Introduction to Word Processing - Jones & Bartlett Learning

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Introduction to Word Processing Objectives 1. Describe the basic functions of a word processing program and the types of projects that are best managed by using it.

2. Define common terms related to word processing. 3. Use appropriate keyboard shortcuts to speed up document creation and editing. 4. Describe the basic MS Word window and related navigational functions. 5. Create, format, edit, save, spell check, and print Microsoft Word documents. 6. Use the appropriate features when creating Word documents.

Introduction A word processing program permits us to manipulate text and related objects such as pictures. If the need is to use mathematical processes to manipulate numbers or to manage data, then a word processing program is not the correct application to use. The main purpose of a word processing program is to permit the user to create text documents, edit (insert, delete, and replace) text and objects, format the document to increase readability and appearance, print a copy of the document, and save the document for future use or reference. This chapter provides the basics of word processing using Microsoft Word 2010.

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Definitions Understanding some of the common concepts related to text manipulation makes using the help system easier and increases your problem-solving skills when things go wrong. Block

Clipboard

Format

Hard Return

Insert

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A block is a selected (highlighted) section of text that the program treats as a unit. You can apply most individual formatting functions, such as bold and underline, to blocks of text, thereby making ­formatting and editing functions much more efficient. A clipboard is a holding area or buffer for copied or cut data for later use. You can place data onto a clipboard and can then paste it into another document, another application, or another location within the original ­document. In Office 2010, the Office Clipboard can hold as many as 24 items at a time (see Chapter 4 for details). Formatting is the process of editing the ­appearance of a document by altering the look of fonts and using indentations, margins, tabs, justification, and pagination; format conditions affect the document ­appearance. In Word, format features vary depending on whether you are formatting characters (font, size, emphasis, and special effects such as highlight or superscript/­subscript), paragraphs (tabs, alignment, indentation, line spacing, and line breaks), or pages (headers, footers, margins, paper size, and orientation). The hard return is a code that you insert in the document by pressing the Enter key. A hard return usually marks the end of a paragraph. In Word, the paragraph mark is . Users may toggle the paragraph markers on to show marks in the document when typing or toggle them off by clicking the Show/Hide button in the Paragraph group of the Home tab. To always show the Show/Hide feature click the File Tab, Options, Display, and place a check in Paragraph marks. To “insert” means to add characters in the text at the point of the cursor, thereby moving all other text to the

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Definitions  217

Move

Outliner

Overtype

ScreenTips

Scrolling

SmartArt

Soft Return

Template

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right. Insert mode is the opposite of overtype mode and is the default in most word processing programs. In Office 2010, the Insert tab is next to the Home tab on the ribbon; use it to insert pages, tables, illustrations, links, and so forth. Move is a function in word processing programs that permits the user to relocate text or graphics to another place in the document or to another document. Outliner is a feature of many word processing programs that enables the user to plan and r­ earrange large documents in an outline form. Overtype means to replace the character under the  cursor by the character typed. To turn it off, click the File Tab, click Options, click Advanced, and clear the Use the Insert Key and Use Overtype Mode check boxes. ScreenTips are small windows that display ­descriptive text when you rest the pointer on a command or icon. Office 2010 offers enhanced ScreenTips with larger windows and more text. Scrolling is the process of moving around a document to view a specific portion of a page of text when the entire document does not fit on the screen. This navigation process does not change the location of the insertion point until the user clicks elsewhere in the document. SmartArt is a feature in Office 2010 that ­permits you to easily create a visual representation of your information. A common use of it is to display organizational structure in an organization. A soft return is the code that the p ­ rogram inserts in the document automatically when the typed line reaches the right margin. A template contains predesigned formats and ­structure. It creates a copy of itself when you open it. When you select File, New you will see a list of templates with more available online at Office.com. Some commons ones are budgets, calendars, memos, and resumes.

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218  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing Toggle

Word Wrap

Toggling switches from one mode of operation to another mode: on or off. For example, a user might toggle from insert mode to replace/overtype mode. This feature automatically carries words over to the next line if they extend beyond the margin.

Data Exchange Word processing software saves documents in file formats that are unique to that software program. Office 2010 documents, worksheets, and presentations are saved in XML with extensions that end in “x” or “m.” The x indicates an XML file that has no macros. An m indicates the file contains a macro. Many word processing programs allow the option of saving documents under another file format by using the Save As feature. For example, you can save a Microsoft Word 2010 document in several ways, such as a Word 2010 document (docx), Word template (dotx), rich text (rtf), Word 97–2003 (doc), PDF (pdf), or Word XML (xml). This feature permits you to exchange a file with others who are working with different word processing programs, versions, or systems. It also permits you to save a word processing file as a Web page (htm or html). Other file formats are also available. By default, Word 2010 uses the docx format.

Saving Work Every person probably has at least one horror story that he or she can tell about lost data or documents. To avoid accidental loss of data, follow these tips:

1. Periodically save your work. When typing a document, the computer

holds that document temporarily in random access memory (RAM). Once you instruct the program to save the document on a storage device, the ­document exists both in RAM and on the storage device. If power goes off (even temporarily), you lose all the data in RAM. While you can set your Office programs to use the AutoRecover feature, this is not a substitute for regularly saving your work through the Save command. AutoRecover does not replace the Save command; it is only effective for unplanned disruptions, such as a power outage or a crash. AutoRecover files are not designed to be saved when you close the program in an orderly fashion. Conversely, you do not lose data stored on secondary storage devices unless that medium gets corrupted. 2. Pay attention to software warnings. These warnings are hints to remind you that doing certain things will have a predetermined result. For example, saving a document with the same name as another one results in a message

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Saving Work  219

Figure 5-1  Warnings that a File Exists with the Same Name

asking whether the file is to be replaced (Figure 5-1). Do not respond with “Replace existing file” unless you have no need for the original document. 3. Always keep a backup or duplicate copy of a document. That backup could consist of a CD, USB storage device, or another hard drive. Store the backup in a different place. If something happens to the original document or the computer, the backup copy will then be available for restoring the data. A particularly valuable document, such as a thesis or research paper, ­ rimary should have a backup that you keep in a different location from the p ­document. Many options for automatic backup are available today from places like MozyHome, MediaFire, or SkyDrive. If you select an online backup service, do your homework first. Some people will also send a copy of the document to themselves as an email attachment thereby having it in another place, the mail server. 4. Word 2010 AutoSaves a document as a draft for 4 days when you choose “Don’t Save” or exit without saving. To find it click File, Recent, and click the box at the bottom of the page. Again, these files may not be perfect when retrieved or as you remembered them.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010 Examples in this text use Microsoft Office Word 2010 for Windows 7. See Figure 5-2a. Using Microsoft Office Word 2011 for the Macintosh, however, is essentially the same; the ribbons, tabs, groups, and toolbars include most of the same headings and icons. See Figure 5-2b. Icons common to all applications appear on the ribbon. Therefore, both Macintosh and Windows users can use the chapters in this book on word processing, spreadsheets, and graphics presentation with very few changes between operating systems.

Ribbons, Menus, and Keyboard Commands Most word processing programs are menu driven, meaning that you can carry out commands by selecting icons or choosing from a menu of options. Menu-driven programs provide you with two options—use the mouse to select items from the ribbon (menus) and command icons or use keystroke combinations to issue the command. The general rule is if your hands are on the keyboard, use the keystroke combinations; if your hands are not on the keyboard, use the mouse and ribbons options. See Table 4-1 for shortcut keys. For example, Ctrl+Enter inserts a hard page break in a document. In the Macintosh operating system, the Apple key (or command key), which is next to the space bar, acts like the Ctrl key in the Windows system.

New Document Button

Status Bar

New Document Window

Zoom Control

Figure 5-2a  Microsoft Office Word 2010 Window, Home Tab Selected and

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  221

Figure 5-2b  Microsoft Word Ribbon 2011 for the Mac

Starting Word As with all Windows programs, there are many ways to start Word including the following. Chapter 4 also described several ways of opening a new or existing Word document.

1. Click Start, Programs. Select Microsoft Office, and then choose MS Office Word from the available options (Figure 4-7d).

