iep procedural guidance - Colorado Department of Education

Loading...
IEP PROCEDURAL GUIDANCE: EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT SERVICES UNIT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

REVISED 07/2017

1

Joyce Rankin (R), Chairwoman

3rd Congressional District

Carbondale, CO

Angelika Schroeder (D), Vice-Chairman

2nd Congressional District

Boulder, CO

Valentina (Val) Flores (D)

1st Congressional District

Denver, CO

Pam Mazanec (R)

4th Congressional District

Larkspur, CO

Steve Durham (R)

5th Congressional District

Colorado Springs, CO

Rebecca McClellan (D)

6th Congressional District

Centennial, CO

Jane Goff (D)

7th Congressional District

Arvada, CO

Katy Anthes, PhD Commissioner of Education Secretary to Board of Education

Toby King Interim Executive Director Exceptional Student Services Unit

REVISED 07/2017

2

The Colorado Department of Education’s Exceptional Student Services Unit (ESSU) wishes to acknowledge and thank those professionals who contributed to the revision of this document during the 2016-17 school year. All information was reviewed to ensure completeness and alignment to current rules and regulations. In addition, any changes to the IEP model forms are reflected in this revision, along with any new guidance specific to these changes.

REVISED 07/2017

3

This guidance was originally adapted from the Chicago Public Schools’ A Procedural Manual: Educating Children with Disabilities in Chicago Public Schools as well as the Arizona Department of Education’s Prior Written Notice.

Recognition and appreciation is extended to the Colorado State Advisory Group for the development of the State Recommended IEP and this guidance.

Original Contributors: Adena Miller

Stephanie Lynch

Senior Consultant Colorado Department of Education

Senior Consultant Colorado Department of Education

Laura Ayers

Laura Freppel

Charm Paulmeno

Parent Cherry Creek School District

Assistant Director of ESLU Colorado Department of Education

Dir. of Special Education Finance & Data Colorado Department of Education

Diane Bassett

Misty Gonthier

Daphne Pereles

Professor University of Northern Colorado

School Psychologist Centennial BOCES

Supervisor Colorado Department of Education

Debi Blackwell

Mary Greenwood

David Rakiecki

Special Education Director Canon City

Senior Consultant Colorado Department of Education

School Psychologist Grand Junction

Pam Christy

Moira Hawks

Linda Sprouse

Parent East Central BOCES

Assistant Special Education Director East Central BOCES

School Psychologist Mapleton

Terri Connolly

Anna Kishman

Vera Turner

Assistant Director of ESLU Colorado Department of Education

Speech Language Pathologist Falcon 49

Special Education Teacher Moffat County

Cindy Dascher

Troy Lange

Lisa Wegner

Parent Consultant Colorado Department of Education

Special Education Director Mountain BOCES

Special Education Director Southwest BOCES

Debbie Dickerson

Anita Manning

Speech Language Pathologist Northeast BOCES

Special Education Director Cherry Creek School District

Betsy Duff

Julie O’Brien

School Psychologist Canon City

Special Education Director Lewis-Palmer

REVISED 07/2017

4

Thirty leadership staff met through the 2015-16 school year to develop tools to enhance student outcomes by providing quality tips to the IEP team. One document for each area of focus has been created and may be found in Appendix D. IEP Workgroup Contributors 2015-2016 Pier Abbott

Carolyn Allison

Colorado Springs School District 11

Executive Director of Student Services Mesa County Valley School District 51

Rachel Browning

Melissa Chaffin

Asst. Director of Student Services Aurora Public Schools

Program Support Colorado Department of Education

Cindy Dascher

Heidi Derr

Supervisor, Family-School Partnering, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Accountability Specialist, Continuous Improvement, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Renae Dove

Victoria Francis

Ex. Director of School Supports and Personnel Moffat County School District RE-1

Special Education Director Southeastern BOCES

Mary Gomez

Moira Hawks

Director, Brighton School District 27J

Director of Special Education, East Central BOCES

Fran Herbert

Karen Higgins

Supervisor, Continuous Improvement, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Director El Paso- Cheyenne Mountain

Gloria Howell

Lisa Humberd

Accountability Specialist, Secondary Transition, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Executive Director of Special Education Widefield School District 3

Miki Imura

Kathlynn Jackson

Supervisor, Data Accountability and Achievement Colorado Department of Education

Director Falcon School District 49

Tammy Johnson

Terri Jones

Director, Uncompahgre BOCES

Executive Director, Mt. Evans BOCES

Annette Lambeth Ed.D.

Gail Lott

Executive Director, Student Support Services Adams 12 Five Star Schools

Accountability Specialist, Secondary Transition, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Cindy Millikin

Beth Nelson

Director, Results Driven Accountability, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Accountability Specialist, Continuous Improvement, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Trina Nichol

Diann Richardson

Director of Special Education Mountain BOCES

Director of Special Education Denver Public Schools

Ann Schick

Njal Schold

Special Education Director Division of Youth Corrections

Accountability Specialist, Continuous Improvement, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Deirdre Shearer

Linda Tegtmeier

Special Education Director Pikes Peak BOCES

Supervisor, Secondary Transition/Continuous Improvement, ESSU Colorado Department of Education

Joyce Thiessen-Barrett

Donna Trujillo

Family –School Partnering Specialist Colorado Department of Education

Director of Personalized Learning Douglas County School District

REVISED 07/2017

5

Navigating this Document ....................................................................................................................... 8 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 10 Important Timelines ................................................................................................................................ 11 The Special Education Process ................................................................................................................. 15 Initial Evaluation......................................................................................................................... 16 Prior Written Notice Requirements ............................................................................................. 18 Determination of Eligibility ......................................................................................................... 23 IEP Development ........................................................................................................................ 26 The IEP Team .............................................................................................................................. 26 IEP Team Members and Responsibilities ..................................................................................... 29 IEP Meeting ................................................................................................................................ 36 Secondary Transition Requirements............................................................................................ 40 Secondary Transition IEP Development ....................................................................................... 43 Implementation and Reviews of the IEP ...................................................................................... 51 Other IEP Actions ........................................................................................................................ 52 Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools ............................................................................... 56 Students with Disabilities Parentally-Placed in Private Schools .................................................... 56 Students with Disabilities Publicly Placed in Approved Facility Schools ........................................ 57 Required Forms – By Type of IEP Meeting ................................................................................... 58 Completing the Individualized Education Program Form .......................................................................... 59 Header ....................................................................................................................................... 60 Type of Meeting & Dates of Meetings ......................................................................................... 60 Student and Family Information ................................................................................................. 61 Procedural Safeguards and IEP Participants................................................................................. 63 Consideration of Special Factors ................................................................................................. 65 Postsecondary Transition Plan .................................................................................................... 68 Annual Goals and/or Objectives .................................................................................................. 69 Accommodations and Modifications ........................................................................................... 70 Extended School Year Determination .......................................................................................... 71 State/District Assessments ......................................................................................................... 73 Service Delivery Statement ......................................................................................................... 75 Special Education and Related Services in the Least Restrictive Environment ............................. 75 Recommended Placement in the Least Restrictive Environment .................................................. 76 Educational Environment ............................................................................................................ 77 Educational Environment – Preschool……………………………………………………………………………………….…77 Prior Written Notice (IEP Embedded) .......................................................................................... 82 Appendix A - Determination of Eligibility Forms ....................................................................................... 83 Autism Spectrum Disorder .......................................................................................................... 84 Deaf-Blindness ........................................................................................................................... 85 Developmental Delay ................................................................................................................. 86 Hearing Impairment, including Deafness ..................................................................................... 87 Intellectual Disability .................................................................................................................. 88 REVISED 07/2017

6

Multiple Disabilities .................................................................................................................... 89 Orthopedic Impairment .............................................................................................................. 90 Other Health Impaired ................................................................................................................ 91 Serious Emotional Disability........................................................................................................ 92 Specific Learning Disability .......................................................................................................... 93 Speech or Language Impairment ................................................................................................. 95 Traumatic Brain Injury ................................................................................................................ 96 Visual Impairment, including Blindness ....................................................................................... 97 Appendix B - Prior Written Notice Forms ................................................................................................. 98 Prior Written Notice & Consent for Evaluation ............................................................................ 99 Prior Written Notice Embedded ................................................................................................ 101 Prior Written Notice & Consent for the Initial Provision of Special Education ............................. 102 Prior Written Notice of Special Education Action ....................................................................... 103 IEP Amendment and Prior Written Notice ................................................................................. 104 Appendix C - Other IEP Related Forms ................................................................................................... 105 Request to Release or Secure Confidential Information ............................................................. 106 Summary of Performance ......................................................................................................... 107 Transfer Student from Within State .......................................................................................... 111 Transfer Student from Another State ........................................................................................ 112 Evaluation Report ..................................................................................................................... 113 IEP Amendment and Prior Written Notice ................................................................................. 114 IEP Team Member Excusal ........................................................................................................ 115 Initial Evaluation Extension – Suspected SLD Only ..................................................................... 117 Notice of Meeting ..................................................................................................................... 118 Behavior Intervention Plan ....................................................................................................... 120 Communication Plan................................................................................................................. 123 Consent to Invite Agencies Related to Transition IEP Amendment ............................................. 124 Learning Media Plan ................................................................................................................. 126 Appendix D - Guidance Documents ........................................................................................................ 128 Goals and Objectives ................................................................................................................. 129 Least Restrictive Environment ................................................................................................... 133 Parent/Student Input ................................................................................................................ 135 Present Levels of Educational Performance Summary ................................................................ 139 Service Delivery Statement ....................................................................................................... 141 Student Needs & Impact of Disability ........................................................................................ 143 Student Strengths, Preferences & Interests ............................................................................... 145 Appendix E – Early Childhood IEP Considerations ................................................................................... 147 Early Childhood Important Timelines ........................................................................................ 148 Early Childhood Initial Evaluation .............................................................................................. 148 Early Childhood Determination of Eligibility .............................................................................. 149 Early Childhood IEP Team /IEP Meeting ..................................................................................... 149 Early Childhood Other IEP Actions ............................................................................................ 151 Early Childhood Extended School Year....................................................................................... 151 Glossary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………152 REVISED 07/2017

7

This IEP guidance document is intended for practitioners to use as a reference. For AU specific questions on IEP processes please refer to the Director of Special Education for the AU. ***UPDATES as of 2017 The following updates and additions have been made with input and guidance from various stakeholders. ***Updates  

Early Childhood Least Restrictive Environment guidance has been updated to reflect current OSEP guidelines Accommodations and Modifications

***Additions 

  

“Special Evaluations” definition Extracurricular and non-academic activities Early Dispute Resolution Appendix E – Early Childhood IEP Considerations

REVISED 07/2017

8

Special symbols have been selected to aid in learning and using the information in this document. They are placed in the sidebars and direct attention to information of unique importance to comply with all rules and regulations. The five symbols are:

This symbol identifies new or revised policies regarding determination of eligibility, development and implementation of IEPs.

This symbol identifies questions and answers to clarify issues.

This symbol is used to point out a particularly critical piece of information to which special attention should be given.

This symbol highlights effective practices for implementing these new procedures but is not required by law.

This symbol identifies Early Childhood IEP Guidance

This symbol refers to a YODeL (Your On Demand eLearning Library) providing information specific to the indicated subject in an interactive video format.

The term parent or parents has been used throughout the document for ease of reading. The reader should understand, however, that the term is used to refer to a person generally authorized to act as the child’s parent or authorized to make educational decisions for the child, e.g., guardian(s) and educational surrogate parent(s). 34 C.F.R. § 300.302.33; ECEA Rule 2.33.

REVISED 07/2017

9

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Colorado’s Exceptional Children’s Educational Act (ECEA) have established the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as the structure for planning and implementing goals and objectives for children with disabilities. This guidance document outlines the specific contents required in the IEP as provided through the IDEA as well as Colorado’s State Recommended IEP Forms. IDEA (2004) and ECEA included significant changes related to the content of IEPs including content related to secondary transition, state and district assessments, IEPs for children with disabilities who transfer from one public agency to another public agency within the same school year, IEP meetings and participants in those meetings, and changes to IEPs following the annual IEP meeting. The 2004 reauthorized IDEA also included significant changes related to parental consent for initial evaluations and reevaluations. The evaluation process presented another substantive change in IEP development. Previously, a “comprehensive evaluation” was required; this was replaced by a “full and individualized” approach. The evaluation must contain sufficient information to appropriately identify all of the child’s special education and related services’ needs. The new evaluation process was intended to provide students with individualized evaluations that are instructionally and behaviorally relevant. Under these new procedures, school personnel employ a more focused assessment process related to a student’s area of suspected disability. This flexibility was designed not only to ensure that the educational needs of the child were recognized, but instructional implications were readily identified and implemented.

Highlights of the changes in the evaluation process as per IDEA 2004 were as follows: 

The Multidisciplinary Team is charged with the responsibility of reviewing existing educationally relevant data, and determining the specific assessments, if any, that are needed to evaluate the individual needs of the child.



The composition of the Multidisciplinary Team will vary depending upon the nature of the child’s present problems and other relevant factors.



The evaluation process begins with a review of existing data related to the child’s performance and results of any screening that is conducted as a part of the general education program. The evaluation must be sufficient to appropriately identify all of the child’s special education and related service needs.

  

REVISED 07/2017

The evaluation should include those areas not commonly linked to the disability category but identified as concerns. As a result of the new process, teams will be required to plan the evaluation needs deliberately and collaboratively.

10

Referral, Evaluation, IEP Implementation Special Education Referral is initiated after: The Signed parental consent for evaluation is received by the Administrative Unit

Evaluation/eligibility determination is to be completed within 60 days

Notice of Meeting

IEP Developed within 90 calendar days of receipt of signed parental consent for evaluation

A referral is initiated when:  The parent is informed of the special education referral or the parent requests an evaluation; AND  The parent provides written consent to conduct the initial evaluation. [ECEA 4.02(3)(c)]

By definition, an initial evaluation must include a determination of eligibility; therefore both must be completed within 60 days from the point of the initiation of the referral. [ECEA 4.02(3)(c)] [IDEA 300.301(c)2] A notice of meeting should be sent to the parent in a reasonable amount of time to ensure that s/he will have an opportunity to attend [IDEA Reg. 300.322(a)(1)]. 10 day notice is usually accepted as reasonable. The IEP must be developed within 30 days of the date that the child is determined to be an eligible child with a disability. Your On Demand eLearning Library (YODeL) interactive learning module for the IEP Process and Timeline

REVISED 07/2017

11

IEP Progress Reporting The IEP must contain a description of when periodic reports will be provided regarding the progress the child is making toward meeting the annual goals (such as through the use of quarterly or other periodic reports, concurrent with the issuance of report cards. [IDEA Reg. 300.320(3)(ii)].

EXAMPLE: p

p

One Year p

REVISED 07/2017

p

12

IEP Annual Reviews, 3 year Reevaluations Annual Initial IE d

p

iews on or b o IE Ann Da

aximu p iod f ion and

An IEP must be reviewed periodically, but not less than annually to determine whether the annual goals for the child are being achieved; and revised as appropriate to address:  Any lack of expected progress toward the annual goals; 

The results of any reevaluation;



Information about the child provided by the parents;



The child’s anticipated needs; or



Other matters. [IDEA Reg. 300.324(b)] A notice of meeting should be sent to the parent in a reasonable amount of time to ensure that they will have an opportunity to attend the IEP meeting. [IDEA Reg. 300.322(a)(1)] A reevaluation of each child with a disability must occur at least once every 3 years, unless the parent and the public agency agree that a reevaluation is not necessary. [IDEA Reg. 300.303(b)(2)] If a reevaluation is necessary, written parental consent for evaluation must be obtained prior to conducting the reevaluation or the public agency must have documentation of multiple attempts to gain parental consent using multiple means of contact. [IDEA Reg. 300.300(c)(1)(i)

Th Reevaluation and IE

IEP Cycle

REVISED 07/2017

13

Determination Initial

of Eligibility

Evaluation Child Find

IEP

 Notice of Meeting

Development

 Referral

 Eligibility meeting

 Notice of Meeting

 Review

 Consent for Provision of Special Education and Related Services

 IEP meeting

 Record review including universal screening

 Prior written notice and consent for evaluation

 Focused screening

 Evaluation

IEP Implementation  Disseminate IEP  Provision of services

 Document interventions  Suspected educational disability

Progress

Annual

Reporting

Review

 Periodically send student progress updates to parent(s)

Reevaluation  Determine continued need for special education at least once every 3 years from previous eligibility determination

 Review and update IEP within 365 days of previous IEP date

Transfer

Changing an

Students

Existing IEP

 In-state

 IEP amendment

 Out-of-state REVISED 07/2017

14

REVISED 07/2017

15

Your On Demand eLearning Library (YODeL) interactive learning module for the IEP Process

Referral to Special Education The special education referral is the initial step of the special education process. Any student who needs or is believed to need special education or related services in order to receive a free and appropriate public education may be referred for an evaluation as a result of a building level screening and/or referral process. A special education referral where the team suspects an educational disability must be clearly distinguished from a building level referral for instructional support where an educational disability is not yet suspected or a building level referral for screening, both of which are general education processes. The administrative unit or state-operated program should establish and follow procedures for referring a child for an initial evaluation to determine whether or not the child has a disability and needs special education and related services. A referral may be made when a parent or representative of the administrative unit (or state-operated program) believes that the student has or may have a disability that would cause the student to be eligible for special education services. Any other interested party who believes that a student is in need of an initial evaluation must collaborate with the parent or the appropriate administrative unit or state-operated program. For preschool screenings and referrals, guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/early/parentconsentscreeningpk

may

be

found

at

Review Existing Data Once a referral is received, the administrative unit must review the referral and existing information regarding the student. Based on the review, the administrative unit must determine the appropriateness of the referral. If the administrative unit determines the referral is appropriate, then a Multidisciplinary Team must review the existing data to determine whether additional evaluation data are needed. This step is conducted through a meeting with members of the Multidisciplinary Team: 1. The team reviews formal and informal information from a variety sources such as:  Information provided by parents and students  School-based problem solving data  Results of interventions and supports, accommodations and modifications  Results of current classroom-based and curriculum based measures  For students from a home where a language other than English is spoken, student’s level of English language proficiency  Anecdotal records  Classroom observations  Cumulative records (attendance, discipline records, report cards, achievement scores, transcript)  Private or independent evaluation information, if available.

REVISED 07/2017

16

1. The team reviews the eligibility documents defining the suspected disabilities, considers whether the evidence required for a suspected disability is available, and determines what additional information may be needed. Because the evaluation is targeted, it is essential that teams prepare to respond to all questions on the individual Determination of Eligibility form for a suspected disability category (For information use these links or see Appendix A). 2. The data should help the team to answer the following questions:  What is the student’s level of educational performance including student’s strengths/skills and needs (for children 3 to 5 in appropriate activities and daily routines)? 

Does the measurable information demonstrate that the disability is adversely affecting the student’s education?



What are the specific special education instruction and related services, including supplementary aids and services the student may need in order to participate, as appropriate, in the general curriculum and to improve educational performance (for children 3 to 5 in appropriate activities and daily routines)? If the administrative unit determines the referral is not appropriate, it must provide Prior Written Notice of Special Education Action (English Version Spanish Version) stating the refusal to initiate the evaluation process (For information use these links or see Appendix B).

Prior Written Notice and Consent to Evaluation Parents must be given a copy of the Procedural Safeguards (English Version Spanish Version) notice when they request an evaluation or when a child is initially referred for evaluation. A parent’s informed consent must be obtained before an evaluation can be conducted.

