfam ar nature of be ng on the water. After the r adventure, they return to the known s de hav ng ga ned new know edge and conf dence. The canoe aunch s the beacon that ca s the campers to beg n the r adventure, and where they return as fear ess heroes.” Th s year s Student Des gn and Construct on Team nc udes the fo ow ng students, sted by the r hometowns: A exandr a: T mothy Mathews Boss er C ty: Dan e Dumas Boothv e: K er yn Sm th Ruston: M chae Dav s, Jed Wa po e Shreveport: Chase Johnson Spr ngf e d: Dav d Hoover St. Franc sv e: Rosa Sche nger Weston: Ethan Rob son West Monroe: Em y Greene, Ashton Russe Zachary: De aney Baker Co umbus, Georg a: Hunter Bradshaw Detro t, M ch gan: Dan e Campbe L nda e, Texas: Lane Wa ters Wh te Oak, Texas: Sam Cross and Sanaa, Yemen: Su a man Yousef Chengdu, Ch na: Mo ang Chang MedCamps of Lou s ana s a non-prof t organ zat on that prov des a ser es of one week, fun f ed camps each summer for ch dren n Lou s ana fac ng the cha enges of a var ety of phys ca and menta d sab t es. These camps are offered comp ete y free of charge and prov de campers w th an opportun ty to part c pate n trad t ona camp ng act v t es such as canoe ng, f sh ng, sw mm ng, horseback r d ng, and much more n a mod f ed sett ng to meet the needs of every camper. Each camp ng sess on s he d at Camp A abama n S b ey, wh ch s a property of the Presbytery of the P nes. The canoe aunch w accommodate a boat ng act v t es for the campers who attend MedCamps of Lou s ana and guests of the Presbytery of the P nes. 13 2016-04-14 Monroe

La. Tech English instructor publishes first book of poetry RUSTON, La. (News Re ease- La. Tech) - Dr. Ph p Estes, an nstructor of Eng sh n the Schoo of Language and L terature at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has ust had h s f rst fu - ength book of poems, “H gh L fe,“ pub shed by Horse Less Press. Poet and trans ator Johannes Goransson, an ass stant professor of Eng sh at Notre Dame, sa d, “ I am on dead songb rd patro … Ph Estes s poems start out as s acker okes but then they go wrong. Somet mes they go so wrong that they become fr ghten ng and po t ca y charged or become beaut fu med tat ons on art. Or do both at the same t me. Mmmhmm has never sounded as prophet c and poet c as n these sn ppets from a scary-funny m dd e Amer ca. Let s ca h m the Ma arme of the Str p Ma .” Estes, an Oh o nat ve, who rece ved h s Ph. D. n poetry from Ok ahoma State Un vers ty, has a so been nv ted to read from h s new work by L v ng Arts, a commun ty arts center n Tu sa, and by Kansas C ty Art Inst tute n Kansas C ty, M ssour . A oca read ng s be ng p anned for Ruston n Apr . Estes poems have appeared n three chapbooks and n poetry ourna s nc ud ng “Act on Yes,” “Hayden s Ferry Rev ew” and “W ow Spr ngs.” 13 2016-04-13 Monroe

La. Tech hosts inaugural ‘Maker Month’ to celebrate makers, creativity RUSTON – The Innovat on Enterpr se at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s proud to announce ts naugura “Maker Month” – a ce ebrat on of a th ngs made and to showcase through exh b t ons, compet t ons and ga er es what students, facu ty and reg ona entrepreneurs have created. V s tors to Maker Month events, wh ch take p ace Apr 14 through May 18, w en oy nteract ng w th the nnovators and earn ng how they create as much as see ng the resu ts of the r creat ons. Th s packed ca endar of events features work from a number of d verse f e ds nc ud ng arts, sc ences, arch tecture, eng neer ng and bus ness. Most nnovat ons are nterd sc p nary n nature and range from eng neered products to bus ness p tches, software and showcases of des gn and aesthet c sens b ty. “Some of these products w no doubt soon become part of thr v ng bus ness enterpr ses n our reg on”, sa d Dr. Dave Norr s, ch ef nnovat on off cer at Lou s ana Tech. “V s tors w be nsp red be the work of peop e actua y mak ng rea tang b e products for art st c or commerc a purposes or even ust to show that they can do t.” Lou s ana Tech and ts reg ona partners are act ve y engaged n creat ng un que products and nnovat ons w th art st c mer t, techn ca and sc ent f c soph st cat on, and potent a commerc a va ue. “Maker Month recogn zes the shared cu ture of creat v ty and mak ng th ngs across our campus and our reg on”, sa d Ky e Prather, d rector of The Th ngery, Lou s ana Tech s maker space. “Th s type of cross-d sc p nary cu ture he ps to support a thr v ng nnovat ve and creat ve cu ture on campus and throughout our reg on.” The ca endar of events w k ck-off w th the New Front ers D g ta Pa nt ng ga ery open ng on Apr 14 – a prem er exh b t on event n north Lou s ana featur ng ead ng-edge d g ta pa nt ng techno ogy for med ca ustrat ons. Other Maker Month events nc ude two Eng neer ng Des gn Expos w th over 100 ndustry sponsors, the Game App Launch and the f rst-ever Th ngery One Day Bu d. Maker Month s a product of Lou s ana Tech s Innovat on Enterpr se – a hotbed of deas, entrepreneursh p, creat v ty and new bus ness opportun t es created through co aborat ons nvo v ng students, facu ty, and our bus ness partners w th un m ted market app cat ons from b omed ca to a ternat ve energy, consumer products, and beyond. A v brant cu ture of entrepreneursh p and nnovat on at Lou s ana Tech and n the surround ng reg on, the Innovat on Enterpr se has resu ted n a burst of new nvent ons, startup compan es, and bus ness partnersh ps. A comp ete ca endar of events for Maker Month s ava ab e at www. atech nnovat on.org/makermonth. A members of the campus and oca commun ty are we come and encouraged to attend month- ong ce ebrat on. For more nformat on, p ease contact Ky e Prather at [email protected] atech.edu. 13 2016-04-13 Ruston

› home › PEACH FEST UNVEILS 2016 DESIGNS Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty graph c des gn ma or Patr ck Ferre s the w nner of the 2016 Lou s ana Peach Fest va poster and t-sh rt des gn contest. Twenty-three poster des gns and 17 T-sh rt des gns were subm tted. Th s year s t-sh rt des gn w a so serve as the 2016 ogo. Ferre w be presented two $500 pr zes from the Lou s ana Peach Fest va . Posters and t-sh rts w be ava ab e for purchase soon at the Chamber off ce, on ne at www. ou s anapeachfest va .org and var ous ocat ons throughout Ruston. The f rst pr nt, autographed poster w be so d to the h ghest b dder at an event n ear y June. The 66th Annua Lou s ana Peach Fest va w be he d June 24-25 and s produced by the Ruston L nco n Chamber of Commerce. 13 2016-04-13 Ruston

LOCAL STUDENT WINS AWARD When Caro ne Hyme , a graduate student n h story at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, began her ourney n Ruston, she never thought she wou d be wa k ng away w th the coveted Lou s ana H stor ca Assoc at on s Rank n Pr ze. Comp et ng her undergraduate work n ust two years, w th a bache or s degree n h story w th a m nor n Eng sh, she dec ded to extend her t me at Tech and comp ete the master s program n h story. “I am from New Or eans, and th s s my fourth year at Tech,” she sa d. “I m a graduate student work ng on my thes s.” 13 2016-04-12 Alexandria

Louisiana Tech's urban concept cars take to Detroit streets in fuel-efficiency test More than a dozen eng neer ng students from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty n Ruston have bu t two veh c es to compete n th s year s She Eco-marathon Amer cas compet t on n Detro t next week. One veh c e s a d ese . The other runs on compressed natura gas.

Lou s ana Tech mechan ca eng neer ng un or T mothy Parker of Mandev e, La., he ps to put the f n sh ng touches on a compressed natura gas veh c e that w compete n the urban concept category. CREDIT MICHAEL SWANBOM M chae Swanbom, a sen or ecturer of mechan ca eng neer ng, s adv s ng the students n the e ghth year Lou s ana Tech has entered th s g oba compet t on for u tra-h gh energy veh c es. Swanbom says Tech s entr es are gett ng the r bodywork done now. “We ca t the character bu d ng phase at the po nt when a ot of the body work s be ng done on these veh c es. Our team wants to make rea y good ook ng veh c es. That takes a ot of e bow grease to make them ook that way,” Swanbom sa d. Swanbom pred cts the d ese veh c e cou d break a Lou s ana Tech record and exceed 500 m es per ga on. T mothy Parker, a un or mechan ca eng neer ng ma or and a team ead, says he vo unteers more than 40 hours a week on th s pro ect. “It s a ot of fun and I ke gett ng my hands on th ngs and rea y gett ng to work w th the concepts I earn n c ass, and app y them n a way that I can actua y see the fru ts of my abor, so to speak,” Parker sa d, who started work ng on Tech s entr es h s freshman year and hopes to one day be an eng ne researcher for an automob e maker. More than 1,200 h gh schoo and un vers ty students from across the Amer cas w compete n Detro t. Swanbom says th s s a one-of-a-k nd earn ng exper ence and t s become a centerp ece of Lou s ana Tech s eng neer ng program.

Lou s ana Tech s urban concept veh c es top out at 300 pounds. Mechan ca eng neer ng student T mothy Parker works ns de Lou s ana Tech s compressed natura veh c e entry. CREDIT MICHAEL SWANBOM “We re try ng to get students to rea y have a fee for what t means to save energy w th respect to transportat on. That s an exper ence that wou d be rea y hard or mposs b e to get any other way n an educat ona sett ng,” Swanbom sa d. Last year, Tech s team rece ved the fue -eff c ency award for a d ese . Ruston H gh Schoo s enter ng ts fourth year of compet t on and the two teams w caravan to Detro t w th the r veh c es on Tuesday, Apr 19. The She Eco-marathon Amer cas s set for Apr 22 – 24 n downtown Detro t n the 10th year of compet t on. 13 2016-04-12 Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH PROGRAM NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED An ndependent co ege rev ew ourna ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s on ne masters n hea thcare nformat cs degree program No. 20 n the top programs n the nat on. Best Co ege Rev ew based the r se ect ons on factors nc ud ng schedu ng, f ex b ty, affordab ty and academ c reputat on. Ange a Kennedy, head of and professor n the department of hea th nformat cs and nformat on management, sa d the graduates and programs are successfu because facu ty and staff are comm tted to prov d ng exce ence n every educat on exper ence. 13 2016-04-11 Monroe

Louisiana Tech engineering students recognized with award for ‘green’ research RUSTON, La (Lou s ana Tech) - Renata M nu na and Abh shek Pancha , b omed ca eng neer ng graduate students from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and the Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng (IfM), have won the prest g ous Poster Presentat on Award at the Po ymer Mater a s Sc ence and Eng neer ng D v s on of the 251st Nat ona Amer can Chem ca Soc ety (ACS) Meet ng he d recent y n San D ego, Ca forn a. M nu na and Pancha s poster t t ed, “O sp remed at on through ha oys te P cker ng emu s f cat on w th enhanced bacter a decompos t on” was se ected from more than 230 presented posters at the po ymer c compos tes sect on of the meet ng. The poster won out over a genera f e d of compet t on w th teams represent ng nst tut ons from around the wor d nc ud ng Ch na, Japan, Germany, Un ted K ngdom and France. “To be recogn zed among hundreds of other posters at the nat ona meet ng s a b g dea for us,” sa d M nu na. “It nd cates that we work on the hot prob em wh ch requ res mmed ate so ut on.” Pancha adds, “The poster award means that our research s gett ng apprec ated on the nat ona eve and that the work we are do ng s needed by th s country. Th s mot vates us to work more ntens ve y on prov d ng an e egant and eff c entso ut on to the prob em of o sp remed at on.” M nu na and Pancha s award-w nn ng poster, wh ch was deve oped as part of a team ed by Dr. Yur Lvov, professor of chem stry and nanosystems eng neer ng n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence and Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng, s devoted to the group s research on the b o-decompos t on of sp o us ng nanoc ay emu s f ers rather than env ronmenta y harmfu detergents. “At Lou s ana Tech, we are deve op ng env ronmenta y fr end y a ternat ve methods of o emu s f cat on based on ha oys te c ay nanotubes, synerg st ca y comb n ng better emu s f cat on and enhanced b o-decompos t on based on oad ng these nanotubes w th taste enhancers for bacter a,” says Lvov. “As a resu t of our work, we recent y rece ved fund ng from the Gu f of Mex co Research Program (together w th Tu ane Un vers ty) based on our p oneer ng usage of the c ay nanotubes as t ny conta ners for oad ng and susta ned re ease of chem ca nh b tors, and b oact ve compounds nc ud ng prote ns, DNA and drugs.” The exp os on on the Deepwater Hor zon o we dr ng p atform n Apr 2010 resu ted n the argest mar ne o sp n Un ted States h story, re eas ng m ons of barre s of o nto the Gu f of Mex co. To prevent the spread ng of the o to coasta areas and to restr ct t underwater, a surfactant ca ed Corex t was app ed from a rp anes. Approx mate y 1.8 m on ga ons of th s surfactant was used, however, ts tox c effect on mar ne fe and o -degrad ng bacter a was ater d scovered. Lvov says that ha oys te was p oneered at Lou s ana Tech and, contrary to the more common carbon nanotubes, s b ocompat b e and ava ab e n mass quant t es. S nce the ntroduct on of ha oys te for compos te mater a s n 2002, Lvov s research group has pub shed 57 papers on the c ay nanotubes mak ng Lou s ana Tech the wor d eader n th s prom s ng “green” natura nanomater a . “In the future, I hope that our efforts w ead to the emp oyment of a un que mater a ke ha oys te c ay nanotubes n an eff c ent, econom ca and most mportant, eco-fr end y techno ogy to combat o sp s,” Pancha sa d. M nu na agrees and hopes one day the approach of us ng natura env ronmenta y-fr end y nanomater a s such as ha oys te nanotubes she and her co eagues are deve op ng at Lou s ana Tech w be w de y used n the f e d to f ght o sp s and he p m croorgan sms degrade o more eff c ent y. 13 2016-04-11 Regional/National

Steeling the Spotlight: Engineering students compete in steel, concrete design challenges Eng neer ng students from Texas and Mex co met Thursday through Saturday at the Texas-Mex co Reg ona Amer can Soc ety of C v Eng neers Student Sympos um and competed to see wh ch eng neer ng des gns wou d w thstand r gorous test ng and come out on top. Eva Schexn der, a sophomore c v eng neer ng ma or from Houston, sa d the Texas Tech ASCE chapter has been prepar ng to host the sympos um for a year and a ha f. “I have a huge comm ttee that he ps me do everyth ng, and t wou dn t be poss b e w thout them,” she sa d. Twenty un vers t es from Texas and Mex co attended the sympos um, Schexn der sa d, as we as Lou s ana Tech because ts compet t on was f ooded out. Students had the opportun ty to compete n f ve d fferent compet t ons, nc ud ng stee br dge, concrete canoe, concrete bow ng, concrete Fr sbee and a mystery des gn compet t on. “Th s s the f rst year we ve ever comb ned stee br dge and concrete canoe nto one compet t on and conference for network ng and promot ng profess ona sm,” she sa d. Profess ona s who are nf uent a n c v eng neer ng udged the compet t ons, Schexn der sa d, and the comm ttee tr ed to get a umn from a the compet ng un vers t es to make the udg ng fa r. In the mystery des gn compet t on, teams had to make a structure out of notecards, paperc ps and tape, she sa d, and t had to ho d an e ght-pound stee textbook. The stee br dge compet t on took p ace from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday n the Un ted Supermarkets Arena, and the compet ng teams had to bu d the r br dges n ess than 45 m nutes before t cou d be udged and tested. M chae N cho s, a un or c v eng neer ng ma or from E Paso and co-capta n of Tech s stee br dge team, sa d t took the team a month to des gn the br dge and f ve months to bu d t. “The br dges are udged over severa d fferent categor es, one be ng def ect on —how much we ght t can take and how much t moves — and the second be ng ghtness, how ght the br dge s,” he sa d. “Those two factor for structura eff c ency and econom c status — how much t wou d cost to bu d f you were actua y bu d ng t n rea fe.” The udges determ ned the br dge s def ect on by pu ng we ghts on one s de of the br dge as we as hav ng the team try to oad ts br dge w th 2,500 pounds on ts base. Many of the other schoo s br dges were s mp e n des gn, and N cho s sa d he was happy h s team was ab e to set one of the fastest bu d ng t mes wh e hav ng a more comp cated br dge. “Everyone comp mented us so much on how profess ona (the br dge) ooked,” he sa d. “That rea y says someth ng about Texas Tech s fabr cat on qua ty and ts standards.” The Tech team was ab e to oad the f rst 1,000 pounds onto the br dge w thout t def ect ng, N cho s sa d, but t started to ean to the r ght as the students cont nued to oad we ght on t and the upper arches eventua y bent. Many of the br dges n the compet t on fa ed under the we ght of the def ect on tests, and some teams d d not get to fu y test the r br dges because the structures fa ed before the f na def ect on test. Texas A&M p aced f rst n the stee br dge compet t on and Southern Method st Un vers ty took second. “Th s year was probab y the best representat on of Tech over the ast coup e of years,” he sa d. “We had a rea y strong team th s year, a rea y strong br dge and a good des gn.” The concrete bow ng compet t on took p ace from 1 to 5 p.m. Fr day outs de the USA, and the teams had to test the bow ng ba s they had des gned from concrete. The concrete Fr sbee compet t on took p ace from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Buffa o Spr ngs Lake wh e races for the concrete canoe compet t on were go ng on. E a ne Hung, an env ronmenta eng neer ng graduate student from Aust n and co-capta n of the Tech concrete canoe team, sa d the team started th nk ng of canoe des gns n September. “It s not that d ff cu t to bu d a canoe out of concrete,” she sa d. “I th nk t s the deta s that count. We a so wanted a canoe that s under 200 pounds, and our est mated we ght s 195 pounds, so our canoe s ghter than a the other canoes here. A these tt e spec f cat ons that we re mak ng does make bu d ng a concrete canoe re at ve y d ff cu t.” The canoe teams are udged on four d fferent categor es, nc ud ng a des gn paper, speech, product d sp ay and f ve races, Hung sa d, a of wh ch are we ghted equa y. The team had pract ced padd ng ts canoe before the compet t on, she sa d, and the students had to compete n a men s spr nt, women s spr nt, co-ed spr nt, men s endurance and women s endurance race. “Everyone seemed to rea y ove our canoe, even a the udges,” Hung sa d. “I fee ke there s a ways room for mprovement, there are a ways ways to be more nnovat ve. I th nk g ven the c rcumstances, we d d the best we cou d ve.” The canoe teams chose names for the r boats, and the Tech team s boat was named Jenny to go a ong w th a “Forrest Gump” theme. Tech p aced second n concrete canoe, tra ng the Un vers ty of Texas at Aust n that took the top spot. Many of the attendees en oyed the sympos um, Schexn der sa d, and Tech w be the standard for future compet t ons. “I ve gotten a ot of good feedback say ng how much fun t s,” she sa d. “We get to be the tra b azer for host ng th s compet t on.” The sympos um w be hosted at the Un vers ty of Texas E Paso next year and at Texas A&M the year after, she sa d, and Tech p ans to compete n both of those compet t ons. The ru es for the compet t ons change s ght y every year, Schexn der sa d, and students usua y start prepar ng for the compet t on as soon as the new ru es are re eased n the fa . Eng neer ng compet t ons benef t the students, she sa d, because they teach va uab e rea -wor d sk s. “It he ps them earn how to p an, t me manage, work together as a team to meet dead nes,” she sa d. “Just ke n the rea wor d, you have a team and f you don t a ways get a ong you have to earn how to work through that.” 13 2016-04-07 Monroe

Tech students present at national conference RUSTON – Two graduate students and four undergraduate Eng sh ma ors at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty represented the Tech Rho Gamma Chapter of S gma Tau De ta and presented the r scho arsh p for the S gma Tau De ta Internat ona Conference n M nneapo s, M nnesota. The r papers were se ected from many subm ss ons from chapters of the Eng sh honorary soc ety from across the country. Graduate students and the r presentat ons were A ana Crump, “Women Wr ters n A Room of One s Own” and Rache Burroughs, “Po nt of No Return.” Undergraduates present ng were Hannah G ssendanner, “Sexua Pervers on and the Home n McTeague;” Amber Jurgensen, “Nob ty and Ident ty n She Stoops to Conquer;” Dawson Shannon, “Court y Love and Marr age;” and Tay or Parker, “Do as Men Do: Women at Home n Shakespeare.” Parker s paper on Shakespeare won second p ace n "The Bard Award," an award category for Shakespeare papers created th s year to commemorate the 400th ann versary of Shakespeare s death. She w a so present her paper dur ng the 10th Annua Shakespeare Fest va hosted by the Rho Gamma Chapter of S gma Tau De ta on Wednesday, Apr 20 n the George T. Mad son Ha Shakespeare Garden n the courtyard. N co e DeFee and Scott Lev n serve as co-adv sers for the honor soc ety. "The s x students who presented at the conference th s year represent some of the best of what not on y our Eng sh department has to offer, but a so what Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty as a who e has to offer,” sa d DeFee, who accompan ed them to the conference. “These papers ustrate the hard work and ded cat on of these students. The r presentat ons were profess ona and the r work ustrates what s to come for the next generat on of scho arsh p. Wh e I know the students were proud and honored to be there, the honor was a so m ne to have been a part of th s conference w th them." Jurgensen, who had served as the Southern Reg on Student Representat ve for the nat ona fratern ty, ended her tenure n the pos t on. She a so rece ved an award for creat ng the Lou s ana Tech chapter s d sp ay board show ng chapter act v t es and pro ects. The board compet t on ra sed funds for a brary for the Ruth House, a she ter 13 2016-04-07 Ruston

Tech student enjoys Ruston, publishes books A Ca forn a nat ve attend ng Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty sa d he kes v ng n Ruston ust as much as he d d v ng n Ca forn a. Zeppy Cheng, a sophomore at Tech, came to Ruston spec f ca y to attend the un vers ty. “I was enamored w th the r eng neer ng program — unt I h t the road b ock of the sophomore tr o of C rcu ts, Stat cs and Thermodynam cs,” he sa d. “Those monster c asses gave me the heads-up that I was n the wrong f e d, and now I m work ng on a psycho ogy degree.” S nce chang ng ma ors, Cheng has rea zed another pass on of h s — wr t ng.

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2016-04-06 Monroe

La. Tech physics, computer science student earns coveted NASA fellowship RUSTON – Darr an M s, a freshman student n phys cs and computer sc ence at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has earned a prest g ous M nor ty Research Scho ars fe owsh p w th the Nat ona Aeronaut cs and Space Adm n strat on (NASA). M s, who s from Greenwood, Lou s ana, earned the fe owsh p through the Lou s ana Space Consort um for h s research w th Dr. Chester W son, assoc ate professor of e ectr ca eng neer ng and nanosystems eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech, and Dr. W am C ower, post doctora researcher at Lou s ana Tech. The NASA fe owsh p offers an opportun ty for M s to cont nue h s work w th W son and C ower to deve op an nexpens ve new nanostructured mater a that s made from carbon and meta and can be used for radar magery to mon tor spacesh ps. W son says M s s work ng to character ze graphene f akes made by a propr etary process deve oped at Lou s ana Tech. “Graphene s as conduct ve as copper, but s on y one f fth the we ght,” says W son. “Regu ar graphene s about $2,000 a gram, but ours can be made for hundreds of do ars a pound. We are deve op ng th s mater a that can be used as an add t ve n p ast cs to make t conduct ve. “NASA and the U.S. A r Force want compos te conduct ve p ast cs, for sma ghtwe ght spacecraft, to make commun cat on systems that surv ve n so ar f ares and e ectromagnet c pu ses made from space detonated nuc ear weapons.” M s cred ts the co aborat ve env ronment ava ab e to h m through W son s research group w th prov d ng h m w th the support and resources to perform top-notch research and the opportun ty to obta n the fe owsh p. “Dr. W son has been he pfu and support ve ever s nce I connected w th h s group,” M s sa d. “He presented me w th th s opportun ty, and I took t. H s exper ence and understand ng of these awards great y fac tated the process for me.” W son says that the co aborat ve env ronment at Lou s ana Tech he ps students earn such coveted awards. “Th s award s representat ve of what youth from north Lou s ana are ab e to ach eve w th a good educat on and mentor ng systems ke we have at Lou s ana Tech, wh ch prov des them opportun t es to better themse ves,” W son sa d. The NASA fe owsh p, wh ch began Apr 1 and asts for one year, s genera y awarded to sen ors. M s, however, was ab e to d st ngu sh h mse f as a freshman w th a 3.9 grade po nt average n the doub e ma or of phys cs and computer sc ence, and h s strong work eth c as we as h s research n deve op ng the new nanostructured mater a . 13 2016-04-05 Monroe

Louisiana Tech fine arts, biosciences faculty join forces to highlight student creativity Students n N ck Bustamante s ART 320 Pa nt ng c ass at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty are us ng the r art st c ta ents n d g ta des gn to promote b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng through Lou s ana Tech s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es. The nterd sc p nary co aborat on between facu ty from Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, and Co ege of L bera Arts s offer ng students rea wor d exper ence n work ng w th a c ent to des gn and ustrate brochure covers and note cards for the 2016-2017 ecture ser es. Th s un que earn ng exper ence for the students was made poss b e through the purchase of tab ets by a generous Lou s ana Tech a umnus and benefactor. “Through th s c ass, students are earn ng the va ue of d g ta art as a v sua means of commun cat on and ts ro e n sc ent f c research,” sa d Bustamante, who s an assoc ate professor of stud o art at Lou s ana Tech. “Students are a so deve op ng mportant sk sets that can be app ed to a var ety of profess ons and ga n the rea wor d exper ence of work ng w th a c ent.” Bustamante worked w th Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and an ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng, to he p students create or g na cover art and magery to be used n program advert s ng and g ft presentat ons to the guest speakers. Newman and Ca dorera-Moore are the co-organ zers of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es that has grown nto one of Lou s ana Tech s prem er nterd sc p nary programs. The co aborat on between the sc ences and arts began when Newman and Ca dorera-Moore were ook ng for an art st to create some v sua s for a book chapter. From there the co aborat on grew w th Bustamante des gn ng the 2015-2016 New Front ers ecture ser es. “From our n t a meet ngs on the ustrat ons for the book chapter, Jam e, N ck and I kept com ng back to the dea of hav ng a sc ent f c ustrat on c ass,” sa d Ca dorera-Moore. “It s exc t ng to see our v s on becom ng a rea ty and to see how much the students are en oy ng and benef t ng from the c ass.” “When we went to c ass the f rst day Dr. Ca dorera-Moore and I were as nervous f not more nervous than the students,” added Newman. “They cont nue to mpress us w th the r w ngness to take on and r se to th s new cha enge. We can t wa t to show off what Mr. Bustamante has taught them and what they have created for the brochure cover.” The work created by the students n the c ass w be d sp ayed n a pub c art exh b t on from 6-8 p.m. Apr 14 at the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center. The exh b t on s free to attend and open to the campus and oca commun t es. There w a so be an auct on of the top p eces w th proceeds go ng toward support ng the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es and cont nued nterd sc p nary co aborat ons at Lou s ana Tech. Fo ow ng the open ng n ght of the exh b t, f fth and s xth graders from se ect L nco n Par sh schoo s w a so v s t the exh b t on on Apr 18, as part of the ACDC Art Outreach Program. The students n th s program come to the Lou s ana Tech campus once a month throughout the academ c year to see the art exh b ts n the ga ery and create art pro ects des gned to comp ement the art work they are v ew ng as we as the r f ne art educat ons. “The sem nar ser es has grown to someth ng I cou d never have mag ned when I started t four years ago,” Newman sa d. “The nterd sc p nary nature of the speakers, the facu ty and students who part c pate and th s co aborat on w th the art department s what a un vers ty s a about. “Expos ng facu ty and students to new ways of th nk ng and commun cat ng s what we are a here to do and I cou d not be prouder to be a part of a of th s.” 13 2016-04-04 Ruston

Louisiana Tech Honors Longtime Team Physician and Notable Orthopedist Dr. Bundrick RUSTON, La. - There was a touchdown at Joe A et Stad um Saturday, fo owed by a ce ebrat on. But t d dn t nvo ve footba and was organ zed by NBA Ha of Fame member Kar Ma one. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty proc a med Saturday to be Dr. W am S. Bundr ck Day and honored the ong-t me LA Tech team phys c an w th a ce ebrat on n h s honor. The touchdown? Bundr ck trave ed to Ruston from h s hometown Shreveport by he copter courtesy Pafford A r One w th the he copter and ng n the C Lot around Joe A et Stad um. The C ub Leve of the Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex was packed w th what can on y be descr bed as a v ng h story of Lou s ana Tech Ath et cs as ust a sma fract on of the ves that Dr. Bundr ck has touched were on hand to honor a v ng egend. Ma one, the Master of Ceremon es and ma n organ zer for the event, sa d the event was years n the mak ng and vast y overdue. He had a bust made of Dr. Bundr ck that w be nsta ed outs de the Joe A et F e d House and Dr. W am Bundr ck Sports Med c ne Tra n ng Room. Dr. Bundr ck has been aff ated w th Lou s ana Tech Ath et cs as the team doctor for over 46 years. Former Lou s ana Tech head coach Pat Co ns asked h m to f n when the prev ous team doctor cou d no onger serve n that capac ty. “L ke he wou d do tens of thousands of t mes n h s fe, Dr. B sa d Yes I w , ” Ma one sa d. A Lou s ana Tech graduate, Bundr ck was or g na y recru ted by egendary footba coach Bear Bryant to Texas A&M and spent h s freshman year n Co ege Stat on. “The great state of Texas ca ed h m away but he qu ck y returned to the Prom se Land of Lou s ana,” sa d Dr. Edward “Edd e” Ang n, one of three ma n presenters at Saturday s ceremony.

Dr. Bundr ck went on to etter n footba the next three years at Lou s ana Tech, serv ng as team capta n and ead ng the Bu dogs to a 9-1 record n h s sen or year of 1959. He wou d eventua y work h s way through med ca schoo , set up h s pract ce n Shreveport, began serv ng as LA Tech s team doctor after Coach Pat Co ns p ea and the rest s h story. S nce then, he has had a pos t ve mpact on count ess student-ath etes, coaches, adm n strators and a umn of Lou s ana Tech. “Dr. B gave me the best adv ce I ever cou d have rece ved as a young man,” Lou s ana Tech ass stant ath et cs d rector for character educat on Ed Jackson reca ed. “He to d me, Remember th s – never et your present affect your future. That adv ce has stuck w th me to th s very day. Former Lou s ana Tech ath et cs d rector J m Oakes ca ed Dr. Bundr ck, “one of the most outstand ng mentors n my fe.” “H s oya ty to Lou s ana Tech has been unpara e ed. He tru y s one of Tech s greatest unsung heroes,” Oakes added. Ma one emphas zed the pos t ve nf uence that Dr. Bundr ck has had on h s fe and how much of a c ose fr end the orthoped st s. “Every year before the start of the [NBA] season, I wou d come home to v s t my mother,” Ma one sa d. “But t wasn t r ght un ess I f ew nto Shreveport and spent two n ghts at Dr. B s house.” LA Tech ath et cs d rector Tommy McC e and po nted out the numerous profess ona ath etes that Dr. Bundr ck had an mpact on such as former Bu dog greats Ma one, Pau M sap, T m Rattay, Terry Bradshaw, Fred Dean, W e Roaf and more. Dr. Les Gu ce, Pres dent of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, reca ed Dr. Bundr ck s work w th the ath et c teams when he was a student at Lou s ana Tech. Fo ow ng a stand ng ovat on after the unve ng of Dr. Bundr ck s bust, the ongt me team doctor was at a oss for words. “Now I know why I eft Texas A&M,” Dr. Bundr ck qu pped. He w beg n h s 47th year as the Bu dogs team phys c an when Lou s ana Tech opens the 2016 season at Arkansas on Sept. 3 n Fayettev e, Arkansas. For comp ete coverage of Bu dog Ath et cs, p ease fo ow Lou s ana Tech on soc a med a at @LATechSports (Tw tter), /LATechAth et cs (Facebook) and @LATechSports (Instagram) or v s t the off c a home of Lou s ana Tech Ath et cs at LATechSports.com. 13 2016-03-31 Monroe

Air Force Concert Band, Singing Sergeants April 10 Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts and The Ruston Da y Leader present the Un ted States A r Force Concert Band and S ng ng Sergeants n concert at 3 p.m. Apr 10 n Howard Aud tor um on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Howard Aud tor um s n the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts on the northwest corner of Dan Reneau Dr ve and Ar zona Bou evard n Ruston. Th s s a genera adm ss on event w th no reserved seat ng and no reserved t ckets. T cket ho ders w be seated on a f rstcome, f rst-served bas s 30 m nutes pr or to performance. Non-t cket ho ders w be seated 15 m nutes pr or to performance. T ckets are free and ava ab e at the Tech Box Off ce at the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts, 1:30-4:45 p.m., Monday-Fr day or The Ruston Da y Leader, 212 West Park Ave., 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Fr day. P ease m t f ve t ckets per person. 13 2016-03-31 Ruston

TECH’S WINTER QUARTER HONORS STUDENTS ANNOUNCED › home › TECH S WINTER QUARTER HONORS STUDENTS ANNOUNCED Subm tted by Ruston Leader on Wed, 03/30/2016 - 9:13am n News Leader News Serv ce Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has announced the names of students who have earned a p ace on the pres dent s and dean s honor sts for the w nter quarter. Students whose names are fo owed by an aster sk earned recogn t on as members of the pres dent s honor st. That d st nct on s gn f es ach evement of at east a 3.8 academ c grade po nt average on a m n mum of n ne semester hours comp eted (100- eve or h gher), w th no grade ower than a B. 13 2016-03-30 Monroe

Guice appreciates section on universities’ research Research and the Innovat on Enterpr se at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty are key components of our nst tut on s m ss on and the contr but ons our facu ty and students are mak ng to the state s growth and compet t veness. Reach ng far beyond the c assrooms and aborator es are the nnovat ve deas that are born from the co aborat ons of peop e from d fferent academ c d sc p nes who are creat ng new products, serv ces, and opportun t es for c t zens and commun t es across the state and the nat on. In h gh ght ng the mportant and h gh y-product ve work be ng done by researchers at Lou s ana s un vers t es, I want to express my s ncere apprec at on to the News-Star for Sunday s “Beh nd those aboratory wa s, a fasc nat ng wor d awa ts” spec a sect on on research tak ng p ace at north Lou s ana s pub c un vers t es. Lou s ana Tech has worked for years to create a nat ona -qua ty nfrastructure to support research, nnovat on and econom c deve opment that produces new growth opportun t es throughout our state. Through engagement n research and an entrepreneur a approach to the co ege exper ence, Lou s ana Tech s produc ng h gh y prepared and h gh y qua f ed graduates who are ready to serve as eaders and make pos t ve mpacts n every commun ty n our reg on. We are gratefu to the News-Star for showcas ng our research successes and shar ng the mpacts of these efforts w th the r readers. It s encourag ng to our facu ty and students to see the r efforts are be ng recogn zed and supported by those n our commun ty. The opportun ty to h gh ght research and nnovat on strengths s mportant to he p ng the c t zens of Lou s ana better understand the scope and depth of the contr but ons that h gher educat on nst tut ons are mak ng to our state. Dr. Les Gu ce Pres dent Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty 13 2016-03-30 Shreveport

La. Tech student wins Rankin Prize Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty h story graduate student Caro ne Hyme was honored recent y at Lou s ana H stor ca Assoc at on s annua meet ng n Baton Rouge. Hyme s from Kenner. She earned the prest g ous Rank n Pr ze award, wh ch s presented each year to the author of the best research paper by a graduate student wr tten on a Lou s ana h story top c. The award s named after egendary Tu ane Un vers ty h story professor Hugh F. Rank n (1913-1989). T t ed “Summer of Purpose Protests to the Part a B rth Ban: Trac ng the Sh ft ng Tact cs n Lou s ana s Abort on Wars, 1973-2001,” the w nn ng paper s part of Hyme s ongo ng master s thes s pro ect. Wh e at the annua meet ng he d n Baton Rouge, she presented another paper from her thes s research on a pane devoted to women s ssues n recent Lou s ana h story. Accord ng to Jeffery Hank ns, h story department coord nator at Lou s ana Tech, Hyme s award s ev dence of the qua ty of student research n Tech s h story graduate program. “It ref ects not on y the qua ty of students enro ed, but a so the r gorous tra n ng our facu ty prov des,” Hank ns sa d. “We are part cu ar y proud of Caro ne s ach evement because t s the f rst Rank n award for a Lou s ana Tech student s nce the compet t on began n 1991.” Accord ng to Hank ns, prev ous w nners have come not on y from such ma or statew de centers as LSU and Tu ane, but a so from as far away as Harvard, the Un vers ty of M ch gan and the Un vers ty of Par s n France. “It takes hard work and ded cat on to be compet t ve n that k nd of f e d,” Hank ns sa d. La. Tech Assoc ate Professor of H story V. E a ne Thompson agreed w th Hank ns on the mportance of Hyme s LHA recogn t on. “We are so proud to ca Caro ne one of our own,” she sa d, remark ng that w nn ng papers are so c ted for pub cat on n the assoc at on s quarter y ourna , Lou s ana H story. Thompson, who herse f rece ved the Rank n Pr ze wh e a graduate student at R ce Un vers ty, emphas zed that Hyme s not on y an accomp shed scho ar, but a so a campus eader and an act ve member of Lou s ana Tech s mu t p e-award w nn ng chapter of Ph A pha Theta h story honor soc ety. Ph A pha Theta tse f was we represented at Baton Rouge, where t conducted ts own annua reg ona conference n con unct on w th the LHA meet ng. Present ng the r own work on Ph A pha Theta-sponsored pane s were three other Lou s ana Tech graduate students. Kev n W. Adk ns of Farmerv e shared resu ts of h s cont nu ng pro ect on “The 31st Lou s ana Infantry Reg ment at M ken s Bend and Ch ckasaw Bayou dur ng the Amer can C v War.” A so present ng was W am A. Butterf e d of Ruston who spoke on “The Myth of Popu ar Support for Secess on n Lou s ana.” F na y, Matthew Franszczak of S de addressed the prob em of “The Caddo Ind ans of Lou s ana and the Treaty of 1835.” 13 2016-03-29 Monroe

Louisiana Tech theatre department announces cast for ‘Love's Labour's Lost' RUSTON, La. (LaTech Press Re ease) -Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre s proud to announce the cast for ts product on of W am Shakespeare s “Love s Labour s Lost” wh ch s schedu ed for 7:30 p.m. Apr 26-30, and 2:00 p.m. on May 1 n Stone Theatre at Lou s ana Tech s Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. “Love s Labour s Lost,” a steampunk- nsp red product on of Shakespeare s w tt est and most nte gent p ay, s d rected by Pau B. Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre n Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts, and s the theatre department s f na product on of the 2015-2016 season. The cast for “Love s Labour s Lost” s as fo ows: - L am McIntyre (Shreveport, Lou s ana) as K ng Ferd nand - Ash ey Dav s (Cov ngton, Lou s ana) as Pr ncess of France - Johnny Mar ey (Boss er C ty, Lou s ana) as Berowne - Courtney Theodos (Shreveport, Lou s ana) as Rosa ne - Co n Cag e (Cov ngton, Lou s ana) as Duma ne - Amy Maroney (Jenks, Ok ahoma) as Kather ne - N ck Reeve (Ruston, Lou s ana) as Longav e - Magg e McAdams (Henderson, Texas) as Mar a - Zachary Bent ey (Ruston, Lou s ana) as Boyet - Cameron Harmeyer (Cov ngton, Lou s ana) as Don Armado - Em a Me nert (E Dorado, Arkansas) as Moth - Aust n Harr son (Mandev e, Lou s ana) as Ho ofernes - Jess ca Cash on (Fa rv ew, Tennessee) as Du - Matthew G eseke (Shreveport, Lou s ana) as Costard - M e Omps (S anesv e, West V rg n a) as Jaquenetta - Em a Gac c (Be grade, Serb a) as Lord/Forester/Marcade In “Love s Labor s Lost,” K ng Ferd nand of Navarre has conv nced h s ords to swear an oath to scho arsh p, and n the process, forego the company of women for three years. The Pr ncess of France, a ong w th her ad es, soon arr ves at Ferd nand s court on a po t ca v s t, on y to be barred adm ttance and requ red to make camp outs de of the court. Natura y, a of the Lords (and the K ng h mse f) mmed ate y beg n to strugg e w th the r oaths as they fa n ove w th the Pr ncess and her ad es. For more nformat on on the aud t on, th s product on or the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre, p ease ca 318-2572930 or v s t www. atechun vers tytheatre.com. You can a so “L ke” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre or fo ow us on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2016-03-28 Monroe

Tech holds the patent for concrete on steroids It ooks and fee s ke any other concrete. The same shade of gray, the same texture, the same we ght. It does the ob of concrete. But th s s concrete on stero ds, stronger and more durab e. And Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty ho ds the patent. A Tech professor has a cens ng agreement w th the un vers ty to operate a bus ness, A chemy Geopo ymer Systems, as a consu tant market ng the techno ogy.

THENEWSSTAR.COM In our sk es, forests and abs: Research n NELA Car os Montes, research ass stant professor, was a graduate student work ng on h s doctorate when he co aborated w th h s professor, Erez A ouche, then an assoc ate professor of c v eng neer ng at Tech, n creat ng a f rst-of- ts-k nd, pure geopo ymer concrete mater a he says s super or n every respect to trad t ona h gh-qua ty concrete, part cu ar y n extreme env ronments. And the concrete s pr mary substance s f y ash, the mater a eft after burn ng coa at p ants. Montes got nto the concrete game a most by acc dent. A Mex co nat ve, he ntended to pursue a master s degree n theoret ca phys cs. “But on the f rst day on campus, I earned about a scho arsh p for students nterested n the study of concrete.” Montes was nterested n eco og ca mater a s and app ed for the scho arsh p. After earn ng h s master s, he was recru ted by A ouche, who now ves n Sacramento, Ca forn a, to pursue h s doctorate under h m at Lou s ana Tech. The research team started work on deve op ng a h gh-tech concrete that accomp shed two goa s: • S gn f cant y mprove upon trad t ona Port and cement. • Make the product more env ronmenta y fr end y. The team worked at Tech s Trench ess Techno ogy Center to deve op a geopo ymer concrete. Car os Montes, a research ass stant professor at Lou s anaBuy Photo Car os Montes, a research ass stant professor at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, ho ds a samp e of the geopo ymer concrete he he ped deve op. (Photo: Mark Henderson/The News-Star) “It s a revo ut onary concept n concrete mater a . There s not one gram of trad t ona Port and cement,” Montes sa d. The process starts w th the f y ash, a r ch source of a um num and s con. It s, by nature, pozzo an c, wh ch means n f ne y d v ded form and n the presence of an a ka , t reacts chem ca y w th ca c um hydrox de at ord nary temperature to form compounds possess ng cement t ous propert es. The end resu t s a concrete that conta ns no water. That makes the concrete extreme y versat e. In compar son to ord nary Port and cement, geopo ymer concrete features greater corros on res stance, substant a y h gher f re res stance (up to 2400° F), h gh compress ve and tens e strengths, a rap d strength ga n and ower shr nkage. When A ouche presented the geopo ymer concrete at the Detro t Sc ence Center or g na y n 2010, h s goa was to get the new techno ogy n front of the pub c. A 7-foot stee -re nforced geopo ymer concrete beam A 7-foot stee -re nforced geopo ymer concrete beam undergoes structura test ng. (Photo: Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty) “If the pub c s aware that there are more susta nab e ways to construct our h ghways and br dges, t w expect ts government agenc es to exp ore and promote these greener techno og es,” he sa d. “Th s sort of po t ca pressure s essent a for new mater a s, such as geopo ymer concretes, to overcome the mu t tude of bureaucrat c barr ers that ex st between the aboratory and the construct on s te.” “Geopo ymer concrete techno ogy s here to stay,” A ouche sa d. “We expect to see a grow ng number of commerc a app cat ons of th s green and nnovat ve techno ogy across the construct on ndustry, w th app cat ons n the area of transportat on nfrastructure ead ng the way.” Montes sa d the f rst commerc a use of geopo ymer concrete was sewer p pes. “We went for spec a ty uses,” he sa d. The product or g na y faced res stance. Montes sa d there was st some fear n the wake of a catastrophe n 2008. A d ke fa ed at the Tennessee Va ey Author ty s K ngston Foss P ant, when 5.4 m on cub c yards of coa ash cascaded nto the Emory and C nch r vers and smothered about 300 acres of and. The breach re eased a s ow-mov ng wave of tox c s udge and po uted water nto the r ver n what rema ns the nat on s argest coa -ash sp n h story. It snapped trees as f they were tw gs and knocked homes off the r foundat ons. It destroyed three houses and damaged dozens of others. There were no n ur es. Montes sa d t s a so been d ff cu t to conv nce eng neers to bu d w thout the concrete they know. T mes are chang ng. • NASA s us ng the product at ts rocket test s tes. Because the concrete has no water, t ho ds up better to the h gh heat of rocket eng nes. Trad t ona concrete tends to exp ode under extreme heat. • Corros ve mater a s don t seap nto the concrete. Paper m s are beg nn ng to use the concrete for f oor ng. Caust c sp s s t atop the concrete, mak ng t eas er to c ean up. • The mater a s be ng used n coasta restorat on. The geopo ymer concrete s a d underneath sand, and because t res sts corros on, ho ds up to the ong exposure to sa t a r. • Montes sa d h s company s prepar ng to bu d a demonstrat on house us ng the concrete for ts foundat on. But Montes s fast to po nt out the env ronmenta benef ts. Lou s ana s one of on y f ve states n the U.S. that does not have an n-house cement ndustry — a the cement used n Lou s ana s mported from ne ghbor ng states. Meanwh e, about 8 m on tons of f y ash are produced annua y w th n an e ght-hour dr ve of Baton Rouge. That f y ash wou d w nd up n andf s. Now t can have a second fe. Geopo ymer concrete s greatest appea may be ts fe cyc e greenhouse gas reduct on potent a — as much as 90 percent when compared w th ord nary Port and cement. In 2014, Montes company was awarded the Lou s ana Startup Pr ze n Shreveport as the state s top startup. Montes sees a rosy future as he cont nues to teach at Tech wh e work ng w th A chemy Geopo ymer Systems. Is t the road to r ches? “I hope so.” 13 2016-03-28 Monroe

Comprehensive scan puts safety on table Varun Kopparthy can on y mag ne how the nnovat ve product he s research ng cou d he p essen cases of food contam nat on. Accord ng to the Centers For D sease Contro , each year one n s x Amer cans, or 48 m on peop e, get s ck from foodborne d seases. Of those cases, 128,000 are hosp ta zed, and 3,000 d e. Determ n ng the number of nesses assoc ated w th spec f c food sources s ca ed foodborne ness source attr but on. You hear the dreaded head nes – sa mone a outbreak, ster a detected – and other pathogens that produce fear of consum ng foods.

THENEWSSTAR.COM In our sk es, forests and abs: Research n NELA An outbreak ast spr ng put a freeze on product on on the popu ar ne of B ue Be ce cream. 10 reported cases of ster a n four states were nked to B ue Be frozen nove t es. Three peop e s ckened, a hosp ta pat ents n Kansas, ater d ed. The company pu ed ts ent re ne of products from freezer cases across the country. A PathoRADAR b osensor conta ns a ta ored data ch pBuy Photo A PathoRADAR b osensor conta ns a ta ored data ch p and conduct ve w res to detect pathogens. (Photo: Bob Lenox/The News-Star) Last September, a Ca forn a-based company, Andrew & W amson Fresh Produce, sh pped sa mone a-ta nted cucumbers to 27 states, as we as the Red Lobster restaurant cha n. Three cases n Lou s ana were be eved to have been a part of the outbreak. Food sh pments across borders s grow ng. Accord ng to the U.S. Department of Agr cu ture, tota mports have ncreased 7 percent per year s nce 1999. In the U.S., mported food now represents 15–20 percent of a food consumed. “Why can t b g compan es be more eff c ent n detect ng contam nat on?”, Kopparthy wondered. Standard test ng usua y ooks for on y those contam nants preva ent n a part cu ar ndustry. “But, there m ght be others as we ,” he sa d. Kopparthy sa d there s no test that can dent fy mu t p e pathogens a at once. What he and h s team are deve op ng cou d advance test ng to d agnose a contam nat on cu pr t. The doctora cand date n b omed ca eng neer ng s mmersed n what he descr bes as “ ab techno ogy used for rea wor d app cat on.” The detect on method he s research ng m ght poss b y one day he p prevent a hea th cr s s. Its ca ed PathoRADAR. The name tru y def nes the d agnost c too that scans and tests a var ety of foods for pathogens known to cause ness. And the concept turned to creat on here n northeastern Lou s ana by Kopparthy and h s partner Dr. Gergana Nestorova. In the center of the B omed ca M crof u d cs Laboratory at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, there s a arge s and, aff xed w th a row of overhead cab nets. From a sma tray on the s and s counter, Kopparthy pu s a th n, p ast c str p. It s a tt e b gger than the s ze of a st ck of gum and encases two w res that extend out from one end. It s a b osensor, deve oped over two years, to a ert researchers to contam nants that cause foodborne ness. “Our techno ogy can be used to detect contam nat on. You have to see whether there s a v rus or not and we do that at a DNA eve ,” he sa d, as he he d the sensor next to the mach ne. The dev ce s a med um-s zed, L-shaped b ack box. Two sma pumps w th red buttons and LED d sp ay are seated on a corner of a mach ne. The procedure tse f seems re at ve y s mp e. A samp ng of the food — even a processed food product — s m xed w th an act ve agent. The agents used are the resu t of research and test ng and are propr etary nformat on. Detect on ch ps conta ned n the b osensor are ta ored to ook for s gnatures of any number of pathogens. The test takes about 40 m nutes to comp ete. Resu ts can determ ned n two to four hours. That eff c ency s someth ng not seen by test ng methods on the market. “W th the current techn ques, ts actua y takes onger for them to detect t. W th our techno ogy, we can do t much faster,” Kopparthy sa d. “The r (food test ng serv ces) techno ogy doesn t have ab ty to detect mu t p es, n a s ng e test run.” Comp ete resu ts from food test ng serv ces can take up to two days. The ength of t me cou d be cr t ca n response and reca efforts f contam nat on s dent f ed. In a f e d where pathogen test ng has grown at greater than 10 percent over the past few years, PathoRADAR s research seeks to opt m ze test ng procedures. A type of one-stop test for food compan es. For examp e, a separate test to detect e. co must be made n add t on to other pathogen tests. “The ma or prob em s that t costs the food process ng compan es a ot of money to own test ng equ pment, so they outsource to a ab,” he sa d. Test ng serv ces abs charge per samp e for each organ sm be ng tested. The pr ce depends on how abor ntens ve the test s for each organ sm as t d ffers from contam nant to contam nant. Pr c ng for the nnovat ve test ng wou d be compet t ve to what compan es a ready pay for test ng, but of greater va ue n perform ng mu t p e tests at once. The too cou d a so be used by to reduce costs at food manufactur ng compan es. The sens ng matter of the product he and h s team has deve oped has not yet been taken to commerc a zat on. Its part y due to the d ff cu t nature of deve op ng the b osensor at a h gh eve of sens t v ty to detect pathogens. Kopparthy sa d there s on y a few research groups n the U.S. pursu ng th s type of test ng techno ogy. The pro ect s present y seek ng bus ness partners n the prototype deve opment phase, but has a ready anded a number of acco ades. PathoRADAR p aced f rst n the Top DAWG New Venture Champ onsh p at Lou s ana Tech n the Spr ng of 2014, and ater that year was se ected as a top f ve f na st n the Lou s ana Startup Pr ze compet t on. Kopparthy was a so among s x entrepreneurs to present as part of the De ta Reg ona Author ty s De ta Entrepreneursh p Network Fe owsh p program ast year. The pro ect s n research phase and has yet to go nto f e d test ng. Kopparthy sa d he hopes to be ab e to go to p aces ke Foster Farms Ch cken P ant n Farmerv e to take the work another step forward. The techno ogy beh nd PathoRadar can a so take shape w th other resources nc ud ng water and the env ronment. It cou d a so be sca ed nto other markets rang ng from agr cu tura ndustry to med ca ndustry and b o-defense. Kopparthy env s ons pract ca , portab e uses for the d agnost c too . “We are focused on mak ng th s ava ab e to someone who may have m n ma techn ca know edge. My goa s n the future to have a hand-he d dev ce. But, I can see r ght now that we can deve op to that k nd of th ng,” he sa d. Techno ogy com ng from research can be a h gh-r sk, h gh-opportun ty venture. “It s a case of where you have to nvest so much nto research and deve opment,” Kopparthy sa d. “That s why our p an s to seek sma bus ness nnovat on grants and go from there.” 13 2016-03-28 Monroe

Tech team at work on device to monitor emissions It churns and burns through motor eng nes of trucks and tractor-tra ers on the h ghways. D ese fue can be seen as the feb ood that keeps some modes of transportat on mov ng The gaso ne prov des a hea thy dose of power and acce erat on for the eng ne. Fumes and vapors of the spent fue are pushed through the exhaust system and out the ta p pe.