2. Click the Word icon on the Quick Launch area of the taskbar if it appears there (Figure 4-8).

Creating a New Document After starting Word, a new blank document opens by default. At this point, you can simply type and format the text as desired. Two methods to create a new ­document once you open Word follow:

1. Click the File Tab and then New. A window appears (Figure 5-3). Click Blank document and a new document appears formatted using the normal template. Note the choices available for a new document under Templates. 2. Add the New Document symbol to the Quick Access toolbar. Click the File Tab, choose Options, Quick Access Toolbar, New, Add , and OK. Alternatively, you can click the arrow to the right of the Quick Access toolbar. Click New. Now the New Document button shows on the Quick Access toolbar. Click the New button and the new document window appears. See Figure 5-2a.

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222  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Figure 5-3  New Document Window

For each document, Word presents a screen with the ribbon at the top, a blank window or document workplace in the center, a scroll bar on the right side, and the status bar on the bottom. A blinking vertical bar, or insertion point marker, represents the position of the cursor in the document. In Figure 5-2a the cursor appears at the beginning of the document.

Opening a Previously Saved Document When changes or additions are necessary in a document, several options are available for opening the document again after you saved it (see Chapter 4 for additional ways to open existing documents). If the application is not open:

1. Start Word and click the File Tab. A list of Recent Documents appears on the right. Click the desired document.

2. Start Word, click the File Tab, and choose Open. The Open dialog box

appears (Figure 4-10) with a list of documents. Note that you can also choose Recently Changed; this choice brings up a complete list that includes the name of each document as well as its size, type, and date modified. 3. Go to the location of the file and double-click the file you want to open.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  223 If Word is open:

1. Click the File Tab and Recent. A list of Recent Documents appears (Figure 4-10).

2. If the file is not in the list of Recent Documents, click the Open button in File Tab. The Open dialog box appears, allowing you to search and select the file to open (Figure 4-9).

The Ribbon in Word: Microsoft’s “Fluent User Interface” Microsoft Word’s Ribbon in 2010 contains a series of task-oriented tabs and groups organized to keep like tasks together (see Figure 5-4). Each tab contains a different group of commands or tasks that help you to use Word. Use the Quick Access Toolbar to add frequently used commands like New, Spell and Grammar Checker, and so forth. Following is a brief description of each tab and its groups in Word 2010. Note that the ribbon shows the groups by default. If you turned that option off and only see the tabs, click the Expand the Ribbon button on the far right of the Tabs. Home

Figure 5-4 shows the Home tab and its groups: Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing. These groups allow you to format the document by (1) ­cutting, copying, or pasting items to the clipboard; (2) selecting a font style, size, and color; (3) setting indents and spacing, adding bullets or numbers to a list, and adjusting text alignment; (4) selecting a document style; and (5) using find and replace. The Insert tab (Figure 5-5a) has groups such as Pages, Tables, Illustrations, Links, Header & Footer, Text, and Symbols. You can add a cover page or insert a blank page, page break, table, chart, SmartArt, or clip art using this tab.

Insert

Cut

Editing

Copy

Paste Clipboard

Justifiy Font

Line Spacing

Paragraph

Styles

Change Styles

Figure 5-4  Home Tab and Groups

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224  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Page Break Clip Art Smart Art

Pages Tables Illustrations

Page Number

Links Header & Footer

Date & Time

Text

Symbols

Figure 5-5a  Insert Tab and Groups

Figure 5-5b shows the menu for adding a page number in a footer. Among other things you can use this ribbon to add a hyperlink, bookmark, text box, or the date and time. Page Layout

References

Mailings

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Figure 5-6 shows the Page Layout tab and its groups: Themes, Page Setup, Page Background, Paragraph, and Arrange. These groups help you select the font style and color, margins, page orientation, paragraph indents and spacing, and allow you to add watermarks, add a page border, or change the page color or arrangement. Groups under the References tab (Figure 5-7) include Table of Contents, Footnotes, Citations and Bibliography, Captions, Index, and Table of Authorities (cases, statutes). These groups help you add endnotes, ­footnotes, citations, index, and tables (content and authorities), and then update these items as necessary. For example, you can manage citation sources like a book, journal, or web site, insert the citation in the document, and choose the style for the source such as APA or MLA. In addition, you can automate the ­creation and updating of a table of contents when working with a paper that requires a table of contents. The Mailings groups (Figure 5-8) help you prepare envelopes, labels, mail merge letters, and recipient lists.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  225

Figure 5-5b  Menu for Adding a Footer and Page Number

Margins

Breaks

Indent

Themes Page Setup Page Background Paragraph

Arrange

Figure 5-6  Page Layout Tab and Groups

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Table of Authorities

Table of Contents Footnotes Citations & Captions Bibliography

Index

Figure 5-7  References Tab and Groups

Envelopes

Labels

Start Mail Merge

Preview Results

Write & Insert Fields

Create

Finish

Figure 5-8  Mailings Tab and Groups

Protect

Spelling & Grammer

Proofing

Language

Comments Tracking

Changes Compare OneNote

Figure 5-9  Review Tab and Groups

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  227 Review

You can use the Review groups for proofing a ­document (see Figure 5-9); for example, these groups help you check spelling and grammar, do a word count, track changes, insert comments, enable ScreenTips for showing a word in another language, or protect a ­document from changes by someone else.   While not part of the Review tab, you may also use a readability index to test the readability level of the document. To set this option, click File Tab, Options, Proofing, and Show readability statistics. Now, when you check the spelling and grammar of the document, a readability index will also appear. This consideration is very important when developing patient educational materials. However, this approach is not sufficient for measuring the health literacy level needed to understand the document. Chapter 14 further explains health literacy The View tab includes commands that allow you to view the document in print layout, full screen reading, Web layout, outline, or draft form (Figure 5-10). The next group has commands to show or hide various items in Word, such as the ruler, gridlines, the ­message bar, the document map, and thumbnails. Zoom ­controls are in the Zoom group or on the status bar at the bottom of the window (Figure 5-2a). Options also allow you to view one or two pages of the document. The next group focuses on the window and provides ways to view a document or to switch between windows. The last group is Macros; a macro is an automated sequence of operations that can prove useful for repetitive tasks.



View

Print Layout Draft Show Ruler One Page New Window Split Window Full Screen

Document Views

Show

Zoom

Window

Macros

Figure 5-10  View Tab and Groups

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Moving Around the Document There are several ways to move around a document. Arrow keys Ctrl + arrow keys Home key End key Ctrl+Home Ctrl+End Page Up and Page Down Keys Ctrl+PageUp Ctrl+PageDown

Move the insertion point one line or letter at a time. Move one word, section, or paragraph at a time. Moves the cursor to the beginning of the line. Moves the cursor to the end of the line. Moves the cursor to the beginning of the document. Moves the cursor to the end of the document. Move the cursor quickly through the document one screen at a time. Moves the cursor to the previous page. Moves the cursor to the next page.

At the right side of the document window is a scroll bar (Figure 5-2a). The View Ruler icon , at the top of the vertical scroll bar, toggles the ruler bar off and on. Dragging the elevator in the scroll bar moves you up or down the scroll line as quickly as desired. The single arrow in the scroll bar is used to move up or down one line at a time, but does not alter the location of the insertion point. Clicking the double arrows (chevrons) up or down moves you through the document a page at a time like the Crtl+PageUp and Crtl+PageDown keys. Clicking and dragging the dotted triangle on the lowerright corner of the window (when the window doesn’t fill the screen) allows you to change the dimensions of the window like the double-headed arrows on a window border. If you click on the title bar and drag, you can move the window around the screen.

NOTE: A scroll wheel on a mouse will also let you scroll through a document by moving the wheel back and forth.