Use the Prior Written Notice & Consent for Evaluation (English Version Spanish Version) form to notify the parent of the date of the referral, the reasons for the referral, and decision of the Multidisciplinary Team. The Multidisciplinary Team documents its decision for seeking further evaluation, the areas to be evaluated, and the reasons for the evaluation. If the Multidisciplinary Team decides that further evaluation data are not warranted, the Team documents on the form why such a determination was made and informs the parents of their right to request an evaluation or to seek an impartial due process hearing on the issue. Additionally, the Multidisciplinary Team documents the evaluation procedures, tests, records, or reports which were used in developing its proposal for evaluation including the other options that were considered, and rationale for rejecting the options as well as other factors considered by the Team. If the evaluation includes release of records requiring parental consent, attach the Release of Secure or Confidential Records Form(s) (English Version Spanish Version) that identifies the records to be released, and to whom they will be released (For information use these links or see Appendix C)

REVISED 07/2017

17

Providing a timely and correct Prior Written Notice to the parent(s) is essential to protecting the rights of students receiving special education and their parents; this step is a vital component of the procedural safeguards that schools make available. The Prior Written Notice provides a clear record for the student, parent, and school of the decisions that have been made; the basis for those decisions; and the actions that have been proposed or refused. The Prior Written Notice may be referenced in any number of circumstances, such as subsequent meetings or dispute resolution situations, or as a clarification and reminder to all parties of commitments made. The notice must be written in language understandable to the general public and provided in the native language of the parents or other mode of communication used by the parent, unless it is clearly not feasible to do so.[IDEA 300.503 (c)(1) (i) (ii)] If the native language/mode of communication of the parent is not a written language, steps must be taken to translate the notice orally or by other means to the parent in his/her native language/mode of communication, ensuring that the parent understands the notice. Written evidence documenting these requirements must be maintained by the public education agency. [IDEA 300.503 (c) (2) (i) (ii) (iii)]

The Prior Written Notice must provide information for each of the following elements:  A description of the school’s action(s), proposed or refused  An explanation of why actions are proposed or refused  A description of evaluation, procedure, assessment, record or report used as a basis for the proposed or refused action  A description of any other options the IEP team considered and the reasons for rejecting those options  A description of any other factors relevant to the proposal or refusal of action  Sources for the parent to contact with any questions regarding provisions of the prior written notice requirements  Acknowledgement of provision of Procedural Safeguards

Conditions under which a Public Agency Must Provide Prior Written Notice: 

When the public agency proposes to initiate or change . . . 1. the identification of a student; 2. the evaluation of a student; 3. the educational placement of a student; and/or 4. the provision of free, appropriate public education (FAPE) to a student.  When the public agency refuses to initiate or change . . . 5. the identification of a student; 6. the evaluation of a student; 7. the educational placement of a student; and/or 8. the provision of FAPE to a student Depending on the situation, different Prior Written Notice forms are required, in addition to the embedded short prior written notice in a standard IEP (For additional information use these links or see Appendix B).  Prior Written Notice for Amendments (English Version Spanish Version)  Prior Written Notice for Notice of Graduation/Maximum Age (English Version Spanish Version)  Prior Written Notice for Special Action (English Version Spanish Version)

REVISED 07/2017

18

What Circumstances Require a Prior Written Notice: Events Requiring Prior Written Notice

Yes No

Identification Screening

X

Problem Solving Team

X

Intervention Strategies

X

Referral for Initial Evaluation (Use Prior Notice & Consent for Evaluation)

X

Evaluation Collection of new data for initial evaluation and reevaluation (Use Prior Notice & Consent for Evaluation) X Evaluation of progress on the annual goals

X

Administration of state or district assessments

X

Independent education evaluation

X

Determination of eligibility upon completion of an initial evaluation or reevaluation (Use Prior Notice & Consent for Initial Provision of Services)

X

Questions regarding eligibility

X

Refusal to conduct an evaluation

X

Educational Placement Initial provision of special education services (Use Prior Notice & Consent for Initial Provision of Services) X Relocation of the special education program

X

Any change in educational placement

X

Termination of special education and related services

X

Transfer of student to another school or district

X

Graduation with a regular diploma

X

Disciplinary removal for more than 10 consecutive school days

X

Disciplinary removal for not more than 10 school days

X

A series of disciplinary removals that constitute a pattern of removals

X

Disciplinary removal to an Interim Alternate Educational Setting for not more than 45 school days

X

Provision of FAPE Deletion or addition of related service

X

Change in annual goals on an existing IEP

X

Increase or decrease in special education services or related services

X

Change in how a student will participate in state and district assessments

X

Review and revision of the IEP

X

Increase or decrease of supplementary aids and services or supports to the school personnel

X

Refusal to increase or decrease related service

X

Consideration of ESY if done at a separate meeting

X

REVISED 07/2017

19

When Should the Prior Written Notice Be Provided? Written notice that meets the requirements under section 300.503 (b) must be given to the parents of a student with a disability a reasonable time before the public agency— (i) Proposes to initiate or change identification, evaluation, or educational placement of the child or the provision of FAPE to the student; or (ii) Refuses to initiate or change identification, evaluation, or educational placement of the student or the provision of FAPE to the student. 34 CFR §300.503 A copy of the Procedural Safeguards must be given to the parents: upon initial referral or parent request for evaluation; upon receipt of the first State complaint and upon receipt of the first due process complaint in a school year; in accordance with the discipline procedures, and upon request by a parent. It should be noted that a copy of the procedural safeguards must be given to the parent(s) annually.

Receipt of Consent for Evaluation Your On Demand eLearning Library (YODeL) interactive learning module for the IEP Timeline

The date the Administrative Unit receives the signed written consent for evaluation triggers the 60 calendar-day timeline for the completion of the evaluation.

If the team is evaluating a child to determine whether he or she has a specific learning disability (SLD), the parents and the multi-disciplinary team may agree in writing to extend the 60-day timeline to complete the evaluation.

REVISED 07/2017

20

Conduct the Evaluation Once the parent(s) have provided consent for evaluation, the team must proceed with the evaluation process. The evaluation should include a review of existing data, including evaluations and information provided by the parents, classroom-based or state/local assessments, and observations by teachers and related service providers. If the team determines that the assessment is not sufficiently comprehensive and further assessments are required in other areas, a Prior Written Notice and Consent to Evaluation must be provided.

In conducting an evaluation, the administrative unit must use a variety of assessment tools

and strategies to gather relevant functional, developmental, and academic information about the student, including information provided by the parent; and not use any single measure or assessment as the sole criterion for determining whether a child is a child with a disability and for determining an appropriate educational program for the student. Assessments and other evaluation materials include those tailored to assess specific areas of educational need and not merely those that are designed to provide a single general intelligence quotient. Assessments should be selected and administered so as to ensure that results of assessments administered to a child with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, accurately reflect the child’s aptitude or achievement level or other factors the test purports to measure, rather than reflecting the child’s impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills (unless those skills are the factors that the test purports to measure). Finally, the evaluation should address all areas related to the suspected disability, including, if appropriate, health, vision, hearing, social and emotional status, general intelligence, academic performance, communicative status, and motor abilities.

REVISED 07/2017

21

Documentation of an Evaluation Through the full and individual evaluation process, the Multidisciplinary Team will:  Identify the student’s strengths and skills;  Identify the student’s disability/ies if any exist(s); 

Collect sufficient information to measure the adverse effect of the student’s disability/ies on his/her educational performance;



For children 3 to 5 participation in appropriate activities and daily routines; and



Identify specific instructional and support services that are needed by the student to improve his/her educational performance, regardless of whether the evaluation team determines that the student has a disability. After the evaluation has been completed, the Multidisciplinary Team must document the evaluation information. The Evaluation Report (English Version Spanish Version) (For additional information use these links or see Appendix C) should: 

Document sources of information and assessment methods used, results obtained and date(s) the assessment(s) was administered.



Analyze raw evaluation data or completed questionnaires and interpret the results, including the student's strengths, needs, and implications for instruction. Data prove to be more valuable with appropriate analysis and synthesis.

Use language that is educationally relevant, succinct, devoid of as much jargon as possible and written in language readily understood by educational staff and parents. Reports that are written in this manner are more helpful for collaborative educational planning. For example, instead of using terms like auditory memory or transitioning, it is best to describe their meanings in a sentence. Evaluation report(s) must be completed and provided to the parent(s).

The evaluation report should not include recommendations about eligibility for special education, a specific disability classification or placement options. The Multidisciplinary Team will make its decision at the conclusion of the eligibility meeting where evaluation results are shared, interpreted and discussed.

REVISED 07/2017

22

Notice of Meeting The Case Manager must send the Notice of Meeting (English Version Spanish Version) to the parent(s) early enough to ensure that they will have an opportunity to attend. The meeting should be scheduled for a mutually agreed upon time and place. The Notice of Meeting provides for the combination of the Eligibility Meeting and IEP development if appropriate (For additional information use these links or see Appendix C).

NOTE: The attendees at the meeting must match those that were identified on the Notice of Meeting as being expected to attend. It is a common practice for parents to be notified in writing at least 10 days prior to the meeting so that the purpose, time, location, attendees, and need for an interpreter can be determined early enough to ensure that parents will have an opportunity to attend. Should the time and place not be acceptable, parents must be afforded the opportunity to arrange another time. The purpose of the Eligibility Meeting is to determine a student’s eligibility to receive special education services by:  Developing and documenting a profile of the student’s academic and behavioral functioning, including current levels of performance;  Discussing characteristics exhibited by the student that support or refute the identification of a disability; and  Determining whether there is or continues to be an adverse impact on the student’s educational performance. In making eligibility determinations, the Multidisciplinary Team must:  Review and consider all assessment data, including results from any independent evaluations;  Consider the strengths and needs of the student;  Use the results of more than one source of data; and  Ensure the determination is not based on the student’s lack of instruction in reading or math or because of limited English proficiency. For students 3 to 5, guidance in answering these questions for Developmental Delay may be found: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/ta_dd The Multidisciplinary Team includes parents and other individuals who are knowledgeable about the evaluation findings and can interpret their instructional implications. The meeting should summarize findings in the relevant areas identified on the appropriate Determination of Eligibility form. Parents must be provided with a copy of the Evaluation Report (English Version Spanish Version) and Determination of Eligibility documents (For additional information use these links or see Appendices A and C). The Multidisciplinary Team should discuss whether or not the characteristics exhibited by the student support the conclusion that the student has a disability and needs special education and related services. If the student is determined eligible for special education, the team can develop the IEP at that time or schedule another meeting for that purpose. If it is determined that the student is not eligible for special education, the Multidisciplinary Team should discuss what other resources are available to support the student and provide the family with Prior Written Notice (PWN). REVISED 07/2017

23

Consent for Initial Placement in Special Education If the Multidisciplinary Team has determined that a student is eligible for special education services at an initial eligibility meeting, the Team must obtain consent from the parent(s) for the initial provision of special education and related services. The Prior Written Notice & Consent for Initial Provision of Special Education and Related Services (English Version Spanish Version) form must be completed before an IEP is developed and before the student receives any special education services (For additional information use these links or see Appendix B).

Written consent for the Initial Provision of Special Education and Related Services is only required at the initial eligibility determination. However, when a student transfers from another state or district and the initial consent is missing, the receiving district must obtain written parental consent to provide services. The consent “opens the door” for special education services. It provides the Administrative Unit permission to provide any special education services once they are agreed upon by the IEP Team. It is not an agreement regarding what specific special education services or placement will be provided. If the parent fails to respond to a request to provide consent for the Initial Provision of Special Education and Related Services, a public agency must document attempts to gain consent within a reasonable time frame. Such documentation includes: 

detailed records including date and time of telephone calls made and the results of those calls;



copies of correspondence sent to the parents and any responses received;



detailed records including date and time of visits made to the parent’s home or place of employment and the results of those visits. 34 C.F.R. §§ 300.300(d)(5) and 300.322(d). Many Administrative Units recommend documenting 3 unsuccessful attempts, using multiple methods of contact and varying times of the day for the contact.

REVISED 07/2017

24

What if parents deny consent? If a parent refuses to consent or fails to respond to a request for consent for the initial provision of special education and related services, the public agency will not be considered in violation of the requirement to make available a FAPE to the student, and is not required to convene a meeting to develop an IEP. A public agency cannot use dispute resolution methods such as mediation or due process to obtain agreement or a ruling that services may be provided to the child. 34 C.F.R. § 300.300(b)(4).

Can parents withdraw consent? The IDEA regulations allow a parent who had previously consented to the initial provision of special education and related services to subsequently remove his/her child from special education services. 34 C.F.R. § 300.300(b)(4). The regulations provide that consent is voluntary and may be revoked at any time. 34 C.F.R. § 300.9(c). When consent is revoked, the revocation is not retroactive and any actions that had occurred prior to the revocation are not negated. The revocation of consent must be in writing from the parent. The public agency must then provide prior written notice to the parents before the public agency discontinues services. The notice should inform parents of the educational services and supports that are being declined and should be accompanied by the procedural safeguards notice. The public agency may not use dispute resolution methods to obtain agreement or a ruling to continue providing the student with special education services, and will not be considered in violation of providing FAPE to the student.

REVISED 07/2017

25

If the child has been evaluated and determined to be a child with a disability, an IEP shall be developed within 90 calendar days of the date that parental consent to evaluate was obtained. Any determination of eligibility triggers the requirement that an IEP must be developed within 90 days of receipt of consent to evaluate and implemented as soon as possible. If a team determines that a child is eligible under one disability category, but in the course of conducting evaluations suspects that the child may be eligible under another disability category, such that additional evaluations may be warranted, the AU may not delay the development of the IEP until all evaluations are completed. In that scenario, the AU should timely develop the IEP based upon the information and eligibility determination that has been done, and request consent to conduct additional evaluations.

Provide Notice of Meeting to Parent A common practice is to schedule the Eligibility and IEP development meeting at the same time; however, the meetings may be held separately. In this case, a separate Notice of Meeting must be sent to the parents. The IEP document must be maintained as part of the student’s special educational record. All IEP discussions are confidential and must not be discussed with persons other than those school district employees who have responsibilities for the education of the particular student and persons authorized by the parent.

A group of professionals and the student’s parents comprise the IEP Team to make decisions about the student’s educational program. The IEP Team may be comprised of the same individuals or vary slightly from the individuals on the Multidisciplinary Team. Based on the student’s eligibility determination, specific professionals may be required to assist in the development of the IEP.

Parent Participation Parents are integral members of their child’s IEP Team. The IDEA requires that school districts take steps to ensure that one or both parents have the opportunity to have meaningful participation in meetings related to the identification, evaluation and educational placement of their child. If neither parent can attend an IEP meeting, the public agency must use other methods to ensure parent participation in IEP development, including individual or conference calls. The case manager is responsible for facilitating communication with the parent to guide the process of evaluation and the subsequent IEP meeting. 34 C.F.R. § 300.322(c) It is recommended that the case manager contact the parent(s) to determine his/her preferences for the date and time of the IEP meeting, and to ascertain if the parent has any special needs which require an accommodation (e.g., interpreter, wheelchair accessible site, etc.). The case manager may use several methods for contacting parents including telephone calls, mailing the information, a home visit, or contact through another adult family member.

REVISED 07/2017

26

The school may conduct an IEP meeting without a parent in attendance if there is no response to the notice, or if the school is unable to convince the parents to attend. School personnel must attempt to secure parental participation. The case manager must also ensure that parents understand the proceedings of the meeting. An interpreter or translator for a parent who is deaf or whose native language is other than English must be provided. All individuals who need to be present must be listed by title on the Notice of Meeting. The parent has the right to request the meeting be rescheduled if individuals present are not listed on the meeting notice or if invited individuals are not present. If a team member, who is not a required member, is absent for all or part of a meeting, the excusal process must be followed. Excusal Forms (English Version Spanish Version) may be downloaded using these links or found in Appendix C.

If a public agency develops a draft IEP prior to the IEP Team meeting, the agency should

make it clear to the parents at the outset of the meeting that any services proposed by the agency in the draft are preliminary recommendations for review and discussion with the parents. The public agency should provide the parents a copy of the draft IEP prior to the IEP Team meeting to give the parents an opportunity to review the draft IEP. This will allow the parents an opportunity to engage in a meaningful discussion of the proposals. If the public agency were to come to the IEP meeting with a completed IEP, without allowing parents’ input, the public agency would be demonstrating pre- determination and violating the parents’ right to participate in the IEP process. 34 C.F.R. §§ 300.116(a)(1), 300.327, 300.501, 300.513(a)(2).

Divorced Parents: Under the IDEA a biological or adoptive parent may be considered a parent for the purposes of the IDEA. However, if a judicial decree or order identifies a specific person to make educational decisions on behalf of a child, then that person is considered to be the parent. In the case of divorced parents, it may be necessary to determine which parent has educational decision making authority. 34 C.F.R. § 300.30.

REVISED 07/2017

27

Initial/ Eligibility

Annual Review

E

E

Reevaluatio n E

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

Individual who can interpret results of evaluation(s)

R

R

R

R

Special Education Director or designee

R

R

R

R

Student age 15 or older (optional if younger than 15)

E

E

E

E

Bilingual specialist for students who are ELs

R

R

R

R

O

I

O

I

R

R

I

I

Team Participants Parent General Education Teacher (if student is or may be receiving services in general education classroom) Special Education Teacher (or Speech Pathologist if child is receiving only speech and language)

Community Service Agency Representative (if student is age 15 or older and the agency will provide or pay for services) Related services providers, when services are considered for initiation, continuation or discontinuation

Transition E

E = Essential; I = Must be invited to participate R = Required attendance O = Optional If the purpose of the meeting is to determine eligibility for special education, then a Multidisciplinary Team must meet ECEA Rule 4.02(6)(b). If the purpose of the meeting is to develop or revise the IEP at an Annual Review, Amendment or Transition meeting, the IEP Team is required to meet. See 34 C.F.R. §300.321 and ECEA Rule 4.03(5). A meeting in which eligibility is determined and IEP is developed should include all required team members and individuals who can interpret evaluation results and their implications for instruction. The general education teacher role must be filled by someone who is currently assigned to teach in a general education classroom for students the same age or grade level as the student whose IEP is being reviewed. If the student is currently in a general education setting, a teacher of the student must be in attendance. If the student is not currently in a general education setting, it is recommended that the general education teacher be able to represent the student’s needs in accessing the general education curriculum. During the development of the IEP, the participation of the general educator is critical to discuss evaluation findings that may lead to appropriate interventions including the identification of supplementary aids and services, program modifications and supports for school personnel.

REVISED 07/2017

28

If a student needs a particular related service in order to benefit from special education, the related service professional must be involved in developing the IEP. For preschool children ages 3 to 5, in cases where an ECSE may serve as both the general education teacher and a special educator, they may sign in both places. An EC Administrator may represent the general education teacher in some instances.