THENEWSSTAR.COM In our sk es, forests and abs: Research n NELA The em ss ons, or d scharge of these gases, are the unhea thy end product. As techno ogy and t mes have change, concern grows over how these em ss ons affect the env ronment. One of the pr mary concerns s the re ease of n trogen ox de gases (NOx), some known to be greenhouse gases. The Env ronmenta Protect on Agency has tracked the vo ume of NOx gas em tted from d ese fue eng nes for decades. More than ha f of ndustr a y produced n trogen ox de gases come from motor veh c es. Em ss ons of NOx ncreased approx mate y 10 percent from 1970 to 1988. Advances n the automot ve ndustry ke cata yt c converters have he ped essen NOx, but the ssue pers sts. The EPA cont nua y addresses a r qua ty standards and has adopted str ngent exhaust em ss on regu at ons. Motor compan es are cont nua y seek ng new ways to reduce and mon tor em ss ons. A very sma p ece of techno ogy to address the b g task s be ng researched at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. Er ca Murray, eft, and doctora student L ng Cu standBuy Photo Er ca Murray, eft, and doctora student L ng Cu stand bes de the “furnace.” The un t ana yzes how exhaust sensors perform under var ous temperatures. (Photo: Bob Lenox/The News-Star) A research and deve opment pro ect of n trogen ox de sensors began ast year at the co ege s Inst tute of M cromanufactur ng. Ramu Ramachandran, execut ve dean for research, sa d the work s part of a partnersh p ca ed the Lou s ana A ance for S mu at on-Gu ded Mater a s App cat ons, or LA-SIGMA. The research s be ng ed by Er ca Murray. The program cons sts of three ma or sc ence dr vers of current strength n Lou s ana — e ectron cs, energy and b omo ecu ar mater a s. Ramachandran sa d the un vers ty s part c pat on has pr mar y been w th energy mater a s. The ab s housed a ong a deep ha way w th arge g ass-w ndowed ab stat ons on e ther s de. F rst door on the r ght s where the sensor stud es are tak ng p ace. Three students are gathered around an s and counter n the m dd e of the room. One student, L ng Cu , s a doctora student n eng neer ng. She s ho d ng a petr d sh w th a few sma wh te rectangu ar ch ps. The p eces are no more than about a ha f- nch n ength and have t ny go d w res com ng out of two s des of the ch p. “Er ca has formed a co aborat on w th Ford Motor Co. to study these exhaust gas sensors. W th newer standards, the detect on eve s keep gett ng ower and ower,” Ramachandran sa d. The sensors are used n d ese after-treatment systems. Murray, who had worked for Ford as a motor sc ent st, has come up w th mater a s and dev ces that appear to be more sens t ve than what s commerc a y ava ab e. “We found f you change the porous structure, the ho e, that are n th s e ectro yte, that nf uences how the d ese gas goes nto the sensor,” Murray sa d. That mpacts how the gas s detected e ectrochem ca y. If the ch p s ess porous, where t has ess ho es, ts harder for the gas to get n and react. If the sensor s too porous, detect on s ess ke y. The research became a quest on of how do you f nd the opt mum amount of poros ty that w cause greater sens t v ty and rap d response. The mathemat ca approach he ped deduce what structure wou d g ve the des red sens t v ty. A standard fabr cat on method was used to deve op a prom s ng ceram c and z rcon a-based sensor. Go d a so was used n manufactur ng the ch p for test ng. On a tab e a ong the back wa of the ab s what s ca ed the “furnace” — an ce chest-s zed box. The top port on of the box opens to show a quartz tube nest ed n a mo ded frame. Murray exp a ns the test ng. “The sensor s attached to w res and p aced n the tube. The w res are attached to an ana yzer,” she sa d. The ana yzer takes sens t v ty read ngs. Once the furnace s f red up t can reach temperatures from 550 to 800 degrees Ce s us. As the temperature r ses, Cu mon tors sens t v ty of the m n ature ch p. Cu kept track of how the sensors performed and found pos t ve outcomes. The effort was rewarded by Cu be ng nv ted to Ford headquarters to perform test ng at the automaker s research fac ty. Rather than a s mu ated mode , the sensor was hooked to an exhaust ne from a mounted d ese test eng ne. The test resu ts were very prom s ng. “Our sensors were ab e to accurate y detect NO2 (n trogen d ox de) at ower eve s than current commerc a zed sensors,” Murray sa d. Sensors that are on the market can detect NO2 at 10 parts per m on. The sensors Cu and Murray produced were ab e detect an even ower rat o of 5 parts per m on. The sensors d d not on y p ck up a ower eve of em ss on, but d d so more accurate y. Other sensor read ngs can be s ght y off due to sound or v brat on. A notab e f nd n the performance of the sensor was the prec s on of sens t v ty and speed of wh ch em ss ons were detected. “That a ows us to have a good dea of what s most su tab e n terms of poros ty,” Murray sa d. The rap d response of the sensor was seen by sharp sp kes n a measurement graph. Because there was a vert ca ump seen on the chart track ng em ss ons, the sensor proved t qu ck y p cked up changes n NO2 be ng em tted. The conc us on of the report stated n part that resu ts w th Ford genera y agreed w th aboratory test ng wh ch s to conf rm the sensor s stab ty. A better perform ng sensor wou d enab e the veh c e s computer system to ad ust fue usage and a ow for better gas m eage and overa performance. At the same t me t wou d serv ng ts pr mary purpose of mon tor ng em ss ons. Accord ng to Murray, the on y drawback of the sensor s the use of go d. The meta has a ower me t ng po nt than what s needed for poss b e commerc a product on. “We have to ook at what e ectro yte cou d rep ace go d to m n m ze the fabr cat on step,” Murray sa d. “We know the r ght structure, but can we f nd someth ng more su tab e?” 13 2016-03-28 Monroe

3D printing opens door to drug-delivery system It s not exact y what the doctor ordered. But t w be soon. A team of researchers at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has deve oped an nnovat ve method for us ng affordab e, consumergrade 3D pr nters and mater a s to fabr cate custom med ca mp ants that can conta n ant bacter a and chemotherapeut c compounds for targeted drug de very. Let s make that s mp er.

THENEWSSTAR.COM In our sk es, forests and abs: Research n NELA Imag ne you have a cav ty and go to the dent st. The dent st te s you he can t work on the tooth yet because t s abscessed. He treats t w th an ant b ot c. You run to the drugstore, p ck up your prescr pt on and take t ora y. Dav d M s Dav d M s (Photo: Courtesy) The dosage of the ant b ot c s strong enough to course throughout your body and st be ab e to do the ob on the tooth. It s more med c ne than you need, rea y, but t gets the ob done. The danger, over t me, s that the body grows res stant to ant b ot cs, or you deve op an a ergy. The techno ogy deve oped at Tech under the d rect on Dav d K. M s, professor of b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng, can de ver the ant b ot c r ght to the area of the tooth, qu ck y and eff c ent y. The researchers had three key concepts n the use of 3D pr nted mater a . “We wanted to prov de nd v dua y custom zed treatment, create app cat ons for mu t p e uses and do t cheap y,” M s sa d. Jeffery We sman, as a doctora student at Tech as part of a un que MD/PhD program offered o nt y by Tech and LSU Hea th Shreveport, co- ed the team compr sed of Tech doctora students and research facu ty n b omed ca eng neer ng and nanosystems eng neer ng programs. IMG_7798 Th s may ook ke a cherry L feSaver, but t s a 3D-pr nted hormone- oaded pessary, a type of ntrauter ne dev ce. (Photo: Courtesy Dav d M s) “After dent fy ng the usefu ness of the 3D pr nters, we rea zed there was an opportun ty for rap d prototyp ng us ng th s fabr cat on method,” We sman sa d. “Through the add t on of nanopart c es and/or other add t ves, th s techno ogy becomes much more v ab e us ng a common 3D pr nt ng mater a that s a ready b ocompat b e.” Accord ng to We sman, persona zed med c ne and pat ent-spec f c med cat on reg mens s a current trend n hea th care. He says th s new method of creat ng med ca y compat b e 3D pr nt ng f aments w offer hosp ta pharmac sts and phys c ans a nove way to de ver drugs and treat ness. “One of the greatest benef ts of th s techno ogy s that t can be done us ng any consumer 3D pr nter and can be used anywhere n the wor d,” We sman sa d. The process of 3D pr nt ng makes a three-d mens ona ob ect of a most any shape by ay ng down success ve ayers of mater a under computer contro . The process was deve oped n the 1980s and has arge y been used to make nexpens ve too s and parts for manufactur ng. More recent y, the techno ogy has moved nto the f e d of med c ne. The Tech team co aborated to create f ament extruders that can make med ca -qua ty 3D pr nt ng f aments. Lou s ana Tech ho ds the patent for the techno ogy, but M s has started a sma company to cense the use of t. Us ng computers and 3D pr nters that produce common b ocompat b e mater a s, the company s creat ng sma stents, cathethers and beads that can be coated w th “ ust enough of the drug oad to treat the ocat on,” M s says. They are mp anted n the body at the s te of a severe nfect on or oca zed to target a tumor wh e avo d ng damage to other t ssues or organs. Another aspect of the mater a s used can save pat ents pa n and money. “Let s say you have an open wound,” M s sa d. Phys c ans treat ng that wound wou d mp ant med cated beads. “But pat ents face a second surgery, to have the beads removed,” M s sa d. “Our p ast cs are b odegradab e. They d sappear, avo d ng the second surgery.” The man beh nd the techno ogy s ust as fasc nat ng as the mater a he he p craft. A nat ve of I no s, h s off ce at Tech s dotted w th Ch cago Cub and Ch cago Bears memorab a. He has a ravenous appet te for earn ng, and h s forma educat on s w de-rang ng. “There are few ke me,” M s sa d. “My fourth-grade teacher wrote on my report card that Dav d has a terr b e cur os ty. ” He sa d the teacher to d h s parents that he wou d get nvo ved n someth ng n the brary “and never come back.” M s ho ds a bache or s degree n h story w th a focus on anc ent h story. A second undergraduate degree was n a study of the c ass cs, w th an emphas s n Near East arch tecture. He found h mse f n reta management. “I was s tt ng at my off ce n the ma I managed after ust tak ng back the cast of A My Ch dren who had appeared at the ma . I started th nk ng about what I have done w th my fe. I made money mak ng money for others.” There had to me more n fe, he thought. M s went back to schoo and earned a master degree n evo ut onary h story of the New Wor d. He had p anned to be a phys ca pa eonto og st. That ed to h s doctorate stud es n b o ogy and anatomy. From manag ng a reta ma to teach ng at one of Lou s ana s prem er un vers t es, th s professor brought w th h m an understand ng of human ty that ed to th s h gh-tech process ntended to he p others. It s a process that a so s be ng stud ed for use n bone cancer treatment. “If someone has bone cancer and f chemo cannot contro t, t often eads to amputat on,” M s sa d. “We have deve oped a prototype of a 3D pr nt gun. W th a 3D scanner, we can mage a bone defect, and then us ng the scanned mage and pr nt gun, comp ete y f n the defect w th resorbab e drug- nfused mater a s and bone cement. The scanned defect s f ed n based on the mage, and drugs are prov ded at the r ght dosage from top to bottom.” The chemo can be de vered oca y. The mp ant can be covered w th stem ce s that can prevent re ect on and f n cav t es n the bone eft by the cancer. Ant funga s can be de vered through nteruter ne mp ants. Most recent y M s and h s research team has deve oped a 3D pr nter b ood vesse . It can red rect b ood f ow to areas of the body affected, for nstance, by d abetes. “We can rep ace fa ng b ood vesse s and d rect b ood us ng a new shunt from the ex st ng artery,” he sa d. The dev ces created n the ab can be custom made for an nd v dua s need, s cheaper than ex st ng therap es and can be manufactured n m nutes. Everyth ng created n the ab s made w th U.S. Food Drug Adm nstrat on-approved mater a . M s sa d sc ence s at the advent of a new techn ca age. It s work that th s former ma manager s eager to pursue, work n wh ch he s a p oneer. “I be eve 3D b opr nt ng for repa r of c eft pa ate and trachea w be commonp ace n f ve years,” he sa d. Usab e 3D rep acement of nterna organs, he says, s about 10 years away. “It s tru y nove and a wor dw de f rst to be 3D pr nt ng custom dev ces w th ant b ot cs and chemotherapeut cs.” 13 2016-03-28 Monroe

3D printing opens door to drug-delivery system It s not exact y what the doctor ordered. But t w be soon. A team of researchers at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has deve oped an nnovat ve method for us ng affordab e, consumergrade 3D pr nters and mater a s to fabr cate custom med ca mp ants that can conta n ant bacter a and chemotherapeut c compounds for targeted drug de very. Let s make that s mp er.

THENEWSSTAR.COM In our sk es, forests and abs: Research n NELA Imag ne you have a cav ty and go to the dent st. The dent st te s you he can t work on the tooth yet because t s abscessed. He treats t w th an ant b ot c. You run to the drugstore, p ck up your prescr pt on and take t ora y. Dav d M s Dav d M s (Photo: Courtesy) The dosage of the ant b ot c s strong enough to course throughout your body and st be ab e to do the ob on the tooth. It s more med c ne than you need, rea y, but t gets the ob done. The danger, over t me, s that the body grows res stant to ant b ot cs, or you deve op an a ergy. The techno ogy deve oped at Tech under the d rect on Dav d K. M s, professor of b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng, can de ver the ant b ot c r ght to the area of the tooth, qu ck y and eff c ent y. The researchers had three key concepts n the use of 3D pr nted mater a . “We wanted to prov de nd v dua y custom zed treatment, create app cat ons for mu t p e uses and do t cheap y,” M s sa d. Jeffery We sman, as a doctora student at Tech as part of a un que MD/PhD program offered o nt y by Tech and LSU Hea th Shreveport, co- ed the team compr sed of Tech doctora students and research facu ty n b omed ca eng neer ng and nanosystems eng neer ng programs. IMG_7798 Th s may ook ke a cherry L feSaver, but t s a 3D-pr nted hormone- oaded pessary, a type of ntrauter ne dev ce. (Photo: Courtesy Dav d M s) “After dent fy ng the usefu ness of the 3D pr nters, we rea zed there was an opportun ty for rap d prototyp ng us ng th s fabr cat on method,” We sman sa d. “Through the add t on of nanopart c es and/or other add t ves, th s techno ogy becomes much more v ab e us ng a common 3D pr nt ng mater a that s a ready b ocompat b e.” Accord ng to We sman, persona zed med c ne and pat ent-spec f c med cat on reg mens s a current trend n hea th care. He says th s new method of creat ng med ca y compat b e 3D pr nt ng f aments w offer hosp ta pharmac sts and phys c ans a nove way to de ver drugs and treat ness. “One of the greatest benef ts of th s techno ogy s that t can be done us ng any consumer 3D pr nter and can be used anywhere n the wor d,” We sman sa d. The process of 3D pr nt ng makes a three-d mens ona ob ect of a most any shape by ay ng down success ve ayers of mater a under computer contro . The process was deve oped n the 1980s and has arge y been used to make nexpens ve too s and parts for manufactur ng. More recent y, the techno ogy has moved nto the f e d of med c ne. The Tech team co aborated to create f ament extruders that can make med ca -qua ty 3D pr nt ng f aments. Lou s ana Tech ho ds the patent for the techno ogy, but M s has started a sma company to cense the use of t. Us ng computers and 3D pr nters that produce common b ocompat b e mater a s, the company s creat ng sma stents, cathethers and beads that can be coated w th “ ust enough of the drug oad to treat the ocat on,” M s says. They are mp anted n the body at the s te of a severe nfect on or oca zed to target a tumor wh e avo d ng damage to other t ssues or organs. Another aspect of the mater a s used can save pat ents pa n and money. “Let s say you have an open wound,” M s sa d. Phys c ans treat ng that wound wou d mp ant med cated beads. “But pat ents face a second surgery, to have the beads removed,” M s sa d. “Our p ast cs are b odegradab e. They d sappear, avo d ng the second surgery.” The man beh nd the techno ogy s ust as fasc nat ng as the mater a he he p craft. A nat ve of I no s, h s off ce at Tech s dotted w th Ch cago Cub and Ch cago Bears memorab a. He has a ravenous appet te for earn ng, and h s forma educat on s w de-rang ng. “There are few ke me,” M s sa d. “My fourth-grade teacher wrote on my report card that Dav d has a terr b e cur os ty. ” He sa d the teacher to d h s parents that he wou d get nvo ved n someth ng n the brary “and never come back.” M s ho ds a bache or s degree n h story w th a focus on anc ent h story. A second undergraduate degree was n a study of the c ass cs, w th an emphas s n Near East arch tecture. He found h mse f n reta management. “I was s tt ng at my off ce n the ma I managed after ust tak ng back the cast of A My Ch dren who had appeared at the ma . I started th nk ng about what I have done w th my fe. I made money mak ng money for others.” There had to me more n fe, he thought. M s went back to schoo and earned a master degree n evo ut onary h story of the New Wor d. He had p anned to be a phys ca pa eonto og st. That ed to h s doctorate stud es n b o ogy and anatomy. From manag ng a reta ma to teach ng at one of Lou s ana s prem er un vers t es, th s professor brought w th h m an understand ng of human ty that ed to th s h gh-tech process ntended to he p others. It s a process that a so s be ng stud ed for use n bone cancer treatment. “If someone has bone cancer and f chemo cannot contro t, t often eads to amputat on,” M s sa d. “We have deve oped a prototype of a 3D pr nt gun. W th a 3D scanner, we can mage a bone defect, and then us ng the scanned mage and pr nt gun, comp ete y f n the defect w th resorbab e drug- nfused mater a s and bone cement. The scanned defect s f ed n based on the mage, and drugs are prov ded at the r ght dosage from top to bottom.” The chemo can be de vered oca y. The mp ant can be covered w th stem ce s that can prevent re ect on and f n cav t es n the bone eft by the cancer. Ant funga s can be de vered through nteruter ne mp ants. Most recent y M s and h s research team has deve oped a 3D pr nter b ood vesse . It can red rect b ood f ow to areas of the body affected, for nstance, by d abetes. “We can rep ace fa ng b ood vesse s and d rect b ood us ng a new shunt from the ex st ng artery,” he sa d. The dev ces created n the ab can be custom made for an nd v dua s ne 13 2016-03-24 Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor publishes book on life, experiences as a rural veterinarian RUSTON, LA (Lou s ana Tech Re ease) - Dr. W am Green, professor of agr cu tura sc ences and nter m d rector of the Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has pub shed a book based on h s exper ences as a rura veter nar an t t ed, “Doc, D d I Wake You Up?” The book, pub shed by Tate Pub sh ng and Enterpr ses, s a co ect on of un que and enterta n ng stor es taken from Green s 27 years as the owner and operator of a rura veter nary hosp ta n the south. Green shares h s memor es about the an ma s, the r owners and other co orfu characters that he encountered dur ng h s veter nary pract ce. He ta ks about h s reco ect ons of treat ng cats, dogs and cows dur ng the dayt me and skunks, horses or e ephants at n ght. “I had accumu ated the stor es n th s book over severa years and dec ded a coup e of years ago to comp e them so that my grandch dren cou d en oy some of my fe stor es and exper ences that happened dur ng my years of veter nary pract ce,” sa d Green. “I hope that peop e who read th s book w come away w th a greater apprec at on of the veter nary profess on n genera and be ab e to rea ze the cha enges and rewards of a rura veter nar an as he dea s w th so many d fferent and un que peop e and an ma s.” Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, wrote the foreword for “Doc, D d I Wake You Up?” and ta ks about the spec a mean ng n Green s stor es, espec a y for those from rura commun t es n the south. Kennedy cha enges the reader to mage that they are a student n one of Green s an ma sc ences c asses at Lou s ana Tech and they w qu ck y see why he s one of the most popu ar and be oved professors at the un vers ty. “Dr. Green shows that work ng w th an ma s s reward ng and nterest ng,” says Kennedy n the book s foreword. “But work ng w th an ma s, peop e and the s tuat ons that they create takes t to a comp ete y d fferent eve . I hope [the reader] en oys these stor es as much as I do.” Green has served on the Board of Veter nary Med c ne and s a fet me member of the nat ona , state, and oca veter nary assoc at ons. He has been honored w th numerous teach ng, adv s ng and serv ce awards at Lou s ana Tech as we as the D st ngu shed Serv ce to Agr cu ture Award for North Lou s ana. Green ho ds a bache or s degree from Lou s ana Tech, h s master s degree from LSU and a doctorate of veter nary med c ne from Auburn Un vers ty. Serv ng as one of the adv sers for pre-veter nary med c ne students at Lou s ana Tech and a teacher of s x d fferent c asses re ated to an ma sc ence and veter nary med c ne, Green has p ayed a ma or ro e n Lou s ana Tech s agr cu tura sc ences department. “The most mportant th ng I want Lou s ana Tech pre-vet students to ga n from th s book s that becom ng a veter nar an s d ff cu t but not mposs b e,” Green sa d. “Above a e se, they shou d d gent y focus on the r stud es, choose know edgeab e and car ng mentors, and keep the Fa th.” “Doc, D d I Wake You Up?” s ava ab e from Amazon, Barnes and Nob e, and other oca and on ne bookstores. Green w be s gn ng cop es of h s book from 2-5 p.m. on Apr 2 at the L nco n Par sh Pub c L brary n Ruston. 13 2016-03-23 Monroe

Louisiana Tech lecture series to host expert in metabolic, molecular medicine RUSTON, La (Lou s ana Tech Re ease) - Dr. Joseph Bass, the Char es F. Ketter ng Professor of Med c ne at the Fe nberg Schoo of Med c ne and ch ef of the D v s on of Endocr no ogy, Metabo sm and Mo ecu ar Med c ne at Northwestern Un vers ty, w v s t Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty on Apr 4 as part of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es. Bass w present a ecture t t ed, “The C ock Gene Pathway from Behav or to Metabo sm” at 3:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. Accord ng to h s research aboratory webs te, Bass says that two start ng hea th stat st cs have captured w despread pub c attent on over the past decade. The f rst s that a ch dren born n the year 2000 face a one- n-three chance of deve op ng d abetes dur ng the r fet me. The second s that near y one-th rd of the U.S. popu at on s overwe ght or obese. “A though both phys ca act v ty and nutr t on are t ed to th s ep dem c, new ev dence from c n ca and exper menta research has p npo nted a ro e for d srupt on n the c rcad an system and s eep n obes ty and d abetes,” says Bass. “The nterna c rcad an system can be thought of as an ntegrator of nformat on that enab es nd v dua s to opt ma y t me nterna systems w th the r s ng and sett ng of the sun. “The pr mary research focus n our aboratory s to understand the mo ecu ar mechan sms through wh ch the c rcad an c ock regu ates ce and organ sma metabo sm and the rec proca feedback of metabo sm on c rcad an osc ators n an ma s. We ant c pate that a better understand ng of c ock processes w ead to nnovat ve therapeut cs for a spectrum of d seases nc ud ng d abetes, obes ty, auto mmun ty, and cancer.” Bass s a graduate of Ya e Un vers ty and earned h s Ph.D./MD from the Med ca Co ege of Pennsy van a n 1991. He has a so comp eted tra n ng n Endocr no ogy and Metabo sm at the Un vers ty of Ch cago where he was the rec p ent of fe owsh ps from the Juven e D abetes Foundat on and the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca doreraMoore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es spot ghts nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. Bass s v s t s sponsored by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on. In add t on to h s research sem nar at 3:30 p.m., he w be g v ng a second, abbrev ated ecture, wh ch s a so open to the commun ty, at 5:30 p.m. n Scotty Rob nson Memor a Gymnas um. The t t e for th s second ta k s “How Do Genes Contro Our We ght and Sugar Leve s” and s des gned for a more genera aud ence. A n attendance at the sem nar and are we come to o n Bass at a recept on that w fo ow. In add t on to Bass ectures, members of Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of Nurs ng, Schoo of Human Eco ogy, and Department of K nes o ogy w be v s t ng w th members of the Boys and G r s C ub and teach ng them about v ng a hea thy fe. The goa of the ser es and co aborat on w th the L nco n Hea th Foundat on s to he p mprove the hea th of our commun ty. A ectures dur ng the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. For more nformat on on Bass and h s presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2016-03-23 Shreveport

1 La. Tech lecture series to host expert in metabolic, molecular medicine RUSTON Dr. Joseph Bass, the Char es F. Ketter ng Professor of Med c ne at the Fe nberg Schoo of Med c ne and ch ef of the D v s on of Endocr no ogy, Metabo sm and Mo ecu ar Med c ne at Northwestern Un vers ty, w v s t Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty on Apr 4 as part of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es. Bass w present a ecture t t ed, “The C ock Gene Pathway from Behav or to Metabo sm” at 3:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. Accord ng to h s research aboratory webs te, Bass says that two start ng hea th stat st cs have captured w despread pub c attent on over the past decade. The f rst s that a ch dren born n the year 2000 face a one- n-three chance of deve op ng d abetes dur ng the r fet me. The second s that near y one-th rd of the U.S. popu at on s overwe ght or obese. “A though both phys ca act v ty and nutr t on are t ed to th s ep dem c, new ev dence from c n ca and exper menta research has p npo nted a ro e for d srupt on n the c rcad an system and s eep n obes ty and d abetes,” says Bass. “The nterna c rcad an system can be thought of as an ntegrator of nformat on that enab es nd v dua s to opt ma y t me nterna systems w th the r s ng and sett ng of the sun. “The pr mary research focus n our aboratory s to understand the mo ecu ar mechan sms through wh ch the c rcad an c ock regu ates ce and organ sma metabo sm and the rec proca feedback of metabo sm on c rcad an osc ators n an ma s. We ant c pate that a better understand ng of c ock processes w ead to nnovat ve therapeut cs for a spectrum of d seases nc ud ng d abetes, obes ty, auto mmun ty, and cancer.” Bass s a graduate of Ya e Un vers ty and earned h s Ph.D./MD from the Med ca Co ege of Pennsy van a n 1991. He has a so comp eted tra n ng n Endocr no ogy and Metabo sm at the Un vers ty of Ch cago where he was the rec p ent of fe owsh ps from the Juven e D abetes Foundat on and the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca doreraMoore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es spot ghts nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. Bass s v s t s sponsored by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on. In add t on to h s research sem nar at 3:30 p.m., he w be g v ng a second, abbrev ated ecture, wh ch s a so open to the commun ty, at 5:30 p.m. n Scotty Rob nson Memor a Gymnas um. The t t e for th s second ta k s “How Do Genes Contro Our We ght and Sugar Leve s” and s des gned for a more genera aud ence. A n attendance at the sem nar and are we come to o n Bass at a recept on that w fo ow. In add t on to Bass ectures, members of Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of Nurs ng, Schoo of Human Eco ogy, and Department of K nes o ogy w be v s t ng w th members of the Boys and G r s C ub and teach ng them about v ng a hea thy fe. The goa of the ser es and co aborat on w th the L nco n Hea th Foundat on s to he p mprove the hea th of our commun ty. A ectures dur ng the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. For more nformat on on Bass and h s presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2016-03-17 Monroe

Air Force Concert Band, Singing Sergeants coming to Louisiana Tech RUSTON, La (La Tech Re ease) - Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts and The Ruston Da y Leader w present the Un ted States A r Force Concert Band and S ng ng Sergeants n concert at 3 p.m. Apr 10 n Howard Aud tor um on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Howard Aud tor um s ocated n the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts on the northwest corner of Dan Reneau Dr ve and Ar zona Bou evard n Ruston. Th s s a genera adm ss on event w th no reserved seat ng and no reserved t ckets. T cket ho ders w be seated on a f rst-come, f rst-served bas s 30 m nutes pr or to performance. Non-t cket ho ders w be seated 15 m nutes pr or to performance. T ckets to th s event are free to the pub c and can be p cked up beg nn ng March 14 at the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts Box Off ce or at The Ruston Da y Leader, wh ch s ocated at 212 West Park Avenue n Ruston and s open Monday through Fr day from 8:00-5:00 p.m. The Lou s ana Tech Box Off ce s ocated n the drama w ng of the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts and s open Monday through Fr day from 1:30-4:45 p.m. P ease m t f ve t ckets per person 13 2016-03-16 Monroe

Louisiana Tech earns Nursing School of the Year honors Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s D v s on of Nurs ng was named the 2016 Nurs ng Schoo of the Year-Undergraduate Degree Program by the Lou s ana Nurs ng Foundat on dur ng ts N ght nga e Awards Ga a he d recent y n Baton Rouge. The annua statew de event of the Lou s ana Nurs ng Foundat on recogn zes qua ty, serv ce, comm tment and exce ence for reg stered nurses throughout the State of Lou s ana. Nom nees n each category are rev ewed by a se ect pane of outof-state nurs ng eaders. The Lou s ana Nurs ng Foundat on s the research, educat on and char tab e subs d ary of the Lou s ana State Nurses Assoc at on. Accept ng the award on beha f of Lou s ana Tech s D v s on of Nurs ng were Dr. Donna Hood, d rector and professor of nurs ng; Nancy Dar and, professor of nurs ng; Caro Owens, assoc ate professor of nurs ng; Sarah McVay, ass stant professor of nurs ng; and Nor yn Hyde, nstructor of nurs ng and pres dent of Lou s ana State Nurses Assoc at on. In add t on to Lou s ana Tech s Nurs ng Schoo of the Year honor, Dar and was nom nated for Outstand ng Commun ty Ach evement by a Reg stered Nurse. John Harr s, pres dent of the Lou s ana Tech Student Nurses Assoc at on, and Aou cha Zorgat , secretary of the Lou s ana Tech Student Nurses Assoc at on were a so n attendance at the event. “The N ght nga e Awards Ga a s an even ng of ce ebrat on and recogn t on of the most outstand ng nurses, nurs ng programs and hea th care agenc es from across Lou s ana,” sa d Hood. “It was a pr v ege to represent Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w th th s honor. It ref ects the hard work and ded cat on of our nurs ng students, facu ty and staff.” Lou s ana Tech s nurs ng program recent y ce ebrated ts 40th year of educat ng reg stered nurses. The program was commended by the Lou s ana State Board of Nurs ng n 2015 for ts 100 percent censure pass rate for nurs ng graduates. “Our program was the on y one n the State of Lou s ana to have a 100 percent f rst attempt pass rate on the reg stered nurs ng censure exam for 2015 graduates,” Hood sa d. “In add t on to exce ent students, our nurs ng facu ty s comm tted to prov d ng an educat on exper ence that cha enges students to exce and supports the r deve opment n an atmosphere that mode s profess ona sm, car ng, and exce ence.” Hood says the reputat on of Lou s ana Tech and ts nurs ng program cont nue to attract a grow ng number of trad t ona and non-trad t ona students des r ng to enter the nurs ng profess on. “Th s outstand ng state recogn t on ref ects the exce ence of our program and the qua ty of our nurs ng graduates,” sa d Hood. Lou s ana Tech s D v s on of Nurs ng s comm tted to exce ence n the educat on of students of d verse educat ona and cu tura backgrounds prepar ng them to enter an ever chang ng hea th care env ronment as competent pract t oners of nurs ng. The educat ona env ronment fosters cr t ca th nk ng wh ch s ach eved through nteract on of facu ty w th students, s respons ve to commun ty needs, s cogn zant of reg ona and nat ona trends n hea th care de very, and recogn zes ts respons b ty for research and scho ar y act v ty, and serv ce. 13 2016-03-15 Monroe

La. Tech ranked first in state for best college “risk-reward” RUSTON - LendEDU, a nat ona marketp ace he p ng students and parents f nd transparency for student oans and student oan ref nance, has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 35 n the nat on accord ng to ts recent y re eased 2016 Co ege R sk-Reward Ind cator (CRRI) st. Lou s ana Tech has the h ghest CRRI of any pub c or pr vate un vers ty n Lou s ana and s one of on y two schoo s n the state to earn a spot n the Top 100. The Un vers ty of New Or eans was the other Lou s ana nst tut on, com ng n at No. 81. Pr nceton Un vers ty topped the 2016 st fo owed by CUNY-Baruch Co ege, CUNY-Queens Co ege, Eastern New Mex co Un vers ty and Ca forn a Inst tute of Techno ogy (Ca tech.)

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech eng neer ng organ zat ons honor outstand ng students “Desp te the cha enges and uncerta nty we ve faced over the past severa years, Lou s ana Tech has cont nued to be successfu n prov d ng our students w th an exce ent return on nvestment and an outstand ng educat ona va ue,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Pres dent Les Gu ce. “Good students want to attend a un vers ty where they earn a d p oma that s h gh y respected and w cont nue to grow n va ue throughout the r profess ona careers. “The nat ona recogn t on we cont nue to rece ve for va ue and ROI s a cred t to our facu ty and staff, and w he p Lou s ana Tech to produce the next generat on of eaders and nnovators for our state and our nat on.” LendEDU def nes “r sk” as the average student oan debt per graduate and “reward” as the average ear y career pay, or the med an sa ary for a umn w th 0-5 years of profess ona exper ence. The CRRI s ca cu ated by d v d ng the measure of reward by the measure of r sk and estab sh ng a numer ca va ue. Lou s ana Tech ach eved a CRRI of 2.79 w th average student oan debt per graduate of $16,855 and average annua ear y career earn ngs of $47,000. LendEDU compared the CRRI of 1,004 pub c and pr vate co eges n the Un ted States n determ n ng the 2016 rank ngs. The average CRRI n the 2016 rank ngs was 1.677 mean ng that the average ear y career pay w be about 67 percent h gher than student oan debt upon graduat on. Data from PaySca e.com s Co ege Sa ary Report was used to determ ne the measure of reward wh e data for the r sk measure came pr mar y from the Inst tute for Co ege Access & Success (TICAS.)

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech students w n state des gn pro ect compet t on The rank ng from LendEDU s the atest nat ona recogn t on for Lou s ana Tech and yet another acco ade for prov d ng students and graduates w th a super or va ue and return on the r educat ona nvestment. In March 2015, PaySca e.com s Co ege ROI Report ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana among a pub c and pr vate nst tut ons n overa return on nvestment (ROI) for both n-state and out-of-state students. It a so ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 13 n the nat on ( n-state tu t on) n h ghest annua percent ROI for students v ng on-campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d. K p nger, the nat on s most recogn zed pub sher of bus ness forecasts and persona f nance adv ce, ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the state and No. 66 n the nat on for n-state students at pub c nst tut ons, n ts Best Co ege Va ues 2016 report re eased th s past December. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana among pub c un vers t es for out-ofstate students and No. 80 nat ona y. LendEDU s 2016 Co ege R sk-Reward Ind cators st ng can be found at http:// endedu.com/b og/co ege-r sk-rewardnd cator. 13 2016-03-14 Monroe

La. Tech math students win regional awards RUSTON – Severa Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty students have won awards at the 2016 Lou s ana/M ss ss pp Sect on Meet ng of the Mathemat ca Assoc at on of Amer ca, he d recent y at Lou s ana State Un vers ty-Shreveport. Matthew Fu ts, who s ma or ng n mathemat cs and e ectr ca eng neer ng, won second p ace n the 11th Annua Lou s ana/M ss ss pp MAA Integrat on Bee. Fu ts says that he was prepared for the Bee as a resu t of the r gorous coursework that was prov ded by h s professors at Lou s ana Tech and ts Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Letter: Gu ce urges pub c to vo ce support for h gher ed In add t on to Fa ts award, a team of Lou s ana Tech students wh ch nc uded N cho as Co ns (mathemat cs), Aust n Kn es (mathemat cs and bus ness), Joshua James (mathemat cs) and Samue Johnson (chem ca eng neer ng), won f rst p ace n the Student Team compet t on. Co ns, the team eader, says that the group prepared by d vvy ng up top cs such as ca cu us, d fferent a equat ons, ana ys s, near and abstract a gebra so that each team member was prepared for prob ems that arose dur ng the compet t on. “Beyond a tt e rev ew, there was no need to prepare. We prepare every quarter s mp y by tak ng e mathemat cs courses at Tech,” Co ns sa d. “After years under tute age of Lou s ana Tech s amaz ng nstructors such as Dr. (J nko) Kanno and Dr. (Jonathan) Wa ters, t s hard not to do we at compet t ons ke these.” Dr. Kat e Evans, d rector of mathemat cs and stat st cs, and ndustr a eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech, says that wh e the awards are mpress ve, the students shou d a so be commended for the r n t at ve. “I am so proud of these students,” Evans sa d. “They n t ated part c pat on n the compet t ons, and I am p eased to see them recogn zed for the r hard work and mathemat ca accomp shments. They are great representat ves for Lou s ana Tech and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence.” “These compet t ons he p to br ng recogn t on to our Un vers ty and ts students and he p students to network w th other top students around the country,” Fu ts sa d. “They a so serve as mot vat on for students to study and earn other than ust a grade n a c ass. We are ucky here at Tech because the un vers ty and ts facu ty prov de and support many opportun t es for students to compete and showcase the r ta ents.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech eng neer ng professor awarded sc ence grant The Mathemat ca Assoc at on of Amer ca (MAA) s the argest profess ona soc ety that focuses on mathemat cs access b e at the undergraduate eve . Members nc ude un vers ty, co ege and h gh schoo teachers; graduate and undergraduate students; pure and app ed mathemat c ans; computer sc ent sts; stat st c ans; and many others n academ a, government, bus ness and ndustry. The m ss on of the MAA s “to advance the mathemat ca sc ences, espec a y at the co eg ate eve .” 13 2016-03-14 Monroe

La. Tech engineering organizations honor outstanding students RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty chapters of the Amer can Soc ety of C v Eng neers (ASCE), Assoc ated Genera Contractors of Amer ca (AGC), North Amer can Soc ety for Trench ess Techno ogy (NASTT) and Ch Eps on C v Eng neer ng Honor Soc ety honored outstand ng students n the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence recent y at the r w nter banquet. The ASCE and AGC honored f ve outstand ng un ors and sen ors dur ng the event for the r comm tment to academ c exce ence and ded cat on to the c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy programs. Each student rece ved a scho arsh p for the r ach evements.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech math students w n reg ona awards “Th s banquet s a chance to show our facu ty and staff, peers and organ zat ona eaders what we have ach eved over the past year, and to ay out what we p an to ach eve n the next year,” sa d Mary Vo s n, student pres dent of ASCE. “I am tru y honored to be part of ASCE and proud to be awarded the Outstand ng Jun or C v Eng neer ng Student Scho arsh p.” Banquet speaker A Mustapha, Reg on 5 Governor of the ASCE, a so spoke about benef ts that c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy students can get from be ng part of the ASCE organ zat on. The outstand ng un ors and sen ors for the AGC and ASCE are: Ty er Harre , AGC, Sen or, Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy, AGC/NASTT Ph anthrop st; Kather ne “Kat e” Lybrand, ASCE, Sen or, C v Eng neer ng, ASCE Concrete Canoe Capta n; James Ethan Nugent, AGC, Sen or, Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy, AGC/NASTT Pres dent; Mary Vo s n, ASCE, Jun or, C v Eng neer ng, ASCE Pres dent, Ch Eps on Pres dent, Tau Beta P Correspond ng Secretary; and Ma ory Wa ters, AGC, Sen or, Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy, AGC/NASTT Treasurer. “I am proud of Kat e and Mary,” sa d Dr. San ay Tewar , ASCE team adv sor and ass stant professor of c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy at Lou s ana Tech. “In add t on of be ng outstand ng students of c v eng neer ng they are exce ent eaders of ASCE student chapter.” Dr. Shaurav A am, NASTT student chapter adv sor and research ass stant professor of c v and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy, added that he s a so proud of the NASTT/AGC outstand ng students. “Ethan, Ma ory and Ty er are exce ent eaders of NASTT/AGC student chapter a ong w th the r good stand ng n the Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy.” Dr. Norman Pumphrey, assoc ate professor of c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy, and program cha r of construct on eng neer ng techno ogy, notes that the students who won the awards have been act ve y nvo ved n eadersh p w th n the r organ zat ons and have been ambassadors for Tech. “These students have been exce ent representat ves of the c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy programs and of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, and a are deserv ng of these scho arsh ps,” sa d Pumphrey. “They have been act ve y nvo ved n the eadersh p of Tech s student chapters of Assoc ated Genera Contractors and the North Amer can Assoc at on for Trench ess Techno ogy and the Amer can Soc ety of C v Eng neers, attend ng conferences and compet t ons. “The construct on eng neer ng techno ogy students have a so attended nat ona conferences and ass sted nat ona organ zers w th operat ona needs and network ng w th profess ona s.” The scho arsh ps are ntended to he p outstand ng students w th tu t on, books and other educat ona expenses. 13 2016-03-09 Monroe

La. Tech students win state design project competition RUSTON – A team of four Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty c v eng neer ng students won f rst p ace n the sen or des gn pro ect compet t on at the Lou s ana Transportat on Conference 2016. Jean-Pau Sandrock, Herman Ve azquez, Da ton Champagne and Morgan Harr s presented the r award-w nn ng pro ect, “T.L. James Lake Pedestr an Br dge” compet ng aga nst teams from the Un vers ty of New Or eans, Lou s ana State Un vers ty and the Un vers ty of Lou s ana at Lafayette. The Lou s ana Tech c v eng neer ng program rece ved a $1,000 award for the f rst-p ace pro ect. The pro ect, sponsored by the Lou s ana Purchase Counc , was ncorporated nto a sen or des gn course taught by Henry Cardenas, assoc ate professor of mechan ca eng neer ng; and Naz mudd n Was udd n, assoc ate professor of c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy and adv sor for the Transportat on Leadersh p Counc (TLC.) Both c v and mechan ca eng neer ng students part c pated n the sen or des gn exper ence, w th teams tak ng on a var ety of des gn cha enges that matched the r academ c background and persona nterests. Fatm r Menku as , ass stant professor of c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy and team adv sor for the hands-on port on of the pro ect, sa d that wh e the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s hands-on earn ng method p ayed an mportant ro e n the success of the pro ect, the award s a so the resu t of the group s hard work. “The students n the T.L. James Pedestr an Br dge Group have been except ona ,” Menku as sa d. “They showed ownersh p of the pro ect and undertook every task w th great enthus asm and conf dence. The r ded cat on and eagerness to earn pa d off at the Conference, where they were awarded the f rst p ace.” Dav d Ha , d rector of c v eng neer ng, construct on eng neer ng techno ogy and mechan ca eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech, a so serves as the assoc ate d rector of the Southern P a ns Transportat on Center (SPTC). The SPTC funded trave for a the Lou s ana Tech students through the TLC student chapter at Lou s ana Tech. “Our sen or des gn approach at Lou s ana Tech nks student teams w th rea -wor d pro ects prov ded by ndustr a , pub c and pr vate contacts,” Ha sa d. “In th s case, the des gn work comp eted by these sen or students benef ts a Boy Scout camp here n North Lou s ana. We are proud that the r accomp shments were recogn zed at the Lou s ana Department of Transportat on and Deve opment Conference.” In add t on to the capstone team, sen or c v eng neer ng students Tay or Tugg e, Bryce Pfe ffer, Paden Sparks and V ctor Zumaran were n attendance. The f rst-p ace team w make a f na presentat on of the “T.L. James Lake Pedestr an Br dge” pro ect to the C v Eng neer ng Adv sory Board th s May. 13 2016-03-09 Ruston

Louisiana Tech closure due to flooding, dangerous travel conditions LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING TECH-BARKSDALE AND SHREVEPORT CENTER, WILL BE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9 DUE TO FLOODING AND DANGEROUS TRAVEL CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT NORTH LOUISIANA. Department heads w not fy essent a personne requ red to work dur ng the c osure. Bas c serv ces for students rema n ng on-campus dur ng the c osure w be prov ded. Lou s ana Tech s Emergency Response Team s STRONGLY RECOMMENDING that students, facu ty and staff refra n from trave ng dur ng th s weather event, un ess abso ute y necessary. If trave s requ red, p ease exerc se extreme caut on and stay a ert to weather forecasts and cond t ons. F ash f ood watches and warn ng rema n n effect throughout the reg on as heavy ra n and the potent a for strong thunderstorms cont nue to occur. Off c a updates w be posted at www.ert. atech.edu. 13 2016-03-08 Monroe

La. Tech to host LSUHSC physiologist RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s w host a presentat on by Dr. Ne Granger, the Boyd Professor and head of the Department of Mo ecu ar and Ce u ar Phys o ogy at LSU Hea th Sc ences Center-Shreveport, on March 14 as part of ts New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es. Granger s presentat on t t ed, “How R sk Factors for Card ovascu ar D sease after the In ury Response to Ischem a and Reperfus on” s schedu ed for 3:30 p.m. n the aud tor um of Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Letter: Gu ce urges pub c to vo ce support for h gher ed In add t on to h s presentat on at Lou s ana Tech, Granger w be meet ng w th ch dren and parents from the Boys and G r s C ub of North Centra Lou s ana to ta k w th them about the mportance of v ng a tobacco free fe and the negat ve effects of tobacco on card ovascu ar hea th. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca doreraMoore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es w spot ght nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. Granger s the author of over 600 art c es n peer-rev ew ourna s, over 100 book chapters and the author/ed tor of s x books. He serves on the ed tor a boards of the Heart and C rcu at on, GI and L ver, and Ce sect ons of the Amer can Journa of Phys o ogy, as we as C rcu at on Research, M croc rcu at on, Shock, Pathophys o ogy, Free Rad ca B o ogy and Med c ne, Lymphat c Research and B o ogy, N tr c Ox de B o ogy, and Exper menta and Trans at ona Stroke Med c ne. Granger has rece ved severa awards and honors for h s research, nc ud ng the APS Bowd tch Award, the D st ngu shed Research Award from the GI Sect on of the APS, the Land s Award from the M croc rcu atory Soc ety, the Laerda Award from the Soc ety for Cr t ca Care Med c ne, and the McKenna Memor a Award from the Canad an Assoc at on of Gastroentero ogy. He has a so been honored w th the Do ph Adams Award from the Soc ety for Leukocyte B o ogy, the Career of D st nct on Award from the Oxygen Soc ety, the N sh maru-Tsuch ya Internat ona Award from the Japanese Soc ety for M croc rcu at on, and the Robert Berne Lecture & Award from the Card ovascu ar Sect on of the APS.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech graduates ce ebrate new beg nn ngs, opportun t es at commencement A ectures dur ng the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. Granger s v s t and meet ng w th the Boys and G r s C ub of North Centra Lou s ana are sponsored by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on and are part of a co aborat on w th Dewanna B ake, ass stant professor n the D v s on of Nurs ng at Lou s ana Tech, and students n the nurs ng program. “The nurs ng students w present nformat on on v ng a tobacco-free festy e wh ch nc udes br ng ng awareness to the hea th benef ts of a tobacco-free env ronment and the benef ts that smok ng cessat on prov des to the heart and ungs,” sa d B ake. “They w prov de nformat on about the hea th r sk for smok ng, us ng smoke ess tobacco and e-c garettes. The mportance of th s event s to educate on ways to mprove the hea th d spar ty for resp ratory re ated d seases, and encourage hea th promot on for the heart and body.” Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. For more nformat on on Granger and h s presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2016-03-07 Monroe