Formatting the Document By using formatting related commands the document can be made to look ­professional at the same time it makes the message in the document more understandable. There are four components to formatting—character, paragraph, page, and document.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  229

Character Formatting The following terms describe the components of fonts and the options for character formatting. Font





Spacing

Special Effects

Symbol Set Typeface

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A font defines a descriptive look or shape (font face or typeface), size, and style of a group of characters or symbols. For example, one font is Times Roman, 12 point, Bold, Italic. Another font is Calibri, 10 point, Italic. The default font for Word 2010 is Calibri. The general rule is to limit the number of different fonts in one document to three. Use serif fonts (fonts with little feet) for text documents; this makes the document easier to read.   Size refers to the height of the characters and is ­measured in 72 points per inch. Normal sizes for business documents are 10 to 12 points while Word uses 11points.   Style or attributes include bold, italics, and condensed. Use these attributes for emphasis—not for the whole document. Proportional or fixed pitch. “Proportional” means a variable amount of space is allotted for each ­character depending on the character width. “Fixed space” or “monospace” means a set space is provided for each character regardless of the character width. For example, an “I” is allowed the same amount of space as a “W.” Word provides the user with the ability to apply ­special effects to characters. Some of these special effects are: superscript, subscript, strikethrough, highlight, color, and small caps. Use these as appropriate for the ­document and the message. Use color only when printing on a color printer or moving the document around electronically. A black and white printer needs to interpret the colors sometimes making them not easily readable in black and white. The characters and symbols that make up the font. The specific design of a character or symbol, commonly referred to as the font face. For example, ­Helvetica, Courier, Times Roman, Times Roman Bold, and Times Roman Italic are all different typefaces.

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Font

Font Size Grow Font

Shrink Font Change Case Clear Formatting

Bold Italic Underline Strikethrough Subscript

Select Font Dialog Launcher Text Highlight Color Text Effects

Superscript

Figure 5-11  Font Style Group in Home Tab

To format a character: font size and style As in previous examples, you can choose the font size and style in several d ­ ifferent ways.

1. Select the text to apply the font and size. 2. Click the Home tab. Choose a font and size from the Font group (Figure 5-11).

or

3. Click the dialog launcher

in the Font group and the Font dialog box appears (Figure 5-12). You can select a font, font style, size, effects, color, and character spacing in this dialog box. You can also choose a default font style and size that will be the default style for all documents. By default, the font size for business documents is 10 to 12 points, but you may also choose a larger size that can be easily read on the screen if you like. Later, you can change the font if necessary. For example, you can highlight the entire document by choosing Select in the Editing group and then Select All (or press Ctrl+A) and reduce the print size before printing by choosing another font size or print style or both.

or

4. Style buttons are available in the Font group for bold, italic, and underline (Figure 5-11).

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  231

Figure 5-12  Font Dialog Box

To use the Style buttons for bold, italic, and underline:

1. Highlight a word or section of text. 2. Click the desired Style button that appears. You can use the Style button in the Font group to change style attributes. Alternatively, when you high-

light a word, a small toolbar will appear as you hold the mouse arrow over the highlighted word; you can then choose bold, italic, or another font size from among the other choices on the toolbar. 3. Clicking a Style button again will change the style back to its previous style. You can turn these attributes on or off by pressing Ctrl+B (bold), Ctrl+I (italic), or Ctrl+U (underline). Note also that the underline button underlines all the highlighted text. To access variations of underlining, use the Font dialog launcher and select the desired underlining.

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4. Click the Change Styles arrow in the Styles group

to select a style, color, and font for text. Even more styles and choices are available when you click the dialog launcher in the Styles group. See Figure 5-13.

Paragraph Formatting Just as there are options for formatting the characters, there are options for ­formatting paragraphs. Note that we define a paragraph by the ending paragraph mark . Paragraph formatting includes justifications, indents, lists, line spacing, borders, shading, and tabs. Alignment

Justified text is aligned relative to the left and right margins. There are four options for justification:

1. Center Figure 5-13  Styles Menu

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places the paragraph equidistant from both margins. 2. Full is alignment of the paragraph flush against both the left and right margins. 3. Left is alignment of the paragraph flush against the left margin and staggered on the right. 4. Right is alignment of the paragraph flush against the right margin and staggered on the left. Borders

 ord provides you with W t he opt i on to pl a c e a border around a paragraph to highlight or make that paragraph stand out. One can choose a line style, width, and color for the border.

Indent

T  o “indent” text means to establish tab settings that place subsequent lines of text the same number of

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  233

Line Spacing

Lists

spaces from the margin until the next hard return. Word has four indents: first line, left, right, and hanging (Figure 5-14). The ruler displays these indent markers. Dragging the top indent marker to the right (first line indent) indents the first line of a paragraph; pressing the Tab key does the same thing. The middle marker is the left indent marker; use it to indent all lines of the paragraph except the first one. The top and middle markers will move together with the bottom marker when you select and move it. The middle marker is the hanging indent when you place it to the right of the first line indent marker. To apply a hanging indent (to the right of the first line), drag the middle marker to the right of the first line indent marker. A hanging indent will indent all lines of a paragraph except the first line. Line spacing is the space between lines or the space before or after each paragraph. By default Word assigns a line spacing of 1.15 and 10 points after a paragraph. Most style manuals require double spacing for lines of text. Word provides for bulleted ( ), numbered ( ), and multilevel lists ( ) that can turn your text into lists of items. Automatic bulleting and ­numbering can be helpful—and frustrating! For example, you might want to stop the list and then start another list later in the document. Word will pick up the previous number and continue numbering from it until you adjust the settings.

Left Indent First Line Indent

Select Tab Here

Right Indent View Ruler

Center Tab Decimal Tab Left Tab

Right Tab

Bar Tab

Figure 5-14  Ruler with Indents and Tabs

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234  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing Shading

Tab

To set the indents:

Shading means to set a paragraph in a color. Use it to highlight an important paragraph or create a box look to the paragraph. A tab is a setting that places the subsequent text on that line a certain number of spaces or inches in from the left margin. Tab settings by default are five spaces (0.5 inch) although they are not visible to you. These settings can be changed, however. Five styles of tabs are available—left ( ), right ( ), center ( ), decimal ( ), and bar ( ). All deal with the alignment of the text around the tab mark (see Figure 5-14). You can adjust and place tabs on the ruler using the mouse. Never use the space bar to move text around; use the tab key. There should be only one tab between items; to line up properly, adjust the tab location.

1. Place the insertion point in the paragraph that you will indent. ­ lternatively, highlight multiple paragraphs if you want to indent more A than one paragraph. 2. Drag the appropriate marker to the chosen tick mark on the ruler bar. You may also access the indents under the Page Layout tab, Paragraph group or by clicking the dialog launcher in that group. To set the tabs:

1. Click the Left Tab

button on the ruler bar until the correct tab mark appears. 2. Click the ruler bar location where the tab should be. (The ruler bar must be showing to use this option.) You may also adjust and apply additional ­features through the Page Layout tab, Paragraph group dialog launcher, at the bottom of the dialog box. and then Tabs To remove a tab(s):

1. Click a tab on the ruler bar and drag it off the ruler into the document. 2. To clear all the tab settings at once, double-click a tab on the ruler and click Clear all

button.

To create a bulleted list:

1. Type the text to be bulleted. 2. Highlight the text. 3. Click the bulleted list icon in the Paragraph group of the Home tab or click the down arrow and select a different type of bullet.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  235 You may also click the bullet button and start typing the list. To modify the appearance of numbers and bullets, click the arrow in the button and choose an appropriate style. To create a numbered list with text already typed:

1. Type the text to be numbered. Make sure the Home tab is active. 2. Highlight the text. 3. Click the numbered list icon in the Paragraph group of the Home tab or click the down arrow and select a different type of number.

To create a numbered list:

1. Select the Home tab. 2. Place the cursor in the document where you intend for the list to begin. 3. Click the Numbering icon in the Paragraph group (Figure 5-15). 4. Type the list, pressing the Enter key at the end of each item. 5. When you finish type the list, press the Enter key twice or click the ­Numbering icon to turn off the numbers.

Increase Indent

Bullets Numbers

Decrease Indent

Multilevel List Sort Show/Hide Paragraph Marks

Justify Left Justify Center Justifiy Right

Line Spacing Add Shading

Select Paragraph Dialog Launcher

Add Borders

Full Justification

Figure 5-15  Paragraph Group in Home Tab

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236  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing Alternatively, you can type the first number and press the Enter key; for the next item, Word will add the 2. If the list is ended, simply backspace to get rid of the next number or press the Enter key twice.