Preparation for the IEP Meeting        

Monitor to ensure that all pre-conference activities are successfully completed within required timelines Determine the date/time/location of the IEP meeting with active participation of parents and other necessary team members Prepare written notice to the IEP team (including parents) prior to the meeting Encourage parents to complete an IEP family report to be included with other annual review and assessment reports from teachers and specialists Inquire about the Medicaid status of the child with the parent Ensure time allocated for IEP meeting is sufficient by collaborating with entire IEP team Prepare an agenda for the meeting Arrange accommodations for parents as necessary (e.g., interpreter or translator)

During the IEP Conference      

Start the meeting with introductions of all IEP team members Ensure that all required participants are present Ensure that the student’s interests and plans for post high school are considered by the IEP Team Conduct the meeting by following an agenda and process based on the purpose of the meeting Facilitate the completion of the IEP document Distribute copies of the completed IEP to parents, teachers and related service providers at the end of the IEP meeting

Implementation of the IEP    

Inform all staff involved in the implementation of the IEP of their responsibilities to implement the IEP as written Monitor to ensure that all services documented in the IEP are delivered. If services cannot be implemented within a reasonable time (refer to the AU’s policies and procedures) Distribute copies of the IEP (or IEP summary sheet, as appropriate) to all teachers and support specialists who have a responsibility for the education of the student Coordinate all meetings related to IEP reviews and amendments, when necessary

REVISED 07/2017

29

Preparation for the IEP Meeting 

        

Review the current IEP to determine extent of mastery of annual goals or, if this is a conference to determine eligibility, compile anecdotal records, samples of student work, and other information relevant to determine the student’s potential for learning, rate of learning and need for specialized instruction and/or accommodations Assess current achievement levels and progress toward achieving Colorado Academic Standards and IEP goals Identify student’s talents, hobbies and other interests Consider student’s educational needs in relationship to the general education curriculum Consider special factors that may impede student’s learning Compile data on student’s attendance and class participation Compile data on levels of English language proficiency for students from a non-English language background Compile data on native language proficiency on students who are English Learners (ELs) who are receiving bilingual services Confer with general educators, other special education providers and parents as needed Develop brief written summary reports or notes

During the IEP Meeting      

Share information regarding the student’s present level of educational performances in relationship to the general education curriculum, including progress toward IEP goals Describe the student’s learning style, behavior and attendance as well as other relevant information regarding the student’s participation in the general education curriculum Assist in identifying supplementary aids and services the student may need to be successful in the general education classroom environment and elsewhere Make recommendations regarding annual goals Make recommendations for accommodations and modifications that will allow the student to be educated in the least restrictive environment Suggest individual modifications and accommodations to be considered for the administration of any assessments (classroom, district-wide and state)

Implementation of the IEP         

Review the IEP and understand responsibilities for implementation Assess, review and document the student’s progress toward goals Prepare progress reports with supporting data Communicate with other service providers, including general education teachers, on a regular basis Implement the IEP - provide instruction, services and consultation in accordance with the IEP Document service delivery as appropriate Establish and maintain effective and positive two-way communication with parents Inform case manager if the need for an IEP amendment or review is identified Collect evidence of progress toward benchmarks and goals

REVISED 07/2017

30

Preparation for the IEP Meeting       

Review the current IEP or, if the purpose of the meeting is to determine eligibility, compile anecdotal records, samples of student work, and other information relevant to determining the student’s potential for learning, rate of learning and need for specialized instruction and/or accommodations Identify instructional and classroom management strategies that have been successful with the student Observe the student’s learning in the general classroom List or identify special factors that may impede the student’s learning Share with the special educator comments on student progress toward achieving IEP goals, including student’s participation in classroom activities Suggest positive intervention strategies for improving the student’s behavior, supplementary aids and services, program accommodations or modifications and supports for school personnel that may be necessary for the student to benefit from specialized instruction Prepare a brief report of the student’s current performance in relationship to the general education curriculum and include information regarding behavior and attendance patterns

During the IEP Meeting      

Share information regarding the student’s present level of educational performance in the general education curriculum and the general education classroom environment Describe student’s behavior and relationships with peers in the general education classroom Make recommendations for annual goals that relate to the progress of the student in the general education curriculum Assist in the determination of appropriate positive behavior interventions and strategies for the student Share information regarding the effect of accommodations provided for the student in the general education classroom during the previous school year Make recommendations for continuation of those accommodations

Implementation of the IEP 

Review IEP for implications on classroom instruction - provide accommodations and modifications in accordance with the IEP



Collaborate with the special education teacher, related service providers, and other teachers about meeting the student’s needs and implementing the IEP



Establish and maintain effective and positive two-way communication with the parents



Assess the student’s progress on a regular basis



Inform the case manager if the need for an IEP amendment or review is identified

REVISED 07/2017

31

Preparation for the IEP Meeting 

Keep anecdotal records as instructed by the teacher



Under the direction of the teacher implements modifications and accommodations and other educational or behavioral strategies used in the classroom



Share data results with the teacher about modifications/accommodations and other educational or behavioral strategies used in the classroom



Observe students as per planned observations made with the special educator and share information about student behaviors in and outside of the classroom



Assist the teacher in gathering documentation such as assessment data, work samples, observations and reports from general education teachers

During the IEP Meeting 

Participate in the IEP meeting as appropriate

Implementation of the IEP 

Support the student with disabilities in the general education curriculum with activities as assigned by the teacher



Support the student in the use of technology in the classroom as assigned by the teacher



Collaborate and communicate with appropriate school personnel about the needs of students with disabilities



Employ interventions, modifications and accommodations to meet the individual needs of students with disabilities under the direction of certified school personnel



Work with a variety of students who may have diverse learning needs



Provide data to the teacher regarding the student’s response to strategies that have been used in instruction or behavior management



Maintain and protect student’s right to confidentiality

REVISED 07/2017

32

Preparation for the IEP Meeting 

Participate with the case manager to determine the date and time for the IEP meeting



Review the current IEP or, if the purpose of the conference is to determine eligibility, review any evaluation or assessment data submitted in advance of the meeting



Review the most recent progress reports from teachers



Share comments regarding the student’s strengths, abilities and needs, including the provision of data



Think about the skills they would like their child to master by the end of the year and formulate a vision of the future



Notify the case manager if they need additional information (e.g., evaluation reports, previous IEPs or other reports, procedural safeguards, etc.), an advocate, or any special accommodations



Decide whether other family members or individuals knowledgeable of the child/student should be invited to attend the conference, and notify the case manager in advance

During the IEP Meeting Parents are important members of the IEP Team and should actively participate in making decisions during the IEP meeting. During the IEP meeting, parents should: 

Ask the case manager to review or explain parent rights and due process procedures, if necessary



Share information about their vision for the student’s future and expectations for the year



Identify the student’s strengths and interests, including the types of activities the student enjoys at home and in the community



Share information about the student’s relationship with siblings and neighborhood friends



Discuss the types of rewards and discipline strategies that are effective at home and in the community



Share relevant information about the student’s medical and personal care needs



Ask questions to clarify any reports or information regarding the student’s present level of performance in class work, behavior and community activities, as appropriate



Ask IEP Team members to clarify, explain or give examples for any information presented that may be unclear



Make recommendations regarding annual goals



Share interests and goals for post high school

Implementation of the IEP 

Review the IEP document to ensure that all decisions made at the conference are documented



Establish and maintain positive communication with teachers, paraeducators and related service providers



Monitor the student’s progress toward meeting goals



Assist the student with homework assignments or ask the teacher what can be done to help the student with school work



Participate in parent training programs to enhance knowledge of relevant educational issues



Contact identified community agencies and resources for additional support, as necessary



Request training that may be needed to assist the student in meeting IEP goals

REVISED 07/2017

33

Preparation for the IEP Meeting 

Think about school activities they enjoy and activities they would like to pursue



Think about educational goals (e.g., college, career, training needs)



Think about career/employment goals



Think about independent living goals



Share any concerns or questions with their parents or teachers



Identify accommodations which have been helpful and those which were not useful



Decide if they would like to share anything specific at the IEP meeting

During the IEP Meeting If transition goals and services are being considered, students must be invited to attend IEP meetings. If the student is unable to attend, efforts must be made and documented, to ensure that the student’s interests and plans for post high school are considered by the IEP Team. 

Share information about their vision for the future and expectations for the year



Identify their strengths and interests, including the types of activities they enjoy at home and in the community



Ask IEP Team members to clarify, explain or give examples for any information presented that may be unclear



Make recommendations regarding annual goals



Share interests and goals for post high school



Identify the accommodations provided in class that are the most helpful and the least helpful

Implementation of the IEP 

Work with teachers, para educators, related service providers, and parents in order to improve achievement and meet goals



Understand the criteria for promotion and grading



Tell parents and teachers about problems encountered and request assistance, as necessary



Indicate to parents and teachers which accommodations or modifications are helpful or ineffective

REVISED 07/2017

34

Preparation for the IEP Meeting 

Ensure the necessary arrangements for designated staff have been made to attend the IEP meeting



Share with case manager comments on student performance, behavior and attendance



Ensure that all pre-IEP meeting activities are completed in accordance with required timelines

During the IEP Meeting 

Help the team make decisions about resource allocation



Contribute information to the IEP meeting discussion

Implementation of the IEP 

Monitor service delivery commitments, the implementation of IEPs and the progress of students with disabilities in the general education curriculum



Periodically review the schedule of support services staff assigned to the school



Utilize local school resources to provide appropriate services; contact special education director or designee if additional resources are needed



Provide professional development opportunities for general and special educators and paraprofessionals, as necessary



Ensure that all students with disabilities have current IEPs and all special education teachers and related service providers have copies



Ensure that copies of the IEP or IEP summary sheets are distributed to general education teachers for students with disabilities in their classes



Ensure that IEP progress reports are completed for each student



Ensure that parents have access to school personnel who can answer questions related to their child’s IEP and progress toward meeting goals

REVISED 07/2017

35

Provide Notice of Meeting to Parent A common practice is to schedule the Eligibility and IEP development meeting at the same time; however, the meetings may be held separately. In this case, a separate Notice of Meeting (English Version Spanish Version) must be sent to the parents (forms may be found in Appendix C). The IEP document must be maintained as part of the student’s special educational record. All IEP discussions are confidential and must not be discussed with persons other than those school district employees who have responsibilities for the education of the particular student and persons authorized by the parent. The IEP meeting is the mechanism used by the IEP Team to discuss and make decisions regarding specially designed instruction and related services for students. The product of the IEP meeting is the IEP document which is a written record that reflects the discussion and decisions of the IEP Team. The IEP document includes goals that are based on the student’s unique needs and should support the student’s progress in the general education curriculum (for preschool children, participation in appropriate activities and daily routines). The IEP document also commits resources that the Administrative Unit/District considers necessary to meet the student’s individualized education needs. An IEP meeting must be convened at least annually to review and revise the student’s goals based on the progress made towards attainment of the goals. The IEP is developed in accordance with the procedures described below and must specify the special education and related services, including any required extended school year services, needed to ensure that the student receives a free appropriate public education (FAPE). All services recorded on a student’s IEP are provided at no cost to the parent. The specially designed instruction and related services are based on the student’s unique needs and not on the student’s disability category. Case managers should make every effort to begin the IEP meeting on time. The conference room should be arranged to facilitate parent participation and effective communication among IEP Team members. It is a good idea to prepare and distribute an IEP meeting agenda in advance to organize the proceedings, to encourage participation, and to ensure that all required topics are discussed. The agenda should identify the topics for discussion and the order in which they will be discussed. An agenda will help maximize the use of available time and enable the IEP Team to keep the discussion focused. The Case Manager should ensure that a copy of the most recent eligibility report or IEP is available for review at the IEP meeting.

Purpose A statement expressing the purpose of the IEP meeting and the agenda should be shared with each participant. (For example, “We are here to discuss the progress of [student’s name] and to plan his/her education program for the next year.”) The Case Manager may want to ask if anyone would like to add to the proposed agenda and determine the feasibility of any additions in relationship to the purpose of the IEP conference. The amount of time participants have available for the conference should be confirmed and an additional meeting scheduled if needed to complete all agenda items.

REVISED 07/2017

36

Sample IEP Meeting Agenda: Time scheduled for today’s meeting: 1.

Introduce IEP Team participants

2.

State the purpose of the IEP meeting

3.

Ask if parents have questions regarding Procedural Safeguards, Rights and Responsibilities

4.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

5.

Determination of Special Factors

6.

Determine Post-School Goals and Transition needs

7.

Develop Annual Goals

8.

Determine Accommodations and Modifications needed

9.

Determine Service Delivery

10. Determine Placement in the Least Restrictive Environment Distribute copies of IEP documents

Procedural Safeguards The Case Manager should check with the parents to ensure that they have received their annual copy of the Procedural Safeguards and understand their educational rights. In addition, the case manager should ask the family if they have any questions. The Procedural Safeguards must be given to parents at least once per school year. Parents should be given another copy if requested at the meeting. The Case Manager should assure parents that the proceedings and the results are confidential and will be used for educational purposes only, and ask if they have any questions regarding their educational rights. The Case Manager should also inform parents and the student, if appropriate, of their rights and invite them to ask questions at any time during the meeting. Interpreters should be present for parents with limited English proficiency or those who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Standards-aligned IEPs as a Framework for the IEP Meeting A standards-aligned IEP is a process and a document that is informed by and based upon the state adopted standards (preschool-12) containing measurable annual goals developed to meet individual student needs and designed to facilitate achievement of enrolled grade level academic standards. (CDE ESSU 2014) See specific guidance at: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/guidance_ieps.

REVISED 07/2017

37

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance The IEP includes a statement of the student’s present levels of academic achievement and functional performance and any gaps from grade-level expectations. The team must include information about how the student’s disability affects his/her involvement and progress in the general education curriculum, i.e., the educational impact of the disability (for preschool, their participation in appropriate activities and daily routines). Results of the most recent formal and informal evaluation must be included. The student’s strengths and personal interests, as well as concerns regarding the student’s educational performance, physical development, social and emotional development, independent functioning (including vocational considerations, if appropriate) and participation in the home and community should be discussed. The Team should also describe the student’s need for instructional accommodations as well as his or her progress toward any goals in the past school year. The IEP Team should have an opportunity to share their expectations and vision of the student’s future, including short-term and long-term issues. The parents and the student for whom the IEP is being developed are encouraged to contribute their perspectives on interests, strengths and needs, a future vision and goals, and any other pertinent considerations. This information must be summarized in writing on the IEP form. 



If the IEP meeting is an annual review, team members should refer to the previous IEP goals and/or objectives data, and indicate the student’s current level of performance. Statements of current performance should not merely indicate reading or math scores. A synthesis of current levels academic, behavioral, and/or functional performance, teacher observations, student insights, parent input and instructional implications should be included. Language and cultural considerations that impact the performance of English language learners should be noted in this section as well. The postsecondary goal is clearly stated and updated in the Present Level of Academic and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) of the IEP document. The PLAAFP statements should have some connection to the student’s identified postsecondary goal(s).

The IEP Workgroup guidance documents around Present Levels of Educational Performance Summary; Goals and Objectives; Service Delivery Statement; Least Restrictive Environment; Student Strengths, Preferences and Interests; Student Needs and Impact of Disability and Parent/Student Input may be found in Appendix D. Needs should be considered by broad areas such as reading, writing or behavior, etc., and include documentation of the student’s progress toward mastery of the Colorado Academic Standards. The Present Levels section should describe in more detail where specific areas of need occur. For example, a student may have a need in the area of writing. The Present Levels section should also describe the need with regard to gradelevel standards and include information whether the need may also be impacted by processing or motor concerns, or both. Later in the IEP, the accommodations, modifications and/or goals should address the instructional implications of each area of need.

REVISED 07/2017

38

Consideration of Special Factors The Case Manager should confer with each IEP Team member to determine whether there are special factors that must be considered. The IEP Team must determine whether the following special factors or instructional implications could impede the student’s learning: 

In the case of a child whose behavior impedes his/her learning or that of others, consider the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports and other strategies to address that behavior.



In the case of a child with limited English proficiency, consider the language needs of the student as those needs relate to the student’s IEP.



In the case of a child who is blind or visually impaired, consider providing instruction in Braille and the use of Braille unless the IEP Team determines, after an evaluation of the child’s reading and writing skills, needs, and appropriate reading and writing media (including an evaluation of the child’s future needs for instruction in Braille or the use of Braille), that instruction in Braille or the use of Braille is not appropriate for the child.



Consider the communication needs of the student and, in the case of a student who is deaf or hard of hearing, consider the student’s language and communication needs, opportunities for direct communications with peers and professional personnel in the student’s language and communication mode, academic level, and full range of needs, including opportunities for direct instruction in the student’s language and communication mode.



In the case of a child who is deaf-blind, consider both the communication needs and Braille instruction considerations discussed above.



Consider whether the student needs assistive technology devices and services.



Consider whether the student has physical or health impairments.



Consider whether the student has documented special transportation needs that demonstrate that the student is not able to meaningfully benefit from his/her program without this provision.

If any of the above factors are relevant to the student’s educational plan, they should be addressed at the IEP meeting. If it is known that resources currently not available at the school may be considered during the IEP meeting, the Case Manager should contact the Special Education Director or Designee who will be addressing the information at the IEP meeting, regarding options available to provide necessary services at the IEP meeting.

REVISED 07/2017

39

Age Appropriate Transition Assessment Transition assessment is the foundation of a meaningful IEP. The IEP must be based on newly administered or reviewed age appropriate transition assessments. Age-appropriate means a student’s chronological age, rather than developmental age. Transition assessment should be comprehensive and tell a rich student story that leads to the development of measureable postsecondary goals, courses of study, transition services, annual goals, and agency linkages (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance and examples).

Measurable Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Goals (PSGs) are required in the areas of education/training and career/employment. The decision as to whether to include a PSG in the area of independent living skills is determined by the IEP Team and should be based on transition assessment. The PSG must focus on what the student will do after exiting the public school system. The postsecondary goal is clearly stated and updated in the Present Level of Academic and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) of the IEP document (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance). The Postsecondary Goals reflect an outcome NOT a process  Must be measurable (observable and defined)  Should reflect a real intent or plan (not simply stating the hopes and desires of a student, but an intentional plan to achieve the goal)  Must reflect the student’s interests and preferences  Must utilize assessment for development

Transition Services Transition services are the activities/strategies/steps/actions that the “community of adults” including special/general education teachers, related service providers, counselors, other school personnel, outside agencies, family members, community members, etc., provides to help the student achieve the identified postsecondary goals (PSGs). Transition services must be specific and individualized for the student (document (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance).

Courses of Study A course of study must include a multi-year description of coursework from the student’s current to anticipated exit year, be specific and individualized to the student taking into account the student’s preferences, interests, and needs and link to the postsecondary goals (PSGs) (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance)

REVISED 07/2017

40

Annual Secondary Transition Goals Annual goals state what the student will do or learn within the next year that will move the student toward achieving the identified postsecondary goals (PSGs) linked to the student’s transition services. The linkage between the annual goals and the PSGS/transition services must be direct, specific, and genuine. If someone were to pick up the IEP and go directly to the annual goals, he/she should be able to predict the PSG/transition service needs with a high degree of accuracy. At least one annual goal must show direct, specific, and genuine linkage to each PSG (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance)

Student Invitation There is documented evidence in the IEP file that the student was invited to participate in his/her IEP meeting, the Student Invitation (English Version Spanish Version) form is optional (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance)

Agency Which May Provide Secondary Transition Services in the Coming School Year An adult agency representative is only required to be invited to the IEP meeting when that agency is likely to provide and/or pay for transition services within the next year. The Consent to Invite Agencies Related to Transition (English Version Spanish Version) must be obtained from parents before inviting an agency representative to attend any IEP meeting. This written consent must be obtained each and every time an outside agency is invited. If an adult service agency is invited, it should be included on the parents’ Notice of Meeting and documented in the IEP. (Indicator 13 Compliance & Quality Tips for guidance) Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 16, or younger, if determined appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually, thereafter, the IEP must include (1) appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based on appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, were appropriate, independent living skills; and (2) The transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals. §300.320 (7) (b) (1) (2) Age Appropriate Transition Assessment Process Used to Develop the Post School Goals. There is an exception to this age requirement in Colorado. ECEA rules 4.03 (6) (d) (i) states that a transition plan is required, “beginning with the first IEP developed when the child is age 15, but no later than the end of the 9th grade, or earlier if deemed appropriate by the IEP team, and updated annually.”

SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE This form is completed upon student graduating based on age appropriate abilities, assessment and student’s postsecondary goals. (Summary of Performance) (To download this form use this link or see Appendix C)

REVISED 07/2017

41

Exiting the System A student can exit the school system for a variety of reasons. A student exits special education upon graduating from high school with a regular high school diploma or upon reaching the age of 21. A student may also exit special education if upon re-evaluation it is found that the student is no longer eligible for special education. When students exit school of their own volition, prior to a formal exit, they are considered to have “dropped out” of the system, however, eligibility does not end for students who drop out of high school or leave under unknown circumstances.