La. Tech, LSUHSC to host biomedical engineering conference RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s o n ng forces w th LSU Hea th Sc ences Center n Shreveport to br ng together b omed ca researchers and experts from across the nat on at the 32nd Annua Southern B omed ca Eng neer ng Conference (SBEC 2016), March 11-13 at the Shreveport Convent on Center. SBEC 2016 w draw ead ng experts, researchers, c n c ans, students and ndustry eaders from as far away as Saud Arab a and Ind a to share nterests n b omed ca app cat ons and to showcase transformat ve research n the emerg ng f e d of b omed ca eng neer ng. The Southern B omed ca Eng neer ng Conference, wh ch began n Shreveport n 1982, s he d annua y at var ous ocat ons throughout the southern Un ted States and has grown nto an nternat ona conference w th part c pants from every part of the Un ted States, Canada, South Amer ca, Europe and As a.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech rece ves $200K g ft for eng neer ng bu d ng “SBEC 2016 prov des a forum for researchers n eng neer ng and med c ne to present the r f nd ngs and atest advances n b omed ca research, earn from each other s ach evements, and dent fy potent a avenues of co aborat on n the near future,” sa d Dr. Bryant Ho ns, conference cha r and ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech. “The conference was created by nvest gators at Lou s ana Tech and LSUHSC pr mar y for b omed ca researchers at nst tut ons n the southern states of the U.S. S nce then, t has evo ved to an nternat ona conference and we are exc ted that, for the f rst t me s nce ts ncept on, t s return ng to ts b rthp ace n Shreveport.” Accord ng to Ho ns, co aborat ons promoted by the SBEC advance the sc ence and ay the foundat on for d scover es n eng neer ng and med c ne to the u t mate benef t of the pat ent and the econom c deve opment of the State of Lou s ana. Both Lou s ana Tech and LSUHSC possess resources that can be everaged to advance the state s overa sc ent f c stature n the nat on. “Lou s ana Tech has a strong eng neer ng departments and a very strong b omed ca eng neer ng nterd sc p nary center, the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS),” Ho ns sa d. “LSUHSC prov des va uab e ns ghts nto bas c sc ence and med ca cha enges. Together, Lou s ana Tech and LSUHSC can deve op creat ve so ut ons to mportant b omed ca prob ems, as has been shown repeated y n the past, has cont nued over t me and acce erated more recent y.” Areas of spec a nterest for SBEC 2016 nc ude neuromodu at on, mob e med c ne, b g data sc ence, b onanotechno ogy and b o mag ng app cat ons, b oeth cs and educat on, and w feature keynote ectures and student compet t ons. It a so prov des a venue for presentat on and d scuss on by sen or sc ent sts and young sc ent sts (post-doctora fe ows, graduate and undergraduate students) from around the wor d as we as exce ent opportun t es for network ng. “Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has one of the o dest b omed ca eng neer ng programs n the country, and part c pated n the ear est Southern B omed ca Eng neer ng Conferences,” sa d Dr. Stan Napper, v ce pres dent for research and deve opment at Lou s ana Tech. “W th new eadersh p and enthus ast c young facu ty n b omed ca eng neer ng, and w th a strong partnersh p w th co eagues at the LSU Hea th Sc ences Center n Shreveport, we are proud to be host ng the 32nd Annua SBEC.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech earns 10-year accred tat on from SACSCOC Accord ng to the Amer can Inst tute for Med ca and B o og ca Eng neer ng (AIMBE), b oeng neers work w th cutt ng-edge techno og es to tack e grand cha enges that def ne the human exper ence. They advance human hea th, eng neer better med c nes, create the too s of nnovat on and sc ent f c d scovery, and harness the power of b o og ca processes to a d our p anet. From the whee cha r that he ps peop e stay mob e to pa n med c nes to x-ray techno og es, the products deve oped by b oeng neers f t seam ess y nto everyday fe. “Lou s ana Tech s ab ty to host a conference w th nat ona and nternat ona mpact speaks wonderfu y to the opportun t es the un vers ty prov des to ts students and facu ty,” says Ho ns. “Th s conference w prov de our students and facu ty the opportun ty to present research to co eagues from around the wor d and form new co aborat ons “The prox m ty of the conference s ocat on to our campus n Ruston and our Shreveport Center w prov de add t ona educat ona opportun t es for students at both the undergraduate and graduate eve , as they w part c pate n the exchange of cutt ng-edge b omed ca research f nd ngs.” SBEC 2016 s be ng hosted and organ zed by Lou s ana Tech s Department of B omed ca Eng neer ng, Lou s ana Tech s Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS), Lou s ana State Un vers ty s Hea th Sc ences Center n Shreveport and the B omed ca Research Foundat on of Northwest Lou s ana. Exh b tors at SEBC 2016 nc ude the Innovat on Enterpr se at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, Nanoga a LLC, the B omed ca Research Foundat on of North West Lou s ana s Entrepreneur a Acce erator Program, ASH Industr es, Inc., Organ cNANO, and Spr nger. 13 2016-03-07 Monroe

La. Tech graduates celebrate new beginnings, opportunities at commencement RUSTON, La. – “Grab the re ns – and a safety he met – and ump n.” Th s was the message about fe g ven by keynote speaker Lou s ana Supreme Court Assoc ate Just ce Marcus C ark to 316 Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty graduates dur ng the schoo s 315th commencement exerc ses he d Saturday at the Thomas Assemb y Center. N nety-four students earned postgraduate degrees wh e 222 rece ved the r bache or s degree. Anna Kathryn Wh tehead, of Downsv e, graduated summa cum aude w th a 4.0 grade po nt average as she earned her Bache or of Sc ence degree n b o ogy.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on awards $518,000 grant for La. Tech “Cons der th s campus as a doorway to the next chapter of your fe,” sa d C ark. “The fee ng of accomp shment you have s much deserved. “For the rest of your days, the status of be ng a Lou s ana Tech graduate w serve you we . “Remember the peop e who paved the way for you and the peop e who p ayed an nstrumenta ro e n mak ng what s happen ng today a rea ty. For peop e ke your parents, th s may be a b ttersweet occas on. I say that because they ve been there for pract ces and rec ta s to h gh schoo dances – be m ndfu of the sacr f ces they made for you a ong the way. F nd a oved one who he ped you through th s. Go up to them and g ve them a hug, ook them n the eyes and say thank you. ” C ark a so rem nded the graduates of the work put n by the r “Tech fam y” to he p them pursue the r degrees. “Remember the facu ty, staff and adm n strat on and the t me they spent n he p ng you,” C ark sa d. “They are heroes and are the backbone of the educat on you ve rece ved. Not on y d d they offer hours of c assroom nstruct on, they prepared you to face the demands of rea fe. The tests they gave you offered you ways to f nd so ut ons and bu d conf dence. A of t prepar ng you to make a d fference n th s wor d.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Re v ng the or g ns of Lady Techster basketba C ark offered four key th ngs he sa d he d ke the graduates to remember as they move on n fe. “F rst, be yourse f,” C ark sa d. “Leave your footpr nt, because no one who came before you or w come after w eave the same mark. V ew the wor d as your own b ank canvas. Second – serve those around you. “Th rd, earn from your m stakes. They do not def ne you. And ast, be present. Take note of the tt e th ngs and apprec ate them. On y fear w prevent you from turn ng opportun ty nto rea ty.” C ark a so rem nded the graduates to remember Tech. “P ease, when you eave home – Lou s ana Tech – he p the un vers ty,” C ark sa d. “He p others rea ze the r goa s as you ve rea zed yours. You can do so by donat ng your t me, money or support. Even better, do a three. That s very mportant r ght now, espec a y n t mes of f nanc a cr s s.” Before wrapp ng up h s speech, C ark went off scr pt for a br ef moment. “How bout those Dogs?” C ark asked of the crowd regard ng the Tech baseba team s recent p ay. “They beat two Top 25 baseba teams. You can t ask for any better than that.” Before ntroduc ng C ark, Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce to d the graduates t was a day they a ways remember. “Many of those who started Tech w th you aren t here today,” Gu ce sa d. “Desp te the cha enges you faced, t was you who set goa s and worked t re ess y to ach eve them. It was you who showed perseverance and ded cated count ess hours to study, research and attend ng c ass. “You have made many memor es that w tru y ast a fet me. Today s tru y a m estone n your fe s ourney.” Lou s ana Tech s V ce Pres dent for Un vers ty Advancement Brooks Hu a so presented the Tower Meda on award of Ha of D st ngu shed A umn nduct on to 1951 account ng graduate John J. Long, a Shreveport nvestments and nsurance sa esman who served three terms as pres dent of the Lou s ana Tech A umn Assoc at on and he ped estab sh the Ha of D st ngu shed A umn n 1976. “I am moved emot ona y because I can now say that I have reached, whether or not deserved by mer t, the p nnac e of my asp rat ons. I am deep y apprec at ve of th s honor.” 13 2016-03-07 New Orleans

LA Tech working with NOPD to select new police officers Lou s ana Tech researchers are work ng w th the New Or eans Po ce Department to he p them se ect new off cers who w best f t the NOPD s new commun ty based approach to aw enforcement. Lou s ana Tech Professor Frank Igou says NOPD s ook ng for a part cu ar type of off cer as the department seeks to correct c v r ghts and m sconduct ssues that have occurred n the past. "What we re try ng to do s he p them come up w th the means to be ab e to determ ne who s the best f t n terms of ab t es, know edge sk s, ab t es, and other character st cs." Igou says be eves New Or eans PD contacted Lou s ana Tech because they have an ntens ve research and consu t ng group. He says researchers trave ed to New Or eans to s t n on po ce academy sess ons, r de a ong w th on-duty off cers, and to meet w th off c a s to determ ne who s needed on the force. "Our part of th s, the b g de verab e from us s go ng to be, we re go ng to produce a ser es, we a test battery to determ ne who gets nto the academy and who doesn t." Igou says they w formu ate test quest ons that app cants w take to udge the r apt tude and persona ty. "If they pass that test then they go on to other steps, wh ch can nc ude a background nvest gat on, a po ygraph test, a drug screen, psycho og ca eva uat on, and then a phys ca eva uat on." 13 2016-03-07 Ruston

TAKE A STAND FOR HIGHER ED Over the past coup e of weeks n Baton Rouge, our governor and our eg s at ve eaders have been engaged n nonstop d scuss ons and negot at ons to br dge a gap between the resources we have and the resources we w need to move Lou s ana forward. In an effort to preserve fund ng for h gher educat on and to ensure that future generat ons of Lou s anans have the same opportun t es for a co ege educat on that were afforded to us, these e ected representat ves have a ready made some tough dec s ons and, n the face of both support and oppos t on, have stepped out on beha f of those who are ook ng to them for conf dence and conf rmat on that strong pub c un vers t es w form the foundat on of the r futures n the state of Lou s ana. I acknow edge and express my apprec at on for the tough dec s ons our eg s ators are mak ng n support of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and a pub c un vers t es n our state. Throughout th s spec a sess on, we have asked our eaders to report to the front nes and secure our pos t ons n the batt e for h gher educat on. And they have made s gn f cant progress and ga ned much ground n that m ss on. H gher educat on serves such an mportant ro e n econom c and commun ty deve opment throughout our reg on, and has mmeasurab e mpacts on the c t zens and commun t es of our state. Our nst tut ons of h gher earn ng have become the ep centers for ndustry and nnovat on growth, commun ty serv ce and support, cu ture and f ne arts, and the overa mprovements n qua ty-of- fe n near y every corner of Lou s ana. In th s ro e and w th th s respons b ty, our un vers t es s mp y cannot afford to take a step backwards as we are an essent a part of the so ut on to a strong and prosperous future for Lou s ana. The progress that has been made on beha f of h gher educat on has been encourag ng and commendab e, but there s st much that needs to be done n the ast few days of th s spec a sess on. A revenue shortfa st ex sts and t w take more tough dec s ons by our e ected eaders to br dge the gap and ensure stab e fund ng for h gher educat on. I encourage a fr ends and advocates of h gher educat on across the state to stand w th our eaders and support the r efforts to fund h gher educat on and preserve the opportun t es that have been afforded to us by those who have served n the past. P ease end your vo ce and commun cate c ear y and construct ve y w th our eaders about the mportance of a strong and product ve pub c un vers ty nfrastructure as a top pr or ty for the state of Lou s ana. Les Gu ce Pres dent Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty 13 2016-03-07 Ruston

TECH’S COED RECEIVES $20K GRANT Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on was awarded a $20,000 research grant for ts effort n the state s Be eve and Prepare program. The Be eve and Prepare Educator Grant Program was started to encourage mentor ng programs who work w th teachers n prepar ng cert f cat on grow the number of teachers n fu -year res denc es and ncrease the number of spec a educat on teachers. Amy Vesse sa d Tech was awarded the research grant from the success of the C n ca Res denc es program, a fu -year student teach ng exper ence. 13 2016-03-04 Monroe

Louisiana Tech researchers helping NOPD find ‘best fit’ in new officers RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - AROS, a research and consu t ng group compr sed of facu ty and students w th n Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s ndustr a -organ zat ona psycho ogy doctora program, s partner ng w th the New Or eans Po ce Department to deve op an entry- eve se ect on test battery and ana ys s too s to dent fy the best cand dates for ts po ce academy and future aw enforcement commun ty. As the New Or eans Po ce Department s mov ng to a new commun ty-based approach to aw enforcement w th ncreased ne ghborhood engagement, AROS s work ng w th them to change the department s organ zat ona structure and h r ng processes n an effort to se ect peop e who w be a “best f t” for the new cu ture that s be ng mp emented. “AROS was or g na y contacted by the C ty of New Or eans C v Serv ce n 2014 as they were fam ar w th our work w th the LSUS Center for Human Serv ces and Pub c Po cy (CHSPP),” sa d Dr. Frank Igou, coord nator of the ndustr a organ zat ona psycho ogy master s program and assoc ate professor of psycho ogy at Lou s ana Tech. “We had worked c ose y w th CHSPP perform ng ob ana ys s to redeve op entry- eve se ect on and promot ona procedures for Lou s ana State Patro .” The New Or eans Po ce Department s current y under a consent decree to correct c v r ghts and m sconduct ssues that had occurred n the past. In partner ng w th the New Or eans Po ce Department to gather data to ass st w th chang ng the r nterna methodo og es and personne se ect on processes, AROS students trave ed to New Or eans to meet w th a federa udge, attended a consent decree hear ng, s t n on po ce academy sess ons, r de a ong w th on-duty po ce off cers and conduct numerous nterv ews, focus groups and meet ngs w th aw enforcement off c a s of a ranks. Igou says the exper ence was of great benef t to the AROS facu ty and students, and speaks h gh y of the reputat on and mpacts that AROS can have on an organ zat on. “At Lou s ana Tech and n the Co ege of Educat on, we often take t for granted that many of our fau ty members are not ust good sc ent st, but they are a so very exper enced pract t oners,” Igou sa d. “I th nk th s s ref ected across the un vers ty n the act v t es of the facu ty and staff, and the product on of the r students. We attract a h gh ca ber of students who are ab e to make these pro ects happen. A though the fau ty contr bute expert se and exper ence from the r areas, t s the student ownersh p of the pro ects that rea y eads to the r success.” Through exper ences ke those w th the New Or eans Po ce Department, AROS doctora students are cont nu ng to grow n the r understand ng of advanced psycho og ca theor es, sound research methods, and how to app y those fundamenta s to rea -wor d organ zat ons. The group s managed by facu ty and everages the energy, enthus asm and creat v ty of ts graduate students. AROS has executed pro ects for g oba , reg ona and oca organ zat ons across mu t p e ndustr es n the areas of personne se ect on, emp oyee engagement, performance appra sa , and data ana ys s. They have worked w th mu t nat ona organ zat ons and Fortune 500 compan es n the deve opment of so ut ons to overcome organ zat ona obstac es. “AROS he ps ump start the careers of our program graduates,” says Igou. “Instead of mere y read ng about the theory, concepts and research, they re ab e to take what s covered n c asses and app y t n rea wor d s tuat ons and w th actua c ents. Students who graduate from Lou s ana Tech s ndustr a -organ zat ona psycho ogy Ph.D. program are often ab e to h t the ground runn ng w th the r f rst emp oyer.” 13 2016-03-04 Ruston

TECH ANNOUNCES NEW INITIATIVE As the westernmost parts of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s campus evo ve nto the Enterpr se Campus, the nes between campus and downtown Ruston w beg n to b ur. J m K ng sa d the un vers ty and downtown Ruston a m to become un f ed. D fferent changes to campus w come together to form the Master P an 2020. 13 2016-03-01 Ruston

Nanotechnology leads way in natural gas conversion process W th n s x months, sc ent sts be eve they may be c ose to comp et ng a nanotechno ogy cata yst to a ow affordab e, marketab e petro eum product us ng nanotechno ogy to convert natura gas to qu d form. Courtesy Photo Shown above s the therma sk d, wh ch s part of the F scher-Tropsch reactor. Courtesy Photo Courtesy Photo Shown above s the therma sk d, wh ch s part of the F scher-Tropsch reactor. Courtesy Photo Jup ter Fue s LLC, ocated at Camp M nden, n partnersh p w th Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has been work ng for the ast three years to deve op a more affordab e way to convert natura gas, thereby mak ng t more affordab e to consumers. Dav d Madden, pres dent of the company, says the u t mate goa s a cheaper way to convert natura gas to qu d. “It wou d be a new cata yst to make F scher-Tropsch more eff c ent,” he sa d. “There s ots of natura gas. We have natura gas everywhere. If you convert natura gas and turn t nto a stab e qu d that w not evaporate at room temperature, then you can transport t anywhere you want to.” Current y, some energy compan es are us ng cryogen c techno ogy that compresses natura gas nto a frozen quef ed natura gas, around -120 Fahrenhe t. They put t on a sh p, transport t to Europe or As a and then thaw t out for use. Th s process wou d e m nate a that, he sa d. Off c a s w th Jup ter Fue s say convert ng t to qu d fue s a ows the use of ex st ng fue product on nfrastructure and ex st ng transportat on techno og es. “It s the goa of th s pro ect to cont nue the process of deve op ng cata ysts used n the F scher-Tropsch Synthes s that can be ut zed on a commerc a sca e,” accord ng to a descr pt on of the pro ect from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Research Center. “Operat ona ana ys s w exam ne var ab es nc ud ng temperature, pressure, convers on on cata yst performance, and space ve oc ty perta n ng to product d str but on and cata yst fet me. In order to ncrease product on, efforts w focus on u t mate cata yst depos t on and cata yst substrate preparat on.”

The process bu ds on the F scher-Tropsch (pronounced F sher-Trope) method of convers on d scovered by two German sc ent sts – Franz F scher and Hans Tropsch – n the 1920s. The dea s to take carbon monox de and hydrogen and convert t to qu d fue . The new cata yst uses nanotechno ogy to nk together the compounds needed to convert natura gas to qu d, Madden sa d. “Thus far, we ve been pretty successfu n d a ng that n accurate y,” he sa d. The nanotechno ogy s ns de the F scher-Tropsch reactor, Madden exp a ned, say ng t ooks ke a w re brush someone wou d c ean a barbecue gr w th. But t s sma enough that a person wou d have to ook at t through an e ectron m croscope. “We re mak ng nano-w res, and a nano s a b onth of a meter,” he sa d, “and we re mak ng w res that are about 25 atoms w de.” Jup ter Fue s was born about three years ago when Lou s ana Tech was seek ng support for ts ath et c programs. The Maddens dec ded to nvest n the un vers ty s math and sc ence program. Two sc ent sts – Drs. Chester W son and John McDona d – deve oped a work ng theory us ng nanotechno ogy but needed a p ace to test the theory. Thus Jup ter Fue s, a p ot p ant, came to be. McDona d, a professor at Lou s ana Tech, works for ASI, or Amer can Strateg c Innovat ons Energy and Defense Research, a s ster company of Jup ter Fue s. “As we progress n our cata yst deve opment vers ons, we can start up the reactor, run t and check the resu ts,” Madden sa d. “We actua y th nk we re pretty c ose to be ng through w th a marketab e nanotechno ogy cata yst for gas to qu d convers on.” It w be a huge w n for Lou s ana Tech, the Inst tute of M cro manufactur ng and north Lou s ana, he sa d. “When Lou s ana Tech, Camp M nden and Jup ter Fue s and the commun ty work ng together to deve op new commerc a products, we a w n,” Madden added. 13 2016-03-01 Ruston

TECH SGA TAKES STANCE AGAINST CUTS The Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Student Government Assoc at on does not agree w th Gov. John Be Edwards proposed budget cuts on state pub c h gher educat ona nst tut ons. Tech s SGA recent y passed a reso ut on c ar fy ng the r pos t on regard ng the proposed $131 m on state h gher educat on budget cuts n hopes that the state Leg s ature, governor s off ce and Board of Regents w sten to the r stance. 13 2016-02-29 Ruston

Local University Has 'Master Plan' For Improvements Lou s ana Tech s Campus Master P an . "It s a ong-term v s on for the un vers ty n an effort to br ng the academ c core, res dent a fe, student fe, ntramura , a aspects of the un vers ty c oser together," says Dave Guer n, Lou s ana Tech Commun cat ons D rector. Guer n says a of those components work together for the un vers ty n a pos t ve way n order to prov de students w th a comprehens ve and enr ched co ege exper ence. W th th s master p an, many renovat ons w occur on campus. "Park ng and res dent a ha s, and student fe bu d ngs, food courts, rea y ust about any aspect of the co ege exper ence that you can th nk of s encompassed n the master p an and our v s on for that," says Guer n. A ong w th changes on an academ c eve ns de the c assroom. "Techno ogy and student engagement, and the way that students commun cate and co aborate are very mportant. They change year to year," says Guer n. Adm n strators say though the campus s gett ng a make-over, t w not oose t s h stor c touch. "We have such a r ch trad t on here and our a umn have a fond memory of the r t me here. We want to honor that and we want to ncorporate that nto the phys ca aspects of the master p an," says Guer n. Changes to Lou s ana Tech w occur over a 20-year per od. "It rea y doesn t have a sunset or an exp rat on date. t s a concept, t s a v s on for the un vers ty, be ng ab e to grow," says Guer n. C ck on the fo ow ng nk to earn more about Lou s ana Tech s master p an. http://www. atech.edu/masterp an/ 13 2016-02-25 Shreveport

Airline students to benefit from Metro Aviation partnersh Metro Av at on has partnered w th the A r ne H gh JROTC av at on program to ass st students n gett ng the r w ngs and he p ng the r profess ona careers take f ght. Photo by Amanda S mmons/Press-Tr bune Photo by Amanda S mmons/Press-Tr bune Impressed w th A r ne s one-of-a-k nd h gh schoo av at on program n Lou s ana, Metro Av at on has purchased a f ght s mu ator for hands-on nstruct on at the schoo and w offer pa d nternsh p opportun t es th s summer to a handfu of students. “Th s type of pa d nternsh p can ead to a fet me career n the av at on ndustry and s an opportun ty that co ege students wou d ove to have,” sa d Ma or Greg K mbrough, nstructor of A r ne s ground schoo . Jun or Lauren Mart n s ust one of the students ut z ng th s opportun ty. She has seen progress and growth n her own ab t es s nce her f rst s mu ated f ght. “It was very d fferent at f rst. It s much d fferent see ng t v rtua y,” Mart n sa d. “I got used to t though. The b ggest advantage s I know what to expect when I get nto a cockp t.” That s exact y what M ton Ge tz, Metro Av at on Manag ng D rector, wants to happen. “We str ve to f nd oca ta ent and teach them the ropes. We hope th s partnersh p w th A r ne H gh Schoo w he p us cu t vate young ta ent and ntroduce students to the end ess poss b t es ava ab e to them n the r own backyard,” Ge tz sa d. Photo by Amanda S mmons/Press-Tr bune Photo by Amanda S mmons/Press-Tr bune A r ne s av at on program has rece ved nterest from a over the state and country. Fam es from out of state have shown nterest n mov ng to Boss er spec f ca y for the r ch dren to pursue av at on stud es at A r ne, then enro after graduat on n the Lou s ana Tech Profess ona Av at on program. “I have had students at LSU n Baton Rouge ca and ask f they cou d get nto the A r ne H gh Schoo program. It s garner ng nat ona attent on as we ,” K mbrough sa d. It was a year ago that A r ne announced a partnersh p w th Lou s ana Tech for dua enro ment, enab ng h gh schoo av at on students to rece ve co ege cred t. S nce then, the program has rea y taken f ght, putt ng Boss er Par sh and A r ne H gh Schoo ahead n the f e d of av at on. Jason Row and, Pr nc pa at A r ne H gh Schoo , sa d h s schoo w cont nue to deve op programs and opportun t es that w g ve students these k nds of opportun t es. “We are go ng to take advantage of every chance we get to offer cutt ng edge programs that are demanded n today s workforce,” Row and sa d. 13 2016-02-24 Monroe

Louisiana Tech earns 10-year accreditation from SACSCOC RUSTON, La (La Tech Re ease) - Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has rece ved off c a conf rmat on of ts decenn a accred tat on from the Southern Assoc at on of Co eges and Schoo s Comm ss on on Co eges (SACSCOC.) The accred tat on, wh ch Lou s ana Tech has he d cont nuous y s nce 1927, was approved n December 2015 dur ng the SACSCOC annua meet ng n Houston, and off c a y awarded to Lou s ana Tech by SACSCOC s Board of Trustees ast month. “SACSCOC accred tat on s essent a to Lou s ana Tech s nst tut ona m ss on and our efforts to enhance academ c qua ty and educat ona exper ences for our students,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “I am proud of our reaccred tat on w th SACSCOC and s ncere y thank a those who worked t re ess y to prepare for th s rev ew and present the strengths and mer ts of Lou s ana Tech.” For severa days n March 2015, an on-s te team of externa peer rev ewers v s ted Lou s ana Tech for meet ngs and d scuss ons w th facu ty, staff, students, a umn and commun ty eaders. The SACSCOC team conducted a deta ed ana ys s and exam nat on of over 90 core, comprehens ve and Federa standards. The ent re accred tat on rev ew process, wh ch represents approx mate y two years of p ann ng and coord nat on, conc uded w th f na approva at the annua SACSCOC meet ng on December 5-8, 2015. “Th s s a r gorous, mu t -year process cons st ng of the comp et on of a se f-study Comp ance Cert f cat on document address ng approx mate y 100 standards and the deve opment of a Qua ty Enhancement P an (QEP),” sa d Dr. Shery Shoemaker, Lou s ana Tech s SACSCOC accred tat on a son and dean of Lou s ana Tech s Graduate Schoo . “Every un t on th s campus contr buted to th s process.” One of the cornerstones of the SACSCOC rev ew process was an exam nat on of Lou s ana Tech s proposed Qua ty Enhancement P an ca ed “BLUE FIRE: Ign t ng Commun cat on Exper ences.” BLUE FIRE s des gned to mprove student effect veness n commun cat on sk s and mprove student engagement n persona deve opment sk s through a robust f rst-year nterd sc p nary exper ence. “The SACSCOC process for reaff rmat on of accred tat on s a r gorous, peer-dr ven process a med at cont nuous mprovement of student earn ng n the context of the Un vers ty commun ty,” sa d Dr. Terry McConathy, v ce pres dent for academ c affa rs at Lou s ana Tech. “Every aspect of the ro es and funct ons of the Un vers ty s scrut n zed by off-s te, ons te, and members of the SACSCOC Board of Trustees and de egates to the annua meet ng.” Lou s ana Tech s accred ted by the SACSCOC to award assoc ate, bacca aureate, master, and doctora degrees. 13 2016-02-23 Monroe

La. Tech professor named to list of nation’s best in healthcare informatics RUSTON – Dr. Ange a Kennedy, department head and professor of hea th nformat cs and nformat on management at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has been recogn zed as one of “20 of Amer ca s Best Hea thcare Informat cs Researchers, Professors and M nds” by Pok tDok, a prov der of c oud-based web serv ces to ntegrate hea thcare transact ons nto apps, webs tes or products. Accord ng to ts b og post ng of the st, Pok tDok says hea th nformat cs, a fast-grow ng f e d wh ch focuses on us ng nformat on techno ogy to mprove hea thcare de very, has count ess profess ona opportun t es for the future. The current generat on of researchers at Amer ca s co eges and un vers t es w have a profound mpact on the f e d and ts future as t cont nues to grow. “It was a n ce surpr se to be recogn zed as one Amer ca s top 20 professors n Hea th Informat cs,” sa d Kennedy. “For me, t s work that I en oy, and t s an honor to be recogn zed by my co eagues. In Lou s ana, as we as n the U.S., we have a ot of work to do. Hea th Informat cs can change the face of hea thcare and the hea thcare ndustry. I ook forward to be ng a part of that work and the pos t ve change that t w br ng to a consumers.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on awards $518,000 grant for La. Tech Kennedy, a two-t me graduate of Lou s ana Tech hav ng earned a bache or s degree n hea th nformat on adm n strat on and a master s degree n educat on, s a Reg stered Hea th Informat on Adm n strator and Cert f ed Hea thcare Qua ty Profess ona w th over 25 years of exper ence n the hea th nformat on and nformat cs f e d. She has served as Pres dent of the Amer can Hea th Informat on Management Assoc at on s (AHIMA) Board of D rectors and rece ved the r D amond Award for Leadersh p n 2014. Kennedy a so served two terms as pres dent of the Lou s ana Hea th Informat on Management Assoc at on (LHIMA) and test f ed before the Un ted States Senate HELP Comm ttee n 2015. “Dr. Ange a Kennedy s most deserv ng of be ng nc uded on a nat ona st of the top 20 researchers and profess ona s n Hea thcare Informat cs,” sa d Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. “In the fa of 2015, she was nv ted by the Un ted States Secretary of Hea th and Human Serv ces to serve on the Hea th IT Standards Comm ttee for a term wh ch w go through August 2018. Th s s a prest g ous appo ntment on a nat ona comm ttee that makes recommendat ons on standards, spec f cat ons, and cert f cat on cr ter a for e ectron c exchange and use of hea th nformat on.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Lou s ana Tech chem stry student pub shed n h gh prof e, nternat ona ourna “We are very fortunate to have an adm n strator, ke Dr. Kennedy, who s recogn zed both at the state and nat ona eve s for prov d ng eadersh p n the hea th nformat cs ndustry.” Kennedy has been honored profess ona y by the AHIMA w th ts Tr umph Award and by the LHIMA w th the organ zat on s D st ngu shed Member and Career Ach evement awards. She s a member of the Amer can Hea th Informat on Management Assoc at on, the Lou s ana Hea th Informat on Management Assoc at on and the Comm ss on on Accred tat on of Hea th Informat cs and Informat on Management. To v ew the comp ete “20 of Amer ca s Best Hea thcare Informat cs Researchers, Professors and M nds” st from Pok tDok, v s t http://b og.pok tdok.com/hea thcare- nformat cs-researchers/. 13 2016-02-19 Monroe

Abraham announces National Science Foundation grant for Louisiana Tech WASHINGTON (Press Re ease) - Congressman Ra ph Abraham, M.D., R-A to, announced Thursday that the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on has awarded Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty a grant worth more than ha f a m on do ars. The $518,155 grant w go toward boost ng Tech s eng neer ng program. The grant s part of a program that seeks to enhance the way students earn eng neer ng n an effort to educate, reta n and tra n more eng neers. “Lou s ana Tech s a ready a prem er un vers ty for study ng eng neer ng. Pres dent Les Gu ce and h s facu ty do a tremendous ob of educat ngthe next generat on of STEM graduates. Th s grant w he p them further the r m ss on of meet ng and f ng these h gh-demand obs,” sa d Dr. Abraham, a member of the House Comm ttee on Sc ence, Space and Techno ogy. Dr. Gu ce pra sed the work of professor Mar sa Orr for her work n the eng neer ng program and her efforts n secur ng the grant. “The mpacts Dr. Orr s work n he p ng students to make good academ c dec s ons, wh ch w affect both the r co ege and profess ona careers, w be fe t for beyond Lou s ana Tech and ong after the students graduate. I am gratefu for the support of the NSF and the eadersh p of Congressman Ra ph Abraham n foster ng research and nnovat on at Lou s ana Tech and a nst tut ons of h gher educat on n our state,” Dr. Gu ce sa d. 13 2016-02-19 Monroe

National Science Foundation awards $518,000 grant for La. Tech The Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on has awarded Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty a grant worth more than ha f a m on do ars. The $518,155 grant w go toward boost ng Tech s eng neer ng program. The grant s part of a program that seeks to enhance the way students earn eng neer ng n an effort to educate, reta n and tra n more eng neers.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech showcases nnovat ve c n ca res dency program “Lou s ana Tech s a ready a prem er un vers ty for study ng eng neer ng. Pres dent Les Gu ce and h s facu ty do a tremendous ob of educat ng the next generat on of STEM graduates. Th s grant w he p them further the r m ss on of meet ng and f ng these h gh-demand obs,” sa d Congressman Ra ph Abraham, a member of the House Comm ttee on Sc ence, Space and Techno ogy. Dr. Gu ce pra sed the work of professor Mar sa Orr for her work n the eng neer ng program and her efforts n secur ng the grant. “The mpacts Dr. Orr s work n he p ng students to make good academ c dec s ons, wh ch w affect both the r co ege and profess ona careers, w be fe t for beyond Lou s ana Tech and ong after the students graduate. I am gratefu for the support of the NSF and the eadersh p of Congressman Ra ph Abraham n foster ng research and nnovat on at Lou s ana Tech and a nst tut ons of h gher educat on n our state,” Gu ce sa d.

TOP VIDEOS Dr ver f shta s on h ghway n 13 nches of snow Dr ver f shta s on h ghway n 13 nches of snow 00:36 Panda tr es to c mb...then tumb es and adorab y fa s Panda tr es to c mb...then tumb es and adorab y fa s 00:50 Ra se your g ass! It s Nat ona Dr nk W ne Day! Ra se your g ass! It s Nat ona Dr nk W ne Day! 00:45 Watch panda cubs take wobb y baby steps Watch panda cubs take wobb y baby steps 00:40 Students step n the name of Bern e Sanders Students step n the name of Bern e Sanders 00:32 Po : Sanders shows edge over C nton aga nst GOP Po : Sanders shows edge over C nton aga nst GOP 00:32 90-year-o d veteran den ed passport 90-year-o d veteran den ed passport 01:35 What you need to know about how the Supreme Court works What you need to know about how the Supreme Court works 01:18 Para yzed Mar ne wa ks aga n w th robot c exoske eton Para yzed Mar ne wa ks aga n w th robot c exoske eton 01:27 Monroe Mayora Debate Monroe Mayora Debate 00:30 LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY Lou s ana Tech s Derr c Jean (1) had a career-h gh 16 po nts aga nst UTSA on Thursday. La. Tech p cks up w n No. 20 Un vers ty News Serv ce Lou s ana Tech s Derr c Jean (1) had a career-h gh 16 po nts aga nst UTSA on Thursday. La. Tech p cks up w n No. 20 Staff Reports F e Art Sports TV/rad o for Feb. 19-20 Lou s ana Tech tops Texas-San Anton o, 87-74 UTEP s Dom n c Art s co des hard w th Southern M ss guard Khar Pr ce n the f rst ha f of the r game Thursday at the Don Hask ns Center. UTEP b ows ear y ead, ra es for b g w n B Kn ght Brand W ngate goes up for a shot aga nst UTSA dur ng Thursday s game. W ngate, Pumroy ead Techsters past UTSA Staff Reports 13 2016-02-19 Shreveport

Louisiana Supreme Court Justice to serve as Louisiana Tech's commencement speaker Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w c ose ts w nter quarter March 5 and Lou s ana Supreme Court Just ce Marcus R. C ark w serve as commencement speaker at graduat on. The ceremony w be he d at 10 a.m. n the Thomas Assemb y Center. C ark, who graduated w th h s aw degree from Lou s ana State Un vers ty n 1985, worked as the ch ef fe ony drug prosecutor at the Ouach ta Par sh D str ct Attorney s Off ce before be ng e ected d str ct udge to the Fourth Jud c a D str ct Court n 1997. Dur ng h s tenure, he vo unteered as drug court udge and served as ch ef udge from 2004-2006. C ark was e ected to the Lou s ana Supreme Court n 2009. He serves as cha rman of the Budgetary Contro Board and serves on the Sher ff s Execut ve Management Inst tute Board, the Interna Aud t Comm ttee and the Human Resources Comm ttee. C ark a so s the Supreme Court s a son to the Lou s ana D str ct Judges Assoc at on. C ark and h s w fe A yson, who s a neonata nurse at St. Franc s Med ca Center, ve n West Monroe. They have two ch dren, N co e and Cooper. Commencement w s gna the end of the w nter quarter for the un vers ty. Spr ng c asses w beg n Wednesday, March 9. 13 2016-02-18 Ruston

Louisiana Tech University researchers study prevalence, impact of 'serial inventors' RUSTON, La. - Researchers from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty have pub shed a study on the preva ence and mpacts of "ser a nventors" - sc ent st and eng neers w th n un vers ty research commun t es who are part cu ar y nvent ve and produce patents at a h gh eve . The art c e t t ed, "Preva ence of Ser a Inventors n Academ a" has been pub shed n a recent ssue of "Techno ogy and Innovat on", a ourna of the Nat ona Academy of Inventor (NAI.) Dr. R chard Korda , d rector of Lou s ana Tech s Off ce of Inte ectua Property and Commerc a zat on; Dr. Dexter Cahoy, assoc ate professor of mathemat cs and stat st cs; Dr. Er c Sherer, ass stant professor of chem ca eng neer ng; and Beatr x Koev, former Lou s ana Tech graduate student, coauthored the paper wh ch deta s a st of nventors on a U.S. patents ssued to f ve ma or research un vers t es over a 23year per od, and h gh ghts the outs zed contr but ons of ser a nventors. "We were nterested n determ n ng f ke ser a entrepreneurs there are ser a nventors, and quant fy ng what percentage of the tota nventors they make up," sa d Korda . "There have been many stud es pub shed about ser a entrepreneurs, but fewer about ser a nventors. For the purposes of the r research, we def ned an nventor as a person who has been granted a US patent." The study d st ngu shes " nventor" from researchers who may have d sc osed a d scovery or a potent a y patentab e nvent on to the r respect ve un vers ty techno ogy cens ng off ces. S nce not a d scover es are patentab e and/or commerc a zab e, patent protect on s common y on y pursued on a fract on of a d scover es. Korda says the study s resu ts support the common y he d be ef that a sma percentage of h gh perform ng nventors (ser a nventors) are respons b e for a d sproport onate number of patents be ng generated by a research organ zat on. "Approx mate y 10 percent of facu ty nventors account for about 50 percent of the patents generated at a un vers ty," Korda sa d. "Part cu ar y str k ng was that th s percentage was dent ca among a f ve ma or un vers t es stud es, nd cat ng t may be a un versa fact. We a so found th s to be true here at Lou s ana Tech as we . "We a so be eve that the success of these h gh y creat ve and product ve nd v dua s s due n arge part to the r success n bu d ng and susta n ng product ve research groups. Key s the r ab ty to obta n fund ng for the r research pro ects from sponsors." Korda and h s team a so be eve the r f nd ngs are t me y g ven uncerta n budget t mes. An un ntended consequence of cut backs to state support for h gher educat on cou d be the oss of these top perform ng researchers to other we -off states that cont nue to nvest n h gher educat on. "There s a compet t on among un vers t es for these ser a nventors and star facu ty, and we cou d be n danger of os ng them to other states f we do not nvest n h gher educat on. Th s oss of key nnovators cou d have ong ast ng negat ves effects on our econom c deve opment efforts." 13 2016-02-17 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Professor Honored by Underground Construction Technology Association RUSTON, La. (Press Re ease) – Dr. Tom Ise ey, professor of c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy and d rector of the Trench ess Techno ogy Center at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has been se ected a 2016 UCTA MVP (Most Va uab e Profess ona ) by the Underground Construct on Techno ogy Assoc at on (UCTA) and Underground Construct on magaz ne. Ise ey rece ved the prest g ous honor for h s contr but ons to the underground nfrastructure ndustry dur ng the UCTA s MVP ceremony at the annua Underground Construct on Techno ogy Internat ona Conference and Exh b t on. The spec a uncheon was a so he d recent y at the Georg a Wor d Congress Center n At anta, Georg a. “I am overwhe med w th grat tude that the Underground Construct on Techno ogy Assoc at on and Underground Construct on magaz ne have shown n se ect ng me for UCTA s Most Va uab e Profess ona for my contr but ons to the underground nfrastructure ndustry” Ise ey sa d of the award. “It s such an honor to rea ze that my peers have recogn zed my contr but ons to have th s eve of s gn f cance. “My father and grandfather were water and sewer p pe ne contractors, so t s even more mean ngfu to know that th s recogn t on s for contr but ons made to the underground construct on ndustry.” Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at Lou s ana Tech, sa d that Ise ey s se ect on as MVP s nd cat ve of the nnovat on and expert se that Ise ey br ngs to the f e d of trench ess techno ogy. “Dr. Ise ey sn t ust an MVP for underground construct on techno ogy,” Hegab sa d. “He s an MVP for Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, and we are fortunate to have h m on our team. W th extens ve exper ence n the ndustry, he has very qu ck y brought renewed nterest and enthus asm to our Trench ess Techno ogy Center, and I am exc ted about many of the new n t at ves he s deve op ng.” Mr. Reg na d Jeter, profess ona n res dence for the construct on eng neer ng techno ogy program at Lou s ana Tech, and Lou s ana Tech c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy students Just n Ca houn, Mad son Fu ford, Ty er Harre , Zack Hernandez, Ryan Laborde, Moath Mohammed, Ethan Nugent, Samman Paude , LaDarr us Thomas, Ma ory Wa ters and Ian Wymore a so part c pated n the conference as presentat on ass stants and were on hand to congratu ate Ise ey. Dur ng h s near y 40 year career n the p ann ng, des gn and construct on of underground nfrastructure systems, Ise ey has served on the facu ty of severa un vers t es and s a found ng d rector of the North Amer can Soc ety for Trench ess Techno ogy (NASTT). Ise ey a so served for three years as the cha rman of the Nat ona Ut ty Contractors Assoc at on s (NUCA) Trench ess Techno ogy Comm ttee. At Lou s ana Tech, Ise ey he ped estab sh the Trench ess Techno ogy Center, an nnovat ve and nternat ona y renowned research center that s at the forefront of trench ess techno ogy research, and the Bur ed Asset Management Inst tuteInternat ona , a non-prof t, nternat ona corporat on that eva uates and deve ops bur ed asset management protoco s for underground water nfrastructure. In Apr 2015, Ise ey was se ected as a D st ngu shed Member of the Amer can Soc ety of C v Eng neers (ASCE) for h s em nence n eng neer ng, becom ng ust one of on y 637 D st ngu shed Members ever se ected by the ASCE. The ASCE represents more than 146,000 members of the c v eng neer ng profess on n 174 countr es. 13 2016-02-17 Monroe

Wyly Tower to be razed, replaced P ans are n p ace to demo sh and rep ace Wy y Tower and Prescott L brary on the Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty campus, but Dave Guer n, d rector of market ng and pub c re at ons for the un vers ty, caut oned that the pro ect s n very ear y phases of a mu t -year p an. Wy y Tower of Learn ng, wh ch was bu t n the ear y 70s, s a 16-story fac ty and s the ta est bu d ng n Ruston. It houses an an aud tor um, part of the un vers ty brary, the un vers ty arch ves, the computer abs, mu t p e co eges and severa adm n strat ve off ces. The second, 12th and 15th f oors were gutted and renovated n 2006.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Evange WR Jones no onger comm tted to Tech due to po t ca events Though the bu d ng was retrof tted w th an automat c f re suppress on system, t was constructed w th asbestos-conta n ng f re proof ng that h nders the ab ty to upgrade the fac ty. Inspect ons from the Off ce of the State F re Marsha c ted def c enc es. The un vers ty has had an emergency pro ect subm tted s nce 2011 to reso ve the c tat ons. Structura prob ems nc ude: Sta rwe s shou d ex t to the exter or of the bu d ng; E evator shafts and sta rwe s need to be comp ete y sea ed; F re a arm system does not meet current code; W ndows a ow water ntrus on and are not energy eff c ent — asbestos prevents rep ac ng the w ndows; The 16-story he ght means c ty cannot ma nta n adequate f re protect on, makes structure d ff cu t to ma nta n; Mechan ca , contro systems don t meet vent at on requ rements; HVAC system s no onger re ab e; e evators shou d be updated; Bu d ng c rcu at on, restrooms fa to meet ADA standards. Guer n sa d the determ nat on that the bu d ng had to be torn down and cou d not be repa red took years of study and contemp at on. The three-story Prescott Memor a L brary s ad acent to Wy y Tower and w be nc uded n the demo t on. The basement of the brary eaks, caus ng a r contro prob ems and water damage. He sa d the un vers ty st has no f na p ans for what w rep ace the structure and the ear est est mate for f na p ans n June 2017. Wy y Tower w stand unt then. The new bu d ng ke y wou dn t be bu t unt 2019 or 2020. A task force s work ng on where the brary, other off ces and department, w be housed wh e the renovat on s ongo ng. The un vers ty p ans to occupy the tower unt t s t me for demo t on. Guer n sa d the bu d ng s safe to occupy. The pro ect w be pa d for through cap ta out ay w th ass stance from the Lou s ana Bond Comm ss on, but the current budget c mate n the state cou d have an effect, Guer n sa d. 13 2016-02-16 Monroe

Louisiana Tech receives gift from Hunt, Guillot & Associates RUSTON, La. The Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence (COES) at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has rece ved a generous g ft of $200,000 from Ruston eng neer ng f rm Hunt, Gu ot & Assoc ates, to support ts campa gn to bu d a new Integrated Eng neer ng and Sc ence Educat on Bu d ng. Th s donat on from Hunt, G ot & Assoc ates (HGA), ts second ma or g ft to COES pro ect, w contr bute to bu d ng the argest academ c bu d ng on the Lou s ana Tech campus and w prov de much needed space for the pro ect-based earn ng that the Lou s ana Tech Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s known for. The Integrated Eng neer ng and Sc ence Bu d ng w further cement Lou s ana Tech s reputat on as a nat ona eader n eng neer ng and sc ence educat on. Mr. Trott Hunt, found ng partner and pres dent of HGA and member of the COES s Eng neer ng and Sc ence Foundat on Board, notes the mpact that the Co ege has had on the company. “Lou s ana Tech has p ayed a va uab e ro e n our company from the beg nn ng, prov d ng a read y ava ab e source of qua f ed, competent graduates that have come n and been key contr butors to our success,” Hunt sa d. “We are proud to be ab e to support the program by donat ng to the new eng neer ng bu d ng and fee th s fac ty w be an mportant part of the schoo and the commun ty for years to come.” Mr. Jay Gu ot, found ng partner and pr nc pa at HGA, echoes Hunt s assert on that HGA s comm tment to Lou s ana Tech s benef c a for both the Un vers ty and the company. “Lou s ana Tech graduates have been ntegra to HGA s success and growth,” Gu ot sa d. “HGA s support of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s a way to g ve back and he p ensure the Co ege s future success. The mpact of that support nc udes graduates who can he p prov de HGA w th a so d eng neer ng foundat on n a departments. The r we -rounded educat on has been a key part of HGA s f ex b ty and success.” Hunt adds that n add t on to profess ona t es to the Lou s ana Tech commun ty, fam y t es to the un vers ty a so dr ve h s des re to he p support eng neer ng and sc ence at Tech. “My father- n- aw, Dr. Jack Canterbury, was a respected mechan ca eng neer ng professor at Lou s ana Tech for many years, and part of our donat on s to honor h s serv ce to the schoo and ts graduates,” Hunt cont nued. “It s exc t ng to be a part of the growth and be ab e to ensure a f rst c ass earn ng env ronment for eng neer ng students for the future.” In add t on to the Dr. Jack Canterbury Sophomore Eng neer ng Lab, HGA s comb ned g fts have estab shed the Jay Gu ot Freshman Honors Lab and the Don P ummer Freshman Honors Lab. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, says he s apprec at ve of the cont nu ng re at onsh p between Lou s ana Tech and HGA. “We are gratefu to rece ve th s add t ona g ft from HGA for our new ntegrated eng neer ng and sc ence bu d ng,” Hegab sa d. “They have been a tremendous partner and supporter for our Co ege and our students. These add t ona funds w a ow us to fu y equ p two of the freshman eng neer ng honors c ass abs to prov de students an mmers ve env ronment for our pro ect-dr ven curr cu a.” HGA s a mu t -d sc p ned pro ect management and eng neer ng serv ces f rm headquartered n Ruston, Lou s ana, w th more than 450 emp oyees, 13 ocat ons n Lou s ana, Texas, Pennsy van a, A abama and New York, and serv ces throughout more than 30 states, Canada and Mex co. A though pr vate g fts to the Integrated Eng neer ng and Sc ence Bu d ng campa gn have exceeded the or g na goa of $7.5 m on, the scope of the pro ect has been expanded, and the bu d ng w be approx mate y tw ce as arge as n t a y p anned. G fts to the bu d ng are st needed to ensure that c assrooms and abs are equ pped and ma nta ned w th the atest techno ogy, and named spaces are st ava ab e to thank and recogn ze s gn f cant contr butors to the pro ect. The new bu d ng s on schedu e for groundbreak ng th s spr ng w th comp et on expected by fa of 2017. For more nformat on about the pro ect and g ft opportun t es, contact the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at [email protected] atech.edu or (318) 257-4971. 13 2016-02-16 Ruston

› home › TECH DIRECTOR EARNS TOP AWARD L ndsey Ke th-V ncent, d rector of the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center and Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng for Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Reg on VIII from the Lou s ana Assoc at on of Computer Us ng Educators. Ke th-V ncent rece ved the honor w th over 400 co eagues and educat ona eaders n attendance at th s year s LACUE Conference n New Or eans. LACUE prov des a forum and support for educators to share deas and mater a s as we as represent ng the needs of educators and students as they re ate to the use of techno ogy, espec a y computers, w th n nstruct ona env ronments to reg ona , state, and nat ona agenc es. “I was honored and humb ed when contacted about the se ect on by Debb e Pender,” Ke th-V ncent sa d. “LACUE s compr sed of an amaz ng group of educators that are mak ng great str des n e- earn ng, and I am fortunate to get to work w th many n LACUE through Sc TEC s Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach. I def n te y be eve I earn much more from those I serve than they do from me.” As the d rector of Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent co aborates w th co eagues across the nat on and deve ops STEM-focused fund ng and outreach n t at ves n the PK-20 arena. She manages the Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach, the IDEA P ace, Lou s ana s on y NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research co aborat ve, and the Lou s ana Tech P anetar um. Sc TEC has been a cr t ca contr butor to the des gn, deve opment, and support of recent arge sca e un vers ty n t at ves nc ud ng the UTeachTech program, wh ch s supported through a $1.5 m on grant from the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute and the Nat ona Math and Sc ence In t at ve. In add t on to her ro e n Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent serves n the Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng and prov des eadersh p on effort re ated to grow ng and enr ch ng persona and profess ona connect ons between the Co ege of Educat on and ts const tuents and stakeho ders. “As d rector for Outreach and Externa Fund ng for the Co ege of Educat on, L ndsey person f es the v s on and sp r t of our co ege n that she exemp f es exce ence through educat on,” sa d Don Sch nger, dean of Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “Through the mu t p e un ts she d rects, nc ud ng the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center and the Off ce for Profess ona Educat on Outreach, Mrs. Ke th-V ncent prov des the resources, support and co aborat ve env ronment necessary for educators to grow profess ona y. “I am very p eased that she s a key member of our eadersh p team, and speak ng for the ent re Co ege of Educat on fam y, we are very proud of her for ach ev ng th s award.” The Co ege of Educat on at Tech seeks to prov de h gh qua ty educat ona exper ences for current and prospect ve profess ona s, from bacca aureate through doctora eve s, to enhance and extend the know edge bases under-g rd ng profess ona programs through research and other scho ar y act v t es, and to de ver profess ona serv ces to the var ous bus nesses, c v c and educat ona commun t es through co aborat ve endeavors. 13 2016-02-16 Ruston