Page and Document Formatting Page and document formatting alters the appearance of the page and the ­document. It includes such features as headers/footers, page break, margins, page orientation, pagination, section breaks, and columns to name a few. Figure 5-16 shows the Page Setup dialog box. Footer

The footer is an information area that one places consistently at the bottom of each page or section of a document. It can hold the name of the document, the page number, the date, or any information that is helpful.

Figure 5-16  Page Setup Dialog Box

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  237 Header

Line Breaks

Margins

Page break

Page Orientation

Pagination

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The header is an information area that is placed consistently at the top of each page or section of a document. It can hold the name of the document, page number, date, or other identifying information. When using section breaks, you can have several different headers. To force lines and paragraphs to move as desired use the appropriate pagination options of keep lines with next and keep lines together. Access this feature from the Paragraph dialog box. Margins are the distance of the text from the edge of the paper. By default Word sets the margins to 1 inch at top, bottom, left, and right. A page break is the place where Word ends the text on one page before it continues text on the next page. Insert a page break by going to the Insert tab and selecting Page Break from the Pages Group or by pressing Ctrl+Enter. The software then places the break at the cursor or insertion point location. It is a good idea to review the finished document to determine where page breaks are necessary. Use this feature cautiously until you make all the necessary document revisions. You can also insert a page break from the Page Layout tab in Word; choose Page Layout and then click Breaks. A list of choices appears. You may also select column, text wrapping around objects, and ­section breaks here. Page orientation refers to the layout of the paper. ­Portrait means the paper is upright, longer than it is wide; landscape means the page is wider than it is long. Pagination consists of the numbers or marks that are used to indicate the sequence of the pages. It is a process of determining when a sufficient amount of text appears on one page and then starting the next page. Word processing programs automatically perform pagination if this feature is turned on. Most programs permit the variation of placement and style of the page number. Add page numbers by going to the Insert tab and choosing Page Number from the Header and Footer Group. A list of options for page number ­placement appears.

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238  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing Section Break

Section breaks permit you to create layout or formatting changes in the document and apply them only to that section. By default a document is one section and page and document formatting applies to the total document. When applying a section break, you can format each section differently. For example, preface material may have i, ii, iii page numbering while the body of the document has 1, 2, 3, and so forth.

To open the Page Setup dialog box:

1. Open a new document. 2. Choose the Page Layout tab. 3. Click the dialog launcher at the lower-right corner

of the Page Setup group. The Page Setup dialog box appears (Figure 5-16). Use it to adjust the document’s margins and decide on paper orientation (portrait or ­landscape), paper size, and layout. In this example margins are set 1 inch at the top and bottom of the page and on the left and right sides of the page. Vertical centering of the text is also set in this dialog box; use this feature to center a title page.

To change the margins:

1. Click PageLayout tab and Margins icon. 2. Select the margin necessary. 3. To change the margins of a section of the document, choose the Page

Layout tab and click Margins; choose Custom Margins at the bottom of the box and do what is necessary and then select this point forward from the Apply to options.

To set a page break:

1. Go to the place in the document where you want to place the page break. 2. Press Ctrl+Enter or select the Insert tab and Page Break from the Pages

group (Figure 5-5a). Use this feature cautiously; use the lines and page break feature in the paragraph dialog box to keep lines together. For example, use this feature to keep a paragraph from splitting between pages or a title from being separated from its related paragraph. Use the page break feature to separate the reference list from the body of the paper.

To add a header or footer to a document:

1. Choose the Insert tab and select Header or Footer from the Header &

Footer group (Figure 5-5a). 2. Select either header or footer. See Figure 5-5b for choices for a footer and page number. 3. Select one of the style options (see Figure 5-17a).

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  239

a

b

Figure 5-17  Header/Footer Options and Results

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4. Figure 5-17b shows the document window that appears after you select

the Header option. Note the addition on the ribbon of the Header/Footer Tools Design Tab. 5. Type the wanted text in the header (or footer) box by highlighting [Type Text]. The tab key moves the cursor from the left side to the middle of the page, and then to the right side. Choose the appropriate spot for inserting the name of the document, the date, or page number. You can also select options from the groups such as Page number, Date and Time, Options, or Position. 6. Click the Close Header and Footer button when you finish (Figure 5-17b).

Figure 5-18  Section Break Options

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  241 To add a section break to a document:

1. Go to the place in the document where you want to place the section break. 2. Click Page Layout tab. 3. Click the Breaks option in the Page Setup group. 4. Section an option from the section break part of the menu (see Figure 5-18). Preparing a Document The above section explained some of the key concepts in formatting your ­document. This section addresses the process you might use. You can prepare the formatting for a document in three ways: (1) by setting the formatting before you begin to type the text, (2) by typing the text and then formatting the document, or (3) selecting a preformatted template. Personal preference should determine how to proceed; remember, however, that the idea is to create and format the ­document efficiently and effectively. The process we describe here focuses on setting the formats before you create the document. Set the margins. By default they are 1 inch all around. If you intend to bind the product, a left-hand margin of at least 1.5 inches is necessary. If you plan to print the document on letterhead, measure the letterhead’s height. You may need a margin of as much as 2.4 inches to make sure that the body of the letter begins below the letterhead. ■■ Select the font type and size. ■■ Apply styles if necessary. If this is a formal paper, you may want to apply Heading styles to the titles of the document parts. For example, Introduction, Definitions, and so forth. This will permit you to generate a table of contents. ■■ Set paragraph formatting. The Paragraph dialog box appears as shown in Figure 5-19. Many styles require that you submit your paper in APA style so you will need to change the line spacing using the dialog box shown in Figure 5-19. You can also choose the line spacing by clicking the arrow next in the Paragraph group. On a computer screen, to the line spacing box it may be easier to work on a document using 1.5 or single spacing. Later, you can change this option to whatever spacing is required or preferred in the final product. You can also highlight the entire document (Ctrl+A) and change its spacing by pressing one of the following key combinations: • Ctrl+1 to create single-spaced lines • Ctrl+5 to create 1.5-spaced lines • Ctrl+2 to create double-spaced lines ■■ Use the Show/Hide feature to check that your formatting is done properly. ■■ Select the Print Layout view when working on the document. This shows you how the document will look when you print it. ■■

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Figure 5-19  Paragraph Dialog Box Type your document! Check your spelling and grammar. ■■ Save your work periodically and know where you are saving it. ■■ ■■

Viewing a Document Word provides several ways to view a document on the screen. Here are your choices. The most common option is Print Layout. Print Layout shows the ­ document as it will look when you print it. This is usually the best view for preparing a document. ■■ Full Screen Reading view maximizes the space available for reading. This view hides the ribbon and status bar to provide the most viewing area on the screen. ■■

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  243

Promote

Demote

Close Outline View

Collapse Demote to Body Text

Move Up Expand Outline Tools

Master Document

Move Down

Figure 5-20  Outline View Ribbon

■■

■■

■■

Web Layout view it in a browser.

shows how the document will look when you display

Outline view provides an outline view of the document. Click Outline and the outlining ribbon appears (see Figure 5-20). An outline provides a map to guide the writing process for a document. It can also help when you want to arrange pictures or columns and so on. Word uses its built-in heading styles for outlines (Heading 1, Heading 2, and so forth) by default. Draft view

consists of text only with very large print.

  You can also access these views from the Status bar in Word. Other groups in the View tab are Show (as in ruler or gridlines), Zoom, which allows for viewing the document as one page or two pages, Window, and Macros. To change a view:

1. Select View. 2. Click the View Option desired from the choices in Document Views or click one of the icons in the Zoom group that corresponds to the view desired (Figure 5-10).

Checking Spelling, Grammar, Readability, and Word Counts Word 2010 includes spelling and grammar checks, translation, and thesaurus tools under the Review tab (Figure 5-9). Word automatically checks spelling and grammar as you type. If you misspell a word, a wavy red line appears under the word. If the program detects a grammar error, the wavy line is green. Because wavy lines distract some people, Word provides an option to turn this feature off.