Eligibility does not end for students who drop out of high school or leave under unknown circumstances.

REVISED 07/2017

42

Goals Based on the present levels of performance, the next step of the IEP meeting is to develop (or review and revise, as appropriate) a written statement about the student’s educational needs and determine annual goals. A student’s goals provide the compass that guides the IEP Team’s decision-making. When writing goals for students, there should be a direct correspondence between present levels of performance, the Colorado Academic Standards, identified need(s), and annual goals that allow the student to be involved in and progress in the general curriculum. Goals should not be written verbatim from the academic standards, but should reflect consideration of, and relationship to, the Colorado Academic Standards, which include the Extended Evidence Outcomes (EEOs) for students with a significant cognitive disability. The standard(s) is referenced after the annual goal has been written. Special Note: For students with hearing impairment, including deafness; visual impairment, including blindness; and/or deaf-blindness, the annual goal may be tied to the Expanded Core Curriculum for Students who are Deaf or Hard or Hearing or the Expanded Core Curriculum for Blind or Visually Impaired Students. Annual goals represent the IEP Team’s estimate of what the student can reasonably be expected to accomplish with specially designed instruction or support during the subsequent 365 days. Annual goals reflect the IEP Team’s judgment, based on current levels of performance, potential for learning, and rate of development regarding what the student should accomplish. The team answers the question: “With specially designed instruction, what do we expect the student to know, understand, and be able to do at the end of the next 12 months?” Annual goals should be recognized by both parent(s) and teachers as high priority items that are educationally meaningful. Some goals may be established for their functional value in increasing the student’s independence. Goal statements:  Describe an improvement from the measurable current level of performance 

Reflect an area of need that is related to progress in the general education curriculum



Include a measurable level of attainment



Describe conditions under which the student will perform



Are prioritized and selected in order of importance each year An acronym to help write effective goals is SMART:     

REVISED 07/2017

Strategic and Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant and Realistic Time Bound

43

Objectives For students with a significant cognitive disability who receive their instruction on the alternate achievement standards called the Extended Evidence Outcomes (EEOs), and who take an alternate assessment, the IEP must include a description of benchmarks or short-term objectives. Students, who’s IEPs require objectives, should still have goals and objectives that are aligned to the state standards at his or her enrolled grade level. EEOs allow IEP teams to individualize benchmarks and/or assessments to focus on the key components of the standards, related access skills, or any combination necessary for a particular student to progress in his or her educational goals. The Extended Evidence Outcomes are directly aligned to the grade level expectations for all students. See CDE’s guidance on Extended Evidence Outcomes (EEO) – State Standards on the CDE website. The IEP Workgroup guidance document for Goals and Objectives may be found in Appendix D

Must the measurable annual goal address all areas of the general curriculum, or only those areas in which the student’s educational progress is affected by the disability? Annual goals should address only those areas that are identified as needs. The IEP Team is not required to include goals that relate to areas of the general curriculum for which the student does not have reported needs.

Accommodations The Accommodations section is used to identify areas of the curriculum and the student’s development that require instructional accommodations. Instructional accommodations may also serve as approved assessment accommodations. A ccommodations allow a student to access the curriculum, but do not change the standards or expectations in any way. Accommodations allow different instructional designs to support students and to enable them to receive instruction based on the general education curriculum and other content focus areas needed by the students, such as social, self-determination, and independent living skills. Accommodations may be used across all educational settings and provided by educators, related service providers, and paraeducators in these settings. Accommodations may involve the provision of a related service (e.g., educational interpreter), the assignment of paraeducators for specific purposes, and/or the provision of adaptive materials or instructional strategies targeted for the student. Accommodations involve adapting instructional strategies (materials, manner of presentation, grouping, format), and/or the classroom environment (seating arrangements, lighting, sound, etc.). Accommodations include, but are not limited to adaptations specific to presentation, response, setting/ environment, and timing / scheduling. Examples include:  Assistive technology devices  Instructional practices, such as tutoring, heterogeneous grouping and/or peer partnerships  Behavior intervention/support plans to address behavior that impedes learning  Adaptations that change how a student accesses information and demonstrates learning, such as digitized text, enlarged print, braille, sign language, calculators or word processors with adapted keyboard entry or word prediction software.  Individualized supports, such as rephrasing of questions and instructions, allowance for additional time on assignments or testing accommodations Curricular aids, such as highlighted reading materials, main idea summaries, organizational aids, prewritten notes or study guides

REVISED 07/2017

44

 Services of related service personnel (e.g., school nurse or educational interpreter services)  Services of a paraprofessional, such as a classroom or individual aide to provide assistance to the student in specific areas of need. Considerations for Instructional Accommodations

To ensure that all students are engaged in standards-based instruction, the members of every educational team shall be guided by applicable state and federal policies. Furthermore, the team should consider the following:



What are the student’s characteristics as a learner?



How can access to grade-level standards be ensured regardless of a disability and/or communication / language barrier?



What types of instructional tasks are expected of the student in order to demonstrate proficiency in grade-level content or other needed school-based tasks?



Is there a consistent “golden thread” or supporting body of evidence that connects the student’s characteristics and needs with accommodations?

 •

Are accommodations documented in a formal plan or standards-aligned IEP, which serves as a foundation for classroom instruction and assessment? Does the student really NEED the accommodation?



Does the student demonstrate willingness to consistently use the accommodation?



Are there training and support mechanisms in place to ensure that the student has access to an accommodation in a timely and needed fashion across educational settings?

It is important to note that certain accommodations which are used for the student’s daily instruction may not be used on assessments. The educational team will need to determine which accommodations, based on the guidelines from the specific assessment, are allowable

REVISED 07/2017

45

Intrusive accommodations, such as the assignment of an individual aide for all or part of the day, consistent use of a human scribe, should be considered alongside the goal of achieving independence, and include plans for a gradual fading and eventual elimination of the accommodation without having a negative effect on the student’s progress. Please note that this consideration does not apply to an intervener who must work closely with a student who is deaf-blind to support continual access to instruction and communication with others.

Modifications The IEP team determines what modifications to the general education curriculum are needed to enable the child to meet the measurable annual goals set out in the IEP of the child. Modifications reflect a change of content, complexity and rigor. They change what the student is expected to learn. They should enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum, to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities, and to be educated and be able to participate with other children with and without disabilities. Modifications:  Change what student learns.  Reflect a change of content, complexity, and rigor.  Are required to participate in all general education activities & extracurricular activities.  Must be documented that parents understand implications of alternate assessment 

Accommodations Manual Participation Guidelines Worksheet It is important that a discussion regarding the student’s course of study, gradelevel or alternate instructional standards, accommodations/modifications and grading criteria occur at each annual review IEP conference. Parents and students must be involved in determining whether the student meets participation requirements to receive instruction based upon alternate academic achievement standards and the potential effects of these decisions on the student’s post – school goals. For more detail see the Transition section of this document.

Service Delivery

i

The service delivery table describes the location (in/out of the general education classroom), duration and frequency of special education and related services to be provided to the child by a special educator and involved related service providers. Services include supplemental instruction to address specific skill deficits and may include program modifications or supports for school personnel to enable the child to advance appropriately toward attaining annual goals, to be involved and make progress in the general education curricula and to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities with other children with or without disabilities. To the extent possible, instruction and interventions should be research-based, systematic and explicit, and can occur in the general education or special education setting(s). Related services may also include parent counseling and training which assists the parents in understanding the needs of the child and provide the parent with information about child development and help the parents to acquire the necessaryskills to allow them to support the implementation of their child’s IEP.

REVISED 07/2017

46

The service delivery statement includes a statement of the types of specialized instruction or interventions and how they will address identified areas of need, as well as the setting in which services will occur. Be sure the service delivery statement includes those services that are not adequately addressed in the table. The IEP Workgroup guidance document for Delivery can be found in Appendix D.

How do we document when general education services meet special education needs (i.e., reading interventionist specialist providing specialized reading instruction, but not a special educator)? It is not necessary to document general education or Title I services on an IEP. However, The Interventionist’s role can be described in the Service Delivery Statement on the IEP. Interventionists could provide specialized instruction according to the student’s IEP in consultation with the special and general education teachers. If the reading/math Interventionist is providing services related to the child’s IEP, the interventionist could be a provider identified on the Service Delivery grid in the IEP.

REVISED 07/2017

47

Determining the Least Restrictive Environment The IDEA requires that every student who has been identified with a disability and is age three through twenty-one must receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE). LRE is the setting where a student with disabilities receives his/her education

The LRE mandate requires that, to the maximum extent appropriate, students with disabilities, including students in public or private institutions or other care facilities are educated with students without disabilities. Special classes, separate schools or other removal of students with disabilities from the general education classroom should occur only when the nature or severity of the student’s disability is such that education in the general education class with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.

Making the LRE Decision The LRE decision is made only after all the goals, modifications and/or accommodations, and specially designed instruction have been developed and identified in the student’s IEP, and is based on the student’s unique needs. (Guidance Document LRE Placement) The LRE may be very different for each student, but the determining factor remains the student’s individual needs.

It is expected in most instances a student with disabilities can be educated in the school he/she would attend if the student did not have a disability and in a general education classroom at least part of the day, with appropriate modifications and accommodations. Parents must be involved in any decision on the educational placement of their child. IEP teams must determine if a change of location is a significant change of placement. In the event the team decides a change in location is also a significant change of placement, a consideration of reevaluation is required Each year when the IEP is developed, the IEP team discusses the LRE for the student. The LRE discussion for every student with a disability, including preschool students, must consider placement in the general education classroom with necessary supplementary aids and services as the first placement option. The IEP Team should identify the student’s strengths, and build upon those strengths when determining how the student will benefit educationally from receiving special education services in the general education classroom. Non-academic considerations such as the social/emotional benefits of interaction with peers without disabilities, social development and self-care goals are equally important when discussing general education classroom placement. The IEP must ensure that the student has equal opportunity to participate in nonacademic and extracurricular services and activities as all students. The student’s areas of need that have been identified in the IEP and addressed with goals and/or accommodations and modifications should also be reviewed individually to determine if through consultation, co-teaching or other supplementary aids, those services can be delivered in the general education classroom.

REVISED 07/2017

48

When determining the LRE for a student with disabilities and before the IEP Team recommends that a student with disabilities receives educational services outside of the general education classroom, the IEP Team should consider these questions to ensure that the student will be educated with peers without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate: 1. Is it possible for the student to receive his/her individually determined services in a general education class? If not, why not? 2. Can the student achieve his or her IEP goals in the general education classroom with the use of supplementary aids and services? 3. Does the IEP provide all necessary supplementary aids and services? 4. What nonacademic benefits are available to the student from interacting with peers without disabilities? 5. Is it possible for the student to access the general education curriculum and meet annual goals in the general education class for all or some of the school day? If not, why not? 6. Would the student require so much of the general education teacher’s time that the teacher cannot give adequate attention to the needs of other students in the classroom? 7. Is the student so disruptive in the general education classroom that the education of the student or other students is significantly impaired? 8. Does the student require the curriculum to be modified so significantly that it bears little relation to the instruction in the classroom? 9. What are the potential effects, both positive and negative, of the placement options being considered? As no one factor outweighs any other, the IEP Team should look at the individual needs of the student and determine in which setting the student would benefit educationally. Remember, even if the IEP Team determines that a student with disabilities should be removed to a separate class for any particular curricular area(s), the student must still be integrated with peers without disabilities for other activities as appropriate and have access to the general education curriculum. If the IEP Team determines that a student with disabilities must be removed from the general education classroom because the student will not benefit educationally, even with the provision of supplementary aids and services, the IEP must document an educational justification for this removal. A decision to remove a student with disabilities from the general education setting must be based on the individual needs of the student and may not be based on the student’s disability. (The IEP Workgroup guidance documents for Least Restrictive Environment may also be found in Appendix D.

When determining a preschooler’s LRE the first factor to consider is whether or not the student is attending a regular early childhood program. A “regular early childhood program” is defined by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) to be a classroom that includes at least 50 percent of nondisabled children. This includes, but is not limited to, Head Start, kindergartens or preschools and group child development center or childcare. If the child is not currently in a regular early childhood program and the Lead Education Agency determines placement in a private preschool program is necessary for a child to receive FAPE, the public agency must make that program available at no cost to the parent.

REVISED 07/2017

49

Concluding the Meeting Copy and distribute the IEP documents as appropriate, ensuring that the special education teacher and parents receive a full copy at the conclusion of the conference or within a reasonable time frame.

EVERY teacher and support specialist who provides instruction for students with disabilities must have access to information regarding the needs of these students. After a review of the entire IEP document, local schools may prepare and distribute an IEP summary report to every general education staff who works with the child, including physical education, art music, computers, library and shop teachers.

The IEP summary report should be explained to general education staff by the case manager or other individuals identified at the IEP meeting. In a functional behavioral assessment is conducted and a behavioral intervention plan is developed, this plan should be provided to all staff that has interactions with the student, including staff responsible for discipline and security. Parents who speak a language other than English should have an interpreter available at the IEP meeting, when feasible to do so, and many also receive a complete copy of the IEP in their native language. If a translation of the IEP is not available, they may receive a reporting of the IEP meeting where the interpreter provided information in their native language.

REVISED 07/2017

50

Progress Reporting The purpose of progress reporting is to provide information to parents and school personnel regarding the student’s progress toward meeting his or her goals. How progress will be reported and the frequency of these reports is to be determined by the IEP team and documented in the Annual Goal and/or Objectives section of the IEP. All progress reports become part of the student’s special education record.

Annual Review IEPs for students eligible for special education must be reviewed within 365 days of the last IEP date. Annual Reviews should follow the process for IEP Development and require a Notice of Meeting.

Reevaluation and Determination of Eligibility A reevaluation is required:  At least every three years 

Prior to a change in eligibility



If the child’s parent or teacher requests, in writing, a reevaluation



If the AU determines that the student’s educational or related service needs warrant a reevaluation;



The parent(s) and Administrative Unit may agree that no further evaluation data are needed in order to determine continued eligibility

Once conducted, the reevaluation “resets the clock”, i.e., the next required reevaluation would be in 3 years from the new date. The Multidisciplinary Team must complete the reevaluation no more than three years from the date of the prior eligibility meeting where the student's eligibility was established or reaffirmed, or the child’s last reevaluation. The evaluation process described earlier in this chapter applies to all reevaluations, including those to redetermine eligibility or if a reevaluation is warranted for a significant change in placement. Documentation of the determination of eligibility must be shared with parents.

REVISED 07/2017

51

PART C to B TRANSITIONS Children transitioning from Part C Early Intervention services require collaboration between the local Early Intervention Colorado program and the local AU. http://www.cde.state.co.us/early/cfpreresources

TRANSFERS A transfer means a change in district enrollment/attendance that occurs within the same school year. A change in district enrollment/attendance that occurs over the summer months, i.e., not within the same school year, is not considered a “transfer” under the IDEA. 34 C.F.R. §§ 300.323 (e) and (f). For all students with disabilities, AUs must have IEPs in effect at the beginning of each school year, regardless of changes in district enrollment/attendance. 34 C.F.R. § 300.323(a). When a student with an IEP from another district enrolls in a district in Colorado within the current school year, whether the transfer is from a Colorado school district or a school district in another state, the new district must immediately initiate education services and provide a free appropriate public education by providing special education and related services comparable to those in the child’s IEP from the previous school district. 34 C.F.R. § 300.323(e) and (f). If the student transfers between Colorado school districts within the same school year, the new district may adopt the IEP from the previous district, in which case an IEP meeting may not necessarily be required; or the new district may decide not to adopt the previous district’s IEP and then proceed to develop and implement a new IEP through the IEP process. 34 C.F.R. § 300.323(e)(1) and (2). If the student has transferred to a Colorado district from another state, the new district may conduct an evaluation if the Colorado district determines that an evaluation is necessary to determine eligibility for special education services under the eligibility criteria established by the ECEA. The Colorado district may develop, adopt, and implement a new IEP if appropriate. The new district must take reasonable steps to promptly obtain the child’s education records including the IEP, other supporting documents, and other records related to the provision of special education or related services from the previous district. When determining whether or not a new IEP is necessary, a district may consider whether a copy of the current IEP is available and/or whether the parent is satisfied with the IEP. The Transfer Forms may be found listed below and or in AppendixC.  

Transfer Form for In-State (English Version Spanish Version) Transfer Form for Out of State (English Version Spanish Version)

IEP AMENDMENTS Under the IDEA, a child’s IEP can always be modified or amended at any time if conditions warrant. Different types of amendments implicate different procedures and considerations. (IEP Amendment & Prior Written Notice form – English Version Spanish Version)

REVISED 07/2017

52

Revising /Amending IEPs  An IEP may always be amended through the IEP meeting process. The procedural requirements related to notice, IEP meeting participants, and IEP content would apply as with any other IEP meeting.  Amendments to an IEP may be made at any time without holding an IEP meeting, if the AU and the parents agree. When making an amendment, the changes are completed through an abbreviated, written document rather than rewriting the entire IEP. Amendments to IEPs without a meeting must be agreed upon in writing by the parents and the AU. 

If the amendment to the IEP meeting is held after the annual IEP meeting for a school year and does not constitute a complete IEP review (e.g., a change in the time of a service), the anniversary date for the annual IEP review will remain the same, i.e., this process would not “reset the clock”.

Distinguishing Significant vs. Nonsignificant Changes in Placement [ECEA 4.03 8(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)] 







If a child’s IEP is altered, such as a change in the amount of a given service, the change is considered a “nonsignificant” change in program/services. o Parental consent is not required, but Prior Written Notice must be provided to the parents. o A nonsignificant change in program/services must be made by the IEP team unless the parent and AU agree to change the IEP after the annual meeting, as described above. o Reevaluation is not required. Recommended Form: IEP or IEP Amendment A significant change of placement includes: o Placement or referral to a private school or approved facility school, or o The addition or termination of an instructional or related services or any change which would result in:  the child having different opportunities to participate in nonacademic and extracurricular services;  a change in educational environment categories for LRE purposes; or  a transfer from brick-and-mortar school to an online program, or vice versa. A significant change of placement shall be made upon consideration of reevaluation, and shall be made by an IEP team with the addition of those persons conducting such reevaluation unless the parents and AU agree to change the IEP after the annual meeting, as described above. Recommended Form: Reevaluation and IEP Other – Other situations which require the IEP Team to meet at the request of the parent or the school. Recommended Form: IEP or IEP Amendment or Appendix C

REVISED 07/2017

53

When is it appropriate to amend an IEP? The IEP may be amended to address issues such as: 

Lack of progress toward annual goals



New information about the child provided to or by the parents



Reconsideration of decisions previously made regarding grading, promotion and assessment



Revision or consideration of transportation services



The need to eliminate or add curriculum modifications or accommodations such as classroom or individual aids



Revision of the need for a behavior intervention plan



The need to identify alternative strategies to meet the transition objectives if those set forth in the IEP are not being provided

Examples of Other Purposes for Conducting IEP Meetings: The IEP Team may meet to identify alternative strategies to meet the transition goals if those strategies set forth in the IEP are not being provided by outside agencies. IEP Team members may need to meet to determine the needs of students who transfer into the district from another district. The IEP Team may review the student’s educational status and determine if additional data are needed to complete an evaluation to determine eligibility (or continued eligibility). If the student fails to meet IEP goals or benchmarks, a meeting may be convened to review the services recommended and to determine whether or not changes are necessary. An IEP meeting may be convened anytime a student with a disability receives a failing grade in a general education class. The purpose of the meeting is to document the cause of the failing grade and to ensure that it was not attributed to a failure to implement any portion of the IEP or lack of supplementary aids or services. An IEP meeting may be convened at the request of an IEP team member.