› home › TECH DIRECTOR EARNS TOP AWARD L ndsey Ke th-V ncent, d rector of the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center and Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng for Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Reg on VIII from the Lou s ana Assoc at on of Computer Us ng Educators. Ke th-V ncent rece ved the honor w th over 400 co eagues and educat ona eaders n attendance at th s year s LACUE Conference n New Or eans. LACUE prov des a forum and support for educators to share deas and mater a s as we as represent ng the needs of educators and students as they re ate to the use of techno ogy, espec a y computers, w th n nstruct ona env ronments to reg ona , state, and nat ona agenc es. “I was honored and humb ed when contacted about the se ect on by Debb e Pender,” Ke th-V ncent sa d. “LACUE s compr sed of an amaz ng group of educators that are mak ng great str des n e- earn ng, and I am fortunate to get to work w th many n LACUE through Sc TEC s Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach. I def n te y be eve I earn much more from those I serve than they do from me.” As the d rector of Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent co aborates w th co eagues across the nat on and deve ops STEM-focused fund ng and outreach n t at ves n the PK-20 arena. She manages the Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach, the IDEA P ace, Lou s ana s on y NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research co aborat ve, and the Lou s ana Tech P anetar um. Sc TEC has been a cr t ca contr butor to the des gn, deve opment, and support of recent arge sca e un vers ty n t at ves nc ud ng the UTeachTech program, wh ch s supported through a $1.5 m on grant from the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute and the Nat ona Math and Sc ence In t at ve. In add t on to her ro e n Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent serves n the Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng and prov des eadersh p on effort re ated to grow ng and enr ch ng persona and profess ona connect ons between the Co ege of Educat on and ts const tuents and stakeho ders. “As d rector for Outreach and Externa Fund ng for the Co ege of Educat on, L ndsey person f es the v s on and sp r t of our co ege n that she exemp f es exce ence through educat on,” sa d Don Sch nger, dean of Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “Through the mu t p e un ts she d rects, nc ud ng the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center and the Off ce for Profess ona Educat on Outreach, Mrs. Ke th-V ncent prov des the resources, support and co aborat ve env ronment necessary for educators to grow profess ona y. “I am very p eased that she s a key member of our eadersh p team, and speak ng for the ent re Co ege of Educat on fam y, we are very proud of her for ach ev ng th s award.” The Co ege of Educat on at Tech seeks to prov de h gh qua ty educat ona exper ences for current and prospect ve profess ona s, from bacca aureate through doctora eve s, to enhance and extend the know edge bases under-g rd ng profess ona programs through research and other scho ar y act v t es, and to de ver profess ona serv ces to the var ous bus nesses, c v c and educat ona commun t es through co aborat ve endeavors. 13 2016-02-16 Ruston

WYLY TOWER TO BE DEMOLISHED Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Wy y Tower of Learn ng, Ruston s ta est bu d ng, s schedu ed to be demo shed due to nfrastructura cha enges. Named n honor of Char es Wy y Sr. the bu d ng was constructed n 1973, Sam and Char es Wy y. Char es Wy y Sr. s sons, were ma or contr butors to the construct on costs of the bu d ng. Wy y Tower s d v ded nto two sect ons — Prescott Memor a L brary and the adm n strat on off ces ocated on the e eventh through s xteenth f oors. Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2016-02-12 Monroe

La. Tech director earns post-secondary award for region RUSTON. -– L ndsey Ke th-V ncent, d rector of the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center (Sc TEC) and Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng for Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Reg on VIII from the Lou s ana Assoc at on of Computer Us ng Educators (LACUE.) Ke th-V ncent rece ved the honor w th over 400 co eagues and educat ona eaders n attendance at th s year s LACUE Conference n New Or eans. LACUE prov des a forum and support for educators to share deas and mater a s as we as represent ng the needs of educators and students as they re ate to the use of techno ogy, espec a y computers, w th n nstruct ona env ronments to reg ona , state, and nat ona agenc es. “I was honored and humb ed when contacted about the se ect on by Mrs. Debb e Pender,” Ke th-V ncent sa d. “LACUE s compr sed of an amaz ng group of educators that are mak ng great str des n e- earn ng, and I am fortunate to get to work w th many n LACUE through Sc TEC s Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach. I def n te y be eve I earn much more from those I serve than they do from me.” As the d rector of Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent co aborates w th co eagues across the nat on and deve ops STEM-focused fund ng and outreach n t at ves n the PK-20 arena. She manages the Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach (OPEO), the IDEA P ace, Lou s ana s on y NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research co aborat ve, and the Lou s ana Tech P anetar um. Sc TEC has been a cr t ca contr butor to the des gn, deve opment, and support of recent arge sca e un vers ty n t at ves nc ud ng the UTeachTech program, wh ch s supported through a $1.5 m on grant from the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute and the Nat ona Math and Sc ence In t at ve. In add t on to her ro e n Sc TEC, Ke th-V ncent serves n the Off ce of Outreach and Externa Fund ng and prov des eadersh p on effort re ated to grow ng and enr ch ng persona and profess ona connect ons between the Co ege of Educat on and ts const tuents and stakeho ders. “As D rector for Outreach and Externa Fund ng for the Co ege of Educat on, L ndsey person f es the v s on and sp r t of our co ege n that she exemp f es exce ence through educat on,” sa d Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “Through the mu t p e un ts she d rects, nc ud ng the Sc ence and Techno ogy Educat on Center and the Off ce for Profess ona Educat on Outreach, Mrs. Ke th-V ncent prov des the resources, support and co aborat ve env ronment necessary for educators to grow profess ona y. “I am very p eased that she s a key member of our eadersh p team, and speak ng for the ent re Co ege of Educat on fam y, we are very proud of her for ach ev ng th s award.” The Co ege of Educat on at Lou s ana Tech seeks to prov de h gh qua ty educat ona exper ences for current and prospect ve profess ona s, from bacca aureate through doctora eve s, to enhance and extend the know edge bases under-g rd ng profess ona programs through research and other scho ar y act v t es, and to de ver profess ona serv ces to the var ous bus nesses, c v c and educat ona commun t es through co aborat ve endeavors. 13 2016-02-12 Ruston

A Message from Louisiana Tech President Les Guice – Higher Education Budget Over the past e ght years and as a resu t of the efforts of our campus commun ty, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has made s gn f cant mpacts and ach eved substant a growth n the face of unprecedented f nanc a constra nts and operat ona cha enges. These accomp shments have shown what can be accomp shed when work ng together to create opportun t es for our students and our state. Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce Desp te these ach evements and our comm tment to bu d ng a better tomorrow for a Lou s anans, we f nd ourse ves today on the thresho d of a budgetary cr s s that cou d cr pp e h gher educat on n the State of Lou s ana and cou d destroy the momentum and ab ty of Lou s ana Tech to produce the graduates and econom c mpacts needed to susta n a hea thy and progress ve workforce. The cuts that are be ng cons dered r ght now wou d have a cr pp ng mpact on near y every aspect of our campus fe and our commun ty. Now more than ever, the a umn and fr ends of Lou s ana Tech must be act ve advocates for our un vers ty. We cannot s t on the s de nes and hope that others w speak oud enough for our nst tut on and the h gher educat on commun ty. I strong y urge you to contact your eg s ators and commun ty eaders, and te them that fund ng for pub c un vers t es must be preserved f we are to fu f our ob gat ons to our students, our commun ty and ndustry partners, and the c t zens of our state. We must effect ve y commun cate to them that h gher educat on s a cr t ca part of the so ut on to Lou s ana s f nanc a cha enges, and not a source of the prob em. The upcom ng spec a eg s at ve sess on represents an unequ voca turn ng po nt for Lou s ana Tech and, qu te poss b y, one of most mportant chapters n the h gher educat on story that w be to d for generat ons to come. Make no m stake about t…the budgetary dec s ons that are made n the next few weeks w affect every reg on, every commun ty, every bus ness and organ zat on, and every Lou s anan. P ease stay act ve and engaged n th s f ght for Lou s ana Tech and h gher educat on. I w keep you updated as best I can and wou d ask that you encourage others to end the r vo ces and advocate on beha f of Lou s ana Tech and our ent re h gher educat on commun ty. Dr. Les Gu ce Pres dent 13 2016-02-12 Ruston

CONSTRUCTION OF IESE BUILDING SET What students now see as a grave park ng ot w soon evo ve nto the argest academ c bu d ng Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s campus has ever known. Th s structure, known as the Integrated Eng neer ng and Sc ence Educat on bu d ng, s expected to beg n ts ascent n Apr , un vers ty Pres dent Les Gu ce sa d. He sa d the 130,000-square-foot, three-story IESE bu d ng w be a structure w th permanence. “We cha enged the arch tects to do someth ng spec a n the des gn,” Gu ce sa d, “to create a bu d ng that, 50 years from now when peop e are ook ng back, they say, Wow. That s an mpress ve fac ty. ” Ronn e Huckaby Jr., a un or mechan ca eng neer ng student, sa d he th nks the IESE w create a fr end er space for students to study and nteract. “I th nk I wou d have been more nc ned to stay n the bu d ng and study,” Huckaby sa d. “I k nd of w sh that I wou d have had that when I was com ng up. Maybe t w make more of the freshmen eng neers meet new peop e.” H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, sa d the IESE s des gned to better accommodate pro ectbased earn ng. “That type of act v ty genera y takes up a ot more space than maybe a trad t ona ecture type scenar o,” Hegab sa d. “We ve renovated a few spaces n Bogard Ha to accommodate for our freshman eng neer ng curr cu um, but we needed more fac t es, more space, to accommodate that type of curr cu um.” Hegab sa d the IESE w have versat e c assrooms that can serve a var ety of purposes. “There w be good-s zed rooms that have tab es that can be rearranged,” he sa d. “A ot of the rooms have power ava ab e to them from the ce ng. The ma n th ng we kept n m nd n the des gn of a ot of the c assrooms s try ng to make sure that they are go ng to be f ex b e for the ong-term.” Huckaby sa d the des gn of the f ex b e c assrooms w mprove eng neer ng educat on. “They have done a very good ob of try ng to make ntegrated c assrooms,” he sa d. “To where t s very easy to teach, very easy to earn.” Hegab sa d the IESE bu d ng w come comp ete w th a student he p desk. “Because we are do ng a th s pro ect-based earn ng, there s go ng to be a student he p desk or ach evement center,” Hegab sa d. “It s go ng to prov de students access to parts and k ts and th ngs that they need for the r courses, as we as access to some of the prototype equ pment that can he p supp ement what they do n c ass.” In add t on to f ex b e c assrooms, Hegab sa d the eng neer ng bu d ng w feature a g ass atr um w th a sp ra sta rcase. The atr um s expected to serve as a gather ng space for up to 1,000 peop e. “One of the attract ons for us n part cu ar s that we want to have a arge space n the bu d ng to be ab e to have events n,” Hegab sa d. Accord ng to the campus master p an, the upcom ng IESE bu d ng w , a ong w th ex st ng Bogard, Nethken and Carson Tay or ha s, so d fy the eastern area of campus as the sc ence and eng neer ng d str ct. 13 2016-02-11 Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech announces honor roll for fall quarter Ed tor s Note: Students whose names are fo owed by an aster sk were named to the pres dent s st. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has announced ts fa quarter pres dent s and dean s honors sts. Students named to the pres dent s honor st must earn a 3.8 grade-po nt average for n ne semester hours w th no grade ower than a B. To be e g b e for the dean s honor st, a student must have a 3.5 GPA w th no grade ower than a C for n ne semester hours comp eted. On y undergraduates w th no ncomp ete grades are e g b e to make e ther st. Students earn ng the honors nc ude the fo ow ng: East Fe c ana Par sh Jackson: Norman Frank Cook IV and Sydney C. Womack S aughter: Freddr cka Mar e Carter, Lawrence Harvey Daute IV* and Qu nton L. Townse * West Fe c ana Par sh St. Franc sv e: Russe L. B ggs, Ca e A. Bu o , Brandon M. Stewart* and John Ham ton W s* 13 2016-02-10 Monroe

Backlash against Civil Rights Movement set for discussion RUSTON – In commemorat on of B ack H story Month, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s h story department w sponsor, “The Southern Man festo: Mass ve Res stance and the F ght to Preserve Segregat on,” by Dr. John Ky e Day, an assoc ate professor of h story at the Un vers ty of Arkansas at Mont ce o. The ta k w take p ace at the L nco n Par sh L brary at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 11 and s free and open to the pub c. In th s d scuss on, Day w recount the h story of the Southern Man festo, a statement ssued by wh te southern segregat on st po t c ans n def ance of the U.S. Supreme Court s h stor c 1954 Brown dec s on, wh ch out awed schoo segregat on and ushered n the c v r ghts movement s era of d rect act on protest. Day w not on y narrate the story of Southern Man festo, wh ch he sees as modern Amer ca s “s ng e worst ep sode of rac a demagoguery,” but he w a so exp a n “the statement s mpact upon both the strugg e for b ack freedom and the arger rac a dynam cs of postwar Amer ca.”

THENEWSSTAR.COM Mess ng w th the Const tut on The ta k s based on Day s recent book, “The Southern Man festo: Mass ve Res stance and the F ght to Preserve Segregat on,” pub shed by the Un vers ty Press of M ss ss pp . Day s ta k s o nt y sponsored by the Lou s ana Tech h story department, the L nco n Par sh L brary and the Lambda-Rho chapter of the Ph A pha Theta h story honor soc ety, w th the support of the McG nty Trust. For add t ona nformat on, contact Dr. Dav d M. Anderson, assoc ate professor of h story and coord nator of B ack H story Month events at Lou s ana Tech, at 318-257-2872 or by ema at h [email protected] atech.edu. Add t ona nformat on on Day s book can be found at www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1865. 13 2016-02-10 Monroe

La. Tech showcases innovative clinical residency program RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s TEAM Mode C n ca Res dency Program had an opportun ty to showcase tse f th s week dur ng a v s t to L nco n Par sh by Ju e Stephenson and Rebecca Free and of the Lou s ana Department of Educat on s (LDOE) Be eve and Prepare Educator Grant Program. The TEAM (Teacher Educators and Mentors) program at Lou s ana Tech represents a transformat ve redef n t on of the expectat ons and ro es of teacher educators and schoo mentors n the c n ca exper ences. The program, co-d rected by Drs. Dawn Bas nger and Amy Vesse from Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on, has been embedded n severa L nco n Par sh e ementary schoo s. Part c pat ng nterns are prepared for n t a cert f cat on n a co-teach ng env ronment surrounded by a TEAM of support.

THENEWSSTAR.COM La. Tech h stor ans present work at nat ona conference “The success we are see ng n the TEAM mode s a testament to every s ng e team member of our mode , from the pr nc pa s to d str ct eaders to un vers ty eadersh p to the nterns,” sa d Vesse . “However, the true key to the c n ca res dency program success cont nues to be the nvo vement of h gh y qua f ed and mot vated mentor teachers.” M che e Chauv n, ead mentor and teacher at Cypress Spr ngs E ementary n Ruston, mode ed the TEAM eva uat on system w th ntern Laura Dav dson. Cand ce Co e, mentor and teacher at G en V ew E ementary n Ruston, co-taught mathemat cs w th Lou s ana Tech ntern Dest ny Maxwe , us ng a para e co-teach ng strategy. Lou s ana Tech nterns and L nco n Par sh mentors part c pated n nterv ews at each of the schoo s nc ud ng Ruston E ementary where Lou s ana State Super ntendent John Wh te made a surpr se v s t. Wh te pra sed the strength of the partnersh p between Lou s ana Tech s teacher preparat on program and L nco n Par sh Schoo s wh ch he says s exemp f ed by the ear y success of the c n ca res dency program and TEAM mode . Wh te a so shared h s perspect ve on the va ue of the c n ca res denc es and offered the TEAM members an opportun ty to share the r ref ect ons on th s nnovat ve nstruct ona exper ence. “Th s new and nnovat ve approach to teacher tra n ng rep aces the trad t ona student teach ng mode that was onequarter/semester n durat on, w th a fu -year c n ca exper ence gu ded by h gh y qua f ed mentors,” sa d Bas nger. Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on and L nco n Par sh Schoo Board were among the state eaders n p ot ng a fu -year (c n ca res dency) student teach ng program w th 11 vo unteers dur ng the 2014-2015 academ c year. The next phase of th s trans t on s occurr ng th s year w th 14 nterns be ng p aced n three oca e ementary schoo s.

THENEWSSTAR.COM Tech s four oca recru ts share bonds through n ury, hardsh ps Dr. Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on, says th s research-based exp orat on of onger and r cher c n ca exper ences s expected to resu t n enhanced accountab ty, more r gorous teacher cand date se ect on and p acement, ncreased ntegrat on of proven curr cu a, strengthened pub c schoo -un vers ty partnersh ps, and mproved dent f cat on of what works and how to best support cont nuous mprovement. “Wh e mp ement ng th s p an s ach evab e and worthwh e, t w be cha eng ng n that t requ res a rea ocat on and ncrease of resources and staff ng and ncreased comm tment by teacher cand dates,” Sch nger sa d. “G ven the cha enges, we are very enthus ast c about the pos t ve outcomes resu t ng from the co aborat on occurr ng between the co ege s teacher preparat on profess ona s and the educat on eaders n L nco n Par sh.” Dr. Bryan McCoy, cha r of the department of curr cu um, nstruct on and eadersh p added, “We are ndebted to the LDOE for the seed fund ng prov ded by Be eve and Prepare grants that serve as the act vat on energy and support to enact these transformat ve n t at ves.” In August 2015, the C n ca Res dency Research Center was estab shed n the Co ege of Educat on to conduct research on the effect veness of nstruct ona mode s assoc ated w th c n ca res dency and mentor ng. Through add t ona fund ng prov ded by the LDOE Be eve and Prepare grants, new schoo mentor teams have been dent f ed, and tra n ng s extend ng beyond L nco n Par sh to our new partners n Ouach ta, C a borne and Un on Par shes. 13 2016-02-10 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Lecture Series Welcomes Distinguished Chemist, Chemical Biologist RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w host a presentat on by Dr. W ma K O son, the Mary I. Bunt ng Professor of Chem stry and Chem ca B o ogy at Rutgers Un vers ty, on February 15 for the next nsta ment of ts 2015-2016 New Front ers n B omed ca Eng neer ng sem nar ser es. O son s presentat on t t ed, “Ins ghts nto Gene Express on and Packag ng from Computer S mu at on” w take p ace at 3:30 p.m. n the aud tor um of Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. W th n the nuc eus of each ce es DNA – an unfathomab y ong, tw sted and ntr cate y co ed mo ecu e – segments of wh ch make up the genes that prov de the nstruct ons that a ce needs to operate. O son w d scuss how a ce stores the genet c nformat on ns de the nuc eus and how t s comp cated by the necess ty of ma nta n ng access b ty to DNA for genet c process ng. “The ta k w focus on our recent treatment of the commun cat on between prote ns attached to prec se y constructed stretches of DNA and chromat n,” says O son. “Our s mu at ons account for the enhancement n commun cat on detected exper menta y. The mo ecu ar states captured n the s mu at ons offer ns ghts nto the ways that the DNA and var ous prote ns contr bute to ong-range commun cat on a ong the genome.” O son rece ved her doctora degree from Stanford Un vers ty (1971), an A.P. S oan Fe owsh p (1975-1977), and a J. S. Guggenhe m Fe owsh p (1978-79). She served as v ce pres dent of the Internat ona Un on of Pure and App ed B ophys cs and as Pres dent of the B ophys ca Soc ety. O son s a so a Fe ow of the B ophys ca Soc ety, wor d-renowned ecturer and researcher w th numerous pub cat ons, awards and honors. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne and an ass stant professor n b o og ca sc ences, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es w spot ght nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. Sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. O son s presentat on s sponsored by Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. A ectures dur ng the ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. For more nformat on on O son and her presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2016-02-05 Ruston

ECO-CAR TEAMS GEAR UP FOR DETROIT Two oca schoo s w seek to cont nue the r success at the 2016 s She Eco-marathon Amer cas n Detro t. The Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Eco-Car team and Ruston H gh Schoo s Bearcat Motorsports, former y known as Ruston H gh EcoCar, have been work ng a schoo year for the event n Apr . She Eco-marathon d sp ays student des gned and bu t cars, focus ng on the ndustry s standards of energy eff c ency. In ast year s compet t on, Tech s eco-car p aced second n the UrbanConcept d ese category and broke barr ers w th a compressed natura gas-powered veh c e. Tech s natura gas veh c e was a so the on y natura gas car to pass techn ca nspect on and run on the course. Both cars rece ved pra se from former ate n ght show host and car enthus ast Jay Leno. Sen or co-capta n Xav er Ther ot sa d the Tech team has 20 act ve members and the teams are work ng on the r second p ace f n sh ng d ese veh c e and a new Compressed Natura Gas veh c e. Ther ot sa d the teams goa s to cont nue ts success from ast year s second p ace f n sh and a so pass nspect on and run the track for the CNG veh c e. “It s a hard task, but we re focus ng on one th ng at a t me and we fee ke we can cont nue on w th our success,” he sa d. Freshman Ky e Dupree sa d the outs de body of the CNG car s made of carbon f ber to make t ghter and the team des gned a components of the car. “From the whee s to the body, t s a been done by us,” he sa d. “We p an to f n sh r ght before the compet t on.” Freshmen R ey Sp man sa d t w take a team effort to bu d the veh c e and update the d ese veh c e, but she fee s they can accomp sh anyth ng together. “We re young, but we he p each other out,” she sa d. “We have a ot a of freshmen, but the upperc assmen show us what to do and we are gett ng a ot of exper ence a ong the way.” Ruston H gh Schoo s team p aced both n the d ese prototype and gaso ne prototype compet t ons. Compet ng aga nst h gh schoo and un vers ty teams around the wor d, the team p ace s xth n the d ese prototype and 11th n the gaso ne prototype compet t ons. In add t on to p ac ng n the compet t ons, RHS sen or Mad son Woo ey was se ected as one of the 12 students from across the country to part c pate n a spec a sess on w th She execut ves and sc ent sts. Th s year, the team s n the process of bu d ng the newest car — Bearcat III — and updated the o der veh c e Bearcat II. The teams teacher and co-sponsor Randa E ott sa d the r goa s to rank h gher n the prototype gaso ne category, the Bearcat II, and rank n the UrbanConcept des gn, Bearcat III. Woo ey sa d updates to Bearcat II and the bu d ng of Bearcat III have gone smooth y. “We f n sh r ght before the compet t on,” she sa d. “We have to make sure a the nuts and bo ts are work ng before we turn t on.” For now, the b ggest he p the Ruston H gh Schoo team needs, s donat ons, sen or Ca sey Baster sa d. “We take any donat ons or sponsors,” she sa d. “We need the fund ng for the construct on and he p gett ng (to Detro t for the compet t on).” In order to donate, sponsor or donors can ema [email protected] .com, dust nwh t [email protected] .com or p ck up a form from NewTech @ Ruston to make a donat on. “Th s team works hand n hand together and we re proud,” sen or Just n Gr ff n sa d. “We cou d use a the he p we can get.” E ott sa d th s year the team went through an nterv ew process to p ck the students. “We want to show the commun ty how the students are tak ng everyth ng they have earned n schoo and app ed t to th s program,” he sa d. “These are great students work ng together for one common goa .” 13 2016-02-05 Ruston

› home › APARTMENT EXPANSION SET FOR TECH Ed tor s Note: Th s s the second part n a f ve-part ser es on the new changes com ng to Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s campus n the next decade. ••• Th s spr ng, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w break ground on a new era for the un vers ty–start ng w th new on-campus apartments. As out ned n Tech s campus master p an, a document that nforms changes and mprovements on campus, the un vers ty w beg n the construct on of 14 new on-campus apartments n the spr ng quarter. 13 2016-02-04 Baton Rouge

La. Tech’s students honored Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has announced ts fa quarter pres dent s and dean s honors sts. To be e g b e for the dean s honor st, a student must have a 3.5 GPA w th no grade ower than a C for n ne semester hours comp eted. Students earn ng a 3.8 academ c GPA for n ne semester hours w th no grade ower than a B are named to the pres dent s st. On y undergraduates w th no ncomp ete grades are e g b e to make e ther st. Students earn ng the honors nc ude: East Baton Rouge Par sh Baker: Er ka W ttenburg GREENWELL SPRINGS: Ashton A an Kennedy, Char otte E a ne Murphy*, Co e C nt Rank n* and Kr sten N co e Shaffer Pr de: Garret Lou s Broussard, B anton J. Burgess and B a ne M chae Johnson Zachary: Andrew R. A br tton*, Br ttany N co e Caste o, Mary E zabeth Day, Co n Harr son Gordon, Ky e Dav d Gordon, Kay an Br anna Hebert, Deanna S. Kaufman, Ka t n Mar e Ma oy*, Seth A. McReyno ds, Avery R. Nea , Stephen T. Samue , Sarah Kather ne Su van and M chae V. Tran. Ed tor s Note: Students whose names are fo owed by an aster sk earned recogn t on as members of the pres dent s honor st. 13 2016-02-04 Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science honors Distinguished Alumni RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - The Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s p eased to announce ts 2016 D st ngu shed A umn . Each honoree has typ f ed the Lou s ana Tech trad t on of exce ence as recogn zed ndustry and commun ty eaders and ro e mode s for future generat ons of eng neers and sc ent sts. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence says that these a umn are not on y eaders n the r f e ds and commun t es, but have exh b ted an ongo ng comm tment to educat on, Lou s ana Tech and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. “We are proud to announce the 2016 Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence D st ngu shed A umn ,” Hegab sa d. “These nd v dua s have served as examp es, not on y for the r co eagues and commun t es, but for our students, as we .” The rec p ents were recogn zed ast week at a d nner recept on at Squ re Creek Country C ub. Facu ty and staff from Lou s ana Tech and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence ce ebrated w th the honorees and the r fam es. The honorees and the r accomp shments, profess ona ach evements and/or human tar an serv ce are as fo ows: + B omed ca Eng neer ng: Mr. Scott Robey, V ce Pres dent of Market ng at Regenes s B omed ca , Inc. + Chem ca Eng neer ng: Mr. Jerry Hudson (posthumous), Ret red Eng neer ng Manager and V ce Pres dent/ Genera Manager of BE&K Mob e, AL Off ce + Chem stry: Dr. Pau a Cra go, Med ca Co-D rector of the Mayo C n c Mu t d sc p nary Med ca S mu at on Center and CoCha r of the Mayo Tr -State S mu at on Counc + C v Eng neer ng: Mr. M ke Pearson, Ret red Pres dent and CEO of Or on Mar ne + Computer Sc ence: Mr. George W. “G.W.” Estep II, Pres dent and CEO of ZedaSoft, Inc. + Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy: Mr. Ken Hart, Co-Owner of SS Incorporated and V ce Pres dent and Manager of the SS Pro ect Management and Est mat ng Team + E ectr ca Eng neer ng: Dr. Jack W sterman (posthumous), Ret red Professor of E ectr ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech + E ectr ca Eng neer ng Techno ogy: Mr. Chr s Remont, D rector of Program Management for Bo nger Sh pyards + Industr a Eng neer ng: Mr. James Lamar Joyner, Ret red Ch ef of the Kennedy Space Center Re ab ty and Safety Eng neer ng D v s on n the M ss on Assurance D rectorate + Mathemat cs and Stat st cs: Dr. F. Russe R chards, Consu tant w th F.R. R chards Operat ons Research + Mechan ca Eng neer ng: Dr. Me v n R. Cor ey, Ret red Academ c D rector for Mechan ca Eng neer ng, C v Eng neer ng and Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy and Professor Emer tus of Mechan ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech + Phys cs: Dr. J. Andrew Green, App ed Phys c st for Nat ona Secur ty Techno og es + Petro eum Eng neer ng: Mr. L. Pau Teague, Ret red Texaco Execut ve and D rector of C marex Energy Company 13 2016-02-04 Monroe

La. Tech’s College of Engineering and Science honors Distinguished Alumni The Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has announced the 2016 D st ngu shed A umn . Each honoree has typ f ed the Lou s ana Tech trad t on of exce ence as recogn zed ndustry and commun ty eaders and ro e mode s for future generat ons of eng neers and sc ent sts. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence says that these a umn are not on y eaders n the r f e ds and commun t es, but have exh b ted an ongo ng comm tment to educat on, Lou s ana Tech and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. “We are proud to announce the 2016 Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence D st ngu shed A umn ,” Hegab sa d. “These nd v dua s have served as examp es, not on y for the r co eagues and commun t es, but for our students, as we .” The rec p ents were recogn zed ast week at a d nner recept on at Squ re Creek Country C ub. Facu ty and staff from Lou s ana Tech and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence ce ebrated w th the honorees and the r fam es. The honorees and the r accomp shments, profess ona ach evements and/or human tar an serv ce are: • B omed ca Eng neer ng: Scott Robey, V ce Pres dent of Market ng at Regenes s B omed ca , Inc. • Chem ca Eng neer ng: Jerry Hudson (posthumous), Ret red Eng neer ng Manager and V ce Pres dent/ Genera Manager of BE&K Mob e, AL Off ce • Chem stry: Dr. Pau a Cra go, Med ca Co-D rector of the Mayo C n c Mu t d sc p nary Med ca S mu at on Center and CoCha r of the Mayo Tr -State S mu at on Counc • C v Eng neer ng: M ke Pearson, Ret red Pres dent and CEO of Or on Mar ne • Computer Sc ence: George W. “G.W.” Estep II, Pres dent and CEO of ZedaSoft, Inc. • Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy: Ken Hart, Co-Owner of SS Incorporated and V ce Pres dent and Manager of the SS Pro ect Management and Est mat ng Team • E ectr ca Eng neer ng: Dr. Jack W sterman (posthumous), Ret red Professor of E ectr ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech • E ectr ca Eng neer ng Techno ogy: Chr s Remont, D rector of Program Management for Bo nger Sh pyards • Industr a Eng neer ng: James Lamar Joyner, Ret red Ch ef of the Kennedy Space Center Re ab ty and Safety Eng neer ng D v s on n the M ss on Assurance D rectorate • Mathemat cs and Stat st cs: Dr. F. Russe R chards, Consu tant w th F.R. R chards Operat ons Research • Mechan ca Eng neer ng: Dr. Me v n R. Cor ey, Ret red Academ c D rector for Mechan ca Eng neer ng, C v Eng neer ng and Construct on Eng neer ng Techno ogy and Professor Emer tus of Mechan ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech • Phys cs: Dr. J. Andrew Green, App ed Phys c st for Nat ona Secur ty Techno og es • Petro eum Eng neer ng: L. Pau Teague, Ret red Texaco Execut ve and D rector of C marex Energy Company For more nformat on about the D st ngu shed A umn Awards, p ease contact the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Off ce of Deve opment at 318-257-4971 or [email protected] atech.edu. 13 2016-02-03 Baton Rouge

Locals named to La. Tech’s honor lists Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty n Ruston recent y announced ts fa quarter pres dent s and dean s honor sts. Students w th at east a 3.8 grade-po nt average on a m n mum of n ne semester hours comp eted, w th no grade ower than a B, are named to the pres dent s st. Dean s honor st students must earn at east a 3.5 GPA w th no grade ower than a C on a m n mum of n ne semester hours comp eted. Baton Rouge students nc ude M chae Anthony Agu ard Jr., Jacque yn Nata e A fandre*, Heather Lou se Bauer*, Kay a E zabeth Bauer*, A ex s H. Be ows*, Fab an Peter B ache IV, John A. Bowman*, Kr st e Lynn Braud*, Ma ory Anne Breaux*, Johne N cho as Brooks, Em y M. Caro*, Tay or N co e Causey*, Sydney E se Cope and*, Meghan G. Cor e, Ash e gh E. Cu van*, Maz e Mar e D eter ch*, Jane E. Emory, Avery B. Enete, Ammar I. Essa ee, Ka e gh A. Fac ane*, Amy M che e Faucheux, Eu a e Tess er Grodner, V ctor A exander Gut errez, Lauren E zabeth Hart, John T. H tt, Mary A. Isera *, Lauren N. Janway* and Jenn fer D. Jones*. A so, Adam Kar La a*, Susannah Lee Leb anc*, Sydney Lombardo, Andrew S. Mackay*, Mackenz e A. May*, Jac e Jo McC ure*, Made yn N co e McKn ght*, Matthew Joseph M re, Trav s J. Moore, Anna Grace Morr s*, Kather ne E sabeth Morr s*, Matthew Robert Mue er, Mar sa E e Noonan*, Chr st an M chae Norton, Nonye um N. Oko, Samue Wh tney Parsons, N cho as Pate*, V ctor a Renee Re er, Azr e O. R chardson*, Ky e Edward Rob chaux*, Bryan Anderson Saffe , Marcus D. Sand fer, A exander D. Say, James Maxwe S ezak*, Sarah E zabeth Sparks*, Seth Chr stopher Sp nner, Ba ey M. Th bodeaux*, Nathan Joe Turner*, Jon-Aust n Vo and, Joseph Dav d W kerson and Andrew Lane W k nson*. Ed tor s Note: An aster sk marks students named to the pres dent s honor st. 13 2016-02-03 Ruston

EDWARDS TO VISIT RUSTON Gov. John Be Edwards s com ng to Ruston on Thursday as part of h s f rst v s t to North Lou s ana s nce h s e ect on. Edwards s schedu ed to tour the Lou s ana Tech and Gramb ng State un vers t es and the L nco n Par sh Pub c Safety Comp ex before meet ng w th off c a s from a f ve-par sh area at 2:30 p.m. at the Ruston C v c Center. Edwards w a so attend a fundra ser at Squ re Creek Country C ub n Choudrant, then speak before address ng the Monroe Chamber of Commerce banquet Thursday n ght. 13 2016-02-02 Monroe

La. Tech historians present work at national conference RUSTON – Two Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty h story professors presented research f nd ngs at the annua meet ng of the Amer can H stor ca Assoc at on, he d recent y n At anta, Georg a. Ass stant professor of h story Jovana Babov c spoke on “Joseph ne Baker n Be grade and Zagreb: Oppos ng Recept ons to European Enterta nment n Interwar Yugos av a.” Babov c s paper was featured on a pane devoted to the egendary Afr can Amer can enterta ner s recept on n Centra and Eastern Europe n the per od between the wor d wars. Babov c o ned the facu ty of the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech n fa 2015 and ho ds a doctorate n h story from the Un vers ty of I no s. She teaches c asses n wor d h story and modern European h story. Appear ng on a pane co-sponsored by the Conference on Lat n Amer can H story, professor of h story Stephen Webre addressed the top c “St Forgotten? Ref ect ons on Centra Amer ca n the 17th Century.” A member of the Lou s ana Tech facu ty s nce 1982, Webre rece ved h s doctorate n h story at Tu ane Un vers ty. He teaches courses n wor d h story, Un ted States h story and Lat n Amer can h story. Webre ho ds the Garn e W. McG nty Cha r n H story and current y serves as assoc ate dean of the Co ege of L bera Arts. 13 2016-01-28 Ruston

PROFESSOR TO SERVE AS PANELIST Dav d K. M s, professor of b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, to serve as a pane st for the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on Graduate Student Fe owsh p and the Nat ona Defense Sc ence and Eng neer ng Graduate Fe owsh p programs. M s, an nternat ona y recogn zed researcher n the f e d of b omater a s and regenerat ve med c ne, was se ected as a rev ewer and pane st for the two fe owsh p programs wh ch are recogn zed among the prem er NSF graduate research fe owsh p programs n the nat on. 13 2016-01-27 Ruston

TECH INTRODUCES MASTER PLAN 2020 Ed tor s Note: Th s s the f rst part n a f ve-part ser es on the new changes com ng to Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s campus n the next decade. ••• As Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty grows, students shou d expect to see severa changes on and around the campus, nc ud ng bu d ng demo t ons, groundbreak ngs for new academ c and res dent a bu d ngs and mproved park ng. Un vers ty Pres dent Les Gu ce has announced the spr ng ground break ng for 14 new on-campus apartment bu d ngs and an approx mate y 130,000–square foot ntegrated eng neer ng and sc ences educat on bu d ng. 13 2016-01-26 Monroe

La. Tech professor to serve as panelist for NSF fellowship programs RUSTON – Dr. Dav d K. M s, professor of b o og ca sc ences and b omed ca eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, to serve as a pane st for the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on Graduate Student Fe owsh p (GRSF) and the Nat ona Defense Sc ence and Eng neer ng Graduate (NDSEG) Fe owsh p programs. M s, an nternat ona y recogn zed researcher n the f e d of b omater a s and regenerat ve med c ne, was se ected as a rev ewer and pane st for the two fe owsh p programs wh ch are recogn zed among the prem er NSF graduate research fe owsh p programs n the nat on. Th s s the second t me M s has been nv ted to rev ew for the GRSF program. He has a so served as a pane st for the Department of Defense s NDSEG program on three other occas ons and tw ce for the Department of Defense s Sc ence, Mathemat cs and Research for Transformat on (SMART) Scho arsh p for Serv ce Program. “I am honored to serve and ass st our nat on n se ect ng outstand ng cand dates for fe owsh ps that w support the r cont nued study and research n STEM f e ds,” sa d M s. “These are among our country s most g fted scho ars and the r fe owsh p support w ass st them n cont nu ng the r research, comp et ng the r advanced degrees and contr but ng to the progress of our nat on s research efforts.” The NSF GRSF program recogn zes and supports outstand ng graduate students n NSF-supported sc ence, techno ogy, eng neer ng, and mathemat cs d sc p nes who are pursu ng research-based master s and doctora degrees at accred ted Un ted States nst tut ons. The NSDEG and SMART programs were estab shed by the Department of Defense to support undergraduate and graduate students n pursu ng degrees n Sc ence, Techno ogy, Eng neer ng and Mathemat cs (STEM) d sc p nes. The programs a m to ncrease the number of c v an sc ent sts and eng neers work ng at DoD aborator es. These fe owsh ps are awarded to outstand ng students who w pursue a doctora degree n, or c ose y re ated to, an area of nterest to the Department of Defense. These nat ona programs seek d verse rev ew pane s composed of outstand ng researchers from a w de range of nst tut ons, geograph c ocat ons, and backgrounds. The qua f cat ons for pane sts nc ude outstand ng research n an NSF-supported f e d, the ab ty to eva uate nterd sc p nary proposa s, know edge of Federa Mer t Rev ew Cr ter a and exper ence n mentor ng undergraduate and graduate students. 13 2016-01-26 Ruston

TECH PREPARES FOR BUDGET CUTS Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w have to chop a most $5 m on more out of ts budget f h gher educat on s forced nto another round of spend ng cuts. “Shou d cuts of th s sca e come to fru t on, t w force us to make hard dec s ons that w mpact a areas of the campus,” un vers ty Pres dent Les Gu ce sa d. 13 2016-01-25 Monroe

Local Universities and Colleges React to Possible Budget Cuts Governor John Be Edwards n the sp r t of transparency, met w th h gher educat on eaders from across the state to d scuss the poss b ty of ma or cuts to h gher ed. "I fe t good that at east we heard t from the governor as to what the p an was and what he hoped to do to so ve th s d emma over the next coup e of weeks," says Dr. N ck Bruno, Pres dent of the Un vers ty of Lou s ana at Monroe. Bruno says the governor met n-person w th educators ear er th s week to d scuss Lou s ana s $750 m on budget shortfa and the poss b e cuts to h gher ed. Bruno says ULM wou d have to cut about $4.1 m on. "We ve expended a s gn f cant port on of our do ars, so to try to come up w th 4.1 m on do ars for the rema n ng 4-5 months wou d be very d ff cu t. There s no fat eft on the bone," says Bruno. Governor Edwards asked co eges and un vers t es to come up w th a p an of where the cuts wou d happen; Bruno says the mpact of the cuts wou d be fe t by the ent re un vers ty. "We may have to exp ore the opportun ty, or the poss b ty rather, of one of our two summer schoo s, what wou d that save f we e m nated one of those, how many emp oyees wou d have to be fur oughed, how ong wou d they have to be fur oughed...," says Bruno. Dr. Barbara Hanson, chance or of Lou s ana De ta Commun ty Co ege, says regard ess of the proposed cuts, the co ege wou d cont nue ts focus of prepar ng students to o n Lou s ana s workforce. "We re go ng to cont nue prov d ng educat ona serv ces and opportun t es for the c t zens of North Lou s ana. We re go ng to focus on our m ss on and do what we do," says Hanson. The $131 m on cut s ust a proposa and not set n stone, but one oca awmaker says f he was asked to vote on the cuts, he wou d vote no. "We a understand that we ve got a budget def c t, we a understand that we ve got to f nd those do ars, but I know that I wou dn t vote for those k nd of severe cuts and I don t th nk my co eagues wou d e ther," says Senator M ke Wa sworth. He warns aga nst cuts to h gher educat on, say ng, "we ve got to be carefu w th h gher educat on, w th as many cuts as we ve a ready h t w th h gher educat on, I d hate for us to go back down th s road aga n." Wa sworth says even the threat of cuts s damag ng to Lou s ana as t cou d g ve peop e the wrong dea about the stab ty of the state. "There p ann ng on cutt ng educat on by 130 m on do ars, I need to p an on go ng somewhere e se, maybe I can go to Texas or O e M ss or the Un vers ty of Arkansas ust to get my educat on because I can t count on the state government of Lou s ana to be there for me," says Wa sworth. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Pres dent, Les Gu ce, re eased the fo ow ng statement regard ng the cuts: Pub c h gher educat on nst tut ons across the state are fac ng another s gn f cant and ser ous budget reduct on s tuat on. The $4.6 m on cut that Lou s ana Tech s be ng asked to potent a y absorb n th s f sca year w be most cha eng ng and w tru y test our ab ty to fu f our m ss on. Desp te the f nanc a cha enges that we have faced n recent years, Lou s ana Tech s facu ty and staff are second-to-none and have proven the ab ty to work together to move our un vers ty forward. They have a so made a d fference n advanc ng educat ona opportun t es that are the future for econom c prosper ty for our state. We can t afford to ose the momentum that has been ga ned. I have had many conversat ons w th h gher educat on and bus ness eaders and our e ected off c a s who have expressed the des re to nav gate th s s tuat on and m n m ze the mpacts of these cuts on our state s pub c nst tut ons. I am comm tted to work c ose y w th them to f nd so ut ons that are n the best nterests of our students and our c t zens. Now s the t me for a of us to come together to protect the future of our state. 13 2016-01-22 Monroe

A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at La Tech is a “Top 25” public school RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s one of the 25 best pub c schoo s n the state, accord ng to ts Schoo Performance Score re eased recent y by the Lou s ana Educat on Department as part of ts 2015 accountab ty assessment of the state s pub ca y-funded schoo s. A.E. Ph ps Schoo Performance Score of 123.2 earned the schoo an overa grade of “A” and was the h ghest of any schoo n north centra Lou s ana, and one of the h ghest n the northern reg on of the state. Schoo Performance Scores are based on a var ety of factors nc ud ng student ach evement, academ c nd cators and measures of career and co ege read ness (such Carneg e cred ts earned through 9th grade), and graduat on rates. “I am extreme y proud of our facu ty, staff and students,” sa d Dr. Joanne Hood, pr nc pa of A.E. Ph ps. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Ph ps rema ns as one of the prem er schoo s n the state. Our teachers spend many hours research ng and prepar ng essons to prov de our students w th the best educat ona opportun t es poss b e. “H gh parenta nvo vement a so contr butes to our schoo s success. A. E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo s a wonderfu p ace to work and earn and I am honored to be part of such an outstand ng schoo .” Known for ts strong academ c focus and nnovat ve teach ng strateg es as we as ts emphas s on the arts, A.E. Ph ps s a K-8 schoo that serves as a mode for the use of research-based nstruct ona pract ces as we as the ntegrat on of techno ogy n the c assroom. Add t ona y, t offers a s te for Lou s ana Tech educat on ma ors to observe and pract ce effect ve teach ng strateg es n a support ve env ronment. D rected by Hood and her 15 years of exper ence as an effect ve educat ona eader, teachers at A.E. Ph ps have rece ved numerous awards and are h gh y qua f ed w th substant a amounts of exper ence, and advanced educat on. The AEP facu ty are an ntegra part of the Co ege of Educat on as many mentor teacher cand dates and serve as ad unct professors. “As a d st ngu shed aboratory schoo , A.E. Ph ps and the teacher preparat on programs housed w th the Co ege of Educat on accrue mutua benef t from the research-based co aborat on that occurs between the co ege s facu ty and teacher cand dates and AEP s h gh y qua f ed teach ng profess ona s,” sa d Dr. Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “It s a pr v ege to p ay a ro e n prov d ng exce ence through educat on as ev denced by A.E. Ph ps most recent Schoo Performance Score. “The score s a tr bute to the ent re A.E. Ph ps fam y – teachers, adm n strators, staff, parents, commun ty partners, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and most mportant y, the students of A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo .” Accord ng to the Lou s ana Educat on Department s webs te descr pt on of the Schoo Performance Scores, e ementary schoo (K-6) scores are based ent re y on student ach evement on annua assessments n Eng sh anguage arts, math, sc ence, and soc a stud es. Schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. M dd e schoo (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student ach evement on annua assessments w th the f na 5 percent based on cred ts earned through the end of students 9th grade year. As s the case w th e ementary schoo s, m dd e schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. 13 2016-01-22 Monroe

A.E. Phillips at La. Tech is a “Top 25” public school RUSTON – A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s one of the 25 best pub c schoo s n the state, accord ng to ts Schoo Performance Score re eased recent y by the Lou s ana Educat on Department as part of ts 2015 accountab ty assessment of the state s pub ca y-funded schoo s. A.E. Ph ps Schoo Performance Score of 123.2 earned the schoo an overa grade of “A” and was the h ghest of any schoo n north centra Lou s ana, and one of the h ghest n the northern reg on of the state. Schoo Performance Scores are based on a var ety of factors nc ud ng student ach evement, academ c nd cators and measures of career and co ege read ness (such Carneg e cred ts earned through 9th grade), and graduat on rates. “I am extreme y proud of our facu ty, staff and students,” sa d Dr. Joanne Hood, pr nc pa of A.E. Ph ps. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Ph ps rema ns as one of the prem er schoo s n the state. Our teachers spend many hours research ng and prepar ng essons to prov de our students w th the best educat ona opportun t es poss b e. “H gh parenta nvo vement a so contr butes to our schoo s success. A. E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo s a wonderfu p ace to work and earn and I am honored to be part of such an outstand ng schoo .” Known for ts strong academ c focus and nnovat ve teach ng strateg es as we as ts emphas s on the arts, A.E. Ph ps s a K-8 schoo that serves as a mode for the use of research-based nstruct ona pract ces as we as the ntegrat on of techno ogy n the c assroom. Add t ona y, t offers a s te for Lou s ana Tech educat on ma ors to observe and pract ce effect ve teach ng strateg es n a support ve env ronment. D rected by Hood and her 15 years of exper ence as an effect ve educat ona eader, teachers at A.E. Ph ps have rece ved numerous awards and are h gh y qua f ed w th substant a amounts of exper ence, and advanced educat on. The AEP facu ty are an ntegra part of the Co ege of Educat on as many mentor teacher cand dates and serve as ad unct professors. “As a d st ngu shed aboratory schoo , A.E. Ph ps and the teacher preparat on programs housed w th the Co ege of Educat on accrue mutua benef t from the research-based co aborat on that occurs between the co ege s facu ty and teacher cand dates and AEP s h gh y qua f ed teach ng profess ona s,” sa d Dr. Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “It s a pr v ege to p ay a ro e n prov d ng exce ence through educat on as ev denced by A.E. Ph ps most recent Schoo Performance Score. “The score s a tr bute to the ent re A.E. Ph ps fam y – teachers, adm n strators, staff, parents, commun ty partners, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and most mportant y, the students of A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo .” Accord ng to the Lou s ana Educat on Department s webs te descr pt on of the Schoo Performance Scores, e ementary schoo (K-6) scores are based ent re y on student ach evement on annua assessments n Eng sh anguage arts, math, sc ence, and soc a stud es. Schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. M dd e schoo (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student ach evement on annua assessments w th the f na 5 percent based on cred ts earned through the end of students 9th grade year. As s the case w th e ementary schoo s, m dd e schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. 13 2016-01-22 Monroe

A.E. Phillips at La. Tech is a “Top 25” public school RUSTON – A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s one of the 25 best pub c schoo s n the state, accord ng to ts Schoo Performance Score re eased recent y by the Lou s ana Educat on Department as part of ts 2015 accountab ty assessment of the state s pub ca y-funded schoo s. A.E. Ph ps Schoo Performance Score of 123.2 earned the schoo an overa grade of “A” and was the h ghest of any schoo n north centra Lou s ana, and one of the h ghest n the northern reg on of the state. Schoo Performance Scores are based on a var ety of factors nc ud ng student ach evement, academ c nd cators and measures of career and co ege read ness (such Carneg e cred ts earned through 9th grade), and graduat on rates. “I am extreme y proud of our facu ty, staff and students,” sa d Dr. Joanne Hood, pr nc pa of A.E. Ph ps. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Ph ps rema ns as one of the prem er schoo s n the state. Our teachers spend many hours research ng and prepar ng essons to prov de our students w th the best educat ona opportun t es poss b e. “H gh parenta nvo vement a so contr butes to our schoo s success. A. E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo s a wonderfu p ace to work and earn and I am honored to be part of such an outstand ng schoo .” Known for ts strong academ c focus and nnovat ve teach ng strateg es as we as ts emphas s on the arts, A.E. Ph ps s a K-8 schoo that serves as a mode for the use of research-based nstruct ona pract ces as we as the ntegrat on of techno ogy n the c assroom. Add t ona y, t offers a s te for Lou s ana Tech educat on ma ors to observe and pract ce effect ve teach ng strateg es n a support ve env ronment. D rected by Hood and her 15 years of exper ence as an effect ve educat ona eader, teachers at A.E. Ph ps have rece ved numerous awards and are h gh y qua f ed w th substant a amounts of exper ence, and advanced educat on. The AEP facu ty are an ntegra part of the Co ege of Educat on as many mentor teacher cand dates and serve as ad unct professors. “As a d st ngu shed aboratory schoo , A.E. Ph ps and the teacher preparat on programs housed w th the Co ege of Educat on accrue mutua benef t from the research-based co aborat on that occurs between the co ege s facu ty and teacher cand dates and AEP s h gh y qua f ed teach ng profess ona s,” sa d Dr. Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on. “It s a pr v ege to p ay a ro e n prov d ng exce ence through educat on as ev denced by A.E. Ph ps most recent Schoo Performance Score. “The score s a tr bute to the ent re A.E. Ph ps fam y – teachers, adm n strators, staff, parents, commun ty partners, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and most mportant y, the students of A.E. Ph ps Laboratory Schoo .” Accord ng to the Lou s ana Educat on Department s webs te descr pt on of the Schoo Performance Scores, e ementary schoo (K-6) scores are based ent re y on student ach evement on annua assessments n Eng sh anguage arts, math, sc ence, and soc a stud es. Schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. M dd e schoo (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student ach evement on annua assessments w th the f na 5 percent based on cred ts earned through the end of students 9th grade year. As s the case w th e ementary schoo s, m dd e schoo s may a so earn po nts for s gn f cant mprovement w th students who are academ ca y beh nd. 13 2016-01-21 Ruston

TECH TO PERFORM ‘SLEEPING BEAUTY’ Once upon a t me, there was pr ncess who was named “S eep ng Beauty,” and at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, the Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre w rete her story — “through mag c and a tt e b t of ha r product” — at the Howard Aud tor um ocated n Lou s ana Tech s Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. Pau B. Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre at Tech, s d rect ng the rete and sa d the p ay s not the usua story. “It s rea y fun,” he sa d. “It s not the D sney vers on of S eep ng Beauty, et s be c ear about that.”