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244  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing To turn the spelling and grammar checker off:

1. Click File Tab and then Options. 2. Click Proofing. Remove the check marks in “Mark grammar errors as you

type” and “Check spelling as you type.” Changing this setting then means you will need to run the spelling and grammar checker manually when you finish the document. 3. Click OK. 4. After you set this option, to check spelling and grammar click the Spelling & Grammar icon under the Review tab. Most programs come with an embedded spell checker, which is a program that checks words for correct spelling. Word combines the spelling and grammar checker. A wavy red line under a word means that it is misspelled or that it is not in Word’s dictionary. The spell checker only checks for words misspelled, not misused. A grammar checker (an add-in that often comes with word processing ­programs) provides feedback to the user about errors in grammar. For example, using “there” when “their” is appropriate or using subjects and verbs that do not agree will evoke a wavy green (grammar) line to appear under the offending ­sentence or phrase. Within the grammar checker, you can select several settings and styles. By default, this feature shows the errors as the user types. A thesaurus is a built-in feature that helps you search for alternative words. In Word 2010, the Thesaurus appears in the Proofing Group under the Review tab. To correct spelling and grammar errors with the checker set to default:

1. Right-click the error. 2. Select a correction, choose to ignore it, or add the word to the spelling dictionary. Figure 5-21 shows the menu that appears when “error” is misspelled.

To run the spelling and grammar checker with default off:

1. Click the Review tab. 2. Click Spelling and Grammar icon. 3. Select a correction, choose to ignore it, or add the word to the spelling

dictionary. Figure 5-21 shows the menu that appears when “error” is misspelled.

When adding a word to the dictionary, be sure that it is correct. The spelling dictionary is stored on the hard drive, so it is available only on the computer to which it was added. Some computer labs may refresh the computer image each time a new user logs in; in such a case, any words added to the dictionary will not be permanent. Make sure you add the correct spelling of the word!

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  245

Right-click menu

Results with selecting Review, Spelling & Grammer icon dialog box

Figure 5-21  Spelling and Grammar Options

Readability statistics provide information about the reading level required to understand the document. The readability level of the document should match the reading ability of the audience for whom the document is intended. It is best to perform grammar, spelling, and readability checks after you have finished the document. While these tools are helpful in improving your document, you will still need to proofread it. Word will not find all the misspellings, wrong terms, or grammar problems that might exist. This is especially true if you have used a ­correctly spelled word, but it is not the word you intended to use . For example, you may have meant to type the word explore, but actually typed the word explode. To run the readability option:

1. First, set the option to run with the spell and grammar checker. a. Click File Tab, and Options. b. Click Proofing, and then click Show readability statistics.

2. Place your cursor at the beginning of the document. 3. Run the Spelling and Grammar checker. At the end, the readability dialog box appears with the results.

Also under the Review tab is the Word Count icon , which appears in the Proofing group (Figure 5-9). Performing a word count is helpful when you are writing an abstract or paper that has a word or character count limit.

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246  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing You can also determine the number of pages, words, lines, paragraphs, or characters in a document by using this option. Note also that Word lists the number of words in the document in the left part of the status bar next to Page number.

Creating a Table Tables in word processing have many uses. For example, they help you set c­ olumns for recording minutes of a meeting or for organizing any kind of information. Tables are also essential to research reports. It is a good idea to plan the kind of table needed in terms of number of rows and columns required before selecting them. Among the choices for a new table in the Tables group are Insert Table, Draw Table, or (built-in) Quick Tables. Figure 5-22 shows the dialog boxes that appear when you select Table and Quick Tables under the Insert tab. Figure 5-23 shows the dialog box that appears when you select Insert Table (under the grid).

Figure 5-22  Table Menu Plus a Quick Table Example

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  247

Figure 5-23  Insert Table Dialog Box

To create a table:

1. Place the insertion point where the table should appear in the document. 2. Click the Insert tab, the Table icon, and Insert Table. 3. Select the number of rows and columns and click OK or, if using the

mouse, drag over the cells for the number of rows and columns desired. Remember that a row is necessary for headers. Insert additional rows or columns if necessary.

To create a table by dragging:

1. Click the Table icon on the Insert tab. 2. Place the mouse over the grid and drag to highlight the number of rows and columns needed. Keep dragging until you create the correct size for the table.

To insert a row:

1. Right-click in a row. 2. From the menu, select Insert and select Insert rows either above or below

the selected row. 3. You may also insert multiple rows at one time by selecting the number of rows to be inserted using the quick select area in the left margin, and ­right-clicking the selection. Follow the directions from the shortcut menu. Insert columns the same way.

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248  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Figure 5-24  Table Tools Tab

The Table Tools Tab appears (Figure 5-24) once the table is in place and selected. Use the Table tab to adjust the table and enhance it. For example, you can change the width or height of a row or column, alter the style of the table, or delete grid lines. To delete the table:

1. Click the four-headed arrow on the top left of the table table. 2. Right-click the table and select Delete table.

to select the

Creating an Outline Sometimes people need to submit an outline before they start work on the actual content of the document. This provides you with a reminder of what should be in the document and how it might need to be organized. Outlines are based on heading styles; they can include a maximum of nine levels of headings. Figure 5-25 shows a multilevel outline of this chapter. While shown in this figure, the title of the chapter is not generally included in the outline levels. It is better to use the heading styles for major content areas of the document, not the document title. To make an outline:

1. To create an outline before you start the document, choose View, then ­Outline

.

2. Type the first line in the Outline. It will show as Level 1.

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  249

Outline Level

Level 1 Level 2

Level 3

Figure 5-25  Outline View of Chapter 5 with Outlining Ribbon

3. Press Enter. Another line of the same level appears. 4. Type the next line or press the Tab key. The Tab key demotes the next line

to the Level 2. Note that a plus symbol appears in front of the first line; this symbol indicates that there is a heading below it. If the minus symbol appears, then there are no subordinates. To promote a level, press Shift+Tab.

If you want to create an outline after you write a document, be sure to apply the appropriate heading styles to the headings in your document. If you don’t want to use Word’s preset styles (Figure 5-26), you can redefine the formula for the default heading styles or apply a different style by choosing the Styles group dialog launcher , selecting the level to change, right-clicking, and making the desired changes (see Figure 5-27).

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250  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Click to See Styles Box

Figure 5-26  Styles Group

Creating a Table of Contents

Figure 5-27  Styles Pane After Right-Clicking to Modify a Style

A table of contents (TOC) usually appears at the beginning of a document after the title page and provides a list of headings from a certain level along with their page numbers. Figure 5-28 shows a partial table of contents for Chapter 7. Each title in the document that you want to display in the Table of Contents must have a heading level assigned to it. Table of contents feature will save you time when you edit and change the document. All you have to do is regenerate it and the table of contents will update to reflect your changes. To create a table of contents once you create the document:

1. Go through your document and assign

a style to each heading. For example, Heading 1 for major headings, Heading 2 for minor headings, and so forth. Most of the time we use from one to three levels of headings. 2. Place the insertion point on the page where you will generate the Table of Contents. This is usually after the title page. It should begin on its own page, which means insert a page break after the title page. 3. Click Reference tab, Table of Contents icon. 4. Select a predesigned table of contents style (see Figure 5-29a) or click Insert Table of Contents (see Figure 5-29b).

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  251

Figure 5-28  Table of Contents Example

Insert Table of Contents gives you the option to customize the look of the Table of Contents. Figure 5-29b shows you the custom options in the dialog box. To update the table of contents once you make changes to the document:

1. Click the Table of Contents. 2. Click the Update Table icon that appears at the top left. 3. Select Update page numbers only or Update entire table and click OK. The table will update based on the selection you made.

Creating Merged Documents Word has features that will help you create envelopes, form letters, and print personalized copies of both for each person on a list. Word replaces merge fields from a main document with information from a data source. As with many other Word functions there is more than one way to send a form letter to a list of people. We use the Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard to prepare the documents in the example in this section. A mail merge requires the creation of two documents. A data source document contains the name, address, and any other necessary individualized data for

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Figure 5-29a  Table of Contents Dialog Box

each letter. The data source can be an Outlook address book, an Access database, an Excel spreadsheet with column headings, or a Word table. In this example, the data source is a Word table. Every data source consists of three parts: records, fields, and field headers. Each row in a data source is a record, and each column is a field. You must plan the data source carefully so that it does what you want it to do. A main document contains the same text that will appear in each letter and the field code from which to insert the personalized data from the data source. To perform a step by step mail merge:

1. Open a new Word document. 2. Select the Mailings group, then click Start Mail Merge (Figure 5-30) 3. Click Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard

. The next screen that appears shows Step 1 of 6 (Select document type) (Figure 5-31).