REVISED 07/2017

54

MANIFESTATION DETERMINATION When a decision is made to effect a disciplinary change in placement for a student with a disability who violated a code of student conduct, the public agency must conduct a manifestation determination within 10 school days of that decision. A disciplinary change in placement occurs when a student is removed for more than 10 consecutive school days or is subjected to a series of removals that constitute a pattern because –  the series of removals total more than 10 school days in a school year;  the child’s behavior is substantially similar to the behavior in previous incidents that resulted in the series of removals; and  such additional factors as the length of each removal, the total amount of time the child has been removed, and the proximity of the removals to one another.[i] The purpose of the Manifestation Determination is to determine if the student’s conduct was a manifestation of the child’s disability or a result of the failure to implement the student’s IEP (use the links below or the forms may be found in Appendix C). 

Manifestation Determination Form Sections 1-3 (English Version Spanish Version),



Manifestation Determination Form Sections 4-8 (English Version Spanish Version),

EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR

Extended School Year (ESY) is for students on IEPs who need additional school days to receive a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) and prolonged periods of time off will have a negative impact on them. ESY services are determined by the IEP team on an individual basis and services that are necessary for the provision of FAPE to the student. ESY must be considered for all children, including preschool-aged children, whether or not they have previously been enrolled in school. ESY requires documentation (ESY Data Document – English Version Spanish Version) of regression, recoupment and/or predictive factors (Forms may also be found in Appendix C).

REVISED 07/2017

55

Children with disabilities who attend public charter schools and their parents retain all of the rights and protections of the IDEA. An administrative unit must serve children with disabilities attending charter schools in the same manner as the administrative unit serves children with disabilities in its other schools, including providing supplementary and related services on site at the charter school to the same extent to which the administrative unit provides such services on the site to its other public schools. In Colorado, how an administrative unit provides special education services is based on the service delivery/funding model that is negotiated between the charter school and its authorizer. There are several service delivery models:  Insurance model: Under the insurance model, the charter school pays an “insurance” premium to the administrative unit to provide all special education and related services for children with disabilities attending the charter school.  Contracted model: Under the contracted model, the administrative unit passes through to the charter school its share of special education funding and the charter school hires or contracts with third party special education service providers to provide special education and related services for children with disabilities attending the school.  Combination/Modified Insurance model: Under the combination/modified insurance model, the charter school and its authorizer negotiate responsibility and funding for special education and related services. The charter school may hire some of its staff and negotiate with its authorizer for the administrative unit to provide some services. Responsibility for the referral, evaluation and IEP processes are determined by the service delivery model negotiated by the charter school and its authorizer. However, the same referral, evaluation, and IEP requirements apply to children with disabilities attending charter schools. Additionally, an IEP for a charter school student must contain a statement that specifies whether the child shall achieve the content standards adopted by the school district in which the child is enrolled or the charter school institute; or whether the child shall achieve individualized standards which would indicate that the child has met the requirements of his/her IEP.

The IDEA requires an administrative unit to locate, to identify, and to evaluate all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private, nonprofit (including religious) elementary and secondary schools located in their school district. This child find activity is designed to ensure the equitable participation of parentally-placed private school children and to get an accurate count of those children. The timelines for initial evaluations apply. An administrative unit must spend a proportionate share of Part B federal special education funding on providing education and related services including direct services to children with disabilities who are parentally placed in private schools. How the funds are used for equitable participation is determined by meaningful consultation with private school representatives and representatives of children with disabilities who are parentally-placed in private school. When a child who is parentally-placed in private school is identified with a disability, it is important to note that there is not an individual right to receive some or all of the special education and related services the child would receive if he/she were enrolled in a public school. If a child with a disability who is parentallyplaced in private school receives services, it is based on a services plan. Although similar, a services plan is REVISED 07/2017

56

not an IEP. A services plan need only describe the specific special education and related services that the administrative unit will provide to the child in light of the determination of how the administrative unit’s proportionate funds are spent. However, a services plan should be developed, reviewed, and revised consistent with the IEP timelines. A services plan for parentally placed students does not apply to preschool and kindergartners.

In Colorado, an approved facility school means a group care facility (e.g. a psychiatric residential treatment facility and a therapeutic treatment facility), group home, community centered board, hospital, or statelicensed day treatment facility that offers a school program providing special education services to children with disabilities that has been approved by the Colorado State Board of Education. Administrative Units and Eligible Facilities should be familiar with and refer to ECEA rule 8.0 Responsibilities of Administrative Units, State-Operated Programs and Eligible Facilities and ECEA rule 9.0 Out of District Placements. The IEP team completing an IEP for a student with a disability placed in an approved facility school should pay particular attention to the Educational Environment categories on the IEP.  For students in a residential facility, check the residential facility box. 

For students in a day treatment program, check the separate school box.



For students in a residential facility who attend a public school part-time, check the two appropriate boxes (e.g. general education class 40%-79% of the time and residential facility).

REVISED 07/2017

57

Forms required for Initial Eligibility: □ Prior Notice & Consent for Evaluation □ Procedural Safeguards □ Notice of Meeting □ Cover page □ Evaluation Report □ Appropriate Determination of Eligibility Form(s) □ Prior Notice & Initial Provision of Special Education and Related Services (if determined eligible) □ IEP (if determined eligible) □ Permission to Invite Agencies Related to Transition (if student is 15 or older) Forms required for Reevaluation □ Prior Notice & Consent for Evaluation □ Notice of Meeting □ Permission to Invite Agencies Related to Transition (if student is 15 or older) □ Cover page □ Evaluation Report □ Appropriate Determination of Eligibility Form(s) □ IEP (if determined eligible) □ Prior Written Notice Forms required for Annual IEP Review □ Notice of meeting □ Permission to Invite Agencies Related to Transition (if student is 15 or older) □ IEP □ Prior Written Notice Forms required for IEP Amendment □ Notice of Meeting (if appropriate) □ IEP Amendment □ Prior Written Notice

REVISED 07/2017

58

REVISED 07/2017

59

Header is used:  To identify the student’s name, SASID, and date of birth  To identify the Administrative Unit, address, and phone number  To identify the date of the meeting

Type of Meeting is used to:  Identify the reason why the IEP meeting is being convened.

Comments: 

Check the appropriate box for the type of meeting being held.



Indicate Date Initial Consent for Services Given. This is the date documented after initial eligibility was determined, and the parent provided written consent for special education services. This date will remain the same on all future IEPs.

Dates of Meetings is used to:  Identify important dates.

Comments: 





Date of Next Eligibility Meeting This is the date of the required 3-year reevaluation for eligibility. If the purpose of the IEP meeting is to determine a student’s initial eligibility for special education, enter N/A in this space. For all other purposes, the date of the next IEP meeting report in which the findings from an initial evaluation, reevaluation, or special evaluation were presented to establish or maintain the student’s eligibility status should be written. Date of Next IEP Review Meeting This is the date of the next meeting that will be used to review the student’s current IEP. This must occur at least annually, within 365 days of the meeting. Date of Initial Eligibility Determination This is the date in which the student was

REVISED 07/2017

60

determined eligible for Special Education services: this date will remain the same on all future IEPs. 

Postsecondary Goals Due This is a date that will also remain the same. It should indicate to parents and the case manager when transition goals and services must be initiated. The date is due during the year the student is 15, but no later than the end of his/her 9th grade year. Remember, revisions to the IEP that are made via an IEP amendment and that did not involve a comprehensive review of the IEP will not cause the date of the annual review to change.

Student and Family Information is used to:  Provide basic demographic information about the student and family.

Comments: Indicate the appropriate answers in the Prior to Meeting column.    



District of Residence: the district the student lives in. Home School: the school that the student would typically attend based on his or her residency. School of Attendance: the school the student currently attends. It may be the same as the home school, depending on where services are provided to the student. Unit/Facility of Attendance: only to be used if the student is (or will be) placed at a location outside of the school district for services. If this section is not to be used, indicate with N/A. Primary Disability, if any: indicate the student’s current primary disability prior to the

REVISED 07/2017

61





meeting, and update after the meeting. This is the disability identified by the team that most significantly interferes with the student’s ability to benefit from general education alone, and the disability that is reported to the State for federal reporting. If there is none, mark with N/A. Secondary Disabilities, if any (Optional): if students have multiple areas for which they are eligible to receive special education services, other secondary disabilities may be noted. Primary Special Education Environment: indicate where the student receives the majority of the special education services; this can be referenced from the Educational Environment area. The term parent, as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), includes a person or persons who are acting in the place of a parent, such as a grandparent, step-parent or foster parent with whom the student lives, or an individual who is legally responsible for the student. For students who are without parents, the educational surrogate parent (ESP) is considered the parent. The ESP is a person who has training and is assigned by the Administrative Unit to represent the student in all educational decision-making processes whenever the parent of a child with a disability is unknown, cannot be located, is unavailable or the child is a ward of the state.

What is the role of parents, including educational surrogate parents, in decisions regarding the educational program of their child? Parents are expected to be equal participants along with school personnel, in developing, reviewing, and revising the IEP for their child.

When must an educational surrogate parent (ESP) be assigned by the District or AU? An ESP is assigned whenever the parent of a child with a disability is unknown, cannot be located, is unavailable or is a ward of the state.

REVISED 07/2017

62

Procedural Safeguards is used to:  Document that the parent has received a copy of the Procedural Safeguards.

Comments: A copy of the procedural safeguards must be given to the parent of a student with a disability one time per school year. During the IEP conference, the parent should check the “yes” box on the IEP form and sign the provided line to indicate that the parent was given a copy of the Procedural Safeguards or enter the date within the current school year when the parent was provided a copy of the Procedural Safeguards. Another copy of the Procedural Safeguards should be given to the parents at the IEP meeting if requested. It is important to ensure the parents understand the Procedural Safeguards, particularly any areas relevant to the meeting; and to inquire whether there are any questions.

IEP Participants page is used to:  Document the participants in the IEP meeting.

REVISED 07/2017

63

Comments:  

Each participant may sign next to the appropriate title. The signature verifies attendance at the meeting. Parent signature on the meeting participation page indicates participation only. Parent signature on the meeting participation page does not reflect agreement to their child’s eligibility for special education or for the consent for special education services. Any single member of the IEP Team may meet no more than two of the required roles at the IEP meeting. For example, the special education teacher may also serve as the special education Director designee if he/she has the authority to designate and approve AU-level resources or an ECSE who also holds a role of a general education preschool teacher may serve in the general education and special education role

Annual goals will be developed and accommodations and/ or modifications (if necessary) are described for each area identified by the IEP Team that is adversely affected by the student’s disability. Annual transition IEP goals are directly related to the student’s postsecondary goals/transition services’ needs. See detail and examples in the Indicator 13 Compliance and Quality Tips http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/transition_trainingta-7

REVISED 07/2017

64

Consideration of Special Factors is used to:  Consider any special factors that may interfere with the student’s learning.  ALL areas must be considered by the IEP team.  ALL areas requiring special consideration must be addressed throughout the IEP, e.g. the PLAAFP and any other areas deemed appropriate by the IEP team.

Comments: 

    

Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) For a student who exhibits behavior that impedes the student’s learning or the learning of others, the IEP Team will need to determine a present level of educational performance in the affected area(s), consider whether the student requires accommodations to the learning environment, develop annual goal(s) and benchmarks as appropriate, and develop a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP). The IEP Team should conduct a functional behavior assessment (FBA). Learning Media Plan For any student who is blind or visually impaired, the IEP Team is required to develop a Learning Media Plan. Communication Plan Consider the student’s communication needs, and, if a student is deaf or hard-of-hearing, develop a Communication Plan to address these issues. For a student who is deaf-blind, both a Learning Media Plan and Communication Plan must be developed. Unique Communication Needs Consider whether the student has unique communication needs and, if so, specify those unique needs. Healthcare Plan For a student who has any healthcare needs, indicate this and identify the location of the Healthcare Plan.

REVISED 07/2017

65







Limited English Proficiency In determining if language is an issue for a student with Limited English Proficiency, the IEP Team may ask the following questions: o Does the student’s level of English language proficiency impact the special education and related services needed by the student? If so, how and to what extent? o Will the special education and related services needed by the student be provided in a language other than English?  If language proficiency is an issue for the student, the IEP Team will need to determine how this will be addressed. Assistive Technology The IEP Team must determine if the student requires assistive technology as it relates to the student’s functional capacity. o An assistive technology device is any item that can be used to increase, maintain, or improve the student’s functional capabilities. An assistive technology service directly assists a student with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device. This service includes a functional assessment of the student in his or her customary environment (e.g., classroom, home, and community settings). Information from the functional assessment of the student’s need for assistive devices should be described in this section. A specific recommendation for assistive devices should not be made without first conducting a needs assessment. o Examples of assistive devices used for program modifications include tape recorders, magnifiers, enlarged key labels for computers, adapted keyboards, and communication displays. Both low and high technology solutions should be considered. In many instances, a low technology device can facilitate the same outcome as a high technology device. It is important to re-examine the need for continued use of any previously recommended devices.  In determining if the student requires assistive technology devices and/or services, the IEP Team may ask the following questions:  What tasks are difficult for this student that might be made easier with assistive technology? 

How will technology be used across the curriculum to ensure that the student has access to the general curriculum?



To answer these questions appropriately, the IEP Team may request an evaluation by an assistive technology specialist.

Transportation is provided as a related service for students with disabilities if a student cannot get to school in the same manner as peers without disabilities or is placed at a school other than his/her neighborhood school. Transportation services include travel to and from school and between schools. Services may also include the provision of specialized equipment, such as special or adapted buses, lifts and/or specialized child restraint systems. If additional support on the bus is required due to the medical, behavioral, or other needs of the student, that support should be described. o Decisions regarding transportation service are to be made on an individual basis. The IEP Team should indicate the decision by checking the appropriate box on the Special Considerations page. If the student requires transportation, justification for this

REVISED 07/2017

66

related service must be included. o The IEP Team should use a variety of criteria to determine whether a student with a disability requires transportation as a related service. Some special transportation service options and examples of justification are identified below. o Special transportation services may be appropriate for students who cannot walk or get to school independently because of the disability, or because the student is assigned to a school other than the neighborhood school to receive special education or related services. Special transportation may be an option for a young child (age 5 or under) who could not participate in the recommended program without transportation.  Some students may require an aide on the bus. Aides may be appropriate for students:  whose unpredictable behavior may cause a substantial disturbance that could be dangerous to the student or others;  who are unable to function independently due to the nature or severity of the disability; or  who are medically fragile.  Another special transportation need would be for a student who requires a vehicle with specialized equipment. This option may be appropriate for students who require a lift, wheelchair tie down and/or occupant restraint system, securement devices for life support systems, or specialized seating systems for infants and toddlers.

Arrival and departure times shall ensure a full instructional day which is comparable to that of students without disabilities.

REVISED 07/2017

67

Postsecondary Transition Plan is used to:  Identify the coordinated set of transition activities for students who are age 15, but not later than the end of 9th grade. It may be used earlier if deemed appropriate by the IEP Team.

Comments: Projected date of graduation/program completion: This date should reflect the month and year that the IEP Team anticipates the student will reach graduation or high school completion. It can be adjusted based on objective criteria (total credits earned) at each annual review and adjusted accordingly. Projected type of completion document: Identify the anticipated type of completion document (i.e. diploma, certificate of completion, etc.). This will be based on district graduation requirements, student needs and the course of study the IEP Team determines will meet the educational needs of the student while also ensuring appropriate support for the preparation needed to attain the post-school goals.

REVISED 07/2017

68

Annual Goals and/or Objectives is used to:  Describe the demonstrated improvement from the measurable present level of performance.  Reflect an area of need that is related to progress in the general education curriculum (for preschool children, participate in appropriate activities and daily routines).  Include a measurable level of attainment.  Describe conditions under which the student will perform.  Relate to Colorado Academic Standards.

Comments: REVISED 07/2017

When writing goals for students, there should be a direct correspondence between identified need, present level of performance and annual goals that allow the student to be involved and progress in the general curriculum (for preschool children, participate in appropriate activities and daily routines). Additionally, if the student is of transition age, the annual goals should directly support and promote the attainment of their post-school goals. For preschool children, the goals should address the gap in development or missing foundational skill, not what all students are working on.

69



Document that annual goals are designed to directly support and promote the accomplishment of the post-school goals if appropriate.



For students taking alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards, write a measurable short term objective. Unit of measurement: This is how achievement of the goal will be measured. Examples include words correct per minute (WCPM), or outbursts per hour. While the goal will likely include a unit of measurement in targeting the improvement, the criteria should be explicit and clear for parents and school personnel.





Progress toward each annual goal will be measured through the identified criteria and evaluation measures established for each goal.



When reporting, use the provided progress reporting key and attach any supporting graphs or available data. The reporting key is very general, and it is helpful to parents to receive a more informative update. Sources of data may include progress monitoring data, Results Matter data (for ages 3-5), or behavior charts, among other items. Whether or not the student met the goals (and objectives if applicable) must be documented. This information must be shared with the parent by issuing an IEP progress report as frequently as was indicated on the most recent IEP. The case manager is responsible for maintaining documentation that the IEP progress reports were provided to parents of students with disabilities.

Accommodations and Modifications are used to:  Identify areas where the student requires accommodations to access the general education curriculum.  Identify areas where the student requires modifications to participate and make progress in the general education curriculum.  For more information on Accommodation and Modifications use this link.

REVISED 07/2017

70

Extended School Year Determination is used to:  Consider whether the student needs extended school year services in order to receive a FAPE.

Comments: 

Follow the ESY guidance document for making the required considerations.



Review student records and data for evidence of regression/recoupment issues over major school breaks.



Indicate whether the student experienced significant regression on any of his/her IEP goals and objectives. If yes, attach documentation of the regression.



Indicate whether the student required an unreasonably long period of time to relearn previously learned skills. If yes, attach documentation. Indicate whether there are other factors relevant in determining the student’s eligibility for ESY services. Predictive factors include, but are not limited to: o the degree of the student’s impairment, o the ability of the student’s parents to provide the educational structure at home, o the student’s rate of progress, o the student’s behavioral and physical problems, o the availability of alternative resources, o the ability of the student to interact with children without disabilities, o the areas of the student’s curriculum which need continuous attention, and o the individual needs of the student and whether the requested ESY service(s) are relevant to support those needs.



REVISED 07/2017

71



Indicate the decision of whether the student is eligible for ESY services. o If the student is eligible for ESY, identify and document which goals will be addressed during the ESY and record ESY services in the Services area and in the Service Delivery Statement. o If the IEP team does not have enough data to make an ESY determination, check the “To be determined. o ESY must be considered for preschoolers who have not yet been in school; i.e. have been identified in the school year or are transitioning from Part C to Part B services.

Must the IEP Team recommend extended school year services for all students with disabilities? No. Consideration must be given annually for each student regarding the need for extended school year services. Factors to consider include likelihood of regression, slow recoupment, and predictive data based on the opinion of professionals. For preschool children who not yet been in school, ESY must still be considered.

IDEA does not require that each school establish summer programs for students without disabilities for the sole purpose of providing integrated activities for students with disabilities in ESY programs, nor does it require that ESY services address all of a student’s IEP goals. Because the purpose of ESY services is to prevent regression and recoupment problems, a student’s placement for ESY services may differ from his/her placement during the regular school year. Therefore a full continuum of placement options is not required for ESY.

REVISED 07/2017

72

State/District Assessments are used to:  Consider the student’s participation in local and statewide assessments of academic performance.