13 2016-01-19 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre Set for Production of "Sleeping Beauty" Once upon a t me, n a and far away, the fa ry ta e “S eep ng Beauty” was born. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre s br ng ng the story to fe and to the stage, January 26-31 n Howard Aud tor um on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The curta n on James Barry s wonderfu story of act on, adventure, h ar ty, and true ove, d rected by Pau B. Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre n Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts, w go up at 7:30 p.m. January 26-30, and 2:00 p.m. January 31. Carabosse, the w cked w tch, sentences the young Pr ncess Aurora to death by sp nn ng whee , but the good fa r es (the s m Fa ry L qu d and the p ump Fa ry Cakes) commute th s to a ong bor ng s eep – a s eep from wh ch the Pr ncess can on y be woken by a k ss from her true ove. Featur ng a oveab e cast of characters, nc ud ng a madcap nanny, wacky fa r es, ser ous y cha enged henchmen and of course, Pr ncess Aurora herse f, Barry s adaptat on of th s c ass c ta e w de ght the ent re fam y. T ckets are $20 for genera adm ss on, $10 for students w th student ID, $15 for youth under 14 years o d and $15 for sen ors 65 years o d and over. The Roya Tea t cket package, wh ch nc udes the show and your exc us ve nv tat on for the Roya Tea event, s $35 for genera adm ss on, $15 for students w th a student ID, $30 for youth under 14 years o d, and $30 for sen ors 65 years o d and over. For t cket nformat on and group rates, p ease contact the Box Off ce, ocated n the obby of Stone Theatre n the Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts, at 318-257-3942, Monday-Fr day from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. For more nformat on on th s product on or the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre, p ease v s t us at www. atechun vers tytheatre.com, “L ke” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre, or fo ow us on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2016-01-19 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre set for production of “Sleeping Beauty” RUSTON Once upon a t me, n a and far away, the fa ry ta e “S eep ng Beauty” was born. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre s br ng ng the story to fe and to the stage, Jan. 26-31 n Howard Aud tor um on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The curta n on James Barry s wonderfu story of act on, adventure, h ar ty, and true ove, d rected by Pau B. Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre n Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts, w go up at 7:30 p.m. January 26-30, and 2 p.m. Jan. 31. Carabosse, the w cked w tch, sentences the young Pr ncess Aurora to death by sp nn ng whee , but the good fa r es (the s m Fa ry L qu d and the p ump Fa ry Cakes) commute th s to a ong bor ng s eep – a s eep from wh ch the Pr ncess can on y be woken by a k ss from her true ove. Featur ng a oveab e cast of characters, nc ud ng a madcap nanny, wacky fa r es, ser ous y cha enged henchmen and of course, Pr ncess Aurora herse f, Barry s adaptat on of th s c ass c ta e w de ght the ent re fam y. T ckets are $20 for genera adm ss on, $10 for students w th student ID, $15 for youth under 14 years o d and $15 for sen ors 65 years o d and over. The Roya Tea t cket package, wh ch nc udes the show and your exc us ve nv tat on for the Roya Tea event, s $35 for genera adm ss on, $15 for students w th a student ID, $30 for youth under 14 years o d, and $30 for sen ors 65 years o d and over. For t cket nformat on and group rates, p ease contact the Box Off ce, ocated n the obby of Stone Theatre n the Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts, at 318-257-3942, Monday-Fr day from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. For more nformat on on th s product on or the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre, p ease v s t us at www. atechun vers tytheatre.com, “L ke” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre, or fo ow us on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2016-01-19 Monroe

Donating for a cause: Tech, Summitt to host 'We Back Pat' night It s rare y a good th ng when a coach needs to get out the r checkbook for a basketba game. In th s case for Lou s ana Tech women s hoops coach Ty er Summ tt, t s the po ar oppos te. To honor h s mother, the egendary basketba coach Pat Summ tt, Ty er Summ tt p ans to d sh out some cash for Saturday s Conference USA game when the Lady Techsters host F or da At ant c as part of We Back Pat n ght. Ty er Summ tt w donate $1 for every Tech student n attendance and $50 for every offens ve rebound h s team pu downs. The proceeds w go to the Pat Summ tt Foundat on. Pat Summ tt, 63, was d agnosed w th ear y-onset A zhe mer s n 2011 and was forced to step down as Tennessee s coach the fo ow ng year. S nce then, the Pat Summ tt Foundat on was created and var ous teams across the country host We Back Pat games to ra se money and awareness for the d sease. "My mom has g ven so much to everybody n women s basketba , not ust me. So, to be ab e to have a We Back Pat game s the way to pay t back and a so for a b gger cause wh ch s A zhe mer s," Ty er Summ tt sa d after Thursday s w n over FIU. "That s rea y the purpose she s tak ng on r ght now to be the face of A zhe mer s. I th nk t s very mean ngfu because we can g ve back n a way. She was a ways the one g v ng and g v ng and now we can g ve back." 13 2016-01-19 Ruston

› home › HOVERBOARDS BANNED AT TECH, GSU TO FOLLOW Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty o ns three other Lou s ana un vers t es bann ng the popu ar hands-free, battery-powered hoverboards fo ow ng scores of n ur es and f res re ated to the dev ces. In an ema sent to Tech students, facu ty and staff, Tech announced ts ntent ons to ban the hoverboards. 13 2016-01-19 Ruston

THANKING TECH’S GUIDANCE I and we owe th s schoo the h ghest eve of apprec at on and grat tude. There were mu t p e t mes th s past week that I had these thoughts. It occurred to me that there are occas ons when a person or group shou d be thanked, and forg ve me for quot ng Forrest Gump, “for no part cu ar reason.” No, th s s not a spec a occas on or t me as far as I know. There s no spec a ann versary date th s week that m ght be recogn zed as stemm ng from an event n 1894, a mere 122 years ago. 13 2016-01-15 Monroe

Louisiana Tech chemistry student published in high profile, international journal RUSTON — Joshua Tu y, sen or chem stry student at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has coauthored a paper t t ed “Ha oys te C ay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immob zat on,” wh ch has been pub shed n “B omacromo ecu es,” a h gh y nf uent a , nternat ona ourna of the Amer can Chem ca Soc ety (ACS.) Tu y, a ong w th Dr. Yur Lvov, professor of chem stry and nanosystems eng neer ng n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence and Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng, and Raghuvara Yend ur , a graduate student n Lou s ana Tech s b omed ca eng neer ng program, authored the paper wh ch out nes the r work n us ng ha oys te c ay nanotubes, a natura and prom s ng mater a n b omed ca techno ogy. The app cat ons of the research presented n “Ha oys te C ay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immob zat on” cou d resu t n a cheap and env ronmenta y safe ant m crob a coat ng for hosp ta s, wh ch may he p n the f ght aga nst superbugs. “B omacromo ecu es” focuses on nterd sc p nary nvest gat ons exp or ng the nteract ons of macromo ecu es w th b o og ca systems and the r env ronments as we as b o og ca approaches to the des gn of po ymer c mater a s. The ourna covers susta nab e chem stry, monomers and po ymers based on natura and renewab e resources, metabo sm of po ymers and po ymer degradat on products, po ymer con ugates, n v vo and n v tro b ocata ys s, b omacromo ecu ar assemb y, b om met cs, b om nera zat on, b oprocess ng, and b orecyc ng. Lvov says that Tu y s research success s nd cat ve of h s ded cat on and apt tude. “Joshua s a rare examp e of a mature undergraduate student who has shown research resu ts at the eve of a product ve Ph.D. graduate student,” Lvov sa d. “I am gratefu for the opportun t es Lou s ana Tech and my adv sor, Dr. Lvov, have prov ded for me,” Tu y sa d. “W thout support from both, I wou d never have dreamed of accomp sh ng so much.” 13 2016-01-14 Monroe

Chemistry student at La Tech published in high profile, international journal RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - Joshua Tu y, sen or chem stry student at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has coauthored a paper t t ed “Ha oys te C ay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immob zat on,” wh ch has been pub shed n “B omacromo ecu es,” a h gh y nf uent a , nternat ona ourna of the Amer can Chem ca Soc ety (ACS.) Tu y, a ong w th Dr. Yur Lvov, professor of chem stry and nanosystems eng neer ng n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence and Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng, and Raghuvara Yend ur , a graduate student n Lou s ana Tech s b omed ca eng neer ng program, authored the paper wh ch out nes the r work n us ng ha oys te c ay nanotubes, a natura and prom s ng mater a n b omed ca techno ogy. The app cat ons of the research presented n “Ha oys te C ay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immob zat on” cou d resu t n a cheap and env ronmenta y safe ant m crob a coat ng for hosp ta s, wh ch may he p n the f ght aga nst superbugs. “B omacromo ecu es” focuses on nterd sc p nary nvest gat ons exp or ng the nteract ons of macromo ecu es w th b o og ca systems and the r env ronments as we as b o og ca approaches to the des gn of po ymer c mater a s. The ourna covers susta nab e chem stry, monomers and po ymers based on natura and renewab e resources, metabo sm of po ymers and po ymer degradat on products, po ymer con ugates, n v vo and n v tro b ocata ys s, b omacromo ecu ar assemb y, b om met cs, b om nera zat on, b oprocess ng, and b orecyc ng. Lvov says that Tu y s research success s nd cat ve of h s ded cat on and apt tude. “Joshua s a rare examp e of a mature undergraduate student who has shown research resu ts at the eve of a product ve Ph.D. graduate student,” Lvov sa d. Th s art c e s one of many Tu y has coauthored dur ng h s undergraduate stud es and research act v t es at Lou s ana Tech. In September 2015, Tu y pub shed a chapter n “Nanomater a s and Nanoarch tectures,” a NATO Sc ence for Peace and Secur tySer es C: Env ronmenta Secur ty book. Tu y s one of the research eaders n Lvov s research group. In June 2015, he was awarded a Greater Research Opportun t es (GRO) Fe owsh p w th the U.S. Env ronmenta Protect on Agency (EPA) for h s research on natura c ay nanotubes for water pur f cat on. Tu y a so mentors a team of researchers and s the po nt of contact for co aborat on w th the Ch nese Academy of Sc ences, Be ng, on med c ne nanoformu at on. Tu y has trave ed to Kazan Federa Un vers ty n Russ a as a Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on (NSF) Fe ow for ha oys te nanosafety research and recent y comp eted a h gh y exc us ve nternsh p n F or da w th the U.S. Env ronmenta Protect on Agency, wh ch s awarded to on y f ve students nat onw de. Tu y cred ts Lvov and Lou s ana Tech for prov d ng h m w th opportun t es for exper ences beyond those genera y ava ab e to undergraduates. “I am gratefu for the opportun t es Lou s ana Tech and my adv sor, Dr. Lvov, have prov ded for me,” Tu y sa d. “W thout supportfrom both, I wou d never have dreamed of accomp sh ng so much.” 13 2016-01-14 Ruston

TECH STUDENT’S PAPER PUBLISHED Joshua Tu y, sen or chem stry student at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has coauthored a paper t t ed “Ha oys te C ay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immob zat on,” wh ch has been pub shed n “B omacromo ecu es,” a h gh y nf uent a , nternat ona ourna of the Amer can Chem ca Soc ety. 13 2016-01-06 Monroe

Committee of 100: Revamp tax structure RUSTON — Lou s ana s Comm ttee of 100, a group of the state s most nf uent a bus ness men and women, doesn t be eve the Leg s ature can afford to wa t to make budget reforms, and ts members are n the m dst of a statew de road show to offer the r take on poss b e so ut ons. "We can t eave t to the Leg s ature to so ve th s on ts own," M chae O v er, ch ef execut ve of the C100, sa d dur ng a presentat on here Tuesday morn ng at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty before mov ng the caravan to CenturyL nk n Monroe for an afternoon encore. "We have to he p them." And the he p can t come fast enough. Gov.-e ect John Be Edwards est mates the state faces a $750 m on m d-year def c t and a potent a $1.9 b on budget ho e next year. "We re tru y at a turn ng po nt for the state of Lou s ana," Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce sa d. The Comm ttee for 100 comm ss oned he p from the Tax Foundat on to comp e ts "Framework for the Future" report. Among the key suggest ons: Un fy state and oca sa es tax co ect ons and e m nate sa es tax exempt ons on serv ces; E m nate the state ncome tax deduct on for federa taxes pa d; F atten corporate ncome tax brackets to a s ng e rate of 5 percent; Repea the the nventory tax and nventory tax cred t; Increase the gas and d ese tax and ndex t to nf at on. "We have to f nd a way out of th s structura def c t," O v er sa d. State Rep. Ju e Stokes, R-Kenner, a cert f ed pub c accountant, s an advocate of the Comm ttee for 100 s p an and ts spokesman dur ng the road show presentat ons. "It s t me for us to make some rea y smart dec s ons," Stokes sa d. State Sen. M ke Wa sworth, R-West Monroe, and Sen.-e ect J m Fann n, R-Jonesboro, who served three terms n the House, attended the Ruston event. "We have to f nd a ba ance of cuts and ra s ng revenue and common ground on where to move forward," Wa sworth sa d. The Comm ttee for 100 won t have to wa t ong to see f any of ts reforms take root. Edwards p ans to ca awmakers nto a spec a sess on next month to address the current and future def c ts. Fo ow Greg H burn on Tw tter @GregH burn1 13 2016-01-04 Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech names fall quarter graduates RUSTON — Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s fa quarter commencement exerc ses were he d Nov. 21, w th d p omas awarded to 311 graduates. Commencement marked the c ose of the fa academ c quarter. Graduates from the area nc ude Garret M. Aymond, master of bus ness adm n strat on, of St. Franc sv e. 13 2016-01-04 Lafayette

La Tech merges agriculture department, school of forestry RUSTON, La. (AP) - Lou s ana Tech says t s merg ng ts agr cu ture department and forestry schoo to create more chances for co aborat on and mprove eff c ency. A news re ease says the merger won t affect degree programs, and has been approved by the Board of Regents and the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System Board of Superv sors. The new Schoo of Agr cu ture Sc ences and Forestry rema ns n the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. The co ege s dean, Gary Kennedy, says the two d v s ons have hosted separate FFA events to br ng h gh-schoo students to campus, and now one schoo w coord nate such events. He says t w a so make student recru t ng more eff c ent. The new schoo s nter m d rector s agr cu ture professor W am Green. Copyr ght 2015 The Assoc ated Press. A r ghts reserved. Th s mater a may not be pub shed, broadcast, rewr tten or red str buted. 13 2016-01-04 Monroe

Kiplinger Ranks Louisiana Tech University Among Nation's Best College Values RUSTON, La. -K p nger, the nat on s most recogn zed pub sher of bus ness forecasts and persona f nance adv ce, has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 1 n the state and No. 66 n the nat on for n-state students at pub c nst tut ons, n ts recent y re eased Best Co ege Va ues 2016 report. Based on qua ty and affordab ty, K p nger s Best Co ege Va ue ana yzed over 1,200 co eges and un vers t es across the country to determ ne the top 300 best va ues. Spec f ca y, they ooked at factors such as compet t veness, graduat on rates, academ c support, cost of f nanc a a d and student ndebtedness. The qua ty measures account for 55 percent of tota po nts w th cost measures account ng for 45 percent. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana among pub c un vers t es for out-of-state students and No. 80 nat ona y. Lou s ana State Un vers ty was the on y other pub c nst tut on to make the Best Co ege Va ue st, rank ng No. 70 for nstate students and No. 83 for out-of-state students. “Lou s ana Tech has bu t a nat ona reputat on for prov d ng our students w th a h gh qua ty educat on and co ege exper ence, and an exce ent va ue,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “I am p eased to see our efforts recogn zed by respected organ zat ons ke K p nger and cred t the facu ty and staff of Lou s ana Tech for earn ng us these nat ona acco ades. “We ook forward to cont nu ng to bu d our brand on a foundat on of offer ng students the best qua ty, va ue and return on nvestment on the r co ege educat ons.” A tota of four Lou s ana nst tut ons made the overa st of the best 300 pub c and pr vate nst tut ons nc ud ng Tu ane Un vers ty (162), Lou s ana Tech (249), Lou s ana State (257) and Centenary Co ege (274). Wash ngton and Lee Un vers ty (VA) topped the overa st fo owed by Pr nceton Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Dav dson Co ege (NC) and Swarthmore Co ege (PA). K p nger s Best Co ege Va ues report capped a strong 2015 for Lou s ana Tech that nc uded a number of nat ona rank ngs. In add t on to a f fth consecut ve T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng, U.S. News & Wor d Report p aced Lou s ana Tech at No. 1 n the nat on among pub c nst tut ons for graduat ng students w th the ease average amount of debt. PaySca e.com ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the state and No. 70 n the nat on n ts 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report for average m d-career sa ar es for graduates. PaySca e.com a so ranked Tech as the state s top nst tut on n ts 2015 Co ege ROI Report n both annua percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for n-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 n the nat on ( n-state tu t on) n h ghest annua percent ROI for students v ng on-campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d. Bus ness Ins der, the Internet s argest bus ness news webs te, ranked Lou s ana Tech the nat on s s xth most underrated co ege, accord ng to ts annua st of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca. For the comp ete st of K p nger s Best Co ege Va ues 2016, v s t http://www.k p nger.com. 13 2016-01-04 Monroe

Bouquets for the week * Bouquets to the Lou s ana Tech student chapter of the Inst tute of Industr a Eng neer ng for rece v ng the 2015 Go d Award, the h ghest recogn t on g ven to a chapter for ts performance. * Bouquets to the Tech Bu dogs for the r 47-28 w n over Arkansas State n the New Or eans Bow . Coach Sk p Ho tz and the ent re team had an outstand ng season, espec a y runn ng back Kenneth D xon w th h s record-sett ng 215 yards and four touchdowns n the game. 13 2016-01-04 Monroe

Louisiana Tech University among nation’s best college values RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - K p nger, the nat on s most recogn zed pub sher of bus ness forecasts and persona f nance adv ce, has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 1 n the state and No. 66 n the nat on for n-state students at pub c nst tut ons, n ts recent y re eased Best Co ege Va ues 2016 report. Based on qua ty and affordab ty, K p nger s Best Co ege Va ue ana yzed over 1,200 co eges and un vers t es across the country to determ ne the top 300 best va ues. Spec f ca y, they ooked at factors such as compet t veness, graduat on rates, academ c support, cost of f nanc a a d and student ndebtedness. The qua ty measures account for 55 percent of tota po nts w th cost measures account ng for 45 percent. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana among pub c un vers t es for out-of-state students and No. 80 nat ona y. Lou s ana State Un vers ty was the on y other pub c nst tut on to make the Best Co ege Va ue st, rank ng No. 70 for nstate students and No. 83 for out-of-state students. “Lou s ana Tech has bu t a nat ona reputat on for prov d ng our students w th a h gh qua ty educat on and co ege exper ence, and an exce ent va ue,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “I am p eased to see our efforts recogn zed by respected organ zat ons ke K p nger and cred t the facu ty and staff of Lou s ana Tech for earn ng us these nat ona acco ades. “We ook forward to cont nu ng to bu d our brand on a foundat on of offer ng students the best qua ty, va ue and return on nvestment on the r co ege educat ons.” A tota of four Lou s ana nst tut ons made the overa st of the best 300 pub c and pr vate nst tut ons nc ud ng Tu ane Un vers ty (162), Lou s ana Tech (249), Lou s ana State (257) and Centenary Co ege (274). Wash ngton and Lee Un vers ty (VA) topped the overa st fo owed by Pr nceton Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Dav dson Co ege (NC) and Swarthmore Co ege (PA). K p nger s Best Co ege Va ues report capped a strong 2015 for Lou s ana Tech that nc uded a number of nat ona rank ngs. In add t on to a f fth consecut ve T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng, U.S. News & Wor d Report p aced Lou s ana Tech at No. 1 n the nat on among pub c nst tut ons for graduat ng students w th the ease average amount of debt. PaySca e.com ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the state and No. 70 n the nat on n ts 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report for average m d-career sa ar es for graduates. PaySca e.com a so ranked Tech as the state s top nst tut on n ts 2015 Co ege ROI Report n both annua percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for n-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 n the nat on ( n-state tu t on) n h ghest annua percent ROI for students v ng on-campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d. Bus ness Ins der, the Internet s argest bus ness news webs te, ranked Lou s ana Tech the nat on s s xth most underrated co ege, accord ng to ts annua st of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca. 13 2016-01-04 Monroe

National Accolades, Institutional Growth Defined Louisiana Tech in 2015 Nat ona rank ngs and recogn t ons, growth n enro ments, and the deve opment of new ndustry partnersh ps and programs are ust some of the successes that he ped to d st ngu sh Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty n 2015. In chrono og ca order, here are ten of the most noteworthy nst tut ona stor es re eased th s past year by Lou s ana Tech s Department of Un vers ty Commun cat ons. Lou s ana Tech ranked among nat on s top pub c co eges by The Bus ness Journa s Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty was one of on y two nst tut ons n the State of Lou s ana to be ranked among the nat on s top 150 pub c co eges, accord ng to The Bus ness Journa s 2015 Best Pub c Co eges n Amer ca st re eased n February. The Bus ness Journa s ana yzed 484 four-year pub c co eges, us ng data from the Nat ona Center for Educat on Stat st cs and the U.S. Census Bureau s Amer can Commun ty Survey as we as rank ngs by Forbes, K p nger, U.S. News & Wor d Report, and Wash ngton Month y. Lou s ana Tech ranked No. 1 aga n n ROI for both n-state and out-of-state students PaySca e.com s 2015 Co ege ROI Report, re eased n March, ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana among a pub c and pr vate nst tut ons n overa return on nvestment (ROI) for both n-state and out-of-state students. Lou s ana Tech earned the state s h ghest rank ng n both annua percent ROI and 20-year net ROI for students v ng on campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d, and who are pay ng n-state or out-of-state tu t on. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 13 n the nat on ( n-state tu t on) n h ghest annua percent ROI for students v ng on-campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d. Lou s ana Tech named a Nat ona Center of Academ c Exce ence for cyber educat on In May, The Nat ona Secur ty Agency (NSA) and the U.S. Department of Home and Secur ty (DHS) des gnated Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty as a Nat ona Center of Academ c Exce ence n Cyber Defense Educat on. Lou s ana Tech s one of ess than 50 comprehens ve research un vers t es n the Un ted States and the on y nst tut on n the State of Lou s ana to atta n these des gnat ons. Lou s ana Tech, Cyber Innovat on Center partner for Lou s ana Tech Research Inst tute W th the ant c pated growth n the reg on over the next decade, the eadersh p of the Cyber Innovat on Center and Lou s ana Tech forma zed a new partnersh p n Ju y w th the creat on of the Lou s ana Tech Research Inst tute (LTRI). LTRI s a notfor-prof t corporat on ded cated to promot ng and advanc ng pub c/pr vate partnersh ps, acce erat ng app ed research and deve opment, and the commerc a zat on of techno ogy n three f e ds: cyber, energy, and res ency. Lou s ana Tech ranked No. 1 aga n n state n m d-career sa ar es for graduates Graduates from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty earn h gher med an m d-career sa ar es than graduates from any other un vers ty n Lou s ana, accord ng to PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report re eased n August. Lou s ana Tech ranks No. 1 among Lou s ana s pub c and pr vate nst tut ons w th m d-career graduates earn ng an average of $86,200 annua y. Lou s ana State Un vers ty was second n the m d-career rank ngs w th $85,600 and Southern Un vers ty was th rd w th $81,100. Tech a so ranks No. 70 n the nat on n med an m d-career earn ngs among graduates from pub c nst tut ons, and No. 91 n the nat on among research un vers t es. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty ach eves record student enro ment In a September announcement of ts fa 2015 headcount, Lou s ana Tech enro ed a record 12,414 students for the fa quarter – an ncrease of 1,143 or 10.1 percent over ast year and ec ps ng the prev ous record enro ment of 11,975 students set back n fa of 2003. A ong w th the record number of students attend ng Lou s ana Tech, the qua ty of students n the freshman c ass was h gh ghted by an average ACT score of 24.5 – the th rd consecut ve year that mark had been ach eved or exceeded Lou s ana Tech s No. 1 n nat on among pub c un vers t es for owest average student debt Students that graduate from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty do so w th the owest average amount of student oan debt of any pub c nat ona un vers ty n the Un ted States, accord ng to U.S. News and Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st. Lou s ana Tech was the f rst pub c nst tut on to appear on the st of Nat ona Un vers t es w th the east average amount of student debt at graduat on and s s xth n the nat on overa , o n ng the kes of Pr nceton Un vers ty, Ca forn a Inst tute of Techno ogy, Br gham Young Un vers ty, Ya e Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Dartmouth Co ege and the Un vers ty of Ca forn a-Berk ey, n the top e ght. Lou s ana Tech earns f fth consecut ve T er One nat ona rank ng from U.S. News & Wor d Report For the f fth stra ght year, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty earned a T er One rank ng among “Nat ona Un vers t es,” accord ng to U.S. News & Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st re eased n September. Lou s ana Tech, a ong w th Tu ane Un vers ty and Lou s ana State Un vers ty, were the on y nst tut ons n the state to ach eve a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es des gnat on. Lou s ana Tech mproved ts rank ng over the prev ous year, mov ng up from 201 to 199 on the 2016 US News & Wor d Report st. Lou s ana Tech s reputat on, graduate sa ar es earn t another nat ona rank ng Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s the s xth most underrated co ege n the nat on, accord ng to a st re eased n November of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca for 2015 by Bus ness Ins der, the Internet s argest bus ness news webs te. Bus ness Ins der compared U.S. News and Wor d Report s rank ngs of the best un vers t es n the country w th PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report, wh ch ranks more than 1,000 co eges and un vers t es, to ca cu ate the r rank ngs. K p nger ranks Lou s ana Tech among nat on s best co ege va ues K p nger, the nat on s most recogn zed pub sher of bus ness forecasts and persona f nance adv ce, ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 1 n the state and No. 66 n the nat on for n-state students at pub c nst tut ons, n ts Best Co ege Va ues 2016 report re eased n December. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana among pub c un vers t es for outof-state students and No. 80 nat ona y. For more nfo on these and other Lou s ana Tech stor es from the past year, v s t the [email protected] webpage at http://news. atech.edu and subscr be to the RSS feed at http://www. atech.edu/rss for future art c es d str buted by the un vers ty. 13 2016-01-04 Monroe

La. Tech Department of Theatre announces cast for 'Sleeping Beauty' RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre has announced the ensemb e cast for ts second product on of the year, James Barry s “S eep ng Beauty,” d rected by Pau B. Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre n Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of the Perform ng Arts. Performances of “S eep ng Beauty” are schedu ed for 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26-30, and 2 p.m. Jan. 31 n Howard Aud tor um ocated n Lou s ana Tech s Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. The cast nc udes the fo ow ng pr nc p e performers: L am Mc ntyre (Shreveport) as Narrator Zach Bent ey (Ruston) as K ng Hannah Fa th Johnson (E Dorado, Arkansas) as Nanny B scu t Co n Cag e (Cov ngton) as Fester O v a W cox (Boss er C ty) as Fa ry Cakes Em a Me nert (E Dorado, Arkansas) as Fa ry L qu d Courtney VanEaton Theodos (Shreveport) as Carabosse Cameron Harmeyer (Cov ngton) as Herman Emm e Lancon (Lake Char es) as Pr ncess Aurora Johnny Mar ey (Boss er C ty) as Pr nce Charm ng Ensemb e cast performers nc ude: The Forest Creatures – E ena Ba nes, Bryant Ford Crook, Sydney Gorman, Ab ga Ho ton, Gr sham Locke, Adr anna Robb ns, Sy as S aughter, Reagan Ta ey, Isabe a Tucker, CJ W son and Le ghann Myers as the Phantom Ow . The Toys and Br arhedge – Ch rstan Bates, Mo e Budds, Jess Cash on, Emma Montgomery, Kendra Rowe and Andrew Webb. The Pa ace Res dents – Ma ory Aust n, N kk Cra n, Aust n Harr son, Grace Ho mes, M randa How and, G nger Johnson, Mon que Mapes, Magg e McAdams, Mary Napper, Jam e W ams and Courtney W son. The V age Res dents – Noah Ceserta, Emma ne Grace Chr st an, CeCe Crook, Ca eb D ebo d, Kat F nney, Roxanne Ho ton, Le ghann Myers, M e Omps, Brenna Rob nson, C a re Sanders, Ros e Shu tz, Tu e S mpk ns, and Tyra Wash ngton. In the story of S eep ng Beauty, Carabosse, the w cked w tch, sentences the young Pr ncess Aurora to death by sp nn ng whee , but the good fa r es (the s m Fa ry L qu d and the p ump Fa ry Cakes) commute th s to a ong, bor ng s eep – a s eep from wh ch the Pr ncess can on y be woken by a k ss from her true ove. Featur ng a oveab e cast of characters, nc ud ng a madcap nanny, wacky fa r es, ser ous y cha enged henchmen and of course, Pr ncess Aurora herse f, Barry s adaptat on of th s c ass c ta e w de ght the ent re fam y. For more nformat on on th s product on or the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre, v s t www. atechun vers tytheatre.com, the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre or fo ow t on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2016-01-04 Ruston

LAP DESKS DONATED TO NEW TECH The Hampton Inn of Ruston recent y donated more than 80 ap desks to New Tech @ Ruston. D rector of Sa es for Hampton Inn Brandon Suther and sa d the ap desks are no onger brand standard for the hote propert es. Suther and sa d he contacted L nco n Par sh Schoo s ACHIEVE Coord nator Cath Cox-Bon o w th an offer to donate the ap desks to enhance student product v ty. Cox-Bon o sa d the ap desks w he p the cont nua y on-the-go students at New Tech. 13 2016-01-04 Shreveport

Kiplinger ranks La. Tech among nation's best college values K p nger has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty No. 1 n the state and No. 66 n the nat on for n-state students at pub c nst tut ons, n ts recent y re eased Best Co ege Va ues 2016 report. Based on qua ty and affordab ty, K p nger s Best Co ege Va ue ana yzed over 1,200 co eges and un vers t es across the country to determ ne the top 300 best va ues. Spec f ca y, they ooked at factors such as compet t veness, graduat on rates, academ c support, cost of f nanc a a d and student ndebtedness. The qua ty measures account for 55 percent of tota po nts w th cost measures account ng for 45 percent. Lou s ana Tech a so ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana among pub c un vers t es for out-of-state students and No. 80 nat ona y. Lou s ana State Un vers ty was the on y other pub c nst tut on to make the Best Co ege Va ue st, rank ng No. 70 for nstate students and No. 83 for out-of-state students. "Lou s ana Tech has bu t a nat ona reputat on for prov d ng our students w th a h gh qua ty educat on and co ege exper ence, and an exce ent va ue," sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. "I am p eased to see our efforts recogn zed by respected organ zat ons ke K p nger and cred t the facu ty and staff of Lou s ana Tech for earn ng us these nat ona acco ades. "We ook forward to cont nu ng to bu d our brand on a foundat on of offer ng students the best qua ty, va ue and return on nvestment on the r co ege educat ons." A tota of four Lou s ana nst tut ons made the overa st of the best 300 pub c and pr vate nst tut ons nc ud ng Tu ane Un vers ty (162), Lou s ana Tech (249), Lou s ana State (257) and Centenary Co ege (274). Wash ngton and Lee Un vers ty (VA) topped the overa st fo owed by Pr nceton Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Dav dson Co ege (NC) and Swarthmore Co ege (PA). K p nger s Best Co ege Va ues report capped a strong 2015 for Lou s ana Tech that nc uded a number of nat ona rank ngs. In add t on to a f fth consecut ve T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng, U.S. News & Wor d Report p aced Lou s ana Tech at No. 1 n the nat on among pub c nst tut ons for graduat ng students w th the ease average amount of debt. PaySca e.com ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the state and No. 70 n the nat on n ts 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report for average m d-career sa ar es for graduates. PaySca e.com a so ranked Tech as the state s top nst tut on n ts 2015 Co ege ROI Report n both annua percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for n-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 n the nat on ( n-state tu t on) n h ghest annua percent ROI for students v ng on-campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d. Bus ness Ins der, the Internet s argest bus ness news webs te, ranked Lou s ana Tech the nat on s s xth most underrated co ege, accord ng to ts annua st of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca. For the comp ete st of K p nger s Best Co ege Va ues 2016, v s t http://www.k p nger.com. 13 2015-12-26 Monroe

La. Tech professor named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow RUSTON – Dr. Leon Iasem d s, the Rhodes Em nent Cha r of B omed ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and d rector of the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS), has been named a 2015 Fe ow of the Nat ona Academy of Inventors (NAI). The NAI Fe ows Se ect on Comm ttee chose to nduct Iasem d s n recogn t on of h s “h gh y pro f c sp r t of nnovat on n creat ng or fac tat ng outstand ng nvent ons that have made a tang b e mpact on qua ty of fe, econom c deve opment, and the we fare of soc ety.” E ect on to NAI Fe ow status s a h gh profess ona d st nct on accorded to academ c nventors who have demonstrated a h gh y pro f c sp r t of nnovat on n creat ng or fac tat ng outstand ng nvent ons that have made a tang b e mpact on qua ty of fe, econom c deve opment, and we fare of soc ety. “I am rea y honored w th th s nat ona d st nct on,” sa d Iasem d s. “I ook forward to cont nu ng a ong the path of trans at ona research d scover es from b omed ca eng neer ng to med c ne for the good of human ty.” Iasem d s s an nternat ona y recogn zed expert n non near dynam cs and the detect on, pred ct on and contro of cr ses n comp ex coup ed systems. He s a so one of the founders of the f e d of se zure pred ct on, s a co-founder of two compan es nvo ved n neuromodu at on and contro of ep epsy, and s the co-author of 10 patents n th s area. H s research and over 100 peer-rev ewed pub cat ons, patents, nterd sc p nary conference organ zat ons, presentat ons and nv ted ta ks have st mu ated an nternat ona nterest n bra n dynam cs, part cu ar y the pred ct on and contro of ep ept c se zures and understand ng of the mechan sms of ep eptogenes s. Iasem d s has had near y 5,000 scho ar y c tat ons and has an h- ndex of 33, and h s research has been h gh ghted n mu t p e forums, nc ud ng the New York T mes, D scover magaz ne, the Teach ng Company, and the Amer can Soc ety for the Advancement of Sc ence. “Our Co ege s fortunate to have such a ta ented nnovator work ng w th our students to address cha enges n the Pres dent a BRAIN n t at ve wh ch s a med at revo ut on z ng our understand ng of the human bra n,” sa d Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. In add t on to h s own research, Iasem d s has served on the ed tor a board of Ep eps a, the IEEE Transact ons on B omed ca Eng neer ng, the Internat ona Journa of Neura Systems and the Anna s of B omed ca Eng neer ng. He s a rev ewer for the Nat ona Inst tutes of Hea th (NIH), the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on (NSF) and severa nternat ona sponsor ng agenc es and foundat ons. Iasem d s s a Sen or Member of IEEE and a Fe ow of the Amer can Inst tute of Med ca and B o og ca Eng neers. The NAI Fe ows w be off c a y nducted as part of the F fth Annua Conference of the Nat ona Academy of Inventors on Apr 15, 2016 at the Un ted States Patent and Trademark Off ce (USPTO). NAI Fe ows represent more than 190 prest g ous research un vers t es and governmenta and non-prof t research nst tut ons. The 2015 Fe ows account for more than 5,300 ssued U.S. patents, br ng ng the co ect ve patents he d by a NAI Fe ows to more than 20,000. USPTO Comm ss oner for Patents Andrew H rshfe d w prov de the keynote address for the nduct on ceremony. In honor of the r outstand ng accomp shments, Fe ows w be presented w th a spec a trophy, meda and rosette p n. 13 2015-12-26 Monroe

La. Tech merges Department of Agricultural Sciences, School of Forestry RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has rece ved approva from the Board of Regents and the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System Board of Superv sors to merge ts Department of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Schoo of Forestry n to a s ng e Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry w th n the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. The merger of these two un ts, wh ch are c ose y a gned n academ c areas re ated to natura resources and conso dat on, w create a number of new earn ng, research and co aborat on opportun t es for both students and facu ty. It wou d a so encourage strong nterd sc p nary nteract ons n teach ng and outreach, and a ow for greater eff c enc es n adm n strat ve and staff ng costs. “G ven that a of the degree programs n agr cu tura sc ences and forestry are natura resources re ated, merg ng the two un ts together s a natura f t,” sa d Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. “The new y formed Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry w g ve Lou s ana Tech s South Campus a arger and more un f ed presence, and w add severa eff c enc es. “In the past, for examp e, both groups have hosted d str ct and state FFA career deve opment events that br ng many h gh schoo students to the Lou s ana Tech campus. Now, one schoo w coord nate those events. In add t on, student recru t ng w be enhanced and more eff c ent, w th targeted recru tment strateg es that w cover more geograph c areas.” Kennedy sa d the degree programs that are current y n p ace w not be affected, so current students w not see a change n curr cu a or courses offered due to the merger. Dr. W am Green, professor of agr cu tura sc ences n the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, w serve as nter m d rector of the new Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry. “I fee th s merger s a benef t to the un vers ty and the students,” sa d Green. “We w now be comb n ng resources of two very comp ex un ts and th s shou d resu t n more eff c ent use of personne , equ pment, and fac t es by the un vers ty and the students. The conso dat on of the Department of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Schoo of Forestry wou d reduce the number of academ c un ts w th n the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences from s x to f ve. The proposed Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry wou d be second to the Schoo of B o og ca Sc ences n terms of the number of undergraduate students per un t w th n the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences. As nter m d rector, Green sa d he ooks forward to ead ng the effort of these two very comp ex un ts be ng b ended nto one eff c ent un t. “The resu t I am hop ng to ach eve s that the Schoo of Agr cu tura Sc ences and Forestry w become recogn zed for dent fy ng, recru t ng, reta n ng, educat ng, and deve op ng agr cu ture and forestry students so they w become pos t ve add t ons to soc ety,” Green sa d. 13 2015-12-18 Ruston

Louisiana Tech University professor named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow RUSTON, La. - Dr. Leon Iasem d s, the Rhodes Em nent Cha r of B omed ca Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and d rector of the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS), has been named a 2015 Fe ow of the Nat ona Academy of Inventors (NAI). The NAI Fe ows Se ect on Comm ttee chose to nduct Iasem d s n recogn t on of h s "h gh y pro f c sp r t of nnovat on n creat ng or fac tat ng outstand ng nvent ons that have made a tang b e mpact on qua ty of fe, econom c deve opment, and the we fare of soc ety." E ect on to NAI Fe ow status s a h gh profess ona d st nct on accorded to academ c nventors who have demonstrated a h gh y pro f c sp r t of nnovat on n creat ng or fac tat ng outstand ng nvent ons that have made a tang b e mpact on qua ty of fe, econom c deve opment, and we fare of soc ety. "I am rea y honored w th th s nat ona d st nct on," sa d Iasem d s. "I ook forward to cont nu ng a ong the path of trans at ona research d scover es from b omed ca eng neer ng to med c ne for the good of human ty." Iasem d s s an nternat ona y recogn zed expert n non near dynam cs and the detect on, pred ct on and contro of cr ses n comp ex coup ed systems. He s a so one of the founders of the f e d of se zure pred ct on, s a co-founder of two compan es nvo ved n neuromodu at on and contro of ep epsy, and s the co-author of 10 patents n th s area. H s research and over 100 peer-rev ewed pub cat ons, patents, nterd sc p nary conference organ zat ons, presentat ons and nv ted ta ks have st mu ated an nternat ona nterest n bra n dynam cs, part cu ar y the pred ct on and contro of ep ept c se zures and understand ng of the mechan sms of ep eptogenes s. Iasem d s has had near y 5,000 scho ar y c tat ons and has an h- ndex of 33, and h s research has been h gh ghted n mu t p e forums, nc ud ng the New York T mes, D scover magaz ne, the Teach ng Company, and the Amer can Soc ety for the Advancement of Sc ence. "Our Co ege s fortunate to have such a ta ented nnovator work ng w th our students to address cha enges n the Pres dent a BRAIN n t at ve wh ch s a med at revo ut on z ng our understand ng of the human bra n," sa d Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. In add t on to h s own research, Iasem d s has served on the ed tor a board of Ep eps a, the IEEE Transact ons on B omed ca Eng neer ng, the Internat ona Journa of Neura Systems and the Anna s of B omed ca Eng neer ng. He s a rev ewer for the Nat ona Inst tutes of Hea th (NIH), the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on (NSF) and severa nternat ona sponsor ng agenc es and foundat ons. Iasem d s s a Sen or Member of IEEE and a Fe ow of the Amer can Inst tute of Med ca and B o og ca Eng neers. The NAI Fe ows w be off c a y nducted as part of the F fth Annua Conference of the Nat ona Academy of Inventors on Apr 15, 2016 at the Un ted States Patent and Trademark Off ce (USPTO). NAI Fe ows represent more than 190 prest g ous research un vers t es and governmenta and non-prof t research nst tut ons. The 2015 Fe ows account for more than 5,300 ssued U.S. patents, br ng ng the co ect ve patents he d by a NAI Fe ows to more than 20,000. USPTO Comm ss oner for Patents Andrew H rshfe d w prov de the keynote address for the nduct on ceremony. In honor of the r outstand ng accomp shments, Fe ows w be presented w th a spec a trophy, meda and rosette p n. ### 13 2015-12-17 Monroe

La. Tech’s College of Business receives $500,000 gift for scholarships The News Star RUSTON – The Co ege of Bus ness at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has rece ved a g ft of $500,000 for scho arsh ps from an anonymous donor. The “Co ege of Bus ness REAL Scho arsh ps” are for ncom ng freshmen (h gh schoo sen ors) v ng n Caddo and Boss er Par shes, and are rece ved n add t on to funds from Lou s ana s Tay or Opportun ty Program for Students (TOPS). A though TOPS covers more than 25 percent of tota annua expenses for a fu -t me undergraduate, many students need more ass stance to be ab e to attend co ege. The scho arsh p funds the Co ege of Bus ness rece ved w he p cover tu t on, room and board, books, and fees – up to 80 percent of the tota cost of a Lou s ana Tech educat on. “The rough y 11,000 Lou s ana a umn v ng n the Caddo and Boss er area, nc ud ng myse f, are b essed to have had the opportun ty to attend th s outstand ng Un vers ty,” sa d the donor. “A so d educat on has he ped enr ch my fe beyond my w dest dreams. In estab sh ng th s scho arsh p, more students n Caddo and Boss er Par shes w have the opportun ty to attend the Co ege of Bus ness at Lou s ana Tech and mprove the r qua ty of fe. “I hope other a umn w be nsp red to g ve back to one of our states greatest assets n Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty.” “We are honored and thankfu to rece ve th s support for our students,” sa d Dr. Chr s Mart n, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness. “W th the r s ng cost of educat on and dec n ng state fund ng, th s money w put a T er 1 Lou s ana Tech educat on w th n f nanc a reach of many more students.” Through market-dr ven academ c programs and mpactfu scho arsh p and teach ng, the Co ege of Bus ness at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty produces bus ness and academ c eaders who are nnovat ve, entrepreneur a , ana yt ca and techno og ca y sk ed for a compet t ve g oba marketp ace. For more nformat on on how to support Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness, p ease contact Mary Susan Br tt n Un vers ty Advancement/Externa Re at ons, at [email protected] atecha umn .org or (318) 257-3741. P ease v s t www.bus ness. atech.edu or connect w th the Co ege of Bus ness on Facebook (www.facebook.com/LATechBus ness), Tw tter (@LATechBUSN) and Instagram (@LATechBus ness). 13 2015-12-16 Baton Rouge

311 earn degrees during Louisiana Tech ceremony Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s fa quarter commencement exerc ses were Nov. 21, w th d p omas awarded to 311 graduates. Baton Rouge graduates nc uded W am Aubrey Anders, bache or of genera stud es; Qu nnton Maur ce Anderson, bache or of sc ence; Tay or S. Ashton, master of sc ence eng neer ng; B ake T. Bo n, bache or of arts; Jonn que Urs n Ca dwe , bache or of genera stud es; Ange ca Mar e Champagne-masden, graduate cert f cate; A son Ir s Fa gout, master of arts; Robert Mccord Hane, bache or of sc ence forestry; and Sarah E. Henthorn, master of sc ence. 13 2015-12-14 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Planning Student Housing Project Gett ng onto campus and v ng n student hous ng s an exc t ng part of co ege fe. One Lou s ana Tech freshman says he oves meet ng and gett ng to know h s new ne ghbors. Dav d Howson, a freshman student, says, "Dorm fe, you can ust wa k downsta rs nto the obby and make a new fr end every n ght." However, another student says the dorms at Tech have h m ook ng at hous ng opt ons off campus. J Tre Sapp, a student, says, "I was a ways n these dorms. They are rea y out dated. If they had more of the apartment sty e dorms, I th nk everyone wou d come here a ot more." Lou s ana Tech off c a s say an update s n the works. They re try ng to secure around one hundred m on do ars n bond money for a hous ng pro ect. J m K ng, the V ce Pres dent for Student Advancement at Lou s ana Tech, says, "It wou d be 880 new beds for Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. D fferent types of conf gurat ons try ng to address student needs and d fferent amen t es that our students are ook ng for. There w be some rep acement hous ng. Some of our trad t ona res dent ha s w be removed." P ans for the new dorms nc ude d fferent sty es, such as apartment and su te ayouts. Off c a s say the goa s to he p students to be more successfu at Tech. They hope mproved dorms wou d a ow more students to cont nue onto the r sophomore year and even ncrease enro ment. "We w br ng about some brand new fac t es to our campus a geared toward student success and growth n terms of student popu at on, growth n d vers ty of the student body, and a geared toward students and the r ab ty to be successfu here at Lou s ana Tech," says K ng. Students a say hav ng a home away from home s mportant for a good co ege exper ence. "Dorm fe s pretty fun ust w th fr ends and everyth ng ke that. It s not about where you ve; t s about the commun ty ns de of t." Lou s ana Tech off c a s say the ref nanc ng part of the pro ect s expected to be comp eted next week, and the construct on on the new dorms wou d start n march of next year to be comp eted around spr ng of 2017. 13 2015-12-11 Monroe

La. Tech to offer online option for graduate engineering degree program RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence has deve oped an on ne opt on for ts Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng degree w th a concentrat on n Industr a Eng neer ng that w be open for students to app y beg nn ng w th the w nter 2016 academ c quarter. The new y-deve oped on ne opt on w be part of Lou s ana Tech s G oba _Campus and w be ava ab e to students around the wor d. The program w be open to trad t ona master s degree students, students who are current y emp oyed fu t me n ndustry and act ve m tary who have earned a bache or s degree n eng neer ng. Through the G oba _Campus, the on ne graduate eng neer ng degree program w empower students from a wa ks of fe to earn an educat on that can be ta ored to the r busy schedu es and that w possess the same eve of qua ty and cutt ngedge educat on that Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence has become known for. The curr cu um w nc ude pro ects as we as theory-based ass gnments, and w prov de off-campus students w th the same educat ona opportun t es as the students who attend c asses on campus. In add t on to the Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng on ne degree opt on, a Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty S x S gma B ack Be t cert f cat on s a so ava ab e to a students at Lou s ana Tech. The ndustr a eng neer ng program has offered the Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty S x S gma Green Be t cert f cat on s nce 2012. The cert f cat ons are ava ab e to both undergraduate and graduate students and can be earned as part of a degree p an or nd v dua y through the fe- ong earn ng program. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, says that the new opportun t es offered by the new Master s degree and S x S gma B ack Be t cert f cat on prov de new avenues for add t ona workforce tra n ng. “We are exc ted to expand our on ne program offer ngs n the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence w th the Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng degree w th the Industr a Eng neer ng concentrat on,” Hegab sa d. “Th s new on ne opt on, coup ed w th the S x S gma cert f cat ons that are ava ab e, prov des an exce ent opportun ty for work ng profess ona s to cont nue to advance the r educat on and the r careers.” For more nformat on about the Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng on ne program, the Lou s ana Tech S x S gma Green Be t cert f cat on and the Lou s ana Tech S x S gma B ack Be t cert f cat on, v s t http://coes. atech.edu/g oba -educat on. 13 2015-12-10 Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s DBA program ranked No. 5 in na RUSTON, La (Press Re ease) - op Management Degrees, an on ne resource for nformat on about bus ness and management educat on and careers, has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Doctor of Bus ness Adm n strat on (DBA) program No. 5 n the nat on n ts 2016 st of the Top 50 Doctorate n Bus ness Management Programs. Des gnated as an Area of Exce ence by the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System and res d ng n the Co ege of Bus ness, Lou s ana Tech s DBA program s des gned to prepare graduates for careers as effect veun vers ty researchers and teachers or for sen or research pos t ons n bus ness or government. Lou s ana Tech was the on y nst tut on n Lou s ana to earn a spot on Top Management Degrees Top 50 st. Doctora bus ness programs at the Un vers ty of South F or da s Muma Co ege of Bus ness topped the st at No. 1 fo owed by Harvard Un vers ty Bus ness Schoo , Un vers ty of F or da s Warr ngton Co ege of Bus ness, Cre ghton Un vers ty s He der Co ege of Bus ness and Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness. “We are honored to be ranked among the top f ve doctor a bus ness programs n the nat on,” sa d Dr. Chr s Mart n, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness. “Th s recogn t on s an aff rmat on of our facu ty s comm tment to exce ence n teach ng and to produc ng research w th s gn f cant mpact on the pract ce of bus ness.” Top Management Degrees Top 50 st were ana yzed and ranked based on factors such as accred tat on, prest ge, est mated cost, student sat sfact on and bus ness management curr cu um. Each cr ter on was g ven equa we ght n order to dent fy a we -rounded and h gh qua ty doctora bus ness management program. Data was gathered from each program s webs te and externa sources such as U.S. News and Wor d Report, the Pr nceton Rev ew and the Nat ona Center for Educat on Stat st cs. Accord ng to the r webs te, Top Management Degree says that w th MBA profess ona s f ood ng the bus ness wor d, an execut ve doctora degree n bus ness management he ps bus ness profess ona s d fferent ate themse ves from the r peers. These degrees nc ude Doctor of Bus ness Adm n strat on, Doctor of Management, and an Execut ve Doctor of Bus ness degrees, wh ch are seen as be ng equa n status and r gor to the Ph.D., but d fferent n focus. Th s atest rank ng comes on the hee s of severa other nat ona acco ades for Lou s ana Tech. In September, U.S. News & Wor d Report ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the nat on among pub c Nat ona Un vers t es for graduat ng students w th the east average amount of student debt. Lou s ana Tech a so ach eved a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng for the f fth consecut ve year. In add t on to ts U.S. News & Wor d Report rank ngs, Lou s ana Tech was ranked No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana recent y for h ghest average m d-career earn ngs for graduates, accord ng to PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report. Tech was a so ranked among the top un vers t es n the nat on n Forbes st of Amer ca s Top Co eges 2015, and n the top 2.6 percent of the wor d s degree-grant ng nst tut ons by the Center for Wor d Un vers ty Rank ngs. 13 2015-12-10 Monroe