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  253

Figure 5-29b  Dialog Box that Appears When You Select Insert Table of Contents

4. Choose Letters . 5. Click Next: Starting document . 6. Choose Start from a template, and then click Select template .

7. Click Letters tab in the Select template window and select type of letter (Figure 5-32).

8. Click OK. Figure 5-33 shows part of the letter that appears. Because the

computer we used to prepare this example belongs to Marjorie Smith, that name appears automatically at the top of the letter. 9. Click Next: Select recipients. 10. Select Type a new list and then click Create. 11. Type the title, first name, last name, address (usually one), city, state, and ZIP code for the first recipient. (Use the Tab key to move between the address fields.) Some fields may be hidden, and the table must be enlarged left to right.

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254  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Start Mail Merge

Figure 5-30  Start Mail Merge Menu

Figure 5-31  Steps 1–3 of Mail Merge Wizard

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  255

Figure 5-32  Dialog Window for Selecting a Letter Template

12. Click New Entry and add a second recipient. Figure 5-34 shows the New

Address List window that appears after you add street names. Add two or three more recipients. 13. Click OK at the bottom of the window. The program will prompt you to name your list and save it in “My Data Sources.” Type a name, click Save, and then OK. Figure 5-35 shows the Mail Merge Recipient List that is ready for mail merge. 14. Click Next: Write your letter in Step 3. Step 4, “Write your letter,” appears. See Figure 5-36 for Steps 4–6. 15. Click the Pick the date down arrow at the top of the letter and select TODAY. 16. Type a name in the upper right-hand space if it isn’t there. Add an address and a phone number. 17. Leave the Address and Greeting fields as is. If you desire to change the Greeting line, Figure 5-37 shows the dialog box for choosing the type of greeting line you desire. Click OK when you are finished. 18. Highlight the body of the letter and type a message. 19. Click [Type the closing] and type Sincerely. 20. Add your name and appropriate information at the bottom of the letter. 21. Click Next: Preview your letters in Step 4 (Figure 5-36). 22. Preview the letters by clicking Recipient 1, Recipient 2, and so on in the right pane.

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Figure 5-33  Templates for the Origin “Letter” for the Main Document

23. When you are satisfied with the way the letters look, click Next: Complete the merge in Step 5.

24. In Step 6, choose Print. A dialog box appears (Figure 5-38). 25. Choose to print all of the letters, the current record, or those records between selected numbers.

Using Bibliography Options One of the features in Word 2010 is the ability to automatically generate bibliographies in several formats. The Citations and Bibliography tools in Word work well if you set the style before you enter the source. Even if you change your mind later, you won’t have to reenter all your source information. Once you enter the

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  257

Figure 5-34  New Address List for the Data Source

Figure 5-35  Mail Merge Recipients List

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Figure 5-36  Steps 4–6 of Mail Merge Wizard

bibliographical sources these are saved by the Word application. If you open a new document, sources that you used for a previous document can be moved to be used in the new document. You are most likely to use one of two specific styles (See number 2 under “add a source”). NOTE: If you are using this function for a course assignment, be sure you use the specific format and version of that format that is acceptable to the faculty who will grade your paper.

To add a source:

1. Click the References tab. 2. Choose an appropriate style

in the Citations and Bibliography group. For this example, APA is used. Below are the two most common styles. ■■ APA—American Psychological Association ■■ MLA—Modern Language Association 3. Choose Manage Sources . The Source Manager dialog box opens (Figure 5-39).

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Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010  259

Figure 5-37  Insert Greeting Line Dialog Box

4. Click the New button. The Create Source dialog box opens (Figure 5-40a). 5. Choose Book. 6. Type the author’s name, the book title, year of publication, city where published, and publisher. If the book has more than one author, click Edit. Type the information for the first author, click Add, type the second author’s name, and repeat until you have added all authors. Click OK. Both the Master and Current lists the citation. You can add additional citations at this time or later. Figure 5-40b shows the Create Source Dialog Box that appears when you chose a Journal Article Figure 5-38  Merge to Printer as Type and select Show All Dialog Box ­Bibliography Fields.

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Figure 5-39  Source Manager Dialog Box for a Bibliography

Dialog Box that opens when you click Book.

Figure 5-40a  Dialog Box for Creating One Source and Editing One Name

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Summary  261

Figure 5-40b  Dialog Box Showing All Bibliography Fields for Journal Article

Summary Word provides unlimited possibilities for creating custom documents. This chapter described some of the basic skills necessary to begin using Word features effectively and efficiently. These included saving and opening documents; moving around Word; viewing documents; formatting characters, paragraphs, pages, and documents; using the spelling and grammar checker; doing readability and word counts, creating a table, and so forth. Additional features you might want to investigate include creating an index or bibliography, working with clip art and SmartArt, making newsletters, writing blogs, addressing envelopes, and customizing and optimizing Word. To develop additional skills use one of the many Word reference books available or go to Microsoft Office Online and take advantage of the many assistance and training opportunities available. Of course, much time and diligent work will be necessary before you can take advantage of all of the program’s features. However, once you learn the basic features you will discover it is easier to learn new functions and to adapt to the newer versions of the application that arrive every few years.

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Exercises Exercise 1  Basic Microsoft Word Functions

© Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.

■■ Objectives 1. Perform selected word processing functions. 2. Explain basic word processing terms and functions.

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■■ Activity 1. Start Word. (This exercise can be done using any word processing program.) 2. Create a document. Type the following text as fast as possible. Do not correct any mistakes that you make, and do not press the Enter key. Do not pay attention to spelling errors. Outcomes-based reimbursement will change how health care is delivered. It is important for healthcare workers to understand what this may mean to their practice. Here are a few things that might change: (1) Payment will be based on outcomes and not volume. (2) Healthcare informatics and electronic health records will be critical to quality care. (3) Continuity of patient care will increase, and (4) Wireless technologies will facilitate capturing critical information when needed. 3. Correct the document. Make sure you are at the top of the document. Click the Spelling and Grammar icon on the Quick Access Toolbar or click Review tab, and Spelling and Grammar icon. Make any corrections necessary. Click the Change button if the highlighted selection is correct and the Ignore button to ignore a correctly spelled word. If no suggestion is given or lists incorrect words, Word doesn’t recognize the word so can’t give a correct spelling. Use an appropriate dictionary for the correct spelling and type it manually if not spelled correctly. Word will announce the completion of the spelling and grammar check and provide readability statistics if you have chosen that option under the Proofing section of Word Options. 4. Save the document. a. Click the File tab, then click Save or press Ctrl+S. b. Type Chap5Ex1-Lastname in the highlighted File name text box. c. Go to the Location text box at the top of the Save As dialog box. Select the correct location and click the Save button (See Figure 4-11 for further help). Alternatively, you can save the document by clicking the Save icon on the Quick Access toolbar. Once the document has a name and location, clicking the Save icon (or pressing Ctrl+S) will update the file and not display the Save As dialog box.

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Exercises  263

5. Move around the document.

a. Practice moving around the document. b. Use the arrow keys and Page Up and Page Down keys. 6. Edit text. a. Highlight the text (or press Ctrl+A). b. Click Copy on the Home tab (or press Ctrl+C). c. Press Ctrl+End to position the insertion point below the original paragraph. d. Press Enter twice. e. Click Paste

(or press Ctrl+V). Now there are two copies of the text.

f. Click Undo icon on the Quick access toolbar. g. Try doing the same thing using the Cut and Paste icons in the Clipboard group. If there is more than one copy left, delete the extra copies ending with one copy. h. Go back to the Quick Access toolbar and click the Repeat paste icon. i. Go to the clipboard. Click the dialog launcher button. A list of what you copied appears on the clipboard. j. End this task with the document containing two of the same paragraphs. 7. Align text. a. Highlight the second copy of the text. Click the Align Right icon in the Paragraph group of the Home tab. Note what happens. b. To use both right and left justification, click the Justify icon. All ­sentences appear flush at both margins except for the last sentence. c. Click the Align Left icon . 8. Edit the document. a. Delete any extra copies of the text, leaving only one copy. b. Use the Tab, Indent, and Enter keys to create a document that looks like this: O utcomes-based reimbursement will change how health care is ­delivered. It is important for healthcare workers to understand what this may mean to their practice. Here are a few things that might change:

(1) Payment will be based on outcomes and not volume. (2) Healthcare informatics and electronic health records will be critical to

ch05.indd 263

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quality care. (3) Continuity of patient care will increase, and (4) Wireless technologies will facilitate capturing critical information when needed. 9. Format the document. a. Type Ctrl+Home, type Implications of Outcomes-Based Reimbursement, and press the Enter key twice.