Comments:   



Note whether the IEP team determined if the student will be taking the regular or alternate district level assessments, based on the standards of instruction. If the student will be taking the state and district alternate assessments, provide justification. If the student will be taking the alternate assessments, inform parent(s) regarding the differences between the regular and alternate assessments and any potential effects of taking the alternate assessments. Indicate that the parent(s) has been so informed by checking the box on the next page. If the student will be taking the state assessment and requires unique accommodations, the team must apply for those (such as math manipulatives on the non-calculator portion of the mathematics assessment); however, this must be documented in the IEP and the application for Unique Assessment must be submitted to the District Assessment Coordinator by the district deadline. The state deadline for request submissions is December 15th; however, districts may have an earlier deadline for review prior to submission to CDE.

REVISED 07/2017

73

All students with disabilities are required by state and federal law to participate in local/state assessments or in alternate assessments if students without disabilities of the same age or grade are tested. It is anticipated that almost all students with disabilities will be able to participate in all local/state assessments. Accommodations needed for general assessment and alternate assessment are documented in the IEP. Accommodations used during instruction should be provided and routinely used in order to mirror those used for assessment. It is vital that students have routine experience with the use of an accessibility feature or accommodation similar to those used on computer-based assessment, in order for the student to become familiar with the tool and be able to independently access the feature. Obvious exceptions are those situations which are unique to standardized tests. 

A student who uses a calculator during classroom instruction to work on mathematical problem- solving tasks might not be allowed to use a calculator on a standardized local or statewide achievement test that measures math calculation skills.



A student who uses a word processor with spell checker in the classroom to complete a writing assignment might not be able to use it when performing on a standardized achievement test that measures ability to spell correctly.

Students must have experience with the accommodation. For example, a student who has directions read to her/ him in the classroom might have difficulty following directions during a standardized assessment that involves listening to a tape recording/digitized screen reader as an accommodation for the student

REVISED 07/2017

74

Service Delivery Statement is used to:  Identify areas of the curriculum and the student’s development that require specialized instruction or intervention from a special education teacher and/or related service provider.

 Explain the services table so that parents can clearly understand how services will be provided. Comments: 

Describe in detail the services that will be provided and how they will be provided.



Provide enough detail that an IEP Team receiving the IEP would be able to implement the services exactly as they were intended by the sending IEP Team. Ensure this is clear for parent(s) to understand what a typical day, week or month might look like for the student. If, for example, a student requires “constant supervision,” this may not be documented in the table under “Specialized Instruction,” but should be described in the Service Delivery Statement.

Special Education and Related Services in the Least Restrictive Environment is used to:  Document any special education services including ESY services.

Comments: 

Indicate the service provider that will be responsible for the identified specialized instruction area or related service.



Only the role of the person should be identified, not specific individuals by name. This allows for continuation of services when there are changes in staff or when the student changes schools. Indicate the Start Date. Services indicated should begin as soon as possible after completing the IEP with the exception of ESY Services.



REVISED 07/2017

75



In the case of students transitioning from Part C services to Part B services, the start date should be on or before the third birthday. In the case of a preschooler who is not yet enrolled in a general education program, the start date is the estimated date of enrollment.

Services may be provided directly to the student or indirectly on behalf of the student. Consultation services are considered “indirect.” Additionally, if the student is Medicaid eligible, and the case manager will be conducting case management activities that are billable to Medicaid, this would be documented in the “indirect” column as well.

Recommended Placement in the Least Restrictive Environment is used to:  Document each setting considered, which setting was selected, and to summarize the discussion  Document possible advantages and disadvantages that the setting and services outlined in the IEP may have on the effectiveness of the student to reach his/her stated PostSchool Goals.

Comments: 

Discuss and document possible advantages and disadvantages, or potentially harmful effects (e.g., embarrassment, potential loss of continuity with classroom discussions) of each setting being considered. Discuss and document any modifications, supplementary aids or services, which may reduce possible disadvantages to the student.

REVISED 07/2017

76

General Education Services for Preschool, ages 3-5 Educational Environment is used to:  The purpose of Educational Environment is for Indicator 6 reporting to OSEP, which requires states to report the percentage of three to five year olds with disabilities who attend a regular early childhood program with their peers for at least 10 hours per week and receive the majority of special education and related services in the regular early childhood program and the percentage who attend a separate special education class, separate school, or residential facility.

Comments: Ages 3-5 When reporting educational environments for children ages three through five, use the following rules to determine which environment to use when reporting each child. Please note that the order of the categories for children with disabilities ages 3 – 5 does not reflect a continuum from least to most restrictive. The first factor to consider is whether the child is attending a regular early childhood program, as defined below. 

Early Childhood Program – A regular program includes as least 50 percent children who are nondisabled. Early childhood programs include, but are not limited to, Head Start, kindergartens, preschool classes offered to an eligible pre-kindergarten population by the public school system, private kindergartens* or preschools, and group child development center or child care.

* Include children with disabilities enrolled by their parents in a private elementary school and receiving special education and related services. If the child does not attend a regular early childhood program or kindergarten, the next factor to consider is whether the child attends a special education program, as defined below. If the child is attending a special education program, report the child according to the location of the special education program.

REVISED 07/2017

77

 Special Education Program - A program that includes less than 50 percent children who are nondisabled (i.e., children not on IEPs). Special education programs include, but are not limited to: o Special education classrooms in regular school buildings, trailers or portables outside regular school buildings, child care facilities, hospital facilities on an outpatient basis, and other communitybased setting; o Separate schools; and o Residential facilities. If the child attends neither a Regular Early Childhood Program nor Special Education Program, as defined above, report the child dependent upon whether the child receives special education and related services at:  Home - If the child attends neither a regular early childhood program nor a special education program, the next factor to consider is whether the child receives some or all of his/her special education and related services in the principal residence of the child's family or caregivers; report the child in that category.  Service provider location or some other location that is not in any other category - If the child is not attending a regular early childhood program nor a special education program, and does not receive any special education services in the home, report the child as receiving services at a service provider location, such as private clinicians' offices, clinicians' offices located in school buildings and hospital facilities on an outpatient basis, or at some other location that is not in any other category.

Ages Three through Five Educational Environment Codes and Definitions 204

205

206

207

Separate Class – Report children who attend a special education program in a class with less than 50 percent nondisabled children. Do not include children who also attend a regular early childhood program. They should be reported in one of the categories below (209 through 212). Separate School – Report children who receive their education programs in public or private day schools designed specifically for children with disabilities. Do not include children who also attend a regular early childhood program. They should be reported in one of the categories below (209 through 212). Residential Facility – Report children who receive their education programs in publicly or privately operated residential schools or residential medical facilities on an inpatient basis. Do not include children who also attend a regular early childhood program. They should be reported in one of the categories below (209 through 212). Home – Report children who receive special education and related services in the principal resident of the child's family or caregivers, and who do not attend an early childhood program or a special education program provided in a separate class, separate school, or residential facility. Include children who receive special education both at home and in a service provider location. The term caregiver includes babysitters.

REVISED 07/2017

78

208

209

210

211

212

Service Provider Location – Report children who receive all of the special education and related services from a service provider, and who do not attend an early childhood program or a special education program provided in a separate class, separate school, or residential facility. For example: speech instruction provided in a private clinician's office, clinician’s offices located in school buildings, hospital facilities on an outpatient basis, and libraries and other public locations. Do not include children who also receive special education at home. Children who receive special education in a service provider location and at home should be reported in the home category. At least 10 hours per week and majority in regular early childhood program – Report children who receive the majority of hours of special education and related services in the Regular Early Childhood Program (and the children attend a Regular Early Childhood Program at least 10 hours per week). At least 10 hours per week and majority in some other location – Report children who receive the majority of hours of special education and related services in a location other than the Regular Early Childhood Program (and the child attends a Regular Early Childhood Program at least 10 hours per week). Less than 10 hours per week and majority in regular early childhood program – Report children who receive the majority of hours of special education and related services in the Regular Early Childhood Program (and the child attends a Regular Early Childhood Program less than 10 hours per week). Less than 10 hours per week and majority in some other location – Report children who receive the majority of hours of special education and related services in some other location (and the child attends a Regular Early Childhood Program less than 10 hours per week).

Ages 6-21  Children should be reported according to the setting in which they have been placed for educational services.  To calculate the percentage of time inside the general education classroom, divide the number of hours the child spends in the general education classroom by the total number of hours in the school day (including lunch, recess and study periods). The result is multiplied by 100. Time spent outside the general education classroom receiving services unrelated to the child’s disability (e.g., time receiving limited English proficiency services), should be considered time in the general education classroom. Educational time spent in age-appropriate community-based settings that include individuals with and without disabilities (e.g. college campuses, vocational sites) should be counted as time spent in the general education classroom.

REVISED 07/2017

79



Following are the categories and definitions for educational environments for students ages 6-21: o General education class 80 percent or more of the time Report children who receive special education and related services in the general education classroom for 80 percent or more of the time. (These are children who receive special education and related services out of the general education classroom for less than 21 percent of the time.) This may include children with disabilities placed in the general education class with: (a) special education and related services provided within general education classes, (b) special education and related services provided outside the general education classes, or (c) special education services provided in resource rooms. o General education class no more than 79 percent of the time and no less than 40 percent of the time Report children who receive special education and related services in the general education classroom for no more than 79 percent of the time and no less than 40 percent of the time. (These are children who receive special education and related services out of the general education classroom for at least 21 percent but no more than 60 percent of the time.) Do not include children who are reported as receiving education programs in public or private separate schools or residential facilities. This may include children placed in: (a) resource rooms, with special education and related services provided within the resource rooms, or (b) resource rooms, with part-time instruction in a general education class.

o General education class less than 40 percent of the time Report children who receive special education and related services in the general education classroom less than 40 percent of the time. (These are children who receive special education and related services out of the general education classroom for more than 60 percent of the time.) It does not include children who are receiving educational programs in public or private separate schools or residential facilities. This category may include children placed in: (a) self-contained special education classrooms with part-time instruction in a general education class; or (b) self-contained special classrooms with full-time special education instruction on a general education school campus. o Separate school -- Report children who receive their educational programs in public or private separate day school facilities. This includes children with disabilities receiving special education and related services, at public expense, for greater than 50 percent of the time in public or private separate schools. This may include children placed in: (a) public and private day schools for children with disabilities; (b) public and private day schools for children with disabilities for a portion of the school day (greater than 50 percent) and in general education school buildings for the remainder of the school day; or (c) public and private residential facilities if the student does not live at the facility. o Residential facility -- Report children who receive their educational programs in, and live in, public or private residential facilities during the school week. This includes children with disabilities receiving special education and related services, at public expense for greater than 50 percent of the school day in public or private residential facilities. This may include children placed in: (a) public and private residential schools

REVISED 07/2017

80

for students with disabilities; or (b) public and private residential schools for children with disabilities for a portion of the school day (greater than 50 percent) and in separate day schools or general education school buildings for the remainder of the school day. Do not include students who receive education programs at the facility, but do not live there. o Homebound/hospital -- Report children who receive education programs in a homebound/hospital environment. This includes children with disabilities placed in and receiving special education and related services in: (a) hospital programs, or (b) homebound programs. Do not include children with disabilities whose parents have opted to provide home-schooling and who receive special education at the public expense. o Correctional facilities -- Report children who receive special education in correctional

facilities. These data provide a census of all children receiving special education in: (a) short-term detention facilities (community based or residential); or (b) correctional facilities.

REVISED 07/2017

81

Prior Written Notice (embedded within the IEP) is used to:  Document the other considerations that were made throughout the IEP meeting that were rejected by the IEP team and the bases for making those decisions, as well as other factors that were considered. The considerations that were made by the IEP team in the IEP meeting that were accepted are documented in the IEP itself, along with the bases for making those decisions. NOTE: If the parent requires that notices are translated in a language other than English, completing the Prior Written Notice as described here will require the translation of the entire IEP. Otherwise, the IEP Team should use the Prior Written Notice of Special Education Action and summary those considerations considered and accepted as well as those that were considered and rejected, along with other options and factors considered.  Meet the requirement to provide prior written notice to parents before the AU takes any action with regard to a student’s identification, evaluation, placement, individualized education plan, or provision of a free, appropriate public education. Provide documentation of specific changes to be made and the timing for those changes.

REVISED 07/2017

82

REVISED 07/2017

83

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-autism_resources

REVISED 07/2017

84

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance

http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-db

REVISED 07/2017

85

Comments: o

o

Children ages three through eight in which a clear determination cannot be made under any other eligibility category, as measured by developmentally appropriate diagnostic instruments and procedures, may be considered with an eligibility determination of developmental delay. To be eligible as a child with a Developmental Delay, there must be evidence through multiple sources of information that the child meets one or more of the three criteria. Criteria for a preschool child being unable to receive reasonable educational benefit from general education shall be a substantial discrepancy between the child's performance and behavior as compared to children of a comparable age. For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-preschool

REVISED 07/2017

86

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance

http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-hearing

REVISED 07/2017

87

Comments: None of these indicators by itself shall be sufficient criterion for determination of a significant limited intellectual capacity. All three indicators shall be evident for the determination of this disability. Professional judgment shall be required for interpretation of scores and/or other findings http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-intellectual REVISED 07/2017

88

Comments: For each identified disability, an eligibility form for that area must be included in the Evaluation Report along with the Multiple Disabilities Eligibility form. All eligibility requirements for each disability category continue to apply. http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-multiple

REVISED 07/2017

89

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-orthopedic

REVISED 07/2017

90

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-other

REVISED 07/2017

91

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-emotional

REVISED 07/2017

92

REVISED 07/2017

93

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-sld

What is the process when one or more team members disagree with the team’s decision of Specific Learning Disability? In the area of Specific Learning Disability, if any member of the Multidisciplinary Team disagrees with the conclusion, a written statement of dissenting opinion must be attached.

REVISED 07/2017

94

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-sli

REVISED 07/2017

95

For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Webpage for resources and guidance http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-tbi

REVISED 07/2017

96

Comments: In the case of a child who is Deaf-Blind but who does not meet the criteria for Visual Impairment, including Blindness, but for whom the combination of a visual impairment and hearing disability adversely affects the student’s educational performance: should be checked “Yes”. The term “visual impairment, including blindness” does not include children who have learning problems which are primarily the result of visual perceptual and/or visual motor difficulties. http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-vision

REVISED 07/2017

97

REVISED 07/2017

98

REVISED 07/2017

99

Prior Written Notice & Consent for Evaluation is used to:  Obtain and document parental consent for an initial evaluation  Obtain and document parental consent for reevaluation (the agency may proceed with the reevaluation if the parent does not respond and the agency can demonstrate that it has taken reasonable measures to obtain consent).  Provide written notice when the team is proposing that no additional evaluation data are needed.

Comments: 1. Indicate the intent of the team (to evaluate, reevaluate, or not to evaluate) and the reason for the proposal. 2. Describe any screening, evaluation procedures, tests, records and reports used to make this decision. 3. Describe any other options that the team considered prior to this action. 4. Explain why any of the options considered were rejected. 5. Describe any other factors that contributed to the decision. If the evaluation includes release of records requiring parental consent, attach the Release of Secure or Confidential Records Form(s) that identifies the records to be released, and to whom they will be released.

REVISED 07/2017

100

Prior Written Notice (embedded within the IEP) is used to:  Document the other considerations that were made throughout the IEP meeting that were rejected by the IEP team and the bases for making those decisions, as well as other factors that were considered. The considerations that were made by the IEP team in the IEP meeting that were accepted are documented in the IEP itself, along with the bases for making those decisions. NOTE: If the parent requires that notices are translated in a language other than English, completing the Prior Written Notice as described here will require the translation of the entire IEP. Otherwise, the IEP Team should use the Prior Written Notice of Special Education Action and summary those considerations considered and accepted as well as those that were considered and rejected, along with other options and factors considered.  Meet the requirement to provide prior written notice to parents before the AU takes any action with regard to a student’s identification, evaluation, placement, individualized education plan, or provision of a free, appropriate public education. Provide documentation of specific changes to be made and the timing for those changes.

REVISED 07/2017

101

Prior Written Notice & Consent for the Initial Provision of Special Education and Related Services is used to:  Provide written notice when initial placement into special education is proposed; and  Obtain and document parental consent for initial provision of special education and related services Comments: If the action includes release of records requiring parent consent, attach Release of Secure or Confidential Information Form(s) that identifies the records to be released, and to whom. REVISED 07/2017

102

Prior Written Notice of Special Education Action is used to:  Meet the requirement to provide prior written notice to parents before the AU takes any action (acceptance or rejection) with regard to a student’s identification, evaluation, placement, individualized education plan, or provision of a free, appropriate public education.  Provide documentation of specific changes to be made and the timing for those changes. REVISED 07/2017

103

IEP Amendment is used to:  Change an IEP.  Document parent and district agreement that an IEP meeting is not necessary to revise the student’s IEP between annual IEP meetings, as permitted by IDEA 2004.

REVISED 07/2017

104

REVISED 07/2017

105

Request to Release or Secure Confidential Information is used to:  Request information from health entities.  Obtain consent from a parent or student to authorize the named agency to: o Send/disclose protected health information and/or educational information; and/or o Receive/use protected health information and/or educational information.

Comments:  

Place a copy of this form into the student/child’s file. It is recommended practice that the school district/program automatically give the parent or student a copy of the form after it has been signed, whether or not it was requested, so the individual will have a record of the authorization.

REVISED 07/2017

106

REVISED 07/2017

107

REVISED 07/2017

108

REVISED 07/2017

109

(For form use this link Summary of Performance)

REVISED 07/2017

110

Transfer Student From Within State:  Comparable services are provided to students transferring in state. The IEP must be in effect at the beginning of the school year. Any changes would need to occur through an official IEP meeting or IEP amendment.  Students who transfer over the summer, they are considered “a new enrollment.” Comparable services are provided, and any changes would need to occur through an official IEP meeting or IEP Amendment.

REVISED 07/2017

111

Transfer Student from Another State is used to:  Define service delivery for students transferring from a district outside of Colorado.

REVISED 07/2017

112

Evaluation Report is used to:  Document results of evaluation data. Comments: Analyze raw evaluation data or completed questionnaires and interpret the results, including the student's Strengths, needs and implications for instructional needs. Data are more beneficial with appropriate analysis and synthesis. REVISED 07/2017

113

IEP Amendment is used to:  Change an IEP.  Document parent and district agreement that an IEP meeting is not necessary to revise the student’s IEP between annual IEP meetings, as permitted by IDEA 2004.

REVISED 07/2017

114

IEP Team Member Excusal is used to:  Document parent and district agreement that specific members of the IEP Team are not required to attend a specific IEP meeting, in whole or in part, because the member’s area of curriculum or related service is not being modified or discussed at the meeting, as permitted by IDEA 2004.  Document parent and district informed consent to excuse the specific member(s) of the IEP Team from attending an IEP meeting, in whole or in part, when the meeting involves a modification to or discussion of the member’s area of curriculum or related service if the member submits input in writing to the parent and other members of the IEP Team input into the IEP before the meeting, as permitted by IDEA 2004.

REVISED 07/2017

115

Comments: 

Explain to parent that agreement for excusal is voluntary.



If the person’s area of curriculum/related service is likely to be discussed, the person requesting excusal should complete the sections identifying the student’s strengths, educational concerns, present levels of academic achievement and functional performance, areas of student need, and accommodations, modifications and specialized instruction.

REVISED 07/2017

116

REVISED 07/2017

117

REVISED 07/2017

118

Notice of Meeting is used to:  Notify the parent of any meeting regarding the identification, evaluation, placement and/or provision of a free appropriate public education to his/her child.  Invite the parent to any meeting regarding the identification, evaluation, placement and/or provision of a free appropriate public education to his/her child;  Invite the student, if the student is 15 or older, and the purpose of the meeting is to consider the IEP and transition services. Students younger than 15 may be invited, as appropriate  Document the district’s attempt to involve the parent, guardian, or ESP in meetings.