Tech's Doctor of Business Administration ranked No. 5 in nation Top Management Degrees, an on ne resource for nformat on about bus ness and management educat on and careers, has ranked Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Doctor of Bus ness Adm n strat on (DBA) program No. 5 n the nat on n ts 2016 st of the Top 50 Doctorate n Bus ness Management Programs. Des gnated as an Area of Exce ence by the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System and res d ng n the Co ege of Bus ness, Lou s ana Tech s DBA program s des gned to prepare graduates for careers as effect ve un vers ty researchers and teachers or for sen or research pos t ons n bus ness or government. Lou s ana Tech was the on y nst tut on n Lou s ana to earn a spot on Top Management Degrees Top 50 st. Doctora bus ness programs at the Un vers ty of South F or da s Muma Co ege of Bus ness topped the st at No. 1 fo owed by Harvard Un vers ty Bus ness Schoo , Un vers ty of F or da s Warr ngton Co ege of Bus ness, Cre ghton Un vers ty s He der Co ege of Bus ness and Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness. "We are honored to be ranked among the top f ve doctor a bus ness programs n the nat on," sa d Dr. Chr s Mart n, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness. "Th s recogn t on s an aff rmat on of our facu ty s comm tment to exce ence n teach ng and to produc ng research w th s gn f cant mpact on the pract ce of bus ness." Top Management Degrees Top 50 st were ana yzed and ranked based on factors such as accred tat on, prest ge, est mated cost, student sat sfact on and bus ness management curr cu um. Each cr ter on was g ven equa we ght n order to dent fy a we -rounded and h gh qua ty doctora bus ness management program. Data was gathered from each program s webs te and externa sources such as U.S. News and Wor d Report, the Pr nceton Rev ew and the Nat ona Center for Educat on Stat st cs. Accord ng to the r webs te, Top Management Degree says that w th MBA profess ona s f ood ng the bus ness wor d, an execut ve doctora degree n bus ness management he ps bus ness profess ona s d fferent ate themse ves from the r peers. These degrees nc ude Doctor of Bus ness Adm n strat on, Doctor of Management, and an Execut ve Doctor of Bus ness degrees, wh ch are seen as be ng equa n status and r gor to the Ph.D., but d fferent n focus. Th s atest rank ng comes on the hee s of severa other nat ona acco ades for Lou s ana Tech. In September, U.S. News & Wor d Report ranked Lou s ana Tech No. 1 n the nat on among pub c Nat ona Un vers t es for graduat ng students w th the east average amount of student debt. Lou s ana Tech a so ach eved a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng for the f fth consecut ve year. In add t on to ts U.S. News & Wor d Report rank ngs, Lou s ana Tech was ranked No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana recent y for h ghest average m d-career earn ngs for graduates, accord ng to PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report. Tech was a so ranked among the top un vers t es n the nat on n Forbes st of Amer ca s Top Co eges 2015, and n the top 2.6 percent of the wor d s degree-grant ng nst tut ons by the Center for Wor d Un vers ty Rank ngs. For Top Management Degrees comp ete Top 50 Doctorate n Bus ness Management Programs st, v s t http://www.topmanagementdegrees.com/rank ngs/best-doctorate- n-bus ness-management-2016. 13 2015-12-10 Ruston

TECH’S REGIONAL ACCELERATOR BENEFITS ENTREPRENEURS Entrepreneurs str v ng to deve op and grow nnovat ve bus ness enterpr ses n the com ng year have an opportun ty to benef t from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Interstate 20 Corr dor Reg ona Acce erator n t at ve. Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-12-09 Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech faculty team selected for NSF Pathways to Innovation Program RUSTON, La – A team of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty facu ty and adm n strators has been se ected by the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on s (NSF) Nat ona Center for Eng neer ng Pathways to Innovat on (Ep center) as one of on y 14 un vers ty teams to o n the Pathways to Innovat on Program n 2016. Dr. Ke y Cr ttenden, assoc ate professor of mechan ca eng neer ng and nanosystems eng neer ng, and Ky e Prather, d rector of the Lou s ana Tech Th ngery, w ead the Lou s ana Tech Pathways group. The nterd sc p nary team, a comp at on of facu ty and staff from Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence and the Co ege of Bus ness, w part c pate n the th rd cohort of Ep center s nat ona Pathways to Innovat on Program, wh ch he ps nst tut ons to fu y ncorporate nnovat on and entrepreneursh p nto undergraduate eng neer ng educat on. Pr mary team members nc ude Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence; Dr. Heath T ms, assoc ate dean of undergraduate stud es for the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence; Dr. Dav d Ha , d rector of mechan ca eng neer ng, c v eng neer ng and construct on eng neer ng techno ogy; Dr. Kat e Evans, d rector of mathemat cs and stat st cs and ndustr a eng neer ng; Dr. Ga en Turner, d rector of computer sc ence, cyber eng neer ng, e ectr ca eng neer ng and e ectr ca eng neer ng techno ogy; Dr. Dave Norr s, d rector of Lou s ana Tech s Enterpr se Center and ch ef nnovat on off cer; and Debb e Inman, coord nator of entrepreneur a stud es for the Co ege of Bus ness. The program s run by Ep center, wh ch s funded by the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on and d rected by Stanford Un vers ty and the VentureWe . Facu ty and adm n strators part c pat ng n the Pathways program are tak ng on th s cha enge and ead ng the r un vers t es nto a new era of eng neer ng educat on that prepares students to tack e b g prob ems and thr ve n th s ever-chang ng economy. “Today, eng neer ng and computer sc ence students are expected to enter ndustry w th techn ca know edge as we as a d verse set of m ndsets, sk sets and att tudes that he p them nnovate, co aborate and create va ue,” sa d Tom Byers, d rector and co-pr nc pa nvest gator of Ep center and professor at Stanford Un vers ty. “As educators, we need to better prepare th s generat on of students for the workforce, pos t on them for success n the r careers, and g ve them more opportun t es to br ng the r nnovat ve deas to fe.” “We a ready str ve to nst a can-do-sp r t n our Lou s ana Tech eng neer ng students,” added Cr ttenden. “Through th s Pathways to Innovat on partnersh p, we are ook ng to expand that m ndset to nc ude nnovat on and entrepreneursh p a ongs de our students techn ca know edge. We w spend the next severa months exam n ng our ex st ng andscape, dent fy ng opportun t es for growth, and mp ement ng new strateg es to transform our undergraduate eng neer ng exper ence.” In add t on to the Lou s ana Tech team, teams from B nghamton Un vers ty – SUNY, Ca forn a State Un vers ty-Northr dge, The C ty Co ege of New York – CUNY, F or da A&M Un vers ty/F or da State Un vers ty, Grand Va ey State Un vers ty, Port and State Un vers ty, South Dakota Schoo of M nes and Techno ogy, South Dakota State Un vers ty, Un vers ty of New Hampsh re, Un vers ty of North A abama, Un vers ty of South F or da, Western Caro na Un vers ty, and Western Kentucky Un vers ty were se ected for the 2016 Pathways to Innovat on Program. Part c pat ng schoo s assemb e a team of facu ty and academ c eaders to assess the r nst tut on s current offer ngs, des gn a un que strategy for change, and ead the r peers n a transformat on process to broaden and strengthen the r campus-based nnovat on and entrepreneur a ecosystems. Program teams rece ve access to mode s for ntegrat ng entrepreneursh p nto eng neer ng curr cu um, custom on ne resources, network ng opportun t es, gu dance from a commun ty of eng neer ng and entrepreneursh p facu ty, and membersh p n a nat ona network of schoo s w th s m ar goa s. The teams n the 2016 cohort o n a commun ty of 36 nst tut ona teams that are current y part c pat ng n the program. The pro ects nc ude nnovat on cert f cates and ma ors, maker and f ex b e earn ng spaces, f rst-year and capstone courses, facu ty fe ows programs, and nnovat on centers. Add t ona y, severa cross- nst tut ona co aborat ons have resu ted from the f rst group of schoo s. “Our two cohorts of Pathways schoo s have made a tremendous and ast ng mpact on the educat on of the r students,” sa d V ctor a Matthew, the Pathways program eader and sen or program off cer at VentureWe . “We are thr ed to we come these 14 new teams to our nat ona commun ty so we can cont nue to work together on transform ng eng neer ng educat on.” 13 2015-12-09 Monroe

La. Tech announces its fall quarter graduates RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s fa quarter commencement exerc ses were he d Nov. 21, w th d p omas awarded to 311 graduates. Commencement off c a y marked the c ose of the fa academ c quarter. Graduates – sted by state, par sh/c ty and degree – are as fo ows: 13 2015-12-08 Monroe

La. Tech’s I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator benefits entrepreneurs RUSTON – Entrepreneurs str v ng to deve op and grow nnovat ve bus ness enterpr ses n the com ng year have an opportun ty to benef t from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Acce erator n t at ve. The Acce erator he ps entrepreneurs prepar ng to aunch a new enterpr se, nd v dua s exp or ng bus ness opportun t es and ex st ng ventures p ann ng to ntroduce new products to add ocat ons or ncrease market s ze. The program prov des tra n ng, coach ng and network ng opportun t es that fac tate strong and steady progress for new or grow ng ventures. Acce erator part c pants are ab e connect w th exper enced execut ves, bus ness profess ona s, coaches, peers and potent a customers to create a v ab e bus ness mode . “The I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Bus ness Acce erator at Lou s ana Tech s a hub of dynam c and nnovat ve act v ty that prov des an exce ent aunch ng pad for prom s ng new bus ness ventures n our reg on,” sa d Dr. Dave Norr s, ch ef nnovat on off cer at Lou s ana Tech. “The entrepreneurs we work w th are creat ng the h gh-growth economy of the future for north Lou s ana.” Each enterpr se part c pat ng n the I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Acce erator n t at ve s ass sted w th estab sh ng and mp ement ng the strateg c act ons needed to keep the venture advanc ng toward startup and success. He p w th determ n ng the funds requ red, dent fy ng sources of funds and prepar ng an nvestor proposa s a so nc uded. Entrepreneurs who have graduated from prev ous Acce erator programs have rece ved more than $3 m on n fund ng. Var ous fund ng sources have prov ded seed or pre-seed grants, compet t on awards, oans, nes of cred t and ange nvestment. Past part c pants are ach ev ng success and cont nu ng to grow. “The ventures part c pat ng n th s n t at ve are mpress ve and have performed extreme y we ,” sa d Kathy Wyatt, d rector of Lou s ana Tech s Techno ogy Bus ness Deve opment Center. “Graduates te us the Acce erator earn ng env ronment was very product ve and the ongo ng coach ng has proven v ta n ma nta n ng focus dur ng the aunch of the r venture. We are eager to have others throughout the reg on o n th s commun ty of nnovators and entrepreneurs who are earn ng together, support ng one another, and ach ev ng the r dreams.” The I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Acce erator program s free, but space s m ted. Cand dates must comp ete and subm t an app cat on summar z ng the r proposed venture by December 18, to be cons dered for Acce erator enro ment. Meet ngs w be he d n Ruston on every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. from Jan. 5, 2016 through Apr 26, 2016. To app y for the Acce erator or obta n more nformat on, ema [email protected] atech.edu or ca (318) 257-3537. 13 2015-12-08 Monroe

La. Tech announces its fall quarter graduates RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s fa quarter commencement exerc ses were he d Nov. 21, w th d p omas awarded to 311 graduates. Commencement off c a y marked the c ose of the fa academ c quarter. 13 2015-12-07 Monroe

La. Tech Poetry Society to present reading, release of student journal The Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Poetry Soc ety w present a poetry read ng to announce the re ease of ts student ourna , "The Quatra n," at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8 n George T. Mad son Ha , Room 105. Student authors from the soc ety w read from the r works pub shed n the f rst ed t on of the pub cat on. Th s event s open to the pub c, and cop es of the ourna w be ava ab e for sa e. "The Quatra n" s a pr nt and e ectron c annua ourna wh ch pub shes h gh qua ty undergraduate and graduate wr t ng and art. Accord ng to the Poetry Soc ety s facu ty adv ser, Dr. Ern e Ruf eth, the comp at on nc udes "fu -dress, researched, academ c essays and scho ar y exp orat ons, photography, fe-wr t ng, scu pture, cu tura cr t c sm, work that has a ref ect ve, autob ograph ca sty e, and creat ve wr t ng n a ts forms." Ruf eth says the ourna seeks to d sp ay samp es of the nterest ng, or g na and qua ty work be ng produced by g fted students and emerg ng ta ents from Lou s ana, Arkansas, Ok ahoma and Texas. "Th s four state reg on, our geograph ca quatra n, s our pr mary nterest." "I am abso ute y de ghted to have a pub c read ng for the f rst ssue of The Quatra n, " sa d Dr. Don Kaczv nsky, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of L bera Arts. "Dr. Ruf eth and the students have worked t re ess y to see the ourna n pr nt, and I be eve the pub cat on w e evate the stand ng of Lou s ana Tech as the prem er un vers ty n the four-state reg on for undergraduate educat on n terature, cu ture and the arts." The Quatra n s made poss b e by generous fund ng from the George E. Pankey Em nent Scho ar Professorsh p n Eng sh, wh ch s he d by Kaczv nsky. 13 2015-12-07 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Poetry Society to present reading, release of student journal RUSTON, La. – The Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Poetry Soc ety w present a poetry read ng to announce the re ease of ts student ourna , “The Quatra n,” at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8 n George T. Mad son Ha , Room 105. Student authors from the soc ety w read from the r works pub shed n the f rst ed t on of the pub cat on. Th s event s open to the pub c, and cop es of the ourna w be ava ab e for sa e. “The Quatra n” s a pr nt and e ectron c annua ourna wh ch pub shes h gh qua ty undergraduate and graduate wr t ng and art. Accord ng to the Poetry Soc ety s facu ty adv ser, Dr. Ern e Ruf eth, the comp at on nc udes “fu -dress, researched, academ c essays and scho ar y exp orat ons, photography, fe-wr t ng, scu pture, cu tura cr t c sm, work that has a ref ect ve, autob ograph ca sty e, and creat ve wr t ng n a ts forms.” Ruf eth says the ourna seeks to d sp ay samp es of the nterest ng, or g na and qua ty work be ng produced by g fted students and emerg ng ta ents from Lou s ana, Arkansas, Ok ahoma and Texas. “Th s four state reg on, our geograph ca quatra n, s our pr mary nterest.” “I am abso ute y de ghted to have a pub c read ng for the f rst ssue of The Quatra n, ” sa d Dr. Don Kaczv nsky, dean of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of L bera Arts. “Dr. Ruf eth and the students have worked t re ess y to see the ourna n pr nt, and I be eve the pub cat on w e evate the stand ng of Lou s ana Tech as the prem er un vers ty n the four-state reg on for undergraduate educat on n terature, cu ture and the arts.” The Quatra n s made poss b e by generous fund ng from the George E. Pankey Em nent Scho ar Professorsh p n Eng sh, wh ch s he d by Kaczv nsky. 13 2015-12-04 Shreveport

Sports concussion researcher to lecture at La. Tech Dr. L -Shan Chou, professor and cha r of the Department of Human Phys o ogy at the Un vers ty of Oregon, w present a ecture t t ed "Track ng Funct ona Def c ts Fo ow ng Concuss on Us ng Movement Ana ys s" Dec. 14 as the next nsta ment of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es. Chou s presentat on w beg n at 3:30 p.m. n the aud tor um of Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es w spot ght nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. "Track ng Funct ona Def c ts Fo ow ng Concuss on Us ng Movement Ana ys s" w be of part cu ar nterest to sports coaches and parents of young ath etes. Chou s research s on the forefront of track ng and understand ng ong term effects of sport-re ated concuss ons n ath etes. Some of h s research has shown a terat ons n the ga t and ba ance of concussed nd v dua s ong after cogn t ve d srupt ons have subs ded. As Chou further deve ops th s area of research, he hopes to dent fy b omechan ca , cogn t ve and other measurements wh ch can ass st c n c ans n the r ab ty to determ ne whether an nd v dua s ready to return to everyday or sport act v t es fo ow ng concuss on. As the d rector of the Un vers ty of Oregon Mot on Ana ys s Laboratory, Chou nvest gates the b omechan ca mechan sms govern ng ga t ba ance contro and factors contr but ng to mob ty mpa rments. Comb n ng eng neer ng know edge and co aborat on w th co eagues n neurosc ence and sports med c ne, h s nterd sc p nary research programs connects bas c research to c n ca app cat ons re evant to pat ents w th neuro og ca or muscu oske eta d sorders. Chou rece ved h s doctora degree n mechan ca eng neer ng from the Un vers ty of I no s at Ch cago. Pr or to arr v ng at the Un vers ty of Oregon n 2000, he he d pos t ons as post-doctora research assoc ate n research fe ow at the Un vers ty of Ch cago and the Mayo C n c, respect ve y. Chou s areas of research expert se nc ude c n ca ga t ana ys s, assessment of dynam c stab ty dur ng ocomot on, and mathemat ca mode ng of the muscu oske eta system. To further h s work, he has rece ved research grants from the Nat ona Inst tute of Hea th, the Mayo Foundat on, the Med ca Research Foundat on of Oregon, and the Centers for D sease Contro and Prevent on. A ectures dur ng the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. Sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. For more nformat on on Chou and h s presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2015-11-30 Monroe

Winners of La. Tech’s 'Won in One' pitch competition announced RUSTON – A d verse group of entrepreneurs from across the reg on h gh ghted the “Won n One” Idea P tch compet t on, wh ch cha enges nnovators to present the r new ventures as part of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Innovat on Enterpr se. L ke contestants on the popu ar te ev s on show “Shark Tank,” the compet tors p tched the r deas recent y w th the goa of mpress ng the aud ence and a pane of bus ness experts who udged and se ected the most appea ng opportun ty. The aud ence a so part c pated by vot ng for the r favor tes. The compet t on s top pr ze of $1,000 went to West Monroe s Dawn Hodges of “Dreamcatcher s Enterpr ses” for her mu t purpose s eep ng sack coveted by outdoor enthus asts and others ook ng for a conven ent and comp ete bedd ng opt on for overn ght stays. Dan e Okougbo s so ut on for de ver ng re ab e power n ocat ons p agued by ncons stent e ectr ca serv ce, such as N ger a, earned h m the Peop e s Cho ce award and a cash pr ze of $750. “Ch cken Checkers,” presented by Sawyer Stone, and “B oSense Labs,” presented by Varun Kopparthy, d v ded the $750 award for Best Student Presentat on. Each of these student teams proposed a d fferent approach for dent fy ng potent a food contam nat on, w th Ch cken Checkers focus ng on n home use by consumers and B oSense Labs emphas z ng mproved detect on at process ng fac t es. The second p ace award of $500 a so went to Varun Kopparthy and B oSense Labs. Kather ne Ha was awarded the th rd p ace pr ze of $250 for her product des gned to ass st tenn s p ayers w th keep ng score. In add t on to vy ng for cash pr zes, a of the compet tors rece ved feedback from the pane of udges, d scovered resources and expert se he pfu for deve op ng the r products and met other nnovators from across the reg on. “Won n One” prov des the entrants an opportun ty to present the r concepts n a way that s ex t ng, nformat ve, and f nanc a y appea ng. The compet t on s a component of the I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Acce erator and, desp te the compet t ve e ements of vy ng for pr zes, contestants and spectators engaged n energet c conversat ons about the r deas, the commerc a potent a and the resources ava ab e to support the r success. Many of the “Won n One” part c pants w app y to and part c pate n the I-20 Corr dor Reg ona Bus ness Acce erator wh ch beg ns n January 2016. Ind v dua s se ected for the Acce erator rece ve ntens ve tra n ng, coach ng and nteract on w th exper enced profess ona s who he p gu de them through the start-up process. For more nformat on or an app cat on for the Acce erator, ema [email protected] atech.edu or ca (318) 257-3537. 13 2015-11-30 Ruston

TECH’S ‘WON IN ONE’ IDEA PITCH WINNERS ANNOUNCED A d verse group of entrepreneurs from across the reg on h gh ghted the “Won n One” Idea P tch compet t on, wh ch cha enges nnovators to present the r new ventures as part of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Innovat on Enterpr se. L ke contestants on the popu ar te ev s on show “Shark Tank,” the compet tors p tched the r deas recent y w th the goa of mpress ng the aud ence and a pane of bus ness experts who udged and se ected the most appea ng opportun ty. The aud ence a so part c pated by vot ng for the r favor tes. 13 2015-11-25 Ruston

[email protected] ALUMNI SPEAKS TO STUDENTS Seven New Tech at Ruston a umn recent y spoke w th more than 50 current New Tech students about how New Tech he ps them through co ege. New Tech, formed severa years ago at Ruston H gh Schoo , teaches students how to work n groups, cr t ca y th nk and effect ve y commun cate before enter ng co ege. Eng sh and pub c speak ng teacher Tara Raue sa d she asked the a umn students to speak w th her c ass to he p them understand the cha enges students w meet n co ege and how New Tech he ped them ach eve. Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-11-24 Lake Charles

Engineering Students Place in International Competition (November 20, 2015) McNeese State Un vers ty s student eng neer ng team took second p ace n the 2015 Amer can Soc ety of Mechan ca Eng neers Student Des gn Compet t on – Robots for Re ef - he d Nov. 15 n Houston, Texas, as part of the ASME Internat ona Mechan ca Eng neer ng Congress and Expos t on. Seventeen entr es from un vers t es n the Un ted States, Mex co, Po and, Lebanon, Pak stsan, Turkey, Peru, Saud Arab a, Ind a and Egypt competed for the three awards n the annua nternat ona compet t on for co ege students. Two eng neer ng teams from North Caro na State Un vers ty captured f rst and th rd p ace. The students – Ben am n Pearce, DeQu ncy, Jeevan Ra , Nepa , A per Un uer, Turkey, and Nab n Dhaka , Nepa – des gned and bu t a sca ed-down prototype of a robot c system that can be a mode for a rescue robot work ng n d saster areas around the wor d. The McNeese team was a owed three m nutes to put ts mode -s zed battery operated robot through the paces on a p anned test course to demonstrate the capab ty of the dev ce to ass st n human tar an operat ons. McNeese s rescue robot performed a most f aw ess y, maneuver ng around obstac es, p vot ng and oad ng and un oad ng bu k mater a s, accord ng to Ju o C. Guerrero, pres dent of ASME. “These students have d sp ayed cons derab e techn ca ngenu ty and sk n des gn ng prototypes that can be the forerunners of robot c systems ab e to perform mportant human tar an re ef serv ces n many parts of the wor d,” sa d Guerrero. “The students are ndeed tomorrow s techno ogy nnovators and prob em so vers.” The McNeese team p aced f rst p ace n the ASME des gn compet t on at the reg ona conference hosted by Texas Tech Un vers ty back n the spr ng to move on to the nternat ona compet t on n Houston. The team s entry was created for the students ENGR 491 Capstone Sen or Des gn course taught by Dr. N ng Zhang. Dr. Zhuang L was the mentor for th s pro ect. The team used a 3D pr nter to des gn ts prototype and bu t a pract ce obstac e course to s mu ate rough terra n that nc uded water, nc nes, sand and 90 degree steps. “Th s s so great!” sa d Pearce - who graduated n the spr ng - of tak ng the runner-up spot n the 2015 ASME Student Des gn Compet t on. “Th s was ass gned for our sen or des gn pro ect and we have been work ng on the robot for more than a year. Th s ASME award rea y caps a ot of work for us.” McNeese s Co ege of Eng neer ng was recent y ranked th rd n the nat on among eng neer ng programs n terms of career return on nvestment for ts graduates- topp ng a eng neer ng programs n the state of Lou s ana – by PaySca e Inc. “We are extreme y proud of our students accomp shment at th s nternat ona event where there was a h gh eve of compet t on,” sa d Dr. N kos K r ts s, dean of the co ege of eng neer ng. “Th s s a great earn ng exper ence for our students. The compet t on showcases the ta ents of our eng neer ng students wh e at the same t me encourag ng them to deve op nnovat ve deas that mprove the qua ty of fe.” He added that “the r hard work and comm tment a so ref ect pos t ve y on the outstand ng professors here at McNeese who are work ng to ensure that our graduates are we prepared and ob ready on day one.” 13 2015-11-24 Monroe

Braud Offers Louisiana Tech Graduates Wisdom from the World of Social Media RUSTON, La. –

“We are aunch ng you. D scover your authent c se f. D scover who you are rea y meant to be.” That was the message from keynote speaker Gerard Braud to 311 new Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty graduates dur ng the schoo s 314th commencement exerc ses Saturday at the Thomas Assemb y Center. Braud s the CEO of Braud Commun cat ons, a pub c re at ons f rm that spec a zes n cr s s commun cat ons, and Lou s ana Tech a umnus. “Many of those who started Tech w th you aren t here today,” Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce sa d to the graduates. “Desp te the cha enges you faced, t was you who set goa s and worked t re ess y to ach eve them. It was you who showed perseverance and ded cated count ess hours to study, research and attend ng c ass. You have made many memor es that w tru y ast a fet me. Today s tru y a m estone n your fe s ourney.” Gu ce then turned the pod um over to Braud, who started by ask ng the graduates to acknow edge the r fam y and teachers. “To beg n, we need to g ve cred t where cred t s due,” Braud sa d. “You are here because of the ove of your fam y and the gu dance of your facu ty. They re a ook ng down from the stands r ght now try ng to get your attent on or get a photo of you. So I d ke you each to ook around for a moment, catch the eye of that spec a someone, wave to them and as oud as you can, say, Thank you. ” He then gave the graduates the opportun ty to take pre-graduat on photos. “Next, I know each of you s dy ng to take a se f e, so et s take a moment to et you take your se f e to get that out of the way. Now on to the work at hand – trans t on ng you from your p ace n your seat to your p ace up here on th s stage and then on to your p ace n fe.” Braud offered some adv ce for the graduates from a sorts of d fferent peop e. “For 30 days, I ve used soc a med a to reach out to some of the br ghtest m nds on the p anet, as we as to ord nary fo ks who w sh to share ust a t ny b t of w sdom w th you as you embark on the next chapter of your fe.” Some of those remarks nc uded: - CNN Anchor Brook Ba dw n says, “Check your ego at the door.” - Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce says, “Have a p an for where you are headed, pursue what you ove and pursue t w th pass on, but prepare for change.” - Sarah Koc an A zamora, a corporate execut ve and mother of a spec a needs ch d says, “Your fe m ght turn out d fferent y than you p anned, but that doesn t mean you aren t r ght where you are supposed to be.” “These graduates are the MM Generat on – the Mob e M enn a Generat on,” Braud sa d pr or to h s address. “Th s graduat ng c ass has spent 50 percent of the r ves on mob e dev ces w th soc a med a. They ve a exper enced the negat ve aspects of soc a med a. My goa s to harness and share the good as we aunch them nto the next chapter of the r ves.” Dur ng the commencement ceremon es, Brooks Hu , Lou s ana Tech s new V ce Pres dent for Un vers ty Advancement, a so presented W. Ray Wa ace w th the un vers ty s prest g ous Tower Meda on Award. The award p aces Wa ace n Lou s ana Tech s Ha of D st ngu shed A umn wh ch honors those who have ach eved great y n the r profess ons, n commun ty serv ce, and n human tar an act v ty wh e rema n ng steadfast y oya to Lou s ana Tech. Wa ace was ongt me pres dent, CEO and cha rman of the board for Tr n ty Stee , a Da as manufacturer of tanks used to store and transport butane and quef ed petro eum gas. In add t on to the r d p omas, each graduate rece ved the r Tenet Meda ons nscr bed w th the 12 Tenets of Tech and the r year of graduat on. The Tenets of Tech are gu d ng pr nc p es and persona character st cs that students and graduates are expected to embrace and upho d dur ng and after the r t me at Lou s ana Tech. 13 2015-11-24 Ruston

A CAMPUS COMMUNITY OF DART SUPPORTERS In one short week, the Domest c Abuse Res stance Team has exper enced an ncred b e amount of partnersh p and support from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. I don t know about you, but when I was n co ege, my focus was on the nsu ated wor d of my campus. I he d a ob on campus, served n student government pos t ons and worked hard to have good grades. If I vo unteered anywhere, t was usua y part of a schoo ass gnment or pro ect. I am proud to report that th s s not the case at Tech. Last week, I rece ved a ca from Jeff Jenk ns, coach of the men s go f team. Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-11-20 Ruston

Auditions announced for theatre production of “Sleeping Beauty” Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre w ho d open aud t ons for ts second product on of the year, James Barry s “S eep ng Beauty,” on December 7-8 n the Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts Young actors and actresses from grades 2 and up as we as co ege students are encouraged to aud t on for Barry s adaptat on of th s c ass c ta e, d rected by Pau Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre at Lou s ana Tech. Pub c performances of S eep ng Beauty are schedu ed for January 26-31, 2016 n Howard Aud tor um. Aud t ons w beg n at 6:00 p.m. for ch dren grade 2-6 and at 7:00 p.m. for grade 7 and up as we as for a co ege students, on both December 7 and 8. Students n grade 2-6 shou d come prepared to read a short poem. A others w part c pate n a co d read that w cons st of read ng a scene from the show chosen by the d rector. Everyone who w shes to part c pate s requested to wear aud t on-appropr ate att re. In the story of S eep ng Beauty, Carabosse, the w cked w tch, sentences the young Pr ncess Aurora to death by sp nn ng whee , but the good fa r es (the s m Fa ry L qu d and the p ump Fa ry Cakes) commute th s to a ong bor ng s eep – a s eep from wh ch the Pr ncess can on y be woken by a k ss from her true ove. S eep ng Beauty features a oveab e cast of characters, nc ud ng a madcap nanny, wacky fa r es, ser ous y cha enged henchmen, and of course, Pr ncess Aurora herse f. For more nformat on about th s product on or the upcom ng aud t ons, p ease contact the Lou s ana Tech Theatre off ce at 318-257-2930. You can a so connect w th the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre by v s t ng www. atechun vers tytheatre.com, “L k ng” the r Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre, or fo ow ng on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2015-11-20 Ruston

Auditions announced for theatre production of “Sleeping Beauty” Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Theatre w ho d open aud t ons for ts second product on of the year, James Barry s “S eep ng Beauty,” on December 7-8 n the Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts Young actors and actresses from grades 2 and up as we as co ege students are encouraged to aud t on for Barry s adaptat on of th s c ass c ta e, d rected by Pau Crook, assoc ate professor of theatre at Lou s ana Tech. Pub c performances of S eep ng Beauty are schedu ed for January 26-31, 2016 n Howard Aud tor um. Aud t ons w beg n at 6:00 p.m. for ch dren grade 2-6 and at 7:00 p.m. for grade 7 and up as we as for a co ege students, on both December 7 and 8. Students n grade 2-6 shou d come prepared to read a short poem. A others w part c pate n a co d read that w cons st of read ng a scene from the show chosen by the d rector. Everyone who w shes to part c pate s requested to wear aud t on-appropr ate att re. In the story of S eep ng Beauty, Carabosse, the w cked w tch, sentences the young Pr ncess Aurora to death by sp nn ng whee , but the good fa r es (the s m Fa ry L qu d and the p ump Fa ry Cakes) commute th s to a ong bor ng s eep – a s eep from wh ch the Pr ncess can on y be woken by a k ss from her true ove. S eep ng Beauty features a oveab e cast of characters, nc ud ng a madcap nanny, wacky fa r es, ser ous y cha enged henchmen, and of course, Pr ncess Aurora herse f. For more nformat on about th s product on or the upcom ng aud t ons, p ease contact the Lou s ana Tech Theatre off ce at 318-257-2930. You can a so connect w th the Lou s ana Tech Department of Theatre by v s t ng www. atechun vers tytheatre.com, “L k ng” the r Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ atechtheatre, or fo ow ng on Tw tter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre. 13 2015-11-19 Ruston

Brooks Hull to lead Louisiana Tech’s Division of University Advancement as new VP RUSTON, La. – Brooks Hu , former y the v ce pres dent of Inst tut ona Advancement at Aust n Co ege n Sherman, Texas, has off c a y assumed eadersh p of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s D v s on of Un vers ty Advancement as ts new v ce pres dent. Hu , who w ead Lou s ana Tech s fundra s ng, deve opment and a umn re at ons act v t es, was se ected from a poo of outstand ng cand dates fo ow ng an extens ve nat ona search. He w rep ace Corre Stega , who ret red n Ju y after a d st ngu shed 25-year career at Lou s ana Tech as an Eng sh professor, a umn and deve opment d rector, and v ce pres dent. “I cons der myse f very pr v eged to assume th s eadersh p pos t on, part cu ar y g ven the stature Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty en oys n Amer can h gher educat on,” sa d Hu . “I am gratefu and exc ted about work ng w th the support ve and ded cated a umn , parents, and fr ends of the un vers ty who make the mportant work of the students, facu ty, and staff so h gh y successfu .” As v ce pres dent of Inst tut ona Advancement at Aust n Co ege, Hu ed a staff of near y two dozen, respons b e for nst tut ona fundra s ng, a umn re at ons, market ng and commun cat ons. He deve oped and mp emented a comprehens ve deve opment program, resu t ng n 129 percent ncrease n outr ght g fts s nce 2011. Dur ng h s tenure, the co ege a so exper enced an ncrease to estate g fts by 61 percent and part c pat on by 14 percent. Pr or to h s ro e at Aust n Co ege, Hu served n var ous deve opment ro es at the Un vers ty of Ok ahoma nc ud ng D rector of Deve opment for the Co eges of Arch tecture and Educat on (1999-2003), D rector of Deve opment for the Co ege of Eng neer ng (2003-2007), and Execut ve D rector of Deve opment for the Co ege of Eng neer ng (2007-2010). He prov ded eadersh p dur ng a $100 m on cap ta campa gn n the Co ege of Eng neer ng, resu t ng n over $139 m on ra sed n f ve years. Hu a so ead deve opment programs for two co eges dur ng an nst tut ona -w de $200 m on “Reach for Exce ence” campa gn that resu ted n over $500 m on. “Brooks s a great add t on to my eadersh p team and br ngs tremendous exper ence and pass on to our deve opment program,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “He has a ready h t the ground runn ng n estab sh ng re at onsh ps w th the Tech fam y and n deve op ng aggress ve p ans for fundra s ng.” Hu earned a bache or s degree n pub c affa rs and adm n strat on (1996), and a master s degree n human re at ons (2001) from the Un vers ty of Ok ahoma, and s a so a Cert f ed Fund Ra s ng Execut ve. Hu has served as a member and as cha rman of the Board of D rectors of the Sherman Econom c Deve opment Corporat on, and a member of the Board of D rectors for the Counc for Advancement and Support of Educat on (CASE)-D str ct IV. Hu has served on teams that have been recogn zed by the Counc for Advancement and Support of Educat on s C rc e of Exce ence Awards Program w th the CASE-Wea th ID Award for Fundra s ng-Overa Performance n 2002 and 2006. Hu comes to Lou s ana Tech and Ruston w th h s w fe, Kerr , and the r two sons, Hunter and F sher. He says they are ook ng forward to th s new chapter n the r ves and to becom ng a part of the Tech fam y. 13 2015-11-17 Ruston

La. Tech offers new minor in actuarial science RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Mathemat cs and Stat st cs has begun offer ng a new m nor n actuar a sc ence. Actuar es manage and reduce r sk, and work for compan es n a range of f e ds, ana yz ng the potent a for undes rab e events to occur and he p ng to p an for those events. These actuar es are current y n h gh demand, espec a y n the f e d of nsurance. In add t on to hav ng obs that are exc t ng and cha eng ng, actuar es earn a med an annua sa ary of approx mate y $100,000. The goa of Lou s ana Tech s actuar a sc ence m nor, wh ch cons sts of 20 cred t hours, s to prepare students to be ab e to pass at east the f rst two profess ona exams. Students are requ red to take courses n mathemat cs, stat st cs and other bus ness-re ated courses such as eng neer ng econom cs and f nanc a mathemat cs. “The Actuar a Sc ence m nor at Lou s ana Tech w be a great too for he p ng w th workforce deve opment,” says sa d Stan McCaa, nstructor of mathemat cs and stat st cs at Lou s ana Tech. “Compan es need the ab ty to eva uate the costs of new r sks. The ob market for actuar es s stead y grow ng, and th s growth s expected to cont nue.” For more nformat on about Lou s ana Tech s m nor n actuar a sc ence, p ease contact Dr. Dave Meng n Lou s ana Tech s Department of Mathemat cs and Stat st cs at [email protected] atech.edu. For more nformat on about actuar es and what they do, v s t the Soc ety of Actuar es webs te at http://www.soa.org. Read or Share th s story: http://tnsne.ws/1NWIeYM 13 2015-11-17 Ruston

Louisiana Tech Offers New Minor in Actuarial Science Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Mathemat cs and Stat st cs has begun offer ng a new m nor n actuar a sc ence. Actuar es manage and reduce r sk, and work for compan es n a range of f e ds, ana yz ng the potent a for undes rab e events to occur and he p ng to p an for those events. These actuar es are current y n h gh demand, espec a y n the f e d of nsurance. In add t on to hav ng obs that are exc t ng and cha eng ng, actuar es earn a med an annua sa ary of approx mate y $100,000. The goa of Lou s ana Tech s actuar a sc ence m nor, wh ch cons sts of 20 cred t hours, s to prepare students to be ab e to pass at east the f rst two profess ona exams. Students are requ red to take courses n mathemat cs, stat st cs and other bus ness-re ated courses such as eng neer ng econom cs and f nanc a mathemat cs. “The Actuar a Sc ence m nor at Lou s ana Tech w be a great too for he p ng w th workforce deve opment,” says sa d Stan McCaa, nstructor of mathemat cs and stat st cs at Lou s ana Tech. “Compan es need the ab ty to eva uate the costs of new r sks. The ob market for actuar es s stead y grow ng, and th s growth s expected to cont nue.” For more nformat on about Lou s ana Tech s m nor n actuar a sc ence, p ease contact Dr. Dave Meng n Lou s ana Tech s Department of Mathemat cs and Stat st cs at [email protected] atech.edu. For more nformat on about actuar es and what they do, v s t the Soc ety of Actuar es webs te at http://www.soa.org. 13 2015-11-17 Ruston

VIZZA CROWNED MISS LOUISIANA TECH 2016 Lou s ana Tech Un ver sty V ce Pres dent of Academ c Affa rs J m K ng and 2015 M ss Lou s ana Tech Eva Ed nger crown Rache V zza as the 2016 M ss Lou s ana Tech at the 2016 M ss Lou s ana Tech Pageant he d Wednesday n Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts. 13 2015-11-17 Ruston

BRAUD SERVES AS TECH GRADUATION KEYNOTE SPEAKER Gerard Braud, CEO of Braud Commun cat ons and Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty a umnus, w serve as the keynote speaker for Lou s ana Tech s fa quarter commencement at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Thomas Assemb y Center. 13 2015-11-16 Ruston

Kinesiology department offers exercise science services, expertise to public The Department of K nes o ogy n Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on s p eased to announce the open ng of a C n ca and Performance Assessment serv ce to the pub c. Th s serv ce, offered through the App ed Phys o ogy Laboratory and Sport and Movement Sc ence Laboratory, w offer the genera pub c an opportun ty to take advantage of facu ty expert se and state-of-the-art exerc se sc ence equ pment. Serv ces nc ude performance tra n ng or c n ca exerc se prescr pt on programs, sport sk s ana ys s w th h gh-speed cameras, VO2 max and metabo c test ng, body compos t on ana ys s, and nutr t on or supp ementat on consu t ng. The fee-based serv ce s ava ab e to nd v dua s, groups and teams w th n the area, tak ng advantage of the Department of K nes o ogy Facu ty s exper ence n c n ca and app ed exerc se sc ence, nc ud ng expert se n the areas of strength and cond t on ng, sport b omechan cs, f tness and we ness, and ergogen c a ds. For more nformat on, v s t www. atechsportsc ence.org. To schedu e a serv ce, p ease contact the aboratory d rector, Dr. Braden Romer, at [email protected] atech.edu or 318-257-5460. 13 2015-11-13 Monroe

Communications expert Braud to keynote fall commencement RUSTON – Gerard Braud, CEO of Braud Commun cat ons and Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty a umnus, w serve as the keynote speaker for Lou s ana Tech s fa quarter commencement at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Thomas Assemb y Center. Braud, whose pub c re at ons f rm spec a zes n cr s s commun cat ons, sa d he s attempt ng to crowd source w sdom on soc a med a to share w th graduates these newest Lou s ana Tech graduates. For the past 30 days, he has been so c t ng comments v a Tw tter, Facebook, YouTube, and L nkedIn, ask ng the quest on, “If you cou d g ve ust one p ece of adv ce to a co ege graduate, what wou d t be?” “These graduates are the MM Generat on – the Mob e M enn a Generat on,” he sa d. “Th s graduat ng c ass has spent 50 percent of the r ves on mob e dev ces w th soc a med a. They ve a exper enced the negat ve aspects of soc a med a. “My goa s to harness and share the good as we aunch them nto the next chapter of the r ves.” In an excerpt from h s commencement address, Braud says “For a of the prom se granted to you by your mob e dev ces, there seems to be ust as many ev s. Instagram, SnapChat, Tw tter, Facebook, YouTube and a of your other mob e apps can be a pathway to shar ng oy. Yet so often, peop e use them as a pathway for hate and meanness. “In an effort to restore our fa th n soc a med a, I ve reached out to some of the br ghtest m nds on the p anet [through soc a med a] as we as to ord nary fo ks who w sh to share ust a t ny b t of w sdom w th you as you embark on the next chapter of your fe.” A1980 ourna sm graduate from Lou s ana Tech, Braud began h s ourna sm career as a wr ter for The Shreveport T mes and has worked as a reporter, weathercaster and news anchor at KSLA-TV 12 dur ng h s career. Braud has a so worked as the Cap to Correspondent at WAFB-TV 9 n Baton Rouge and as the Env ronmenta Reporter at WDSU-TV 6 n New Or eans. Throughout h s career, he a so prov ded reports for NBC, CBS, CNN and The Weather Channe . Braud eft te ev s on n 1994 to deve op a career as a cr s s commun cat ons expert, based on corporate and governmenta fa ngs he observed as a ourna st. He founded Braud Commun cat ons wh ch serves organ zat ons on f ve cont nents that re y on Braud to tra n the r spokespeop e and execut ves to commun cate effect ve y dur ng a cr s s. H s c ents have ranged from the Fortune 500 c ents to ma or government agenc es n the U.S. and around the wor d, as we as med um to sma bus nesses across Amer ca. Braud cred ts Lou s ana Tech and ts ourna sm facu ty w th h s success, espec a y the ate department head W ey H burn. “Every morn ng I th nk of myse f f rst as a wr ter who s us ng the power of the wr tten and spoken word,” Braud sa d. “I am keen y aware that the strong foundat on I rece ved at Tech makes a the d fference n the wor d to my c ents.” A of the fa graduates from each of Lou s ana Tech s f ve academ c co eges and the Graduate Schoo w rece ve d p omas dur ng the commencement ceremony as we as the r Tenet Meda ons nscr bed w th the 12 Tenets of Tech and the r year of graduat on. The Tenets of Tech are gu d ng pr nc p es and persona character st cs that students and graduates are expected to embrace and upho d dur ng and after the r t me at Lou s ana Tech. Fa commencement off c a y ends the fa quarter. W nter quarter c asses at Lou s ana Tech w beg n on Dec. 2. 13 2015-11-13 Ruston

Louisiana Tech liberal arts dean presents talk in D.C. Dr. Dona d P. Kaczv nsky, dean of the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, gave a presentat on at the 50th annua meet ng of the Counc of Co eges of Arts and Sc ences Nov. 4-7 n Wash ngton D.C. Kaczv nsky s presentat on was part of a pane t t ed, “Restructur ng the Un t: Lessons n How to Lead Reorgan zat on.” The annua meet ng gathered near y 580 deans from across the country to d scuss var ous top c, nc ud ng eadersh p, fundra s ng and the ro e of bera arts n Amer can un vers t es today. Kaczv nsky earned a Ph.D. n Eng sh from Penn State Un vers ty n 1989, a master s degree n Eng sh from the Un vers ty of V rg n a n 1984, and a bache or s degree n Eng sh from Prov dence Co ege n 1982 13 2015-11-12 Ruston

Kinesiology alumnae earns research fellowship Brand DeCoux, a k neso ogy a umnae from Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on and Auburn Un vers ty doctora student, has recent y rece ved the Auburn Un vers ty Research In t at ve n Cancer (AURIC) fe owsh p. DeCoux s research s focus ng on the re at onsh p between ower extrem ty pa n and movement us ng ga t ana ys s n th s popu at on. Accord ng to Auburn, t s the f rst known b omechan ca research pro ect of ts k nd. DeCoux graduated from Lou s ana Tech w th her master s degree and s or g na y from New Iber a, Lou s ana. In add t on to her exce ent academ c work wh e at Lou s ana Tech, she a so engaged n a arge amount of serv ce n the PK-12 arena n Ruston and the surround ng commun t es. To earn more about DeCoux s research, v s t http://www.educat on.auburn.edu/news/coe-doctora -student-awarded-aur cfe owsh p-he p-breast-cancer-surv vors/ 13 2015-11-09 Ruston

Distinguished alumni to be honored at Louisiana Tech Alumni Awards Luncheon

RUSTON, La. – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w honor d st ngu shed a umn as part of Homecom ng Week 2015 dur ng the annua A umn Awards Luncheon at noon Fr day, Nov. 6 n the c ub eve of the Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex. George Ba dw n, a 1978 petro eum eng neer ng graduate, has been named as the 2015 Lou s ana Tech A umnus of the Year; and Just n Bounds, a 2011 mechan ca eng neer ng graduate, and Joshua G d ow, a 2011 mechan ca eng neer ng graduate, have been named the 2015 Young A ums of the Year.

In add t on to Ba dw n, Bounds and G d ow, f ve other Lou s ana Tech graduates w be des gnated D st ngu shed A umn n the r respect ve co eges. 13 2015-11-06 Ruston

Distinguished alumni to be honored at Alumni Luncheon Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w honor d st ngu shed a umn as part of Homecom ng Week 2015 dur ng the annua A umn Awards Luncheon at noon Fr day n the c ub eve of the Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex. George Ba dw n, a 1978 petro eum eng neer ng graduate, has been named as the 2015 Lou s ana Tech A umnus of the Year. Just n Bounds and Joshua G d ow, both 2011 mechan ca eng neer ng graduates, have been named as the 2015 Young A ums of the Year. In add t on to Ba dw n, Bounds and G d ow, f ve other Tech graduates w be des gnated D st ngu shed A umn n the r respect ve co eges.