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264  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Figure 5-41  Finished Exercise 1

b. Highlight the title. c. Click the Bold icon, and the Center Text icon. d. Click in the text to deselect the title. See Figure 5-41 for the finished result. 10. Print the document. a. Click the File tab, select Print, and choose an option. b. Alternatively, press Ctrl+P or click the Printer icon on the Quick Access toolbar. 11. Close and save the document. a. Click the Save icon or press Ctrl+S to save the document. This will update the file saved earlier. b. Click Close on the Word application title bar or File tab, Close . Exercise 2  Character Formatting

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■■ Objectives: 1. Apply the appropriate typeface to a selection of characters. 2. Change the font size of selected text. 3. Apply font attributes to selected text. 4. Apply special effects to selected text. 5. Use the change case feature to change text case.

ch05.indd 264

■■ Activity 1. Type Face. This refers to the look of the characters. a. Download and open the document Chapter5-Exercise2-Characterformatting. b. Select the two lines immediately following the word “Arial” by placing the pointer in the margin across from the two lines and double-clicking

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Exercises  265

ch05.indd 265

© Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.

and/or holding down the left mouse button while dragging the mouse to the end of the text. Let go of the mouse button before moving on to the next step. c. Click the font down arrow in the font group of the home tab. Click Arial. Repeat these directions for the remaining three fonts. Can you see the little feet on the “i” and “h” for Courier and Times New Roman? These are serif fonts; the other two are sans serif fonts. Use serif fonts for word processing. 2. Font Size. This refers to the height of the characters. a. Select the line beginning with “18 Point” like in the exercise above. b. Click the down arrow next to the current size (12) in the font group of the home tab. Click 18 points. You may also right-click the selection and click on font from the shortcut menu. Select the correct size in the dialog window. c. Repeat these directions for the remaining points in the exercise. In the health field why would you want to use some of the larger fonts? Type your answer under font size section. 3. Font Attributes and Special Effects: a. Select the first “I am going to be an excellent healthcare provider and Word user” sentence. b. Right click the selection and select Fonts from the shortcut menu. c. At the bottom of the tab, under “Effects,” there are boxes with options such as “strikethrough,” “shadow,” “outline,” “small caps,” etc. Select the box to the left of the “Strikethrough” option. Click OK. d. Repeat the same steps for the next three sentences, choosing the ­Superscript, Subscript, and Small Caps options. e. Select the fifth sentence. Click Bold on the Font group in the home tab. f. Select the sixth sentence. Right-click the selection and select font from the shortcut menu. In the underline options section, choose the underline, words only option. g. Select the seventh sentence and click the italic on the font group in the Home tab. h. Select the eighth sentence. Click down arrow to the right of the Font Color icon in the font group. Under the font color menu, choose any color. The sentences should now display eight different font attributes and/or special effects. i. Write a sentence next to each sentence as to the conditions under which you might use this effect. j. Select the text in parentheses that reads “cHANGE cASE.” Click the Change Case down arrow in the font group then select Toggle Case. 4. Save this file as Chapter5-Exercise2-LastName. Submit as directed by your professor.

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266  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing

Exercise 3  Paragraph Formatting—Tabs, Indents, and Justification ■■ Objectives 1. Apply the appropriate tab for the text. 2. Apply left, right, hanging, and first line indents to selected text. 3. Apply center, justify (full), left, and right justifications to selected text. ■■ Activity

Working with Tabs

© Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.

Imagine that you are nearly finished with your college degree and are ready to start practicing in the healthcare field. Much to your chagrin, your advisor told you that you’ve forgotten to fulfill a general literature requirement and that the only appropriate course with seats available is Readings in Contemporary Poetry. So there you are, in this poetry class, when your professor tells you that there’s no book to buy at the bookstore and that you’re going to create the book yourself. She hands each student the name of a poet and tells him or her to pick that poet’s best ten poems and copy them into a neat anthology for the class. You’ve been handed Nicholas Christopher and you’ve already selected your poems. But the professor keeps saying that the anthologies must look nice. “Remember that this is our textbook,” she keeps saying. The anthology’s appearance is 40% of your grade, so you want your list of poems and their related pages to look nice. What do you do?

ch05.indd 266

1. Download and open the document Chapter5-Exercise3-LeftTabsandDotLeaders. 2. Select all text in the Part 1 list. 3. Look at the ruler above the document. To its left is a box with a short L in . If there isn’t a plain, short L facing the right way, click tab box until it there is. The L means that Word is ready for you to set standard left tabs. 4. Click just below the half-inch mark on the ruler, but just above the gray, which separates the ruler from the document. 5. Click the tab box on the left of the ruler bar, until a right tab appears. 6. Set a right tab at 5.5 inches. 7. The titles in boldface are the books from which the poems come, and the other titles are the poems themselves. Move the cursor in front of “Reflections on a Bowl of Kumquats, 1936,” the first poem title, and press the tab key once. Repeat this step for each of the rest of the poem titles. 8. There is still one more thing that can be done. Select all the text in the list again. Double-click the right tab. 9. In the tab dialog box on the left of the Tabs window, select the 5.5” tab. 10. In the same window, under Leader, select 2), which is a series of dots. Click Set button.

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Exercises  267 11. Click OK. 12. Part 2: Your employer has a Word document with the content listed in part 2 of the Left Tabs and Dot Leaders file. He is stumped as to how to align the words so they look nice. What he wants to do is insert multiple tabs to move the text over to align properly, but knows there must be a better way. He asks you to format them properly. 13. Turn on the Show/Hide mark (Click the Show/Hide icon in the paragraph group of the Home tab). Check to make sure there is only one tab mark between the items. 14. Select the first line of text. That would be student number, year, exam 1 and exam 2. 15. Make sure the left tab is displaying on the far left of the toolbar (If not, click it until the left tab marker displays). 16. Place a tab stop at 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 marks on the ruler bar. 17. Select the next two lines of text. Place a left tab stop at 1.5 on the ruler bar. 18. Change the tab to display a decimal align tab. Place a decimal align tab on the 6th tab stop between the 2” and 3” marks on the ruler bar and then on the 6th tab stop between the 3” and 4” marks. 19. What other feature could you use to create the list of poems?

Working with Indents

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1. Download and open the document Chapter5-Exercise3-Indents. 2. Select the text below “Left Indent,” starting with “this” and ending with “spaces.” 3. Press the Tab key. The paragraph should now be indented from the left margin. You can also use the ruler bar and drag the indent marker as a unit . 4. Under what conditions do you use the left indent? 5. Select the text below “Right Indent,” starting with “right” and ending with “toolbar.” 6. On the ruler near the top of the screen, there is a triangle pointing up at 6”. . Your paragraph is now right Click that triangle and drag it to 5” indented. 7. Under what conditions is the right indent paragraph formatting feature used? 8. Place the insertion point to the left of “this” and press the Tab key .” The first line of the paragraph is now indented. You may also drag the top indent marker to the .5 mark on the ruler bar. Some style manuals require the first line of a paragraph to be indented five spaces from the left margin. 9. Select the text below “Hanging,” starting with “depending” and ending with “spaces.”

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268  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing 10. Click the Paragraph dialog box launcher. This time, from the “Special” box, select Hanging. Now your paragraph has a Hanging Indent . 11. Under what circumstances is the hanging paragraph used?