Comments: 



Students who are 15 years old, but not later than the end of the 9th grade while the IEP is in effect must be invited to an IEP meeting if a purpose of the meeting is to consider transition services. Enter the title, and if appropriate, agency of any individuals invited to attend. These individuals might include required IEP Team members, additional general education teachers, related service personnel, or other individuals with knowledge or special expertise about the child.

REVISED 07/2017

119

REVISED 07/2017

120

Behavior Intervention Plan is used to:  Document the use of positive behavior interventions, supports and other strategies to address the behavior of a child whose behavior impedes the child’s learning or that of others. §300.324(2)(i). A Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) should be developed in conjunction with a Functional Behavior Assessment.

Comments: 









Sources of Information: Document all sources of information that were used in developing the behavior plan (e.g. interviews, observations, checklists, academic assessments, record reviews). Information about the student should be obtained from a wide variety of formal and informal sources. Strength-Based Profile: Document the student’s strengths and interests such as positive relationships with adults or peers, prosocial behaviors in which the student consistently engages and supports the student receives from family and community. Also include other protective factors such as academic assets, hobbies, talents, or special interests. Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) Summary Statement: Based on observations, interviews, background information and other data, generate a hypothesis regarding the motivation behind the problem behavior. The summary statement includes factors such as the setting where the behavior occurs, antecedents to the behavior, a description of the behavior and reinforcing consequences or functions of the behavior (e.g. the child gains the teacher’s attention). BIP Strategies/Outcomes Worksheet: Complete the four columns for addressing the problem behavior: o Setting Event Strategies: These are strategies designed to prevent the child’s problem behavior, make the behavior irrelevant, or reduce the likelihood that the problem behavior will occur. Setting event strategies include approaches such as modifying the activity schedule, adding prompts for appropriate behavior, and considering environmental arrangements. o Antecedent Strategies: These preventative strategies address the events that most likely trigger the problem behavior. An antecedent is an immediate predictor of the problem behavior. o Behavior Teaching Strategies (Alternative Behaviors): These are strategies designed to make the problem behavior less efficient in gaining the reinforcing consequences described in the FBA. o Summary Statement. Behavior teaching strategies may include teaching the child an alternative behavior or teaching the child adaptive social skills. o Reinforcement Strategies (Consequences): Reinforcement strategies refer to strategies that make the problem behavior less effective. Crisis Intervention Plan: If the student displays unsafe behaviors, a crisis intervention plan that emphasizes prevention, positive intervention, and de-escalation techniques should be developed and attached to the BIP. The Crisis Intervention Plan should be readily accessible, communicated and distributed to all relevant parties, should be aligned with district and state policies, and should support the school or district safety plan. If the student’s behaviors do not warrant a crisis plan, there is no need to include one in the BIP.

REVISED 07/2017

121







 

Evaluation: Describe the ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of the plan including how the progress will be monitored, the criteria for success, the person responsible for monitoring progress and a follow-up meeting date. Contextual Fit: Describe how the plan is designed specifically for the environment in which it will be implemented including the skills, resources, budget and impact of time constraints that may affect the ability to implement the plan with fidelity. Communication Plan: Identify who needs to be notified and who needs copies of the plan. Indicate how contact will be made, who will be responsible for making contact, and the date and frequency of contact. Identify who will communicate revisions and updates. Team members: Record the names and members of the planning team. Parent Provided a Copy of Plan: A Parent should always receive a copy of the most recent BIP.

Comprehensive resources on Positive Behavior Supports, Behavior Interventions and Functional Behavior Assessments are available at www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/Behavior.

REVISED 07/2017

122

Communication Plan for a Student Who is Deaf/Hard of Hearing or Deaf-Blind is used to:  Create a mechanism for problem solving and taking action where communication gaps are identified in the student’s access to the educational day.  For instructions and guidelines, see the ESSU Technical Assistance document: Communication Plans for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students and the Colorado Guidelines for Schools, and the Colorado Resource Guide available at www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/SD-Hearing.asp. REVISED 07/2017

123

Consent to Invite Agencies Related to Transition is used to:  Document written consent from the parents to invite agency representatives to the student’s transition planning meeting.

Comments: Some agencies might include:  Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (may provide support for attainment of competitive employment and/or specialized instruction or training)  Disability Access Center at college/university/trade school (may provide accommodations for learning)

REVISED 07/2017

124

    

Community Center Board (may provide for adult living supports, residential care, and employment support) County Mental Health Services (may provide for personal therapy, employment support and other mental health needs) Social Security Administration (may provide for Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid medical coverage) Adult Service Provider (may be the provider of supports if the student qualifies for Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver) Local Independent Living Center (may assist student to develop an independent living plan and to provide supports to realize the plan)

REVISED 07/2017

125

Learning Media Plan for Student with a Visual Impairment, Including Blindness, or DeafBlindness is used to:  Identify the student’s primary literacy mode. Comments:  

The Learning Media Plan can be a separate written document that is attached to the student’s IEP or its content can be infused into the IEP. All required information must be in the separate document or the IEP. The Learning Media Plan must include a statement about the selection of a student’s primary literacy mode(s) and possible secondary literacy mode(s). Learning and literacy modes as defined by sections 22-20-103 (19) (a-d) of the Colorado Revised Statutes, as well as CDE guidance, include the following:

REVISED 07/2017

126

o Auditory Mode: any method or system of achieving literacy that depends upon the auditory senses, including the use of readers, taped materials, electronic speech, speech synthesis, or any combination of the above. o Braille: the system of reading and writing by means of raised points, commonly known as Standard English Braille. This tactile mode includes any method or system of achieving literacy that depends on the sense of touch such as, but not fully limited to, real objects, tangible symbols, tactile letters, tactile cueing, tactual sign language, and Braille. o Print enlargement: any method or system of achieving literacy that includes optical aids to enhance comprehension of printed material, electronic enlargement of printed material, books and textual material printed in large print, and any combination of the above. This visual mode with optical enhancement also includes any method or system of achieving learning and literacy that depends on the sense of vision with the assistance of optical measures of support such as, but not limited to enlargement of pictures, print, or other visual symbols; and use of magnification devices. o Regular print: any method or system of achieving literacy that depends upon the comprehension of regular-sized printed material. This visual mode also includes any method or system of achieving learning and literacy which depends upon the sense of vision such as, but not limited to real objects, pictures, visual communication symbols (e.g., Picsyms, Bliss symbols, Mayer-Johnson symbols), sign language, and print.  (Note: the terms Braille / tactile mode, print enlargement / visual mode with optical enhancement, and regular print / visual mode may be used interchangeably based on the individual learning and literacy needs of the student). 

  



Adequate justification must be made as to why this mode(s) was selected. The decision must not be based solely on the student’s eye condition. The decision must be based on the assessment findings by a certified teacher of students with visual impairments, which includes student, parent and service provider input. The Learning Media Plan must include a statement of how the selected learning and literacy mode(s) will be implemented in the student’s educational program. ECEA Rule 4.03(6)(b)(i). The Learning Media Plan must include a statement of how the student’s instruction in the selected learning and literacy mode(s) will be integrated into educational activities. ECEA Rule 4.03(6)(b)(ii). The Learning Media Plan should include a date on which the student’s instruction, in the selected mode(s), as appropriate, shall commence. ECEA Rule 4.03(6)(b)(iii). For example, if the student is learning Braille, the date of beginning/ongoing instruction should be noted in the Learning Media Plan. The Learning Media Plan should include a statement of the level of student competency in each selected literacy mode(s) that the student should achieve by the end of the period covered by the IEP. ECEA Rule 4.03(6)(b)(iv).

Colorado teachers licensed and endorsed in the area of visual impairment must have demonstrated competency in reading and writing literacy Braille per the guidelines developed by the Colorado Department of Education. ECEA Rule 4.03(6)(b)(v).

REVISED 07/2017

127

REVISED 07/2017

128

Goals and Objectives Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the Results-Driven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Goals and Objectives A statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals designed to meet the child’s needs that result from the child’s disability to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(i)(A); and meet each of the child’s other educational needs that result from the child’s disability (IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(i)(B). For children with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards, a description of benchmarks or short-term objectives IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(ii) Guiding Questions Goals are Measurable - IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(i) ● Are baseline data point/points accurate and current? ● Did you include all components of ABCDE goal writing (see following page)? Can the skill identified in the goal be addressed in multiple settings as appropriate Measurement strategies are appropriately aligned with the metric identified in the measurable targets within the goal statement - IDEA 300.320(a)(3)(i)

REVISED 07/2017

Compliant Example Writing ~Anthony will improve his writing skills as demonstrated by scoring proficient or above on the writing rubric.

Reading ~Betty will answer comprehension questions with at least 80% accuracy 4 out of 5 times.

Math ~Conrad will solve multi-step math problems with 80% accuracy. Communication ~Diane will correctly produce /r/ in the initial position of words with 80% accuracy.

Quality Example Writing ~Across all academic settings, Anthony will independently follow the 3rd Grade Writing Rubric for Organization (creating a plan for his writing, writing a topic sentence and detailed closing sentence); and Word Choice (using descriptive adjectives, adverbs, and verbs) by scoring Proficient or above (Strong Performance). Reading ~Betty will determine and clarify the meaning of unknown words in both fiction and nonfiction grade level texts using a variety of strategies to answer comprehension questions with at least 80% accuracy 4 out of 5 times as measured by unit tests given over the course of the IEP. Math ~During daily independent activities, Conrad will solve multi-step problems with whole numbers and fractions using a variety of strategies and answering questions with 80% accuracy as measured by a classroom probe administered 3 times per IEP period. Communication ~During a structured activity Diane will produce/r/ and /r/ blends in words, phrases, sentences, and 3-5 minute oral conversations using probing strategies with 80% accuracy in 3 consecutive trials as measured by weekly data collection.

129





Have you used the appropriate unit of measurement for the goal? Can progress on the goal be graphed?

Goals are designed to meet the child's needs that result from the child's disability - IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(i); 4.03 ● Is goal written based on current present levels of performance and evaluation data? ● Is the goal designed to close the identified gap as stated in the present levels of performance? ● Is the goal practical and pertinent for student’s age and remaining years in school? ● Will progress on the goal be monitored frequently enough to adjust instruction? Goals enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum - IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(i); 4.03

REVISED 07/2017

Edgar will understand content specific pictures with 85% accuracy.

Edgar will understand and state the function of content specific pictures (categories to include: classroom, household, and personal items) during 3 to 4 structured therapy sessions with 85% accuracy by the IEP end date.

Behavior ~Frannie will use appropriate social interactions in the general education classroom in 4 out of 5 observation trials.

Behavior ~Frannie will demonstrate understanding of the factors that support healthy relationships with friends and family by independently using appropriate social interactions (i.e. -Turn taking, kind words, asking permission) in the general education classroom in 4 out of 5 observation trials, as measured by monthly observation and data collection. ~During daily independent activities, without prompting, George will be able to self monitor escalating frustration and place a visual reminder card on his desk when his does not understand what to do next in 3 of 5 situations by (date of the annual review).

~George will follow adult instruction without arguing 80% of the time.

Motor ~Henry will cross midline in 4 out of 5 opportunities as measured by teacher/therapist observational chart.

Motor ~During a structured session within a classroom, Henry will cross midline (i.e. sorting, stacking, writing, and working with manipulatives) in 4 out of 5 opportunities daily as measured by teacher/therapist observational chart.

~Isis will initiate and maintain functional grasp in 2 of 3 opportunities.

~During a 3 minute coloring task, Isis will initiate and maintain a functional grasp on a crayon in 2 of 3 opportunities as measured in one on one or small group activities.

Early Childhood ~Juan will follow single step oral directions with 80% accuracy.

Early Childhood ~Juan will demonstrate knowledge of basic spatial concepts by following single-step oral directions with 80% accuracy in small-group activities across academic settings as measured by weekly observations maintained over a 9 week period.

~Karrie will verbally name 10 out of 26 letters as measured by data collected.

~Upon presentation of lowercase or uppercase symbols, Karrie will verbally name 10/26 letters as measured by data collected in 3 out of 4 weekly sessions. 130





Is the goal aligned with grade level standards? Does the goal focus on the skills to be acquired rather than restating the standard?

For children with disabilities who take alternate assessments, short-term objectives are written - IDEA 300.320(a)(2)(ii); 4.03(6)(f) A description of how the child's progress toward meeting the annual goals will be measured, and when periodic reports on the child's progress will be provided - IDEA 300.320(a)(3)(iii) For transition IEPs, all annual goals are directly and genuinely link to transition services and/or postsecondary goals  Please refer to the CDE 1-13 Compliance Tips Questions to ask yourself: ● Does the goal pass the stranger test? ● If the student qualifies for ESY, is the goal is appropriate for ESY? REVISED 07/2017

~Lane will recognize his name in print with 100% accuracy.

~Lane will recognize his name in print with a field of 3 “M” names using name strips or naturally occurring items in the classroom with 100% accuracy in 3 consecutive sessions.

~Megan will match a quantity with a numeral with 80% accuracy.

~Megan with match a quantity with a numeral using the numbers 1-10 using coins, toys, manipulatives outside the classroom with 80% accuracy in 3 consecutive sessions.

~Neil will name basic shapes with 75% accuracy.

~Neil will name 8 basic shapes found in the natural environment using real objects or pictures with 75% accuracy in 3 consecutive sessions.

Goals with Objectives ~Omar will increase reading skills by achieving the following objectives:

Goals with Objectives ~During classroom and/or individualized instruction, Omar will increase general reading skills as measured by achieving the following objectives:

Objectives ~ Omar will recognize and read the first 373 sight words with 100% accuracy ~ Omar will demonstrate understanding of the main idea of non-fiction text and three supporting details.

Objectives ~Omar will recognize and read the first 373 sight words with 100% accuracy on three separate trials by 06/01/16. Omar currently knows 247 of 373 sight words. ~Omar will demonstrate understanding of text by accurately identifying three details of a passage as measured using three samples per trimester by 06/01/16.

Goals with Objectives ~Paul will develop functional hand, wrist, and forearm mechanics necessary for pre-academic skills 80% of the time in the classroom environment using adaptive strategies as needed. Objectives ~Paul will place wrist on table with forearm in neutral position when holding an adaptive pencil in 1 out of 2 attempts.

Goals with Objectives ~Paul will develop functional hand, wrist, and forearm mechanics necessary for academic skills as measured by the following objectives: Objectives ~Paul will place wrist on table with the forearm in neutral position using a slant board 5’ binder or easel or other vertical surface when holding a marker, crayon, or adaptive pencil in 1 out of 2 attempts by the end of first quarter. ~Paul will use a “thumbs up” position with holding/cutting with scissors using dominant hand in 3 out of 5 attempts by the end of the first quarter with minimal to no prompting. 131





Is the goal stated ~Paul will use a 4 finger grasp using in a positive way? an adaptive pencil in 4 out of 5 Student will attempts. instead of student will not Are you measuring more than one skill in one goal?

REVISED 07/2017

~Paul will use a 4 finger grasp in 2 out of 3 attempts for 30 seconds or more when coloring, and or imitating shapes of circle, horizontal/vertical line by the end of the 3rd quarter. ~Paul will use a 4 finger grasp using a short crayon, wide marker, or adaptive pencil in 4 out of 5 attempts for a period of one minute or more while imitating letters P,a,u,l in a step by step stroke formation in 2 out of 3 attempts by the completion on the 4th quarter.

132

Least Restrictive Environment Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the Results-Driven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Recommended Placement in the Least Restrictive Environment To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children without disabilities; and special classes, separate schooling or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular education environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes, with the use of supplementary aids and services, cannot be achieved satisfactorily. 300.114(a)(2)(i-ii) An explanation of the extent, if any, to which the child will not participate with children without disabilities in the regular class and in the activities pertaining to special education, related services, and supplementary aids and services. 300.320(a)(5) Placement decision is to be made by a group of persons including the parents, and other persons knowledgeable about the child, the meaning of the evaluation data, and the placement options 300.116(a)(1); 2.28: 2.50 403(8); 5.01(2)(c); 300.116(b)(2); 4.03(3); 5.01(2)(c) In selecting the LRE, consideration is given to any potential harmful effect on the child or on the quality of services that the student needs 300.116(d); 5.01(2)(c) Guiding Questions The LRE decision is made only after all the goals, modifications and/or accommodations, and specially designed instruction have been developed and identified in the student’s IEP, i.e., based on the student’s unique needs. The LRE may be very different for each student, with the determining factor being the student’s individual needs. Are the parents active participants in the IEP? Is there a person knowledgeable in grade level content? What does the evaluation data and information in the present levels tell the team with regard to the student’s ability to access grade

REVISED 07/2017

Compliant Example The advantage for the student is that she would receive the specialized instruction she needs. A possible disadvantage would be that the student is not in the general education classroom with peers. Student receives support for SLD, no additional services necessary.

The advantage is that the student will be understood while reading aloud. The disadvantage is that

Quality Example Possible advantages to being pulled from the classroom would be that the student would be provided with the specialized instruction in literacy and math that she requires in a focused environment with little distractions in order to close the achievement gap. Possible disadvantages to a setting outside the general classroom would be that she would not have as much access to her typical peers as she would in a lesser restrictive setting. She might miss active classroom discussions and the models her peers might provide for asking questions of clarification from the teacher. She would also not have access to the elective courses that her typical peers have. Possible advantages would be that the Student would be able to receive his specialized instruction embedded throughout his school day, rather than

133

level curriculum, both academically and behaviorally? Did the team consider placement in the general education classroom with necessary supplementary aids and services as the first placement option? Is it possible for the student to receive his individually determined services in the general education classroom? If not, why not? Was a full continuum of placement options considered? Does the student require the curriculum to be modified so significantly that it bears little relationship to the instruction in the classroom? Is the student’s behavior so disruptive in the general education classroom that the education of the student and of other students is significantly impaired? Discuss possible advantages of each setting. Summarize the discussion. Discuss the possible disadvantages or potential harmful effects (e.g., embarrassment, potential loss of continuity of classroom discussion, anxiety, distractibility, etc.) within each setting. Summarize the discussion.

the student will be pulled out of the general education classroom. Student receives no additional services.

during one class, one time per day. Possible disadvantages would be that he would not have access to his typical peers in the general education setting, reducing the amount of time he has to learn from his peer models.

The student continues to make adequate academic progress in this placement option.

The advantages to the student’s participation in the center-based classroom are that there is a smaller class size and additional mental health support. A disadvantage to a centerbased classroom is that the student has limited access to move about the building freely. Student requires a modified placement and additional services to receive FAPE.

Possible advantages for Student would be that she would receive instruction based on the Extended Evidence outcomes. The modifications she requires are so significant that it bears little relation to the instruction in the general education setting. Possible disadvantages are that she would not have access to as many typical peers as she would in a general education environment, reducing the likelihood that she would learn from social interactions.

Discuss any modifications, supplementary aids or services considered, that might reduce any of the possible disadvantages. Summarize the discussion.