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-11-03 Monroe

Distinguished alumni to be honored by La. Tech

13 2015-11-03 Monroe

Distinguished alumni to be honored by La. Tech

RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w honor d st ngu shed a umn as part of Homecom ng Week 2015 dur ng the annua A umn Awards Luncheon at noon Fr day, Nov. 6 n the c ub eve of the Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex. George Ba dw n, a 1978 petro eum eng neer ng graduate, has been named as the 2015 Lou s ana Tech A umnus of the Year; and Just n Bounds, a 2011 mechan ca eng neer ng graduate, and Joshua G d ow, a 2011 mechan ca eng neer ng graduate, have been named the 2015 Young A ums of the Year. In add t on to Ba dw n, Bounds and G d ow, f ve other Lou s ana Tech graduates w be des gnated D st ngu shed A umn n the r respect ve co eges. T ckets for the uncheon are $25 per person or $200 for a reserved tab e of e ght. T ckets can be purchased by ca ng the Lou s ana Tech Marbury A umn Center at (318) 255-7950 or v s t ng www. atecha umn .org/2015a umn awards. George A. Ba dw n Jr. s a petro eum eng neer and pres dent and CEO of EnS ght IV Energy Partners n Shreveport. After graduat on, Ba dw n marr ed h s co ege sweetheart, Jean Anne Murphy and began h s career n the o and gas bus ness as a petro eum eng neer w th Ark a Exp orat on Company. After two years w th Ark a, he worked for a consu t ng f rm n Da as and ndependent energy compan es n Shreveport and Houston. Ba dw n returned to Shreveport w th Ark a n 1986 and rema ned there unt 1992. Short y thereafter, Ba dw n o ned Brammer Eng neer ng n Shreveport and, together w th pr nc pa s of Brammer and Keystone Exp orat on, formed Brammer-Keystone Energy n 1994. He became pres dent of Brammer-Keystone n 1997 and pres ded over the reorgan zat on of the company as EnS ght Resources and the sa e of the company n 2001. Ba dw n and h s ong-t me bus ness assoc ate, fr end and fe ow Tech a umnus, Gregory K. Madden, then successfu y bu t and so d EnS ght Energy Partners and EnS ght III Energy Partners. Fo ow ng the sa e of EnS ght III n 2008, Ba dw n and Madden formed Ba dw n Madden Energy, an o and gas acqu s t on, deve opment and nvestment company. In June, Ba dw n Madden aunched EnS ght IV Energy Partners to pursue o and gas opportun t es n Arkansas, Lou s ana, M ss ss pp and Texas. Ba dw n s a Reg stered Profess ona Eng neer n Lou s ana. He serves on the Boards of TDX Energy and CyberReef So ut ons and on the Adv sory Comm ttee of the New Lou s ana Ange Fund 1. He a so serves on the Board of the Shreveport Symphony Orchestra and s a member of F rst Un ted Method st Church, where he s current y Cha rman of the Church Counc . Ba dw n s a fet me member of the Lou s ana Tech A umn Assoc at on, a d rector of the Un vers ty Foundat on and a past d rector and off cer of the Eng neer ng and Sc ence Foundat on. Just n Bounds s emp oyed at ExxonMob n Baton Rouge as an eng neer ng and nspect on sect on superv sor. He s the superv sor over group of eng neers and nspectors respons b e for ensur ng mechan ca ntegr ty and assoc ated regu atory comp ance of ref nery equ pment. In August 2011, Bounds was mechan ca contact eng neer for the company, where he worked w th an nspect on group to ensure ref nery p p ng and f xed equ pment comp ed w th a app cab e codes, standards, and regu at ons. He responded to unexpected ref nery equ pment ssues w th eng neered so ut ons that m n m zed bus ness osses. Bounds worked as ead n ght mechan ca eng neer on two ma or un t shutdown ma ntenance events. In December 2013, Bounds ead and managed a tank ma ntenance group for ExxonMob . He managed a team of 12 emp oyees and 120 contractors n the p ann ng, schedu ng, and execut on of annua storage tank ma ntenance pro ect, then n September of th s year, he was moved to h s current pos t on. Joshua G d ow s a construct on eng neer and system owner for Banyu Ur p Pro ect, Mob Cepu L m ted, Indones a, where he coord nates mu t -d sc p ne construct on and comm ss on ng of 27 cr t ca ut ty sub-systems, dent fy ng m sa gnment between mater a s, craft abor, construct on sequenc ng to mprove schedu e. When ass gned as system owner for two ear y product on n t at ves, G d ow de vered on-t me turnover of m n mum scope for add t ona 50,000 barre s/day qu ds product on. He was a so the pro ect representat ve n operat ons ear y o read ness rev ew. G d ow eads rev ew of subcontractor eak test p ans, mp ement ng r sk-based change to a ow test ng through pumps. He has reduced test campa gn durat on and e m nated 108 w tness o nts n a sour serv ce fac ty. G d ow a so prov ded overs ght to pre-comm ss on teams conduct ng pump co d a gnments: to erances, act v ty sequenc ng, methodo ogy, and work pr or t zat on per API RP 686 and mentored ear y career eng neers on construct on eng neer / system owner ro e – use of pro ect spec f cat ons, nterpretat on of P&IDs, best pract ces from PNG LNG pro ect execut on. Wes ey Madden s the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences D st ngu shed A umnus for 2015. A 1999 graduate n nurs ng, Madden started work ng w th St. Franc s Med ca Center n Monroe as a surg ca ntens ve care nurse. He was a so nvo ved n E ectron c Hea th In t at ves as a super user and mp ementat on team member. Madden began to see he st en oyed work ng w th techno ogy and had the opportun ty to effect change for a of the other c n c ans n h s area w th mproved documentat on and work f ow. After trans t on ng to P & S Surg ca hosp ta n Monroe, Madden was once aga n part of an e ectron c med ca record n t at ve. He comp eted h s bache or s degree n nurs ng as he trans t oned to a fu t me pos t on n the nformat on techno ogy department at Jefferson Reg ona Med ca Center n P ne B uff, Arkansas. Wh e work ng at Jefferson, he had the opportun ty to be nvo ved w th the r med ca dev ce ntegrat on pro ect. He w tnessed an mmed ate pos t ve mpact to c n c ans a over the hosp ta . The Co ege of Bus ness w recogn ze Dona d LeB anc Jr., a 1979 account ng graduate, as ts D st ngu shed A umnus of the Year. LeB anc s a member of the KPMG LLP Board of D rectors and Cha rman of the Aud t F nance and Operat ons Comm ttee of the f rm s Board. In add t on, he s the G oba Lead Partner for AT&T and CenturyL nk and s a tax partner based n the Shreveport off ce and was e ected to the Board n 2013. LeB anc o ned KPMG n 1979 n aud t, transferred to tax n 1981 and became a partner n 1988. LeB anc s a member of the Lou s ana Tech Co ege of Bus ness Adv sory Board and past pres dent of the Tech Account ng Adv sory Board as we as a member of the LSUS Foundat on. LeB anc has been a guest ecture/teacher at co eges nc ud ng Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. He has attended and part c pated n execut ve educat on programs at the Wharton Schoo of Bus ness at the Un vers ty of Pennsy van a and the Internat ona Inst tute for Management Deve opment Bus ness Schoo n Lausanne, Sw tzer and. LeB anc ho ds a CPA cense n the states of Lou s ana and Texas and s a member of the Amer can Inst tute of Cert f ed Pub c Accountants as we as the Lou s ana Soc ety of Cert f ed Pub c Accountants. W am Ware and Pame a Ware have been named the Co ege of Educat on s D st ngu shed A umn for 2015. A 1962 Eng sh and speech educat on graduate, Pame a Ware res des n Ga nesv e, Georg a, and works fu t me at Ga nesv e H gh Schoo and part t me w th Ga nesv e Parks and Recreat on Department. Over the years, Ware has produced over 400 mus ca s and p ays at Ga nesv e H gh Schoo and n her ro e as d rector for Ga nesv e Parks and Recreat on Summer Theater. She has a so estab shed two ntens f ed summer workshop n mus ca theater for e ementary ch dren that cu m nates n a product on for the pub c. W am Ware, a 1962 phys ca educat on graduate of Lou s ana Tech, s a professor and dean emer tus at Brenau Un vers ty n Ga nesv e, Georg a. After graduat on, Ware was a genera sc ence, b o ogy and phys ca educat on teacher and ass stant coach at A.G. Par sh H gh Schoo n Se ma, A abama, unt 1966. After, he became cha rperson of the h gh schoo s phys ca educat on department and head footba and track coach. In 1968, Ware became the schoo s counse or and two years became the ass stant pr nc pa and d rector of gu dance. From 1972 to 1973, W am Ware became the d rector of gu dance for Brookstone Schoo n Co umbus, Georg a and ater became the pro ect d rector of ESEA T t e III and counse or educat on pro ect form P oneer RESA n C eve and, Georg a. He then became the pr nc pa of Fa r Street E ementary Schoo n Ga nesv e unt 1978. Ware ater became a professor and cha rperson of Brenau Co ege s department of educat on unt 1995, when he moved on to become the un vers ty s Schoo of Educat on dean. Char es Sprue has been honored as the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s D st ngu shed A umnus for 2015. Sprue , a 1957 and 1964 petro eum eng neer ng graduate, serves as a d rector of the Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Foundat on Board. In 1957, he started h s career by p ann ng and eng neer ng ass gnments n Kansas, Ok ahoma, Texas and New York headquarter unt 1976, where he became genera manager for Energy M nera s unt 1980. Sprue then became the cha rman and pres dent of Mob e North Sea, Ltd., n London unt 1982. In 1984, Sprue became v ce pres dent of Mob Internat ona Produc ng Operat ons n New York unt 1987, when he became the pres dent and genera manager of Mob Exp orat on and Produc ng U.S. n Da as unt h s ret rement n 1994. He has a so part c pated n var ous outs de c v c and o ndustry act v t es, nc ud ng serv ng as cha rman from 1994-1995 of the Da as W dcat Comm ttee, a prest g ous m ted membersh p group of energy execut ves. Kenneth Rea, a 1966 h story graduate, s the Co ege of L bera Arts 2015 A umnus of the Year. He rece ved h s M.A. and Ph.D. n Ch nese h story from the Un vers ty of Co orado n 1968 and 1970, respect ve y. Beg nn ng h s career at Lou s ana Tech as an ass stant professor of h story, Rea he d a number of pos t ons n the Co ege of Arts and Sc ences under Dean Pau Penn ngton before be ng chosen by Pres dent Dan Reneau to serve as v ce pres dent for academ c affa rs, a post he he d for 25 years unt h s ret rement n 2012. Dur ng Rea s tenure as v ce pres dent, the un vers ty added doctora programs n educat on, eng neer ng, computat ona ana ys s, counse ng psycho ogy, aud o ogy, ndustr a and organ zat ona psycho ogy, and mo ecu ar sc ence and nanotechno ogy; the un vers ty a so created 14 new masters and graduate cert f cate programs and estab shed 14 academ c and research centers. Rea a so represented the un vers ty and the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System on numerous statew de comm ttees, nc ud ng two terms on the Lou s ana Governor s B ue R bbon Comm ss on for Educat ona Exce ence, Cha r of the Lou s ana Board of Regents Support Fund ng P ann ng Comm ttee, Lou s ana L brary Network Comm ss on, Regents Task Force on Genera Educat on, and Cha r of the Regents Task Force on Internat ona Educat on.

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Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty Lou s ana Tech nebacker N ck Thomason w m ss a few weeks w th a spra ned knee. Notebook: Thomason to m ss a coup e weeks; USM k ck set for 11 a.m. Sean Isabe a Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s the s xth most underrated co ege n the nat on, accord ng to a new st of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca for 2015 re eased by Bus ness Ins der. La. Tech earns another nat ona rank ng Spec a to the News Star Southern M ss head coach Todd Monken ye s w th h s team as they p ay aga nst UTEP Saturday. W th bow e g b ty assured, both Monken and h s team are focus ng on a Conference USA champ onsh p. Go den Eag es proud of bow e g b ty, not sat sf ed JASON MUNZ 91215_2696 Techsters sweep Char otte n C-USA p ay Un vers ty News Serv ces Southern M ss ss pp runn ng back Ja en R chard breaks through UTEP defense dur ng an NCAA co ege footba game Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015, n Hatt esburg, M ss. Conference USA footba stand ngs Fe x F. Chávez Southern M ss ss pp runn ng back Ja en R chard breaks through UTEP defense dur ng an NCAA co ege footba game Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015, n Hatt esburg, M ss. M ners show fe n oss to Southern M ss Bret B oomqu st

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Forget The Phone 7. Next App e Sensat on Leaked The 13 2015-11-03 Monroe

Louisiana Tech's Reputation, Graduate Salaries Earn it Another National Ranking RUSTON, La. (Press Re ease) –

Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s the s xth most underrated co ege n the nat on, accord ng to a new st of the 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca for 2015 re eased by Bus ness Ins der, the Internet s argest bus ness news webs te. Bus ness Ins der compared U.S. News and Wor d Report s rank ngs of the best un vers t es n the country w th PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report, wh ch ranks more than 1,000 co eges and un vers t es based on the r graduates m d-career sa ar es. Us ng that data, Bus ness Ins der focused n on nst tut ona reputat on and future earn ngs of graduates to ca cu ate the r rank ngs. “As Lou s ana Tech cont nues to earn nat ona acco ades for the va ue and return on nvestment we prov de to our students and graduates, the strength of our brand and our reputat on for exce ence cont nues to grow, says Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “When you ook at nst tut ons that rank n U.S. News and Wor d Report s T er One of Nat ona Un vers t es, and whose graduates earn among the h ghest average start ng and m d-career sa ar es and eave co ege w th some of the owest amounts of student debt, there are very few nst tut ons n Amer ca that rate as h gh y as Lou s ana Tech.” Lou s ana Tech ranked n T er One of Nat ona Un vers t es at No. 199 n U.S. News and Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st and earned a spot among the nat on s Top 120 Pub c Un vers t es. In add t on to ts T er One rank ng, Lou s ana Tech was ranked No. 1 n the nat on among pub c nat ona un vers t es and No. 6 overa for graduat ng students w th the east average amount of debt. In PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report, Lou s ana Tech ranked No. 1 n Lou s ana w th graduates earn ng average m d-career sa ar es of $86,200 annua y, and No. 70 n the nat on n med an m d-career earn ngs for graduates from pub c nst tut ons. Lou s ana Tech was second n the state for ear y-career sa ar es w th graduates earn ng an average of $47,000 annua y. PaySca e.com has a so recogn zed Lou s ana Tech as the state s top nst tut on n the r Co ege ROI Report re eased n March. Lou s ana Tech earned the state s h ghest rank ng n both annua percent ROI and 20-year net ROI for students v ng on campus and rece v ng f nanc a a d, and who are pay ng n-state or out-of-state tu t on. Pace Un vers ty n New York C ty topped the Bus ness Ins der 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca st fo owed by M ssour Un vers ty of Sc ence and Techno ogy, New Jersey Inst tute of Techno ogy, Un vers ty of Massachusetts at Lowe , and Hofstra Un vers ty (New York). Lou s ana Tech was the on y nst tut on from Lou s ana to earn a spot n the Top 50. To v ew the comp ete st of Bus ness Ins der s 50 Most Underrated Co eges n Amer ca, v s t http://www.bus ness ns der.com/most-underrated-co eges- n-amer ca-2015 13 2015-11-02 Monroe

La. Tech engineering and technology management program among nation’s best RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s master s n eng neer ng and techno ogy management program has earned a spot n the top 20 of a eng neer ng management programs n the nat on, accord ng to GraduatePrograms.com s Fa 2015 rank ngs. The Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program at Lou s ana Tech ranked No. 17 n the nat on and was the on y eng neer ng management program n the State of Lou s ana to earn a p ace n the Top 20. The Un vers ty of A abama at B rm ngham earned the categor es top spot fo owed by the Un vers ty of Co orado at Bou der, Duke Un vers ty, Dartmouth Co ege and Penn State Un vers ty Park. The rank ngs are based on rev ews and eva uat ons from students on a var ety of top cs nc ud ng academ c compet t veness, career support, f nanc a a d and qua ty of network. Program rank ngs, comp ed us ng data gathered between September 1, 2012 and September 30, 2015, encompass rev ews posted by more than 75,000 students part c pat ng n over 1,600 graduate programs nat onw de. “We are p eased that our current students and a umn have seen the career benef ts that the M.S. n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program offers,” sa d Dr. Beth Hegab, program coord nator for the eng neer ng and techno ogy management program and ecturer n the ndustr a eng neer ng program. The M.S. Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program s open to graduate students around the wor d, and has enro ees who are mmersed n ndustry, are n the m tary, as we as trad t ona master s degree students. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at Lou s ana Tech says that the on ne ava ab ty of the degree adds to ts va ue. “Our M.S. n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management degree has been very attract ve to work ng profess ona s s nce we made t ava ab e on ne. It prov des our graduates va uab e sk s to further advance the r careers,” Hegab sa d. 13 2015-11-02 Ruston

Engineering and technology management program among nation’s best Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s master s n eng neer ng and techno ogy management program has earned a spot n the top 20 of a eng neer ng management programs n the nat on, accord ng to GraduatePrograms.com s Fa 2015 rank ngs. ENG_ ogo_newThe Master of Sc ence n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program at Lou s ana Tech ranked No. 17 n the nat on and was the on y eng neer ng management program n the State of Lou s ana to earn a p ace n the Top 20. The Un vers ty of A abama at B rm ngham earned the categor es top spot fo owed by the Un vers ty of Co orado at Bou der, Duke Un vers ty, Dartmouth Co ege and Penn State Un vers ty Park. The rank ngs are based on rev ews and eva uat ons from students on a var ety of top cs nc ud ng academ c compet t veness, career support, f nanc a a d and qua ty of network. Program rank ngs, comp ed us ng data gathered between September 1, 2012 and September 30, 2015, encompass rev ews posted by more than 75,000 students part c pat ng n over 1,600 graduate programs nat onw de. “We are p eased that our current students and a umn have seen the career benef ts that the M.S. n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program offers,” sa d Dr. Beth Hegab, program coord nator for the eng neer ng and techno ogy management program and ecturer n the ndustr a eng neer ng program. The M.S. Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program s open to graduate students around the wor d, and has enro ees who are mmersed n ndustry, are n the m tary, as we as trad t ona master s degree students. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence at Lou s ana Tech says that the on ne ava ab ty of the degree adds to ts va ue. “Our M.S. n Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management degree has been very attract ve to work ng profess ona s s nce we made t ava ab e on ne. It prov des our graduates va uab e sk s to further advance the r careers,” Hegab sa d. You can f nd the comp ete GraduatePrograms.com rank ngs of eng neer ng management programs at http://www.graduateprograms.com/masters- n-eng neer ng-management. More nformat on about the M.S. Eng neer ng and Techno ogy Management program at Lou s ana Tech can be found at http://coes. atech.edu/eng neer ng-techno ogy-management. Wr tten by Brandy McKn ght – mckn [email protected] atech.edu 13 2015-10-30 Monroe

La. Tech music department adds composition concentration to major RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Department of Mus c n the Schoo of the Perform ng Arts has added a compos t on concentrat on to ts st of concentrat ons to the Bache or of Arts n Mus c degree. The concentrat on was approved by the un vers ty n the spr ng of 2014 and forma y accred ted by the Nat ona Assoc at ons of Schoo s of Mus c n June of th s year. The compos t on concentrat on was des gned for students nterested n compos t on as a career. Students w take a d verse set of courses that prov de a we -rounded and thorough study of compos t ona techn ques of the 20th and 21st centur es. They w a so compose works for var ous nstrumenta , voca and e ectron c med ums. It s expected that students who comp ete th s concentrat on w cont nue the r stud es at the graduate eve . Dr. Joe A exander, professor of mus c, sa d three students had unoff c a y comp eted the degree through d rected stud es c asses. Sen or Joshua Matt son s the f rst off c a student to study mus c w th a concentrat on n compos t on at Lou s ana Tech. “Mus c was a ways a pos t ve channe ,” Matt son sa d. “I wanted to be ab e to wr te mus c that other peop e cou d perform as a s m ar out et.” Matt son sa d he p ans to attend graduate schoo after graduat on and work on a master s degree n compos t on. A exander sa d Matt son has a ready composed severa p eces that have rece ved h gh recogn t on. “In the w nter quarter of 2014, [Matt son s] compos t on, Tango, p aced second at the 2014 Lou s ana Tech Undergraduate/Graduate Student Research Sympos um n the Undergraduate Ora Presentat ons category,” A exander sa d. “Because of th s, he represented Lou s ana Tech at the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System s 2014 Academ c Summ t. Later that spr ng, h s unaccompan ed tuba compos t on, Don t Be Seen, was se ected for the F fteen M nutes of Fame: Kenyon W son compet t on and was prem ered at the 2014 Internat ona Tuba/Euphon um Conference.” 13 2015-10-30 Monroe

Homecoming Week 2015 at La. Tech celebrates school pride, spirit RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s A umn Assoc at on, n con unct on w th the un vers ty s Student Government Assoc at on and var ous student organ zat ons, academ c co eges, ath et cs department, and campus and commun ty partners, has announced ts off c a ca endar of events for Homecom ng Week 2015. For more nformat on on Homecom ng events and act v t es tak ng p ace on and around the Lou s ana Tech campus, ca the Marbury A umn Center at (318) 255-7950 or v s t www. atecha umn .org/homecom ng2015. Monday, Nov. 2: Scavenger Hunt Freedom Stage (Outs de of To ver) – 3 p.m. Sen or Rec ta by Chr st na Amos, Bar tone Rec ta Ha - 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3: Organ zat ona Cook-Off Centenn a P aza – 11:30 a.m. Un on Board Ta ent Show Lou s ana Tech Student Center – 7 p.m. The Reduced Shakespeare Company s Comp ete H story of Comedy Abr dged presented by the Lou s ana Tech Concert Assoc at on Howard Aud tor um – 7:30 p.m. For t ckets, contact the Howard Center for the Perform ng Arts Box Off ce at (318) 257-3942 Wednesday, Nov. 4: NPHC Un ty Step Show Memor a Gym – 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5: Ben Rector Concert presented by Un on Board Howard Aud tor um – 7 p.m. Fr day, Nov. 6: A umn Awards Luncheon Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex - 12:00 p.m. Contact Barbara Swart at 318-255-7950 or [email protected] atecha umn .org for t ckets and more nformat on C ass of 1965 Reun on Dav son Ath et cs Comp ex - 5:30 p.m. Contact Barbara Swart at 318-255-7950 or [email protected] atecha umn .org for more nfo Homecom ng Parade Through Campus - 5:30 p.m. Pep Ra y and Presentat on of Court Howard Aud tor um - fo ow ng the parade D v s on of Nurs ng “Ce ebrat ng 40 Years of Exce ence” Recept on Ropp Center – 6 p.m. (RSVP to [email protected] atech.edu or ca 318-257-3101.) Lawrence G bbs and the Lou s ana Tech Jazz Ensemb e Howard Aud tor um -8:00 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7: Bookstore Open House Barnes & Nob e at Lou s ana Tech Bookstore - 8:00 a.m. Breakfast w th Champ Lou s ana Tech Student Center - 9:00 a.m. Contact Barbara Swart at 318-255-7950 or [email protected] atecha umn .org for t ckets and more nformat on The Schoo of Human Eco ogy Open House Carson Tay or Ha 9:30 a.m. Schoo of the Perform ng Arts Open House Howard Aud tor um – 10:00 a.m. Department of Profess ona Av at on B annua Industry Adv sory Board Meet ng Dav son Ha Room 307 – 10 a.m. BCM Homecom ng A umn Drop In BCM House - 10 a.m. S gma A pha Eps on Brunch SAE House – 11 a.m. S gma Kappa Homecom ng Tea S gma Kappa Lodge – 11 a.m. A umn Ta gate Argent Pav on - 11:30 a.m. Bu dog Footba vs North Texas Joe A et Stad um – 2:30 p.m. V s t www. atechsports.com/t ckets or ca (318) 257-3631 for t ckets. 13 2015-10-30 Ruston

Students showcase ideas during TOP DAWG The ourney for 18 entrepreneur a groups of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty students began Tuesday w th p tch ng the r creat ve and nnovat ve product and serv ce deas at the TOP DAWG Idea P tch compet t on. D rector of Tech s Center for Entrepreneursh p and Informat on Techno ogy Debb e Inman sa d students from a var ety of ma ors made the r presentat ons. “Th s was the beg nn ng stages to the f na s or New Venture Champ onsh p compet t on,” she sa d. “Th s a so he ped them pa r w th mentors from severa bus ness owners and commun ty members.”

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-10-28 Monroe

La. Tech’s education dean named Vantage 2015 Visionary Educator RUSTON – Dr. Don Sch nger, dean of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Co ege of Educat on and Chase Bank Endowed Assoc ate Professor, has been recogn zed as the Vantage Hea th P an 2015 V s onary Educator. The V s onary Educator honor s reserved for outstand ng educat ona eaders work ng to bu d Lou s ana Tech s reputat on of be ng a eader n qua ty programm ng and pro ects for un vers ty students. “I am very gratefu to Vantage Hea th P an for prov d ng annua recogn t on to Lou s ana Tech educators who are str v ng to nnovate and make a d fference n the r respect ve f e ds,” sa d Sch nger. “Th s award s representat ve of the outstand ng facu ty, staff and students of the Co ege of Educat on who endeavor every day to ach eve exce ence through sett ng and then meet ng h gh standards.” Sch nger, who was named dean of the Co ege of Educat on n Ju y, has been awarded over $6 m on n grant fund ng dur ng h s career. In December 2014, he was awarded a $1.45 m on grant from the Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute and the Nat ona Math Sc ence In t at ve to rep cate an nnovat ve system to graduate h gh y qua f ed STEM educators. The grant w support an exc t ng new program ca ed “UTeachTech,” wh ch s po sed to revo ut on ze secondary STEM educator preparat on at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and throughout the reg on. Lou s ana Tech was one of ust f ve un vers t es nat onw de se ected to rece ve the h gh y-compet t ve Howard Hughes Med ca Inst tute and Nat ona Math Sc ence In t at ve grant, o n ng an exc us ve nat ona network of research un vers t es n the expans on of the UTeach teacher preparat on program. Sch nger says fund ng from grants such as UTeachTech prov des act vat on energy that spurs further nnovat on and co aborat on not on y n the var ous departments of Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on, but a so w th research and pract t oner co eagues n the other co eges on campus. “Lou s ana Tech s un que n that t s home to r ch nter and ntra-co ege co aborat ve env ronments where shared deas and resources y e d h gh qua ty outcomes that are greater than the sum of the r parts,” Sch nger sa d. “These outcomes nc ude nternsh ps, scho arsh p and other opportun t es for students as we as mproved research fac t es, and enhanced nstruct on for students nvo ved w th STEM educat on as e ther future teachers or eaders n STEM re ated areas n bus ness and ndustry.” Before be ng named dean of the Co ege of Educat on, Sch nger served as an assoc ate professor, assoc ate dean of undergraduate stud es and d rector of c n ca and f e d exper ences, and d rector of assessment and accred tat on (IT superv s on.) Pr or to h s arr va at Lou s ana Tech n 2006, Sch nger was a department head n McNeese State Un vers ty s Burton Co ege of Educat on. He came to Lou s ana from M ss ss pp where he served as co-d rector for assessment for the Center for Educat ona Research and Eva uat on at the Un vers ty of M ss ss pp , and d rector of the Teach M ss ss pp Inst tute. Dur ng h s tenure at Lou s ana Tech, Sch nger has been honored w th the Co ege of Educat on s Outstand ng Serv ce Award (2009) and Outstand ng Facu ty Grants Award (2008) as we as the Co ege s Outstand ng Grantsmansh p Award n the Department of Curr cu um and Instruct on (2008.) He s a member of the State of Lou s ana ACT Counc and the Adv sory Board for L-STEM: The Lou s ana STEM In t at ve. Sch nger earned h s Ph.D. n secondary educat on (sc ence) from the Un vers ty of M ss ss pp n 2004. He a so earned a master of educat on degree n secondary educat on (chem stry) from the Un vers ty of M ss ss pp and a bache or s degree n chem stry educat on from the Un vers ty of Centra F or da. 13 2015-10-26 Baton Rouge

Two Louisiana libraries honored for accessibility LSU L brar es and Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty¡ s Prescott Memor a L brary have been honored by U.S. Government Pub sh ng Off ce as 2015 L brar es of the Year.

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Cheer Your Team on W th These 10 Ta gat ng Necess t es Cheer Your Team on W th These 10 Ta gat ng Necess t es By Be k - Road South ¡X Here are a few tems that w he p your co ege footba party go off w thout a h tch. Cont nue read ng ?

The 2015 L brar es of the Year are reg ona Federa Depos tory L brary Program brar es recogn zed for demonstrat ng eadersh p, nnovat on and comm tment to prov d ng free pub c access to federa government nformat on. The two Lou s ana brar es have been prov d ng serv ces to Lou s ana res dents s nce the 19th century, ensur ng that government documents are access b e and up-to-date for patrons. The brar es he ped work w th Southern Un vers ty n New Or eans to reopen ts brary a most a decade after the destruct on eft beh nd by Hurr cane Katr na. After hurr canes Katr na and R ta, brar ans recovered and reassemb ed government co ect ons at damaged depos tory brar es to restore pub c access to government nformat on at a of the state¡ s 27 federa depos tory brar es. The other brary named th s year s The Un vers ty of North Texas L brar es.

¡§The Lou s ana and Texas brar es rece v ng th s honor serve as another examp e of the cr t ca ro e brar es p ay n he p ng GPO prov de the pub c Government nformat on,¡¨ sa d GPO D rector Dav ta Vance-Cooks. ¡§These brar es are va uab e partners to the FDLP and an ncred b e resource for the Amer can peop e. GPO has such a r ch h story w th brar es that dates back to 1895 and they have proven to be the backbone of Keep ng Amer ca Informed.¡¨ The LSU L brar es has been a depos tory for federa government pub cat ons s nce 1907 and has a substant a number of U.S. documents ssued before and after that t me. The brar es became a Reg ona Depos tory L brary n 1964 and was des gnated an off c a depos tory for U.S. Patents n 1981. The patent co ect on nc udes a patents ssued from 1871 to the present. Stephan e Braunste n s the LSU L brar es Head of Government Documents 13 2015-10-26 Shreveport

TOP DAWG Idea Pitch to showcase student innovation at Louisiana Tech RUSTON, La. – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty students from a var ety of ma ors are prepar ng to p tch the r creat ve and nnovat ve product or serv ce deas at the TOP DAWG Idea P tch compet t on on October 27. Hosted by Lou s ana Tech s Center for Entrepreneursh p and Informat on Techno ogy (CEnIT) and Bu dog Entrepreneurs, 18 teams of students w showcase the r deas from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Each team w g ve f ve-m nute p tches to see what profess ona udges th nk about the r concepts. The event s free and the pub c s nv ted to attend. The student body and attendees can v s t each team s booth at any t me dur ng the event to vote for the r favor te deas us ng “Bu dog Bucks.” The team w th the h ghest number of Bu dog Bucks w ns a $300 pr ze. The TOP DAWG Idea P tch teams w be nv ted to compete n the TOP DAWG New Venture Champ onsh p he d next spr ng. Th s event offers Idea P tch part c pants a chance to w n cash and s x months of off ce space n Lou s ana Tech s Enterpr se Center to he p them move one step c oser to mak ng the r deas a rea ty. Teams are mentored by bus ness profess ona s from throughout the area w th CEnIT sponsor ng sem nars to prepare teams as they deve op the r bus ness deas n the months before the New Venture Champ onsh p. The TOP DAWG Idea P tch and New Venture Champ onsh p compet t ons, estab shed n 2002, are organ zed by Bu dog Entrepreneurs – a student organ zat on that empowers entrepreneurs and promotes nnovat on on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Bu dog Entrepreneurs encourages students to bu d nnovat ve, creat ve products and serv ces that create va ue n the marketp ace. The New Venture Champ onsh p a so showcases nte ectua propert es deve oped by Lou s ana Tech researchers and students. Part c pants promote new techno og es as we as create non-techno ogy based ventures. For more nformat on about the TOP DAWG events, contact Debb e Inman n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness at deb [email protected] atech.edu 13 2015-10-26 Shreveport

TOP DAWG Idea Pitch to showcase student innovation at Louisiana Tech RUSTON, La. – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty students from a var ety of ma ors are prepar ng to p tch the r creat ve and nnovat ve product or serv ce deas at the TOP DAWG Idea P tch compet t on on October 27. Hosted by Lou s ana Tech s Center for Entrepreneursh p and Informat on Techno ogy (CEnIT) and Bu dog Entrepreneurs, 18 teams of students w showcase the r deas from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Each team w g ve f ve-m nute p tches to see what profess ona udges th nk about the r concepts. The event s free and the pub c s nv ted to attend. The student body and attendees can v s t each team s booth at any t me dur ng the event to vote for the r favor te deas us ng “Bu dog Bucks.” The team w th the h ghest number of Bu dog Bucks w ns a $300 pr ze. The TOP DAWG Idea P tch teams w be nv ted to compete n the TOP DAWG New Venture Champ onsh p he d next spr ng. Th s event offers Idea P tch part c pants a chance to w n cash and s x months of off ce space n Lou s ana Tech s Enterpr se Center to he p them move one step c oser to mak ng the r deas a rea ty. Teams are mentored by bus ness profess ona s from throughout the area w th CEnIT sponsor ng sem nars to prepare teams as they deve op the r bus ness deas n the months before the New Venture Champ onsh p. The TOP DAWG Idea P tch and New Venture Champ onsh p compet t ons, estab shed n 2002, are organ zed by Bu dog Entrepreneurs – a student organ zat on that empowers entrepreneurs and promotes nnovat on on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Bu dog Entrepreneurs encourages students to bu d nnovat ve, creat ve products and serv ces that create va ue n the marketp ace. The New Venture Champ onsh p a so showcases nte ectua propert es deve oped by Lou s ana Tech researchers and students. Part c pants promote new techno og es as we as create non-techno ogy based ventures. For more nformat on about the TOP DAWG events, contact Debb e Inman n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness at deb [email protected] atech.edu 13 2015-10-23 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Receives Literary Donation to Special Collections Lorna and Jon Kardatzke recent y added 12 terary art facts to the Fre sen F etcher Sm th Co ect on Ga ery at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty that w be housed n the Prescott Memor a L brary s Spec a Co ect ons on the fourth f oor of the brary n Wy y Tower. The co ect on, estab shed by the Kardatzkes n memory of Lorna s father Fre sen Sm th, who served as professor of techn ca wr t ng from 1938-1972, houses numerous etters and f rst ed t on books from a var ety of we -known Br t sh and Amer can authors. The new donat on, coord nated w th ass stance from Eng sh professor Dr. Patr ck Garrett, nc udes framed etters from poet James Russe Lowe and authors A dous Hux ey and from S r Arthur Conan Doy e. In add t on, the Prescott Memor a L brary rece ved f rst ed t ons of n ne books, some w th author s s gnature: - Tennessee W ams “Mo se and the Wor d of Reason” (s gned) and “Sweet B rd of Youth” - Mark Twa n s “To Mrs. Fa rbanks” (s gned 1st ed t on) - “The Adventures of Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass” (L m ted Ed t on, No. 18 of 375) - W am Fau kner s “Absa om, Absa om!” (2nd pr nt ng) and “Notes on a Horse Th ef” (L m ted Ed t on, No. 744 of 950) - Ernest Hem ngway s “A Farewe to Arms” (s gned, L m ted Ed t on of 510 (Ten Presentat on cop es, No. 385) - Gertrude Ste n s “Usefu Know edge” (1st of the Two R vers of Manhattan Ed t ons) and Thornton W der s “Theoph us North” (s gned 1st ed t on, No. 6 of 275). W th these and the prev ous donat ons, Garrett sa d of the Lou s ana Tech co ect on, “Jon and Lorna Kardatzke have g ven us one of the f nest co ect ons n the South. We are forever gratefu .” The co ect on s ava ab e to the pub c dur ng the hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Fr day. More nformat on on the co ect on s ava ab e on the Prescott Memor a L brary webs te: http://www. atech.edu/ brary/scma/ffs.php. Copyr ght 2015 Nexstar Broadcast ng, Inc. A r ghts reserved. Th s mater a 13 2015-10-23 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Professor Receives National Health Information Management Award RUSTON, La. (Press Re ease) --

Dr. Prerna Dua, assoc ate professor of hea th nformat cs and nformat on management at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, has been honored by the Amer can Hea th Informat on Management Assoc at on (AHIMA) w th ts 2015 Tr umph Award for research. The AHIMA Tr umph Awards recogn ze the exce ence, ded cat on and serv ce of hea th nformat on management (HIM) profess ona s who have made steadfast efforts to enr ch the f e d. Dua was honored dur ng the AHIMA s 87th Annua Convent on and Exh b t n New Or eans for her research expert se n hea thcare, dec s on support and trans at ona b o nformat cs. “I fee very humb ed and honored to rece ve th s award,” says Dua. “It has prompted me to ref ect back to my research when I started at Lou s ana Tech and ook at what brought me here. Lou s ana Tech s my a ma mater and work ng here has been a very r ch and reward ng exper ence for me. “W nn ng the award adds an extra ayer of respons b ty and means work ng ust as hard on my current and future research as I d d n the past before rece v ng th s award, to ensure the same eve of qua ty.” Dua says the AHIMA Tr umph Award a so recogn zes the hard work of the more than 25 research ass stants/students that she has been ab e to h re as a resu t of externa grants. “Th s award encourages new students to be d gent and g ves them conf rmat on that f they are work ng on someth ng who ehearted y and are open to new deas, they w be rewarded,” Dua sa d. “The AHIMA Tr umph Awards are an mportant way to recogn ze and thank those who make a s gn f cant d fference n our profess ona commun ty of hea th nformat on management,” sa d AHIMA CEO Lynne Thomas Gordon. “The 2015 award w nners are eaders who bu d our know edge, prepare future HIM profess ona s and share the r ta ent w th the rest of the f e d.” The AHIMA represents more than 100,000 hea th nformat on profess ona s n the Un ted States and around the wor d and s comm tted to promot ng and advocat ng for h gh qua ty research, best pract ces and effect ve standards n hea th nformat on. W th research expert se n data m n ng for hea thcare, dec s on support and trans at ona b o nformat cs, Dua has pub shed severa ourna and conference pub cat ons and book chapters, and has de vered presentat ons at the state, nat ona , and nternat ona eve . She has a so co-authored a book, t t ed “Mach ne Learn ng n Hea th Informat cs.” Dua be eves th s award w he p to put Lou s ana Tech s hea th nformat cs and nformat on management program on a nat ona p atform. “Recogn z ng our research efforts s a cr t ca accomp shment for our program,” says Dua. “It w a so he p us attract more ta ented students to our bache or s n hea th nformat cs and nformat on management program as we as our master s n hea th nformat cs 13 2015-10-22 Shreveport

Ranking the 50 most 'underrated' colleges in the U.S. When t comes to p ck ng a co ege, prospect ve students shou d keep n m nd that some schoo s aren t gett ng the grades they deserve. A recent art c e from Bus ness Ins der (BI) magaz ne comp ed the 50 most underrated co eges n the country, and found that graduates from some esser known co eges earn sa ar es on par w th esteemed nst tut ons ke Pr nceton and Ya e. They arr ved at the st by compar ng "US News rank ngs of the best un vers t es and nat ona bera arts co eges n the country w th PaySca e s 2013-2014 Co ege Sa ary Report, wh ch ranks co eges and un vers t es based on the r graduates m d-career sa ar es." The most underrated schoo s were those wh ch ranked ow on the US News st, but ed to h gher sa ar es ater on. "We not ced that a ot of esser-known tech schoo s made th s st," sa d Jenn fer Po and, ed tor of the sts and rank ngs sect on at BI. "Th s makes sense cons der ng that graduates of tech schoo s tend to go on to make a ot of money." Topp ng the st s the New Jersey Inst tute of Techno ogy (NJIT), wh ch ranked 149th on the US News st. Accord ng to Bus ness Ins der, the average m d-career sa ary of NJIT graduates s $98,000. Add t ona y, 56% of students are a ready emp oyed by the t me they graduate, a f gure 26% h gher than the nat ona average. "NJIT s on a growth tra ectory, enro ng near y 11,000 students as the workforce demand for our student exceeds the supp y n NJ, the nat on and g oba y," sa d Joe B oom, pres dent of NJIT. The schoo spec a zes n sc ence, techno ogy, eng neer ng and mathemat cs (STEM) ma ors — a trend wh ch can be found throughout the ent re st. Round ng out the top f ve are the Un vers ty of Massachusetts at Lowe , F or da Inst tute of Techno ogy, Un vers ty of Houston, and M ssour Un vers ty of Sc ence and Techno ogy, respect ve y. COLLEGE FACTUAL: Behav ora Sc ence tops st of fastest grow ng ma ors of the past 5 years Of the top f ve co eges on the st, three are tech-focused — and a are known for the r STEM programs. "These ma ors are among the most cha eng ng d sc p nes, and are be ng taught by an exce ent facu ty," B oom sa d. B oom sa d NJIT has severa notab e a umn , nc ud ng A bert Dorman, found ng CEO and Cha rman of AECOM, the argest eng neer ng, des gn and techno ogy f rm n the wor d. E en Paw kowsk , commander of the US Space and M ss e Systems and R chard Sweeney, co-founder of the Keur gs ng e coffee brew ng system, a so graduated from the nst tute. "C ear y, we we come the good news about our a ums and the r ach evements. We repeated y hear from them about the exce ent preparat on they rece ved at NJIT for the r profess ona careers," B oom sa d. Wh e sts and rank ngs serve to prov de prospect ve students w th a genera framework from wh ch to start the r search, they aren t necessar y the best way to make a f na dec s on. COLLEGE FACTUAL: The top 10 eng neer ng co eges n the U.S. "Rank ngs measure spec f c cr ter a, and f a schoo doesn t rank h gh y n a certa n category, t may not make a st — but that doesn t mean that t s a bad schoo . It s ust d ff cu t for rank ngs to encompass every aspect of a co ege educat on," Po and sa d. Po and sa d the Bus ness Ins der team put together the st to h gh ght schoo s that may not get much attent on n trad t ona rank ngs, but st prepare students for successfu careers. "It s d ff cu t to measure the qua ty of a schoo because every student s d fferent and wants d fferent th ngs from co ege," Po and sa d. "It s such a persona cho ce, so I th nk the best way for students to f nd the r ght co eges s to do the r research, v s t the schoo s and see wh ch one fee s r ght for them." Here s Bus ness Ins der s countdown of the top 25 most underrated co eges. See the fu st here. 25. Utah State Un vers ty 24. Seton Ha Un vers ty 23. Co orado Schoo of M nes 22. Stevens Inst tute of Techno ogy 21. Catho c Un vers ty of Amer ca 19 (TIE). Rutgers Un vers ty — New Brunsw ck campus 19 (TIE). W am Jewe Co ege 16 (TIE). Un vers ty of I no s at Ch cago 16 (TIE). George Mason Un vers ty 16 (TIE). Pace Un vers ty 15. M ch gan Techno og ca Un vers ty 14. St. John s Un vers ty 13. Hartw ck Co ege 12. I no s Inst tute of Techno ogy 11. Un vers ty of the Pac f c 10. Un vers ty of A abama at Huntsv e 9. C arkson Un vers ty 8. Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty 7. W dener Un vers ty 6. Hofstra Un vers ty 5. M ssour Un vers ty of Sc ence & Techno ogy 4. Un vers ty of Houston 3. F or da Inst tute of Techno ogy 2. Un vers ty of Massachusetts at Lowe 1. New Jersey Inst tute of Techno ogy Ca ey Ha r s a student at Wash ngton State Un vers ty and a spr ng 2015 USA TODAY Co eg ate Correspondent. 13 2015-10-20 Monroe

LaTech's Power Hour Helps Expand Businesses RUSTON, La. (Press Re ease) –

In ust one hour, nnovators, entrepreneurs, des gners, students and facu ty can earn how to expand bus nesses successfu y through sem nars hosted by profess ona adv sers through Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Innovat on Enterpr se. At the Power Hour sess ons, profess ona adv sers w exp a n how to move from a new bus ness dea to a bas c act on p an. Innovators can attend the Power Hour to ntroduce deas for a new venture, ga n feedback from exper enced adv sers, estab sh spec f c act ons to deve op concepts and network w th other nnovators. The sess ons w share ns ght re ated to new deas, markets and fund ng. Part c pants w eave w th h gh pr or ty act on steps def ned, resources to support ventures dent f ed and progress underway toward a goa . Both new ventures and expand ng bus nesses can benef t from attend ng and can come prepared to d scuss deas, the venture s most va uab e aspect, wh ch s a so ut on urgent y needed for customers and where th s enterpr se go ng n the next year. The presentat ons w be offered for free at the fo ow ng t mes and ocat ons: - Wednesday, Oct. 21, 12-1 p.m. at the Boss er Chamber of Commerce, 710 Benton Rd., Boss er C ty - Thursday, Oct. 22, 12-1 p.m. at the Un on Par sh L brary, 202 West Jackson Street, Farmerv e - Tuesday, Oct. 27, 11:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Gramb ng State Un vers ty, Gramb ng Ha n Gramb ng For more nformat on or reg strat on, contact tbdc 13 2015-10-16 Ruston

Tech hosts history program The Lou s ana Tech Department of H story w we come 10 scho ars from across the Un ted States to speak at the two-day “North Lou s ana H story and Cu ture S nce the C v War” sympos um beg nn ng at 1:30 p.m. today at the L nco n Par sh L brary events center. Featured top cs w range from “the v o ence of the Reconstruct on era, to the growth of azz and rock-and-ro , the econom c env ronment that aunched the Long fam y nto po t ca prom nence.”