Working with Justifications 1. Download and open the document Chapter5-Exercise3-Justification. 2. Select the text “My Story - A Brush with Death” immediately following Here is an example under Center Justification. 3. Click Center Justification in the paragraph group. What happens to the text Why would you use center justification? 4. Select the text “This is a paragraph… in the paragraph” following the Justify (full) justification description. 5. Click Justify (Full) Justification in the paragraph group. The text is now flush at both the left and right margins. The words are spread out to make the text flush. Under what conditions would you use this justification? 6. Left justification is the default. There is no need to select this paragraph because it is already left justified. 7. Select the text “Title of My Paper through Name: Irene Joos” following the right justification description. 8. Click Right Justification in the paragraph group. The text is now flush at the right margin. Under what conditions would you use this justification? 9. If directed by the professor, save these files by adding your name to the end of the file name and submitting as directed. Exercise 4  Merge and Find Functions

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■■ Objectives 1. Create main, data source, and merged documents. 2. Use the find and replace function. 3. Print created letters.

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■■ Activity 1. Create the documents. a. Create the main and data source documents like those at the end of this exercise. Use the directions given earlier in this chapter for creating the mail merge documents. Save the files Chapter5-Exercise4-Doc1DM and Chapter5-Exercise4-DataDM. 2. Use the find and replace function and replace all occurrences of “DM” with diabetes mellitus, “September 25, 2013” with January 25, 2014, and “medications” with insulin.

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Exercises  269 3. Merge the documents. a. Use the merge (mail merge) feature to generate and print the individual letters. b. Check the letters for accuracy. c. Save the results as Chapter5Exercise43-LastName. The appearance of the fields depends on the word processor. The fields may be indicated with the name of the field, a number with a hyphen (-), or something else.

Main Document Figure 5-42 shows the sample main document. Make sure you use the insert field feature; do NOT type the fields and the related chevron into the document. Data Source Title

First Name

Last Name

Address

City

ST

ZIP

Ms.

Mary

Jones

325 First Street

Carnegie

PA

15102

Mr.

Robert

Tutor

45 Software Ave.

Milford

PA

15102

Dr.

Susan

Master

8997 Default Lane

Eagan

MN

55123

Figure 5-42  Sample Main Document

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<> <<FirstName>> <<LastName>> <<Address rel="nofollow">> <<City> <<State>> <<PostalCode>> (Use the automatic date function to place date with this style: Month Day, Year.) Dear <<FirstName>>: We invite you to attend a patient education program on adult-onset DM. The date of the program is September 25, 2013. The program time takes place from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Patient Education Conference Room, 4th floor, Computerville Hospital. We designed this program for newly diagnosed diabetics. The program will address adjusting to diabetes, diet and exercise, and medications. The guest speaker is Nellie Netscape, Nurse Practitioner. Please notify us at 624-3333 if you plan to attend. There is no charge for this program. We look forward to seeing you. Sincerely, Chris Data, PhD, RN<br /> <br /> 5/28/2013 6:15:40 PM<br /> <br /> © Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC. NOT FOR SALE OR DISTRIBUTION<br /> <br /> 270  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing 4. Using the information from the letter, make a flyer that you can post in the clinic where other patients might see it. a. Choose an Event flyer from Office.com under Templates, Flyers. b. Include clip art that is appropriate for the document. c. Save the flyer as Chapter5Exercise3b-LastName. 5. Place all work in a folder titled Chapter5Exercise3-LastName. Zip the folder and submit as directed by the professor.<br /> <br /> Assignments Assignment 1  Preparing a Résumé<br /> <br /> © Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.<br /> <br /> You will need Microsoft Word and an Internet connection for this assignment.<br /> <br /> ch05.indd 270<br /> <br /> ■■ Directions A résumé that summarizes educational and professional accomplishments is necessary when you apply for a job. This assignment uses the registered nurse résumé, but you may select others if you desire. 1. Obtain a want ad from the paper (preferably in the health field). 2. Compose a résumé using Word’s Resume Template. a. Click File tab and then New. b. Under Templates and Office.com (you will need to have an authorized MS Word application on your computer to do this and an Internet connection): i. Click Resumes and CVs. ii. Click Job Specific resumes and Registered Nurse resume or another of your liking. iii. Click Download button. iv. Complete the template by replacing the text placeholders with your own information. Delete any extra placeholders. Remember that this template uses tables to hold the data, so you will need to work with tables to add or delete rows. Make sure the résumé includes the following information: ■■ Information about the person: name, address (city, state, ZIP code), phone number, and email address ■■ Summary of your professional skills ■■ Listing of your professional credentials like registration and certifications ■■ Education (school, degree, date, major) ■■ Professional experience as a health professional/nurse (Begin with your most recent position and include the year, name of position, and type of unit.)<br /> <br /> 5/28/2013 6:15:40 PM<br /> <br /> © Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC. NOT FOR SALE OR DISTRIBUTION<br /> <br /> Assignments  271<br /> <br /> ■■ ■■<br /> <br /> Affiliations like professional associations and any office held. Community service activities<br /> <br /> c. Use uppercase and lowercase. d. Use the spell checker as appropriate. e. Save the résumé as Chapter5Assign1-Lastname. 3. Compose and revise a cover letter applying for the position. a. Open the résume filé –Chapter5Assign1-Lastname; if necessary, go to the end of the file, and create a page break. Type the cover letter. Save the file. b. Run the cover letter through the spell and grammar checker including a word count and reading level. Make spell and grammar corrections. Use the snipping tool to capture the readability statistics dialog box results (Start, Accessories, Snipping Tool, New down arrow , and select Window snip). Copy the image in the snipping window to the end of the résumé file. c. Copy the original cover letter page after the page with the readability statistics. Make appropriate revisions in the cover letter using the results from 3b. 4. Save the file as Chapter5-Assign1-Lastname. Submit the advertisement, a letter of application (original and revised), and a résumé as directed by the professor. Assignment 2  Creating a Table<br /> <br /> ch05.indd 271<br /> <br /> © Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.<br /> <br /> ■■ Directions 1. Select some topic that lends itself to a table. For example, list of nurses with contact information, list of items with a description and price, budget items you would like to request with descriptions, number, and cost, and so forth. Use content that means something to you. 2. Create a table using the following directions. a. Create at least five columns. b. Add at least five records. c. Format the table using one of the design auto format features. d. Copy the table to a new separate page in this document (insert page break and place table on next page). e. Sort the first table by name from A–Z. f. Sort the second table by another column. Format it with a different design. 3. Save the file as Chapter5Assign2-YourName. Submit as directed by the professor.<br /> <br /> 5/28/2013 6:15:41 PM<br /> <br /> © Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC. NOT FOR SALE OR DISTRIBUTION<br /> <br /> 272  chapter 5: Introduction to Word Processing<br /> <br /> Assignment 3  Preparing a Newsletter (A Challenge to Show What You’ve Learned) ■■ Directions 1. Use the following features to create a one-page newsletter. a. Use WordArt to create the title – Eating Healthy. Size it to span 6 inches across the page and apply a text effect (Commands found in the Insert tab). HINT: Press the Enter key twice and anchor the WordArt on the first paragraph mark.<br /> <br /> b. Insert a section break, continuous at the second paragraph mark. c. Create two columns for the second section. d. Type at least five subtitles and add content about each. e. Make the first letter of the content under each subtitle a drop cap. f. Add at least one clipart in an appropriate place(s). g. Place a border around the page. 2. Save this assignment as Chapter5Assign3-YourName. Submit it to the professor as directed. Assignment 4  Formatting a Formal Paper<br /> <br /> © Inga Ivanova/ShutterStock, Inc.<br /> <br /> ■■ Directions Assignment 4 has you working with a formal paper that includes a title page, table of contents, headers, table, and bibliography. You will use APA style 6th edition for the paper.<br /> <br /> ch05.indd 272<br /> <br /> 1. Use a paper you have written for another class or one provided by your professor. 2. Create a title page. 3. Insert a header and the page number according to APA style. 4. Apply the appropriate styles to enable later generation of the table of contents. 5. Add a relevant table. 6. Format the table to look well. 7. Add appropriate clip art, pictures, or Smart Art as appropriate to enhance the message. 8. Generate the table of contents. 9. Create a reference list. 10. Save the file as Chapter5Assign4-LastName. 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