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-10-12 Shreveport

La Tech history organization garners national recognition RUSTON – Once aga n, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s mu t p e award-w nn ng Lambda-Rho Chapter of Ph A pha Theta, H story Honor Soc ety, Inc., has brought home nat ona honors n the soc ety s annua “best chapter” compet t on. Accord ng to Ph A pha Theta nat ona execut ve d rector Dr. Graydon A. “Jack” Tunsta , the Lou s ana Tech chapter has been off c a y recogn zed as “best chapter” for 2015 n D v s on IV, co eges and un vers t es w th enro ments of between 10,000 and 15,000 students. Lambda-Rho Chapter was a so des gnated as rec p ent of the Ne s A. C even Award for 2015. The C even Award s “reserved for those chapters who have won the Best Chapter Award f ve or more t mes, thus exh b t ng a un que eve of exce ence,” Tunsta sa d. A separate and more demand ng area for compet t on, “ t s our most notab e d st nct on, cons der ng the tremendous t me and effort requ red to ma nta n a chapter of th s ca ber so cons stent y.” Founded n 1921 and w th more than 800 act ve chapters at co eges and un vers t es n the Un ted States, Ph A pha Theta s the nat on s o dest and argest d sc p nary honor soc ety. Membersh p s open on y to students w th outstand ng academ c records, nc ud ng a m n mum number of hours earned n h story courses. Judg ng n the compet t on s based on documented chapter act v t es dur ng the academ c year. Dur ng 2014-2015, student members of Lambda-Rho Chapter organ zed pub c programs on h story top cs, he d a used book sa e, sponsored a o nt research paper conference w th h story students at Gramb ng State Un vers ty, and attended a spr ng awards banquet. Ph A pha Theta members a so presented papers at scho ar y conferences and served as udges at soc a stud es fa rs n oca schoo s. “The student eadersh p we see n Ph A pha Theta s a great source of pr de to Lou s ana Tech,” Lou s ana Tech h story department coord nator Dr. Jeffery R. Hank ns sa d. “Th s k nd of eadersh p s a trad t on at Tech. In fact, th s s LambdaRho Chapter s 30th Best Chapter Award and ts 12th Ne s C even recogn t on s nce that award was created n 2004.” “There s more than ust recogn t on nvo ved,” sa d Dr. V. E a ne Thompson, a Lou s ana Tech h story assoc ate professor and one of Lambda-Rho Chapter s facu ty adv sers. “There s a so money. W nn ng chapters rece ve $250 toward the purchase of books for the r nst tut ons brar es.” Over the years, Lambda-Rho Chapter s compet t on w nn ngs have purchased more than $7,000 worth of books for Tech s Prescott Memor a L brary. Chapter pres dent dur ng 2014-2015 was sen or h story ma or N cho as Tr 13 2015-10-09 Monroe

Research chemist to present next installment of La. Tech seminar series RUSTON – Dr. Bryant Ne son, staff research chem st at the Nat ona Inst tute of Standards and Techno ogy (NIST), w present a ecture t t ed “Fundamenta Interact ons of Eng neered Nanomater a s w th DNA and DNA Repa r Prote ns,” on Oct. 19 as part of Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s New Front ers n B omed ca Eng neer ng sem nar ser es. The presentat on w take p ace at 3:30 p.m. n the aud tor um of Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. Ne son s research focuses on understand ng the nteract ons between DNA and nanomater a s, and how those nteract ons may ead to a terat ons n DNA structure and act v ty. He s respons b e for the des gn, techn ca deve opment and eadersh p of research pro ects n the area of understand ng and character z ng the potent a env ronmenta hea th and human safety r sks of eng neered nanomater a s. “Eng neered nanomater a s may b nd, comp ex or chem ca y mod fy DNA at the strand eve or at the base eve ,” sa d Ne son. “In order to accurate y character ze and quant fy the potent a ong-term env ronmenta hea th and safety r sks of nanomater a s to v ng organ sms, our group deve ops and app es nove metro og ca methods and too s that are re evant for measur ng mod f cat ons to DNA and DNA repa r prote ns.” The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The 2015-2016 ser es spot ghts nterd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers from across the nat on. Ne son s v s t s sponsored by Lou s ana Tech s chapter of S gma X , an nternat ona honors research soc ety, and the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence. A ectures dur ng the ser es w be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. Sponsors for the 2015-2016 ser es nc ude L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Off ce of the Pres dent, Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. For more nformat on on Ne son and h s presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers 13 2015-10-07 New Orleans

Second debate for governor set Oct. 15 at Louisiana Tech Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and the Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy have schedu ed the second and poss b y f na gubernator a debate featur ng the four ma or cand dates on the Oct. 24 ba ot. The event s set Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. at Lou s ana Tech s campus n Ruston and s to be te ev sed across the state. "We are not go ng to g ve out the quest ons n advance," sa d news d rector Randy Ba n of KTBS te ev s on n Shreveport, wh ch s broadcast ng the event. "When the process was so d f ed, t was made c ear the quest ons wou d not be prov ded." Ba n sa d campa gns had requested quest ons ahead of t me. But Jeremy Mh re, the debate organ zer from Lou s ana Tech, sa d none of the campa gns asked for the quest ons n advance. Severa part es have been nvo ved n p ann ng the event, so t m ght be that campa gns were commun cat ng w th d fferent peop e about the og st cs of the debate, caus ng confus on about whether quest ons were requested n advance. But Ba n sa d a the campa gns were aware they wou dn t have access to the quest ons when they comm tted to attend ng the event. Many of the cand date forums that have been ab e to attract the four front-runners d d prov de the r quest ons to the campa gn ahead of t me. U.S. Sen. Dav d V tter, R-La., hasn t agreed to attend as many forums and debates that are unscr pted, where the quest ons weren t prov ded, as the other three ma or cand dates. The senator does have a schedu ng cha enges d fferent from h s opponents, Repub can Pub c Serv ce Comm ss oner Scott Ange e, Repub can Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne and state Rep. John Be Edwards, D-Am te. V tter has to trave back and forth to Wash ngton because of h s work n Congress, wh e the other three cand dates have day obs n Lou s ana. V tter has so far part c pated n one debate, hosted by WDSU-TV n New Or eans. Wh e he has agreed to go to the Lou s ana Tech event as we , V tter s not attend ng a handfu of other te ev sed debates -- nc ud ng those sponsored by a Baton Rouge te ev s on stat on and Lou s ana Pub c Broadcast ng -- that h s three pr nc pa oppoenents have a agreed to do before the pr mary. The V tter campa gn d d not respond to requests for a comment on th s story. The WDSU debate focused on soc a ssues such as gun r ghts, same-sex marr age and mar uana. The quest ons referenced po c es n Kentucky and Oregon but d dn t often t e d rect y to Lou s ana. Lou s ana s f nances and taxes were bare y ment oned, though most profess ona ana ysts say the budget cr s s s the most press ng ssue fac ng the next governor. WDSU a so nc uded two m nor gubernator a cand dates n ts debate, wh ch meant ess t me was spent w th the four front-runners. The Lou s ana Tech debate s m ted to Ange e, Dardenne, Edwards and V tter. Add t ona y, organ zers expect to address the budget, a though they haven t f n shed assemb ng the f na st of quest ons. "What we rea y want to do s g ve th s a d st nct ve Lou s ana focus," Mh re sa d. 13 2015-10-06 Monroe

La. Tech’s Waggonner Center to host Constitution Day presentation RUSTON – The Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w sponsor a Const tut on Day presentat on by Dr. Jeremy Ba ey, the Ross M. Lence D st ngu shed Teach ng Cha r and assoc ate professor of po t ca sc ence at the Un vers ty of Houston, at 2:00 p.m. Fr day n the aud tor um of Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Ba ey s presentat on t t ed, “What Makes the Const tut on the Author ty,” w ook at James Mad son s dec s on to become the father of the U.S. Const tut on. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are nv ted to attend. “The Center s exc ted to host Professor Ba ey s ta k,” sa d Dr. Jeremy Mh re, d rector of the Waggonner Center. “Most peop e know of James Mad son as the Father of the Const tut on, though few know of h s amb va ence towards our found ng document. Professor Ba ey w he p us see the reason(s) for Mad son s amb va ence, as we how those reasons can nform our understand ng of the Const tut on even today.” Ba ey s research nterests focus on execut ve power, const tut ona sm and Amer can po t ca thought and deve opment. He s the author of “Thomas Jefferson and Execut ve Power” (Cambr dge Un vers ty Press 2007), “The New Un tary Execut ve and Democrat c Theory,” (Amer can Po t ca Sc ence Rev ew 2008) and “The Contested Remova Power, 17892010” (Un vers ty Press of Kansas 2013) wh ch was coauthored w th Dav d A v s and F agg Tay or and was named a 2014 “Outstand ng Academ c T t e” by Cho ce. H s most recent book, “James Mad son and Const tut ona Imperfect on” w be re eased soon from Cambr dge Un vers ty Press. Before o n ng the facu ty of the Un vers ty of Houston n 2007, Ba ey attended Rhodes Co ege and rece ved h s Ph.D. from Boston Co ege, where h s d ssertat on was the 2004 co-w nner of the APSA s E. E. Schattschne der Pr ze for best d ssertat on n Amer can po t cs. The Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy s housed n the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech. Its m ss on s to foster c t zensh p, c v c engagement, effect ve pub c po cy, and c v c eadersh p among students and the pub c at arge. The Center a so seeks to promote act ve and respons b e c v c engagement through an nterd sc p nary comb nat on of nnovat ve curr cu ar n t at ves, academ c outreach, and commun ty outreach. For more nformat on on the Waggonner Center at Lou s ana Tech, v s t www.waggonnercenter.org or ema [email protected] atech.edu. 13 2015-10-05 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech University to host televised gubernatorial debate RUSTON, La. – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and the Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy w host a te ev sed gubernator a debate at 6:00 p.m., October 15 that w feature the top four cand dates n the race for Governor. Pub c Serv ce Comm ss oner Scott Ange e (Repub can), L eutenant Governor Jay Dardenne (Repub can), State Representat ve John Be Edwards (Democrat) and U.S. Senator Dav d V tter (Repub can) have accepted nv tat ons to take part n the debate, wh ch w be te ev sed by KTBS-TV n Shreveport and s mu cast throughout the state. “Lou s ana Tech s p eased to have the opportun ty to host th s event and to engage the pub c n the process of e ect ng the next Governor to ead our state,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “Prov d ng the cand dates w th a fa r and neutra forum to share the r deas and v s on for the future of Lou s ana s an mportant part of our pub c serv ce. Through the Waggoner Center and ts focus on c v c eadersh p and engagement, Lou s ana Tech s proud to contr bute to a strong e ectora process.” KTBS anchor Sherr Ta ey w serve as the event s moderator w th quest ons posed by pane sts represent ng med a out ets from north and south Lou s ana. The stud o-sty e debate w focus on top cs such as econom c deve opment, the state budget, K-12 and h gher educat on, and eadersh p. “Lou s ana Tech s proud to host th s mportant event,” sa d Dr. Jeremy Mh re, assoc ate professor of po t ca sc ence at Lou s ana Tech and d rector of the Waggonner Center. “Lou s ana faces an mportant cho ce n the upcom ng e ect on and the Waggonner Center s exc ted to do ts part n he p ng voters make an nformed dec s on by host ng th s debate.” The Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy s housed n the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech. Its m ss on s to foster c t zensh p, b part san understand ng, effect ve pub c po cy and c v c eadersh p among students, and engag ng the pub c at arge. The Center a so seeks to promote act ve and respons b e c v c engagement through an nterd sc p nary comb nat on of nnovat ve curr cu ar n t at ves, academ c 13 2015-10-02 Shreveport

Louisiana Tech University to Host Televised Gubernatorial Debate Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and the Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy w host a te ev sed gubernator a debate at 6:00 p.m., October 15 that w feature the top four cand dates n the race for Governor. Pub c Serv ce Comm ss oner Scott Ange e (Repub can), L eutenant Governor Jay Dardenne (Repub can), State Representat ve John Be Edwards (Democrat) and U.S. Senator Dav d V tter (Repub can) have accepted nv tat ons to take part n the debate, wh ch w be te ev sed by KTBS-TV n Shreveport and s mu cast throughout the state. “Lou s ana Tech s p eased to have the opportun ty to host th s event and to engage the pub c n the process of e ect ng the next Governor to ead our state,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “Prov d ng the cand dates w th a fa r and neutra forum to share the r deas and v s on for the future of Lou s ana s an mportant part of our pub c serv ce. Through the Waggoner Center and ts focus on c v c eadersh p and engagement, Lou s ana Tech s proud to contr bute to a strong e ectora process.” KTBS anchor Sherr Ta ey w serve as the event s moderator w th quest ons posed by pane sts represent ng med a out ets from north and south Lou s ana. The stud o-sty e debate w focus on top cs such as econom c deve opment, the state budget, K-12 and h gher educat on, and eadersh p. “Lou s ana Tech s proud to host th s mportant event,” sa d Dr. Jeremy Mh re, assoc ate professor of po t ca sc ence at Lou s ana Tech and d rector of the Waggonner Center. “Lou s ana faces an mportant cho ce n the upcom ng e ect on and the Waggonner Center s exc ted to do ts part n he p ng voters make an nformed dec s on by host ng th s debate.” The Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy s housed n the Co ege of L bera Arts at Lou s ana Tech. Its m ss on s to foster c t zensh p, b part san understand ng, effect ve pub c po cy and c v c eadersh p among students, and engag ng the pub c at arge. The Center a so seeks to promote act ve and respons b e c v c engagement through an nterd sc p nary comb nat on of nnovat ve curr cu ar n t at ves, academ c outreach, and commun ty outreach. For more nformat on on the Waggonner Center for C v c Engagement and Pub c Po cy, v s t www.waggonnercenter.org. Copyr ght 2015 Nexstar Broadcast ng, Inc. A r ghts reserved. Th s mater a 13 2015-10-01 Monroe

Louisiana Tech, ExpressJet Airlines Partner to Offer Students Career Opportunities ExpressJet A r nes has teamed up w th Lou s ana Tech through a P ot Pathway Agreement w th the un vers ty s department of profess ona av at on. The partnersh p w ensure av at on students a h gh y structured path from f ght tra n ng to potent a career opportun t es w th ExpressJet A r nes. “Over 150 profess ona av at on students w have the opportun ty to part c pate,” sa d Jordan Lyons, head of the profess ona av at on department at Lou s ana Tech. Students, the r fam es and commun ty members attended a rcraft tours and the s gn ng ceremony of the program agreement ast Thursday. “The ExpressJet A r ne P ot Pathway Program w a ow our av at on students to nterv ew and be h red before graduat on,” Lyons sa d. “After se ect on, students w bu d the f ght t me necessary to beg n n t a a r ne tra n ng wh e be ng mentored by a current p ot work ng w th ExpressJet. Th s partnersh p w prov de students w th another poss b e career track to an a r ne cockp t. “The partnersh p s poss b e through our ded cated, goa -or ented av at on students. Add t ona y, our graduates have been recogn zed by many a r nes, nc ud ng ExpressJet, for the r hard work and ded cat on to be ng true av at on profess ona s w th n the ndustry.” “The v s t from ExpressJet A r nes w g ve our students, staff, facu ty and oca av at on enthus asts an opportun ty to earn about the exc t ng career opportun t es w th n ExpressJet,” Lyons sa d. Lou s ana Tech s Department of Profess ona Av at on offers Bache or of Sc ence degrees n both Profess ona Av at on and Av at on Management. FAA cert f cates and rat ngs are ava ab e to Lou s ana Tech students nc ud ng the Pr vate, Instrument, Commerc a , Cert f ed F ght Instructor, and Cert f ed Instrument F ght Instructor. The department s a member of the Un vers ty Av at on Assoc at on and s accred ted by the Av at on Accred tat on Board Internat ona . 13 2015-09-28 Monroe

La. Tech to host BRAIN pioneer RUSTON – Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and ts Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS) s proud to we come Dr. Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., who w present h gh ghts from h s research n neurosc ence and neura s gna process ng, and answer quest ons about the BRAIN (Bra n Research Through Advanc ng In t at ve Neurotechno og es) In t at ve. The presentat on s free and w take p ace at 11:30 a.m. Fr day n the aud tor um of Lou s ana Tech s Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng (IfM.) Brown s a professor of anesthes a at Harvard Med ca Schoo , professor of computat ona neurosc ence at the Massachusetts Inst tute of Techno ogy (MIT), assoc ate d rector of the Inst tute for Med ca Eng neer ng and Sc ence at MIT, d rector of the Harvard-MIT D v s on of Hea th Sc ences and Techno ogy, and a member of Pres dent Barack Obama s Comm ttee for the BRAIN In t at ve. H s research has paved the way for understand ng the work ngs of the bra n under anesthes a and other cond t ons. The BRAIN In t at ve s a $100 m on program that nc udes f ve federa agenc es, the Nat ona Inst tutes for Hea th, the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on, the Defense Advanced Research Pro ects Agency, Federa Drug Adm n strat on and Inte gence Advanced Research Pro ects Act v ty. Brown s a Guggenhe m Fe ow and Fe ow of the Amer can Assoc at on for the Advancement of Sc ence, the IEEE, the Amer can Inst tute for Med ca and B o og ca Eng neer ng, and the Amer can Stat st ca Assoc at on. He s a member of the Nat ona Academy of Sc ences, the Nat ona Academy of Eng neer ng and the Inst tute of Med c ne. Brown was awarded the Nat ona Inst tutes of Hea th (NIH) D rector s P oneer Award n 2007 and the NIH D rector s Transformat ve Research Award n 2012. Estab shed n 1985, CBERS been recogn zed as a Center of Exce ence at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty by the Lou s ana State Leg s ature, and more recent y by the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System fo ow ng a comprehens ve rev ew of programs at a of ts co eges and un vers t es. The Center ex sts to deve op and promote bas c and trans at ona b omed ca research, nte ectua property, strong t es w th b otechno ogy and med ca ndustry, and strengthen the educat ona exper ence and potent a of our eng neer ng and sc ence students n b osc ences. CBERS and other Lou s ana Tech research centers prov de un que opportun t es for facu ty and students throughout the un vers ty to part c pate n a mu t tude of educat ona and research act v t es at the forefront of b omed ca research 13 2015-09-28 Monroe

La. Tech co-sponsors history series on north Louisiana since the Civil War RUSTON – Rac a v o ence and po ce response n Reconstruct on-era North Lou s ana w be the top c when h stor an Dr. LeeAnna Ke th de vers the keynote address at a sympos um on “North Lou s ana H story and Cu ture S nce the C v War,” to take p ace at the L nco n Par sh L brary Events Center, 910 N. Trenton Street n Ruston. Adm ss on s free and the pub c s we come. Author of “The Co fax Massacre: The Unto d Story of B ack Power, Wh te Terror and the Death of Reconstruct on,” a book pra sed for reshap ng the debate over Reconstruct on v o ence n the South, Ke th ho ds a Ph.D. n h story from the Un vers ty of Connect cut and current y teaches at the Co eg ate Schoo n New York C ty. Ke th w speak at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15. Her ta k s t t ed, “Po ce Act on and the Po t cs of Wh te Supremacy n North Lou s ana: A H stor ca Perspect ve.” The sympos um “North Lou s ana H story and Cu ture” s made poss b e by an nterd sc p nary enhancement grant from the Lou s ana Board of Regents Support Fund. Accord ng to Tech h story department coord nator Dr. Jeffery R. Hank ns, one goa of the ser es s to showcase a recent surge n research on the North Lou s ana reg on. “There was a t me when the story of South Lou s ana dom nated our h stor ca understand ng, but that s now chang ng,” Hank ns sa d. “North Lou s ana has a r ch h stor ca and cu tura egacy of ts own and our purpose here s to h gh ght the mportant ro e the reg on has p ayed n the h story of Lou s ana as we as n the h story of the South and the nat on.” In add t on to Ke th s keynote address, n ne other presentat ons are schedu ed as part of the sympos um. A are set for the par sh brary events center and a are free and open to the pub c. CE un ts for schoo teachers are ava ab e upon request. The schedu e s as fo ows: Thursday, Oct. 15, beg nn ng at 1:30 p.m.: • N cho as Ducote of LaGrande, Oregon, “The Growth of the Forest Products Industry n North-Centra Lou s ana, 1895 through the Great Depress on” • Kent B. Germany of Un vers ty of South Caro na, “ Do I Rea y Need to S ug Them? : LBJ and North Lou s ana” • LaGuana K. Gray of Un vers ty of Texas-San Anton o, “ How Us Women Do : North Lou s ana Women and The r L ved Exper ence” • M chae G. Wade of Appa ach an State Un vers ty, “Learn ng to Learn: The North Lou s ana Educat on of Joe Lafayette F etcher, Jr.” • Kev n Fontenot of Aust n, Texas, “ Way Up North Around Shreveport : The Forgotten Legacy of North Lou s ana Mus c” • Thomas A e o of Va dosta State Un vers ty, “North Lou s ana Ho y Days: Spectac e, Race, and Representat on n the Reg on s 20th Century Sports” Fr day, October 16, beg nn ng at 10:30 a.m. • Donna Barnes of the Un vers ty of Wyom ng, “Race and C ass D v des n Lou s ana Popu sm, 1881-1900” • Jerry P. Sanson of Lou s ana State Un vers ty-A exandr a, “North Lou s ana s Huey Long Confronts the Great Depress on” • Barry Stent ford of U.S. Army Schoo of Advanced Stud es, “The F nest Area I Have Ever Seen for M tary Tra n ng : Northern Lou s ana Dur ng Wor d War II” Accord ng to “North Lou s ana H story and Cu ture” pro ect d rector and Lou s ana Tech assoc ate professor of h story Dr. V. E a ne Thompson, the stud es presented dur ng the two-day sympos um w be co ected and pub shed as a book to appear next year. In add t on to the Board of Regents grant, support for “Lou s ana H story and Cu ture” s prov ded by the Lou s ana Tech Co ege of L bera Arts, Schoo of H story and Soc a Sc ence, and Schoo of L terature and Language; Lambda-Rho Chapter, Ph A pha Theta, H story Honor Soc ety, Inc.; the McG nty Trust; and Rosemary s K tchen, ocated at 400 S. Bonner Street. 13 2015-09-25 Monroe

Louisiana Tech University numbers are up

)_ It s been 125 years s nce Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has had the argest enro ment of freshman. The pres dent of the LA Tech Un vers ty Les Gu ce, says "It s exc t ng to see ab e work at an nst tut on that gets recogn t on nat ona y and nternat ona y, and then attract so many great students to the campus, as you can see the ev dence today." 50 percent of the schoo s ncom ng freshman rece ved a 24 on the r ACT score.The un vers ty a so have a retent on rate of more than e ghty percent. The schoo s commun cat on Execut ve D rector Dave Guer en, says "A that together means we re reta n ng good students and we re prov d ng them w th a support serv ces they need to be successfu here at Lou s ana tech and once they graduate." Freshman Jeremy Gonza es says, "I m ov ng t, t was a rough trans t on for the f rst few weeks or so, but after that I rea y got nto th ngs, started to get nvo ved. I en oy my c asses and manag ng the oad pretty we ". Dave Guer en says, "We re very student centered everybody around the campus no matter what the r ob ro e s .. Student support s number one. We take pr de and put a ot of emphas s on support ng students and prepar ng them for the r careers". The Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence program has seen the b ggest growth. Two-hundred students have chosen that as the r ma or. US News and Wor d report ranked the co ege number one n the nat on for a ow ng students to have the east amount of debt after co ege.

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13 2015-09-25 Monroe

Louisiana Tech to Host Renowned Researcher, BRAIN Initiative Pioneer RUSTON (Press Re ease)

Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and ts Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng Rehab tat on Sc ence (CBERS) s proud to we come Dr. Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., who w present h gh ghts from h s research n neurosc ence and neura s gna process ng, and answer quest ons about the BRAIN (Bra n Research Through Advanc ng In t at ve Neurotechno og es) In t at ve.

The presentat on s free and w take p ace at 11:30 a.m. Fr day n the aud tor um of Lou s ana Tech s Inst tute for M cromanufactur ng (IfM.)

Brown s a professor of anesthes a at Harvard Med ca Schoo , professor of computat ona neurosc ence at the Massachusetts Inst tute of Techno ogy (MIT), assoc ate d rector of the Inst tute for Med ca Eng neer ng and Sc ence at MIT, d rector of the Harvard-MIT D v s on of Hea th Sc ences and Techno ogy, and a member of Pres dent Barack Obama s Comm ttee for the BRAIN In t at ve. H s research has paved the way for understand ng the work ngs of the bra n under anesthes a and other cond t ons.

The BRAIN In t at ve s a $100 m on program that nc udes f ve federa agenc es, the Nat ona Inst tutes for Hea th, the Nat ona Sc ence Foundat on, the Defense Advanced Research Pro ects Agency, Federa Drug Adm n strat on and Inte gence Advanced Research Pro ects Act v ty.

Brown s a Guggenhe m Fe ow and Fe ow of the Amer can Assoc at on for the Advancement of Sc ence, the IEEE, the Amer can Inst tute for Med ca and B o og ca Eng neer ng, and the Amer can Stat st ca Assoc at on. He s a member of the Nat ona Academy of Sc ences, the Nat ona Academy of Eng neer ng and the Inst tute of Med c ne.

Brown was awarded the Nat ona Inst tutes of Hea th (NIH) D rector s P oneer Award n 2007 and the NIH D rector s Transformat ve Research Award n 2012.

Estab shed n 1985, CBERS been recogn zed as a Center of Exce ence at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty by the Lou s ana State Leg s ature, and more recent y by the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System fo ow ng a comprehens ve rev ew of programs at a of ts co eges and un vers t es. The Center ex sts to deve op and promote bas c and trans at ona b omed ca research, nte ectua property, strong t es w th b otechno ogy and med ca ndustry, and strengthen the educat ona exper ence and potent a of our eng neer ng and sc ence students n b osc ences.

CBERS and other Lou s ana Tech research centers prov de un que opportun t es for facu ty and students throughout the un vers ty to part c pate n a mu t tude of educat ona and research act v t es at the forefront of b omed ca research. 13 2015-09-25 Ruston

Student enrollment record broken

Tech: Average freshman ACT score of at east 24.5 for th rd year

Leader News Serv ce

mugs 9.24. pg Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has enro ed more students th s fa than at any t me n ts 125-year h story. Accord ng to ts fa 2015 headcount announced Wednesday, Lou s ana Tech has enro ed 12,414 students for the fa quarter — an ncrease of 1,143 or 10.1 percent over ast year and ec ps ng the prev ous record enro ment of 11,975 students set back n fa of 2003.

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WMWO Chamber of Commerce to host 2015 Northeast Louisiana Celtic Festival on Saturday, Oct. 3 WEST MONROE, La. –

The West Monroe-West Ouach ta Chamber of Commerce s p eased to announce t w host the 2015 Northeast Lou s ana Ce t c Fest va on Saturday, Oct. 3 at K ro Park n West Monroe. Th s year marks the 11th ann versary of the Northeast Lou s ana Ce t c Fest va , wh ch s the ongest runn ng Northeast Lou s ana fest va st n ex stence. Ce t c Fest va founder Doy e Jeter of Enoch s Ir sh Pub w rema n as co-book ng agent and w manage the ma n stage. Tom McCand sh Jr. w serve as co-book ng agent and Fest va D rector. The fest va w once aga n be he d n K ro Park n West Monroe and w be he d on Saturday, October 3 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. The fest va w rema n a free, fam y fr end y event. Adm ss on to K ro Park s 50 cents per person. The fest va features a day- ong ce ebrat on of Ce t c cu ture nc ud ng var ous mus ca performances. Head n ng the fest va are Coyne, Reeves and Abarta, Emera d Accent, Sm thf e d Fa r and others. A so nc uded n th s year s mus ca neup are the Jackson Ir sh Dancers, The Trave ng Murphy s and much more. The fest va a so features an assortment of food vendors, craft vendors and ch dren s act v t es New to th s year s fest va s a rugby exh b t on conducted by the Lou s ana Tech Rugby Team. Dr. Jeffery R. Counts w serve as attend ng phys c an and present ng sponsor for the exh b t on matches. For more nformat on or nqu r es on booth space, p ease ca the WMWO Chamber of Commerce off ce at (318) 325-1961 or v s t www.westmonroechamber.org or “ ke” the fest va at www.facebook.com/NELACe t cFest. 13 2015-09-24 Ruston

Louisiana Tech University achieves record student enrollment Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has enro ed more students th s fa than at any t me n ts 125-year h story. Accord ng to ts fa 2015 headcount announced Wednesday, Lou s ana Tech has enro ed 12,414 students for the fa quarter – an ncrease of 1,143 or 10.1 percent over ast year and ec ps ng the prev ous record enro ment of 11,975 students set back n fa of 2003. A ong w th the record number of students attend ng Lou s ana Tech, the qua ty of students n the freshman c ass was h gh ghted by an average ACT score of 24.5 – the th rd consecut ve year that mark has been ach eved or exceeded. Over 55 percent of f rst-t me freshmen at Lou s ana Tech scored at or above 24 on the r ACT w th 149 students earn ng a score of 32 or h gher, wh ch qua f es them as Pres dent a Scho ars. F rst-t me freshman enro ment grew by near y s x percent over ast year, wh ch represents an ncrease of over 50 percent s nce the fa quarter of 2012. “An ncrease of 50 percent n comm tted and h gh-ach ev ng fu -t me freshmen over the past three years, coup ed w th a strong student retent on effort s he p ng us to bu d a arger and stronger student body that w serve th s state, reg on and nat on,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “I want to recogn ze the tremendous efforts of our facu ty and staff n recru tment and retent on, and the r ded cat on to offer ng the qua ty academ c programs that are attract ng more and more outstand ng students. The growth of our nst tut on and ts h gh-ca ber student body s not poss b e w thout them.” Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence had the argest overa enro ment ncrease of 205 students (among those who have dec ared a ma or) fo owed by the Co ege of Educat on, Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, Co ege of Bus ness, and Co ege of L bera Arts. “The student recru tment and engagement efforts of facu ty and staff across our campus, ed by the amaz ng work of our ent re adm ss ons team, are cr t ca to h gh ght ng the educat ona opportun t es we offer and the exper ences that awa t students at Lou s ana Tech,” sa d Dr. J m K ng, v ce pres dent for student advancement. “I am gratefu for the r efforts and a they have done to make th s newest c ass of Lou s ana Tech students fee va ued and we come.” The record enro ment was accompan ed by an ncrease n the retent on of students to Lou s ana Tech, from the 2014 freshman cohort. 80.5 percent of f rst-t me, fu -t me freshmen from fa 2014 returned to Lou s ana Tech th s year, wh ch s an ncrease of near y one percent over ast year. Ear er th s year, Lou s ana Tech reported a four percent ncrease n ts graduat on rate to 54 percent, wh ch s h ghest n the Un vers ty of Lou s ana System and second h ghest among a pub c un vers t es n the state. 13 2015-09-24 Ruston

Tech alum recognized

Tech a um recogn zed Subm tted by Ruston Leader on Wed, 09/23/2015 - 10:32am n News Leader News Serv ce McCa ster. pg Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty a um M ke McCa ster w be nduced n the Tech Ha of Fame dur ng the Ruston-L nco n Chamber of Commerce Awards D nner set for Sept. 29. McCa ster, who earned h s bache or s degree n account ng from Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Bus ness n 1974, has been a oya supporter of h s a ma mater s nce h s graduat on, earn ng the 2003 Lou s ana Tech A umnus of the Year. In honor of h s nvo vement n and support of Tech, McCa ster was awarded the Tower Meda on and was se ected as Lou s ana Tech s A umnus of the Year n 2003. 13 2015-09-24 Ruston

Tech is No. 1 in nation for lowest average student debt

Tech s No. 1 n nat on for owest average student debt Subm tted by Ruston Leader on Tue, 09/22/2015 - 10:27am n News Leader News Serv ce Students that graduate from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty do so w th the owest average amount of student oan debt of any pub c un vers ty n the Un ted States, accord ng to U.S. News and Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st and ts c ass f cat on and rank ng of Nat ona Un vers t es. 13 2015-09-22 Monroe

LA Tech is No. 1 in nation among public universities for lowest average student debt Students that graduate from Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty do so w th the owest average amount of student oan debt of any pub c un vers ty n the U. S., accord ng to U.S. News and Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st and ts c ass f cat on and rank ng of Nat ona Un vers t es. Lou s ana Tech s the f rst pub c nst tut on to appear on the st of Nat ona Un vers t es w th the east average amount of student debt at graduat on and s s xth n the nat on overa . Lou s ana Tech o ns the kes of Pr nceton Un vers ty, Ca forn a Inst tute of Techno ogy, Br gham Young Un vers ty, Ya e Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Dartmouth Co ege and the Un vers ty of Ca forn a-Berk ey, n the top e ght. Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce sa d, “Lou s ana Tech s pos t on on th s st w th nst tut ons such as Pr nceton, Harvard, Ya e and Ca tech s someth ng our ent re un vers ty commun ty s extreme y proud of and s a testament to our comm tment to offer ng students educat ona exce ence and va ue.”

Gu ce sa d, “When you comb ne th s est average debt and our T er One rank ngs from U.S. News & Wor d Report a ong w th other nat ona recogn t on for h ghest return on nvestment and h ghest m d-career sa ar es for graduates, we are prov d ng opportun t es and va ue that on y a handfu of un vers t es n the nat on can match.” A ong w th the east average debt rank ng, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty earned ts f fth consecut ve T er One Nat ona Un vers t es rank ng n the 2016 U.S. News & Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st. Lou s ana Tech, a ong w th Tu ane Un vers ty and Lou s ana State Un vers ty, were the on y nst tut ons n the state to ach eve a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es des gnat on. Lou s ana Tech mproved ts rank ng over ast year, mov ng up from 201 to 199 on the 2016 st. Lou s ana Tech a so earned a spot among the nat on s Top 120 Pub c Un vers t es as we as earn ng a spot n the Top 125 of the nat ona rank ngs for ts undergraduate eng neer ng programs. The undergraduate bus ness programs at Lou s ana Tech were a so nat ona y ranked.

Gu ce sa d, “The T er One Nat ona Un vers ty rank ng s someth ng we are a so very proud of and s ev dence of the comm tment shown by our facu ty and staff to serv ng our students and strengthen ng our nst tut on,” Gu ce added, “I thank the facu ty and staff across the campus for the r ded cat on and support n prov d ng our students w th unpara e ed earn ng opportun t es and educat ona exper ences.” The U.S. News and Wor d Report rank ngs are based on severa key measures of qua ty, nc ud ng assessment of exce ence as def ned by feedback from academ c peers and h gh schoo gu dance counse ors, graduat on and retent on rates, facu ty resources, student se ect v ty, f nanc a resources, graduat on rate performance wh ch s def ned by the d fference between actua and pred cted graduat on rates, and a umn g v ng. Scores for each measure are we ghted to determ ne a f na overa score. U.S. News & Wor d Report assessed near y 1,600 four-year co eges and un vers t es across the country and has c ass f ed a tota of 280 nst tut ons as “Nat ona Un vers t es,” 173 of wh ch are pub c. Based on categor es deve oped by the Carneg e Foundat on for the Advancement of Teach ng, “Nat ona Un vers t es” nc ude nst tut ons that offer a fu range of undergraduate ma ors, p us master s and Ph.D. programs, and emphas ze facu ty research. The Carneg e c ass f cat on has served as the bas s for the Best Co eges rank ng category system s nce the f rst rank ngs were done n 1983. In add t on to ts U.S. News & Wor d Report rank ngs, Lou s ana Tech was recent y ranked No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana for h ghest average m d-career earn ngs for graduates, accord ng to PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report. Tech was a so ranked among the top un vers t es n the nat on n Forbes st of Amer ca s Top Co eges 2015, and n the top 2.6 percent of the wor d s degree-grant ng nst tut ons by the Center for Wor d Un vers ty Rank ngs.

13 2015-09-22 Ruston

Tech hosts Career Day

More than 135 compan es w attend

Derek J. Amaya Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty w host career day for current students and a umn to showcase var ous oca , nat ona and nternat ona compan es seek ng new emp oyees. Career Center Events and A umn Re at ons Coord nator Ca t n Dartez sa d more than 135 compan es w be attend ng Fa Career Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Tech Student Center.

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La. Tech professor’s work featured on album cover RUSTON, La – Frank Hamr ck, assoc ate professor n Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty s Schoo of Des gn, was chosen by Dave Raw ngs Mach ne to produce work for the band s newest a bum cover. Hamr ck v s ted Nashv e th s summer to comp ete the photograph c work for Dave Raw ngs Mach ne s upcom ng a bum, “Nashv e Obso ete” wh ch w be re eased Fr day. The award-w nn ng duo of Dave Raw ngs and G an We ch met Hamr ck n the summer of 2014 when he produced a t ntype of the band that wou d ater become the front cover for th s a bum. Hamr ck was ater contacted by We ch, whose undergraduate sen or work was n photography at the Un vers ty of Ca forn a-Santa Cruz, to make a return tr p to Nashv e to produce the back mage of the a bum. The band features Raw ngs and We ch, as we as W e Watson and Pau Kowert. Raw ngs and We ch were a so named as the 2015 rec p ent of the Amer can Mus c Assoc at on s L fet me Ach evement Award for Songwr t ng. 13 2015-09-16 Monroe

Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science Joins National ASEE Pledge RUSTON, La. (Press Re ease) --

Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty and ts Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence has o ned more than 100 North Amer can un vers t es n a p edge to support d vers ty n eng neer ng. Dr. H sham Hegab, dean of the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, s gned the Amer can Soc ety for Eng neer ng Educat on (ASEE) p edge on beha f of Lou s ana Tech “to prov de ncreased opportun t es for women and other underrepresented demograph c groups to pursue mean ngfu eng neer ng careers.” “Address ng the ssue of d vers ty s v ta to prov d ng a compet t ve and nnovat ve workforce for our nat on, part cu ar y n the eng neer ng and sc ence f e ds,” Hegab sa d. “Dur ng the past severa years, our Co ege has n t ated severa proact ve programs and strateg es to he p ncrease the representat on of women and underrepresented m nor t es w th n our facu ty and students. We are comm tted to the goa s out ned by the ASEE p edge.” The p edge represents the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s ded cat on to prov d ng nc us ve programs and opportun t es for women and other underrepresented m nor t es, and s a cu m nat on of ASEE s 2014-15 “Year of Act on on D vers ty.” Lou s ana Tech has estab shed a nat ona reputat on for support ng women and m nor t es n eng neer ng and sc ence through efforts n t ated and advanced by the Off ce of Women n Sc ence and Eng neer ng (OWISE), and award-w nn ng organ zat ons such as the Lou s ana Tech chapters of the Nat ona Soc ety for B ack Eng neers and Soc ety of Women n Eng neer ng. Dr. Kat e Evans, d rector of the OWISE and of the Wa ter Koss Assoc ate Professor of Mathemat cs at Lou s ana Tech, says that the partnersh p w he p promote STEM f e ds among oca ch dren from d fferent demograph cs. “We hope to get ch dren n the Ruston commun ty exc ted about STEM and a so expose them to ro e mode s from d verse backgrounds,” Evans sa d. “The Eng neer ng and Sc ence Assoc at on, a student group that spans the breadth of our co ege, w be engag ng other student groups from a areas of our co ege to part c pate n th s outreach.” The Off ce of Women n Sc ence and Eng neer ng at Lou s ana Tech has severa programs and n t at ves p anned re ated to the recru tment and retent on of fema e and underrepresented m nor ty students and facu ty, nc ud ng a new partnersh p w th the Lou s ana Tech Sc TEC and the Ruston Market, n wh ch student groups w showcase STEM (sc ence, techno ogy, eng neer ng, and mathemat cs) act v t es to k ds. In add t on, Lou s ana Tech s Grand Cha enge Scho ars program has been spec f ca y recogn zed and auded by the Wh te House Off ce of Sc ence and Techno ogy Po cy for graduat ng a h gher than average percentage of fema e scho ars. 13 2015-09-15 Shreveport

Biomedical engineer, Louisiana Tech alumnae to begin New Frontiers lecture series RUSTON, La – The New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es w k ck-off ts th rd year at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty on September 21 w th a presentat on by Dr. M che e Dawson, ass stant professor n the Schoo of Chem ca and B omo ecu ar Eng neer ng at Georg a Tech and 1999 Lou s ana Tech a umnae. Dawson, whose research s focused on man pu at ng ce mechan cs to contro ce funct on, w present a ecture t t ed, “Mechan cs and Ma gnancy: B ophys ca Approaches for Understand ng Cancer,” at 3:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. The event s free and members of the campus and oca commun t es are cord a y nv ted to attend. The comp ex m croenv ronment n a so d tumor s a ma or barr er n understand ng the mo ecu ar and mechan ca mechan sms that contro cancer progress on. B ophys ca approaches used to quant fy the ntrace u ar forces from the act n cytoske eton and surface tract on forces from adhes on a ow Dawson s group to probe the b omechan ca propert es of nd v dua ce s exposed to tumor-m m ck ng cond t ons, such as secreted so ub e factors, mechan ca stress, and hypox a, w th an unprecedented eve of deta . By systemat ca y nvest gat ng the parameters n the tumor m croenv ronment that contro cancer ce behav or, as we as the r nteract ons w th tumor-assoc ated stroma ce s, Dawson hopes to ga n a better understand ng of ma gnant ce behav or, wh ch w be used to deve op new strateg es for treat ng cancer. Dawson has rece ved numerous awards for her research and mentorsh p nc ud ng the Women n Eng neer ng (WIE) Teach ng Exce ence Award and Jun or Facu ty Outstand ng Undergraduate Research Mentor Award at Georg a Tech. She has a so rece ved the Georg a Tech and Emory Center for Regenerat ve Med c ne Award for her work on ant ang ogen c mesenchyma stem ce -based therapy for metastat c me anoma. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. Newman and Ca dorera-Moore nv te guests to o n them n we com ng Dawson and earn ng more about her work n th s cutt ng edge area of cancer b o ogy. Dawson s v s t s sponsored by the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ences (CBERS) and the Off ce for Women n Sc ence and Eng neer ng (OWISE). For more nformat on on Dawson and her presentat on, or other events n th s year s New Front ers n B omed ca Research ecture ser es, v s t www.b omed ca research.w x.com/new-front ers. 13 2015-09-14 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Receives Grant to Bridge Gap Between Physical Education, STEM Fields Dr. Braden Romer, ass stant professor of k nes o ogy at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty, and Mrs. L ndsey Ke th-V ncent, d rector of Sc TEC n Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Educat on, were recent y awarded a $52,000 grant by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on to he p deve op a program to br dge the gap between phys ca educat on and the sc ence, techno ogy, eng neer ng and mathemat cs (STEM) f e ds. The program w fac tate the ntegrat on of k nes o ogy concepts, nc ud ng sport and hea th sc ence, nto the e ghth grade phys ca educat on and sc ence curr cu um n L nco n Par sh c assrooms. Romer says the p ot program s a med at br dg ng the gap between the STEM f e ds of study, so that the sc ence or math educat on doesn t stop at the door and phys ca f tness doesn t end once students eave the f e d. “K nes o ogy s a non-trad t ona f e d wh ch has h stor ca y been assoc ated w th the profess on of phys ca educat on,” sa d Romer. “Wh e th s st rema ns a component of many k nes o ogy programs around the country, the f e d has evo ved over the past severa decades to become broad y def ned as the study of movement. Furthermore, phys ca educat on and STEM educat on are often v ewed as oppos tes, w th these programs compet ng for m ted tempora resources dur ng pr mary and secondary educat on schedu es.” Ke th-V ncent, who n add t on to d rect ng Sc TEC a so oversees the Off ce of Profess ona Educat on Outreach, the Lou s ana Tech P anetar um, and the IDEA P ace at Lou s ana Tech, says the program bu ds upon the success of past pro ects n STEM educat on. “Th s s ta ored to an age group that often t mes f nds STEM sub ects and phys ca f tness at odds,” exp a ns Ke th-V ncent. “It s hoped that th s program w prove successfu , a ow ng for the mp ementat on on a arger sca e across a number of grades.” Ke th-V ncent oversees a number of grant-funded profess ona deve opment and outreach pro ects support ng the educat ona deve opment of PK-12 students and teachers. Romer spec a zes n b omechan cs n Lou s ana Tech s Department of K nes o ogy, s a member of the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, and s the d rector of the Sport and Movement Sc ence Laboratory and the App ed Phys o ogy Laboratory at Lou s ana Tech. He a so serves on the board of d rectors for the Ga t & C n ca Movement Ana ys s Soc ety, a mu t -d sc p nary organ zat on of phys c ans, a ed hea th profess ons, eng neers, and b omechan sts. Copyr ght 2015 Nexstar Broadcast ng, Inc. A r ghts reserved. Th s mater a may not be pub shed, broadcast, rewr tten 13 2015-09-11 Monroe

Louisiana Tech Ranks High Among Other National Universities The 2016 U.S. News and Wor d Report revea s what co eges and un vers t es aroud the nat on have to offer.

Lou s ana Tech ranked number one on that report for hav ng the east amount of debt for co ege students.

"That s amaz ng. Now everyone s hav ng to pay debt as they go nto the r career s, st pay ng off co ege and tu t on," says Kay a L pscomb, LA Tech Student.

"I m very exc ted about that, espec a y try ng to go to med schoo . I know that there I w accumu ate a ot of debt, so not hav ng any undergraduate debt rea y he ps out a ot," says Cydn Ward, LA Tech Student.

D rector of F nanc a A d, A mee Baxter, says f nanc a adv sors at Tech speak w th freshmen one-on-one when they comm t to the Unvers ty about the best f nanc a route for the r co ege career.

"Try ng to encourage a more nd v dua counse ng w th the students. We encourage them to come n before they ask for add t ona a d, to come n and et us ta k to them about the d fferent types of a d that s ava ab e. Do they rea y need that money? What do they need t for? Just gett ng more n depth w th the r nformat on," says A mee Baxter, LA Tech D rector of F nanc a A d.

A ong w th the pr vate adv ce, there are a so numerous scho arsh ps and grants offered to keep students from gett ng nto debt.

"We encourage students to do work study and to not borrow more than they have to. Don t ust borrow for the ce phones and expens ve cars, and to ve rea y, rea y n ce. Try not to end up w th a ot of debt," says Baxter.

H gh graduat on numbers were a so a key factor on the 2016 report and Tech showed great numbers for students that comp ete co ege.

"The quarter system rea y he ps contr bute to that. our students graduate n an average of 4.4-year, a fu year ear er than a ot of our s ster nst tut ons n the state," says Pame a Ford, LA Tech Dean of Enro ment Management.

Students that attend tech say they are proud to go to a Un vers ty that ranks h gh among vy eague schoo s.

"Tech s do ng someth ng r ght that a ot of schoo s aren t do ng," says L pscomb.

13 2015-09-11 Ruston

La. Tech ranked No. 1 again For the f fth consecut ve year, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has earned a T er One rank ng among “Nat ona Un vers t es,” accord ng to U.S. News & Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st re eased Wednesday. Tech, a ong w th Tu ane Un vers ty and Lou s ana State Un vers ty, were the on y nst tut ons n the state to ach eve a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es des gnat on.

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-09-10 Monroe

La. Tech to launch 2015-2016 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series RUSTON - Interd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers w form the foundat on for the 2015-2016 ed t on of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty. A presentat on by Dr. M che e Dawson t t ed, “Mechan cs and Ma gnancy: B ophys ca Approaches for Understand ng Cancer” w beg n the 2015-2016 ser es on Sept. 21. Dawson, an ass stant professor of chem ca and b omo ecu ar eng neer ng at the Georg a Inst tute of Techno ogy (Georg a Tech), s a 1999 b omed ca eng neer ng a umnae of Lou s ana Tech. A sem nars th s year are open to the pub c and w beg n at 3:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Lectures w a so be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php. The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The ser es s once aga n sponsored by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty. New sponsors th s year nc ude the Off ce of the Pres dent at Lou s ana Tech, Sc TEC and the Co ege of Educat on, and the Off ce for Women n Sc ence and Eng neer ng. Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce has been a strong supporter of the ser es s nce ts f rst year and has met w th near y every presenter and guest. “I am very p eased that the facu ty organ zers have pu ed together another great s ate of speakers that w benef t our campus commun ty through a deeper understand ng of exce ent b omed ca research that s tak ng p ace around the country,” sa d Gu ce. “I encourage everyone who has a pass on for research to take advantage of the opportun t es that are be ng prov ded and I thank a of the sponsors for the r support.” In add t on to nvo v ng the sc ent f c d sc p nes, the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es nvo ves a new co aborat on w th Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of Des gn through the des gn and ustrat on of brochure covers and note cards for the ser es. N cho as Bustamante, assoc ate professor of stud o art, worked w th Newman and Ca dorera-Moore to create cover art and magery to be used n advert s ng and g ft presentat ons to the sem nar speakers. Th s co aborat on w cont nue w th a new course Bustamante s offer ng n d g ta pa nt ng dur ng the w nter 2016 quarter where students w work w th Newman and Ca dorera-Moore to des gn new magery for the 2016-2017 sem nar ser es. Work generated n th s c ass w be d sp ayed n an art exh b t on at the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center dur ng the spr ng 2016 quarter, and w nc ude a v s t from profess ona med ca ustrators who w spend some t me v s t ng w th facu ty and students on campus. “Through th s c ass students w earn the va ue of d g ta art as a v sua means of commun cat on and ts ro e n sc ent f c research,” sa d Bustamante. “Students w a so deve op mportant sk sets that can be app ed to a var ety of profess ons and ga n the rea wor d exper ence of work ng w th a c ent.” For more nformat on on the 2015-2016 New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es, contact Newman at [email protected] atech.edu or Ca dorera-Moore at [email protected] atech.edu. Add t ona nformat on as we as a comp ete schedu e of 13 2015-09-10 Ruston

Louisiana Tech earns Tier One national ranking from U.S. News & World Report For the f fth consecut ve year, Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty has earned a T er One rank ng among “Nat ona Un vers t es,” accord ng to U.S. News & Wor d Report s 2016 Best Co eges st re eased Wednesday. _DJC1005Lou s ana Tech, a ong w th Tu ane Un vers ty and Lou s ana State Un vers ty, were the on y nst tut ons n the state to ach eve a T er One Nat ona Un vers t es des gnat on. Lou s ana Tech mproved ts rank ng over ast year, mov ng up from 201 to 199 on the 2016 US News & Wor d Report st. Pr nceton Un vers ty was No. 1 on the Nat ona Un vers t es st fo owed by Harvard Un vers ty, Ya e Un vers ty, Co umb a Un vers ty, Stanford Un vers ty and Un vers ty of Ch cago. In add t on to earn ng a spot on the T er One Nat ona Un vers t es st, Lou s ana Tech was ranked No. 1 n the nat on among pub c Nat ona Un vers t es and No. 6 overa for graduat ng students w th the east average amount of debt. Pr nceton Un vers ty topped the east average debt st fo owed by the Ca forn a Inst tute of Techno ogy, Br gham Young Un vers ty, Ya e Un vers ty, Harvard Un vers ty, Lou s ana Tech, Dartmouth Co ege and the Un vers ty of Ca forn aBerk ey. “The T er One Nat ona Un vers ty rank ng from U.S. News & Wor d Report s someth ng we are very proud of and s c ear ev dence of the comm tment shown by our facu ty and staff to serv ng our students and strengthen ng our nst tut on,” sa d Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce. “I am equa y proud that we are he p ng our students graduate from Lou s ana Tech w th a ower average amount of debt than graduates from any other pub c nst tut on n the Un ted States, c ass f ed as a Nat ona Un vers ty. “I thank our ent re campus commun ty for the r ded cat on and support n prov d ng our students w th unpara e ed earn ng opportun t es and educat ona exper ences, and congratu ate them on th s ach evement.” Lou s ana Tech a so earned a spot among the nat on s Top 120 Pub c Un vers t es as we as earn ng a spot n the Top 125 of the nat ona rank ngs for ts undergraduate eng neer ng programs. The undergraduate bus ness programs at Lou s ana Tech were a so nat ona y ranked. The U.S. News and Wor d Report rank ngs are based on severa key measures of qua ty, nc ud ng assessment of exce ence as def ned by feedback from academ c peers and h gh schoo gu dance counse ors, graduat on and retent on rates, facu ty resources, student se ect v ty, f nanc a resources, graduat on rate performance wh ch s def ned by the d fference between actua and pred cted graduat on rates, and a umn g v ng. Scores for each measure are we ghted to determ ne a f na overa score. U.S. News & Wor d Report assessed near y 1,600 four-year co eges and un vers t es across the country and has c ass f ed a tota of 280 nst tut ons as “Nat ona Un vers t es,” 173 of wh ch are pub c. Based on categor es deve oped by the Carneg e Foundat on for the Advancement of Teach ng, “Nat ona Un vers t es” nc ude nst tut ons that offer a fu range of undergraduate ma ors, p us master s and Ph.D. programs, and emphas ze facu ty research. The Carneg e c ass f cat on has served as the bas s for the Best Co eges rank ng category system s nce the f rst rank ngs were done n 1983. In add t on to ts U.S. News & Wor d Report rank ngs, Lou s ana Tech was recent y ranked No. 1 n the State of Lou s ana for h ghest average m d-career earn ngs for graduates, accord ng to PaySca e.com s 2015-2016 Co ege Sa ary Report. Tech was a so ranked among the top un vers t es n the nat on n Forbes st of Amer ca s Top Co eges 2015, and n the top 2.6 percent of the wor d s degree-grant ng nst tut ons by the Center for Wor d Un vers ty Rank ngs. 13 2015-09-10 Ruston

Guice gives ‘State of the University Address’ Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce he d h s annua “State of the Un vers ty Address” Tuesday at a facu ty/staff convocat on s gna ng the start of the un vers ty s 2015-16 schoo year. C asses w beg n for Tech students on Thursday. Gu ce expressed opt m sm for the upcom ng year and sa d that Tech s newest freshman c ass shou d be a s gna for good th ngs to come.

Fu text of th s art c e s ava ab e to subscr bers on y. Log n f you are a ready a subscr ber. If you are not a subscr ber, you can subscr be to the on ne vers on here. 13 2015-09-09 Monroe

Louisiana Tech to Launch 2015-2016 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research Series Interd sc p nary co aborat ons, a umn spot ghts and features, and research d scuss ons by renowned guest speakers w form the foundat on for the 2015-2016 ed t on of the New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es at Lou s ana Tech Un vers ty.

A presentat on by Dr. M che e Dawson t t ed, “Mechan cs and Ma gnancy: B ophys ca Approaches for Understand ng Cancer” w beg n the 2015-2016 ser es on September 21. Dawson, an ass stant professor of chem ca and b omo ecu ar eng neer ng at the Georg a Inst tute of Techno ogy (Georg a Tech), s a 1999 b omed ca eng neer ng a umnae of Lou s ana Tech.

A sem nars th s year are open to the pub c and w beg n at 3:30 p.m. n Un vers ty Ha on the Lou s ana Tech campus. Lectures w a so be recorded and can be accessed through the Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence s Events web page at http://coes. atech.edu/about-the-co ege/events.php.

The New Front ers n B omed ca Research sem nar ser es s co-organ zed by Dr. Jam e Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor n Zoo ogy and Premed c ne, and Dr. Mary Ca dorera-Moore, ass stant professor of b omed ca eng neer ng. The ser es s once aga n sponsored by the L nco n Hea th Foundat on, Lou s ana Tech s Co ege of Eng neer ng and Sc ence, the Co ege of App ed and Natura Sc ences, the Center for B omed ca Eng neer ng and Rehab tat on Sc ence, S gma X , and generous donat ons from members of the commun ty.

New sponsors th s year nc ude the Off ce of the Pres dent at Lou s ana Tech, Sc TEC and the Co ege of Educat on, and the Off ce for Women n Sc ence and Eng neer ng. Lou s ana Tech Pres dent Les Gu ce has been a strong supporter of the ser es s nce ts f rst year and has met w th near y every presenter and guest. “I am very p eased that the facu ty organ zers have pu ed together another great s ate of speakers that w benef t our campus commun ty through a deeper understand ng of exce ent b omed ca research that s tak ng p ace around the country,” sa d Gu ce. “I encourage everyone who has a pass on for research to take advantage of the opportun t es that are be ng prov ded and I thank a of the sponsors for the r support.”

In add t on to nvo v ng the sc ent f c d sc p nes, the New Front ers n B omed ca Research ser es nvo ves a new co aborat on w th Lou s ana Tech s Schoo of Des gn through the des gn and ustrat on of brochure covers and note cards for the ser es. N cho as Bustamante, assoc ate professor of stud o art, worked w th Newman and Ca dorera-Moore to create cover art and magery to be used n advert s ng and g ft presentat ons to the sem nar speakers.

Th s co aborat on w cont nue w th a new course Bustamante s offer ng n d g ta pa nt ng dur ng the w nter 2016 quarter where students w work w th Newman and Ca dorera-Moore to des gn new magery for the 2016-2017 sem nar ser es. Work generated n th s c ass w be d sp ayed n an art exh b t on at the Lou s ana Tech Enterpr se Center dur ng the spr ng 2016 quarter, and w nc ude a v s t from profess ona med ca ustrators who w spend some t me v s t ng w th facu ty and students on campus. “Through th s c ass students w earn the va ue of d g ta art as a v sua means of commun cat on and ts ro e n s