REVISED 07/2017

134

Parent/Student Input Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the Results-Driven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance In developing each child’s IEP, the IEP team must consider the concerns of the parent for enhancing the education of the child IDEA 300.324(a)(1)(ii); ECEA 4.03 Guiding Questions Questions asked of parents/students should be open ended using an ethnographic style ❏ Did the parents share information about their vision for their student in his or her current and future academic setting? ❏ How does the parent describe the student’s behavior at home, with friends and in the community? (Is this typical behavior/expected behavior for your student in your culture?) ❏ How does the parent describe the student’s work and study habits or attention to tasks at home? (Consider developmental age of student)

Compliant Example PARENT INPUT Parent(s) provided input regarding his student (changed reference of child to student) prior or during IEP meeting. Parent(s) attended and participated in meeting. Parent(s) attended and participated remotely by ... Prior to the meeting, that the parent(s) did not attend, parent(s) stated……. Parent(s) states/state student is able to complete homework with assistance and enjoys coming to school. Parent(s) states/state that the student has difficulty with math computation and is

REVISED 07/2017

Quality Example Parent/ Student (when appropriate) statement should: ❏ be written from the perspective of the parent (or the student) ❏ include components of the home, school, and community setting ❏ state expectations for their student within the school setting including perceived strengths, preferences, interests and needs During the home visit and parent interview, Gloria, Juana’s’ mother, expressed concerns about Juana’s language development. Specifically, Gloria states that Juana doesn’t use as much language in Spanish as her other siblings did at her age. Juana expresses herself using single words and often times her words are difficult to understand. Juana is new to the district and has two older siblings that attend the same elementary school. Her two siblings are doing well learning English and with their academics. Gloria notes that Juana prefers to speak English at home and is concerned that she is not able to understand her daughter. Gloria does not want her daughter to have difficulties when she goes to school. According to the Elementary Parent Inventory completed by the family on 3/12/15, Mary has strengths in playing independently and in

135

❏ Did you elicit and include data from the parent and family (ex. homework completion, time on task, behavioral data, frequency and/or duration of behaviors)? ❏ How does the parent describe the student’s skills and/or level of independence in: ❏ Self care ❏ Self advocacy ❏ Travel (public transportation access ❏ What is the expectation for the student to live independently post school? ❏ How does the parent describe the student’s ability to access the community? Early Childhood (Key elements): Parent statement may include some component(s) of the following: ❏ Perception of social functioning/ interpersonal skills: ❏ ability to ask questions ❏ attributes of play ❏ friendships ❏ listening skills ❏ turn-taking ❏ others as pertinent ❏ Perception of academic readiness skills: ❏ ability to attend to task ❏ ability to explore and manipulate educational materials

REVISED 07/2017

uncomfortable asking for help in the classroom.

STUDENT INPUT (when appropriate) When I finish school, I want to…

helping out with her younger siblings. She is very patient with them, follows directions from her parents, and asks for help when she needs it. She enjoys making loom bracelets, dancing, Choreography, and painting. Mary is very proud of her citizenship awards, and she loves to show family her dance routines. Parent reported concerns that Fred works slowly on homework. He wants his work to be accurate, so he seeks frequent feedback on his performance. Parents expressed worries that his difficulty in completing work on time will increase as he gets older and the work more difficult. Fred is able to help with setting the table taking out the trash and cleaning his room. He carefully organizes his supplies/backpack and makes his lunch the night before so he is ready to go in the morning. He has to be given sufficient time to complete his morning routine or he becomes anxious. Fred is very sensitive to perceived criticism and wants to please others. Rosa’s parents describe her as a quiet young girl who prefers to stay in her room after school and on weekends. Her parents noted they immigrated to the US a couple of years ago when the family business in Spain went bankrupt. Since arriving in the US Rosa does not care to socialize with her older brother and sister or the small circle of Spanish speaking friends the family has met since moving to their current neighborhood. They expressed concerns with Rosas’ inability to do her homework independently stating that she frequently asks for help from her older sibling who are doing very well with their adjustment in a new country and their academics. Rosa refuses to speak English in spite of the fact that she and her siblings had English classes in Spain. Her parents have concerns she is also

136

❏ ability to follow directions ❏ ability to follow directions ❏ ability to follow routines ❏ coping strategies ❏ interests ❏ needs ❏ preferences ❏ self-help skills (i.e. toileting, dressing, feeding, etc.) ❏ strengths

having difficulties with reading in Spanish. Rosa completed the first grade in Barcelona, Spain where she was on track with her reading but struggled with her writing and math assignments.

School Age (Key elements): Parent/Student (when appropriate) statement may include some component(s) of the following: ❏ Perception of social functioning / interpersonal skills: ❏ ability to collaborate ❏ ability to maintain friendship(s) ❏ interaction with peers ❏ self advocacy skills ❏ self-esteem ❏ self-help skills ❏ others as pertinent ❏ Perception of current academic achievement and functional performance: ❏ ability to listen and comprehend ❏ ability to follow directions ❏ academic needs ❏ academic strengths ❏ attention ❏ interests ❏ learning strategies ❏ organizational skills ❏ preferences ❏ respecting the opinions of others ❏ study skills ❏ time management ❏ work habits

Secondary Transition (Key elements): Parent/Student statement may consider readiness for post-school outcomes: ❏ Perception of workforce readiness ❏ ability to advocate for needs ❏ ability to collaborate/work with others

REVISED 07/2017

137





ability to develop and maintain relationships ❏ organization and time management skills ❏ Perception of ability to access the community ❏ community resources (Community centers, YMCA, medical, emergency, churches, stores, housing) ❏ transportation ❏ Consideration of student’s post-secondary goals ❏ academic needs ❏ academic strengths ❏ education ❏ employment ❏ independent living ❏ interests preferences

REVISED 07/2017

138

Present Levels of Educational Performance Summary Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the Results-Driven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance In developing each child’s IEP, the IEP Team must consider the results of the initial or most recent evaluation of the child IDEA 300.320(a)(1)(iii) and the academic, developmental, and functional needs of the child. IDEA 300.320(a)(1)(iv) Guiding Questions Compliant Example Quality Example (5th grade SLD) Have you gathered a recent and comprehensive Body of Evidence specific to the student’s disability category? (data within one IEP year) Have you included evidence such as:  Review of previous data  Observation (mandatory for SLD)  Academic Benchmark Assessments  Disability Specific Assessments  English Language Learners Assessment  Curriculum Based Measures  Behavioral Data  Attendance  Executive Functioning  Student, Parent, teacher Input  Health updates  Functional performance Have you included review and progress towards goals since last IEP meeting? Have you discussed progress in related services? Have you explained how the accommodations help the student access the general education curriculum? Have you identified the skills

REVISED 07/2017

Mark is enrolled in 5th grade and receives special education services as a student with a specific learning disability in the basic reading skills of phonics and decoding, reading comprehension, and written expression. TCAP- Grade 4 Reading- 482 Writing- 405 Math- 390 Science- 403 DIBELS Next ORF: 27 WRC On the 5th grade benchmark, DIBELS Next Oral Reading Fluency (ORF), he scored 27 words read correctly (WRC) in 1 minute. DIBELS Deep Word Reading and Decoding Quick Assessment. The results of that assessment indicate need for further remediation with short vowels, vowel teams, consonant blends and common syllable patterns. Comprehension Text-to-speech formats: 87% Printed text: 40% In the area of writing, as measured by a district

Data analysis: Mark is enrolled in 5th grade and receives special education services as a student with a specific learning disability in the basic reading skills of phonics and decoding, reading comprehension, and written expression. Mark’s weak decoding skills significantly impact both reading accuracy and speed (fluency). Based on the classroom observation, he is able to participate successfully in classroom discussions and works well with peers, especially during peer editing sessions for writing. In the area of writing, as measured by a district writing survey administered by his teacher, Ms. Jones, he is able to develop ideas independently, but struggles with conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. As a result, expanding, combining, and reducing sentences for meaning are skills which need support. He is familiar with word prediction software with prompting. When working on the draft process, he is able to develop a topic, use facts, definitions, and examples or other information orally, but struggles to put the words onto paper as measured by the 5th grade writing rubric on 3 writing prompts given during the week of 9/02/14 by Ms. Smith, special education teacher. On the 5th gradebenchmark, DIBELS Next Oral Reading Fluency (ORF), he scored 27 words read correctly (WRC) in 1 minute. The expected beginning-of-year (BOY) benchmark for 5th grade is 111 words read correctly with a 98% accuracy rate. Mark is progress monitored with a 2nd grade reading probe. On 9/10/14, and he scored at the 13th percentile, with 41 words read correctly at 86% accuracy in 1 minute. Mark’s teacher administered DIBELS Deep Word Reading and 139

and gaps based on grade level expectations and standards to meet annual goals and postsecondary goals if appropriate? Has the student demonstrated regression and recoupment on IEP goals? For students of transition age, did you consider and review the student’s postsecondary goals, then update, if appropriate, based on transition assessment information used to develop the IEP Have you provided a family friendly statement of what data analysis means in terms of:  The characteristics of the child  The impact of the child’s disability on access to General Education Strengths and what skills remain to be developed?

REVISED 07/2017

writing survey administered by his teacher, Ms. Jones, he is able to develop ideas independently, but struggles with conventions of standard English. When working on the draft process, he is able to develop a topic, use facts, definitions, and examples or other information orally, but struggles to put the words onto paper as measured by the 5th grade writing rubric Summary Statement: The assessments show that even though Mark’s word reading skills are significantly below grade level in the area of reading, his strength in listening comprehension and his welldeveloped fund of background information greatly assist his comprehension of various texts. When he uses audio formatted materials or text- to-speech, his levels of understanding are significantly higher as measured by comprehension scores of 87% (audio format) versus 40% (print format).

Decoding Quick Assessment. The results of that assessment indicate need for further remediation with short vowels, vowel teams, consonant blends and common syllable patterns. Summary Statement: The assessments show that even though Mark’s word reading skills are significantly below grade level in the area of reading, his strength in listening comprehension and his welldeveloped fund of background information greatly assist his comprehension of various texts. When he uses audio formatted materials or text-to-speech, his levels of understanding are significantly higher as measured by comprehension scores of 87% (audio format) versus 40% (print format). He is able to accurately determine the elements of short stories and locate key details in informational texts. He needs to develop strategies for decoding unfamiliar words and work on applying knowledge of syllable patterns to both decoding and encoding. Learning more about morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) can also help Mark understand the meaning of words in a text and is an additional strategy for decoding multi-syllabic words. Vocabulary acquisition is accelerated when interventions that encompass “repeated”, “echo”, and “choral” are used. Reading and pre-reading strategies are needed for Mark to read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

140

Service Delivery Statement Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the Results-Driven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Service Delivery Statement A statement of the special education and related services and supplementary aids and service, based on peer-reviewed research to the extent practicable, to be provided to the child, or on behalf of the child, and a statement of the program modifications or support for school personnel that will be provided to enable the child To advance appropriately toward attaining the annual goals 300.320(a)(4)(i) To be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum and to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities 300.320(a)(4)(ii); and, To be educated and participate with other children with disabilities and children without disabilities 300.320(a)(4)(iii) Guiding Questions Compliant Example Quality Examples Describe in detail the As determined by the IEP As determined by the IEP team, including the services that will be team, including the parent, the student will receive direct provided and how they parent, the student will language services as specialized instruction will be provided. receive direct language to support academic and social expressive services as specialized language skills. Services will be provided by a Provide enough detail instruction to support Speech/Language Pathologist (SLP) and a in the Service Delivery expressive social language Speech/Language Pathology Assistant Statement that an IEP skills. Services will be (SLPA). All specialized instruction to increase team receiving the IEP provided by a expressive language skills will be designed by would be able to Speech/Language the SLP who will meet with the SLPA on a implement the services Pathologist (SLP) and/or a biweekly basis to review progress exactly as they were Speech/Language monitoring data and adjust instruction as intended to be Pathology Assistant (SLPA) needed. New instructional activities will first implemented by the under the supervision of a be modeled by the SLP and the SLPA will sending IEP team. licensed SLP. Services will then implement those activities into direct be provided in a small instruction under the weekly supervision of Ensure the information group inside the general the SLP. Services will be provided in the is clear so families education classroom. general education classroom, during the understand what a Consultation will be small group instruction that follows the typical day, week, or provided throughout the teacher’s literacy demonstration lesson. The month might look like school year to address teacher and SLP will co-plan on a biweekly for the student. specific communication basis, using the formative data collected by needs. the SLPA during small group instruction. Describe in detail any support provided that may not be REVISED 07/2017

The student will receive direct specialized instruction by the special

The student will receive direct specialized instruction in literacy through a pull-out model of service delivery. The special 141

represented in the services grid. If services will be provided by a Speech Language Pathology Assistant (SLPA), describe the relationship of the SLP and SLPA in providing services to the student, i.e., provide the specific amount of time that the SLPA will be involved in providing services and the specific amount of time the supervising SLP will either be providing direct services to the student or consulting to the SLPA who will then provide direct services.

education teacher outside of the general education classroom for 45 minutes a day in literacy to increase her reading fluency and overall reading level. The team considered providing these services within the classroom; however, it was determined that small group instruction outside of the classroom was necessary to meet the level of her specific needs.

education teacher will co-plan with the classroom teacher on a weekly basis, reviewing formative data and determining the foci for specialized instruction. Given the co- planning, the special education teacher will concentrate on fluency and increasing the student’s overall reading level. The IEP determined that first instruction will occur through the general education teacher, with demonstration lessons and small group instruction in the classroom. The specialized instruction will serve as a “triple dip” in literacy for the student, following the whole class and small group instruction in the classroom.

Are there services or supports required for the student to enable him or her to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities?

REVISED 07/2017

142

Student Needs & Impact of Disability Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the ResultsDriven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance How the child’s disability affects the child’s involvement and progress in the general education curriculum or, for preschool children, as appropriate, how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities CR 300.320(a)(1)(i-ii); ECEA 4.03 Guiding Questions Compliant Example Quality Examples Prioritize needs - All needs must be addressed, whether by goals, accommodations and/or modifications. The level of detail should be reflective of the intensity of the child’s overall needs pertaining to the disability, considered within the timeframe of the IEP period (i.e., 365 days). Each IEP team member’s area of expertise, if appropriate, must be addressed in this section. It would be important to consider the family’s preferred format for the information, e.g., narrative, bulleted, or both. If the student is of preschool age, needs must be aligned to the child’s participation in age appropriate developmental activities across all domains. What are the needs of the student specific to the student’s disability AND REVISED 07/2017

Student needs to demonstrate matching skills to develop academic skills

Student needs to demonstrate matching skills so he can begin to develop pre-math, memory and life skills. [Instructional]

Student doesn’t use both hands well together for functional activities and doesn’t avoid obstacles with his gait trainer.

Due to the student’s disability of autism spectrum disorder that limits his motor skills, he needs to increase his ability to use both hands together during functional activities. In addition; he needs to improve his ability to access the school environment by improving his ability to advance his gait trainer in the hallway avoiding obstacles. [motor]

Because of the student’s disability he requires specialized transportation to get to school.

Due to the student’s motor disabilities, need for support for entering and exiting the bus, and need for specialized equipment, including the gait trainer, the student requires specialized transportation in order to access a free, appropriate public education. [specialized transportation].

Student doesn’t direct his eyes toward who he is interacting with and others don’t know who he is attempting to communicate with. Student also doesn’t complete self-help tasks.

Student struggles with complex communication and needs repetition of concepts when working with EEO’s.

Due to the student’s disability of autism spectrum disorder that limits his communication skills, he needs to direct his eye gaze in the direction of peers and adults when interacting with them so others understand with whom he is communicating / socializing. [language/social] Student also needs to increase independence in completing self-help tasks in order to increase independence at school. [self-help] Due to the student’s multiple disabilities, her academic and adaptive skills are affected due to her difficulty with complex communication, reading, reading comprehension, writing, memorization, and 143

how do they affect the student’s involvement, progress, and participation in the general education curriculum and participation in appropriate activities? 300.320(a)(1)(iv)

REVISED 07/2017

logical thinking. Her level of academic and adaptive functioning prevents her from taking general education classes independently or participating independently in various school activities. She needs repetition of concepts and real life practice with working in a modified curriculum (EEO). Hyperlink: Extended Evidence Outcomes In order to improve comprehension, student needs to build his vocabulary and needs to practice more skills in following written instructions.

According to the assessments given as well as a review of records, discussions with the student and his mother, and various observations, student has several areas that he can improve upon to increase his literacy related to his SLD. Specifically, he needs to work on building his vocabulary to support increasing reading comprehension skills and following written directions in order to participate in the general education curriculum specifically his 9th grade Literacy and Social Studies courses. He needs continued practice following written directions when high level vocabulary is involved.

Student has developmental delays in age appropriate communication. She struggles to stay on task, follow directions and understand social cues. She needs constant reminders around social skills in order to improve her communication with peers and adults.

Student is experiencing developmental delays in age appropriate communication and social-emotional skills, preventing her from successfully participating in general education classroom discussions and small group work without additional supports. Her delays make it difficult for her to stay on task, follow verbal directions, maintain personal space and boundaries with peers, and to understand social cues. Student requires direct specialized instruction in communication and social skills, as well as a highly structured environment with reminders to stay on task, maintain personal space/boundaries, frequent breaks, structured and timely positive feedback.

144

Student Strengths, Preferences & Interests Guiding Questions and/or Considerations to Improve IEP Quality and Student Outcomes This document was created through the collaboration of Directors of Special Education and the ResultsDriven Accountability teams at the ESSU.

IEP Section: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance In developing each [student’s] IEP, the IEP Team must consider the strengths of the child CR 300.324(a)(1)(i); If the student does not attend the IEP meeting, the public agency must take other steps to ensure that the student’s preferences and interests are considered CR 300.321(b)(2); Transition services are a coordinated set of activities for a student with a disability that is based on the individual student’s needs, taking into account the student’s strengths, preferences, and interests CR 300.43(a)(2); ECEA 4.03 Guiding Questions

Compliant Example

What are the student’s educational/developmental strengths, interest areas, significant personal attributes and personal accomplishments as indicated by formal or informal assessment? Be sure to include specific feedback from the student.

Student has strengths in math and scored proficient on the last state assessment. Student expressed her interest in playing high school basketball. Parent expressed they would like to see their student play sports.

Consider the student’s educational and developmental strengths, including the skills the student has mastered. Include observations and/or student-parent expressed and/or implied area(s) of interests, such as hobbies, clubs, community/church activities, etc. Include observations and/or student-parent conveyed area(s) of preference and personal attributes, such as awards, volunteering, dance, karate, etc. REVISED 07/2017

Quality Example

During a 1:1 interview, Student states that she is respectful, persistent, and a hard worker when she decides to be. Student states and has shown a strength in advocating for herself; she asks for help if she needs it. Student’s interests include listening to country western music, babysitting and learning about children. Student prefers to attend classes that pique her interest and she likes to engage in all types of learning styles. Student demonstrates adequate word Student likes to read recognition skills in isolation (read word list, did fiction, with particular not define the words) through an 8th grade interest in the civil level, as noted on the teacher feedback form war. Student’s reading submitted [date]. Student’s dominant learning comprehension is at modalities are reportedly visual and auditory, grade level. She is very based on teacher observations. social, gets along well with others and has Student is a non-verbal student who, through lots of friends. Student observation and parent conversations, has and parent state she expressed the following: attends a lot of church Strengths: Persistence with activities he enjoys, functions. ability to assist others with his self-help skills such as eating, drinking, and dressing, and the Student has expressed warmth he shows to peers and others. an interest in working Interests: likes to be around people, i.e., both with animals. Student peers and adults, likes swimming, and likes works part-time at music. McDonald’s. Student Preferences: Student demonstrates his 145

has good attendance and likes attending his 9th grade English class. Student is currently passing both his English and Social Studies classes.

preference and willingness by participating in the hand over hand activity of using the electric stapler. He demonstrates his dislike for shredding by looking away when it is his turn to participate in this activity and refusing adult prompts. As reported by Student’s teachers on the teacher feedback form submitted [date], student enjoys school and the school environment. She has improved her pragmatic, social language skills and replaced aggressive means of greeting others/gaining attention with appropriate means of communication. Student loves to participate in music activities and demonstrates good receptions skills. Student responds to conversation about past and present activities. Student prefers to learn in a classroom setting that is free of sensory overload, e.g., low lights, buzzing noises, clutter, wall décor. Student’s teacher noted on the teacher feedback form submitted [date], that Student benefits from established and familiar routines and requires 1:1 supervision and support throughout the school day. In the feedback form completed by Student and the parent input form completed by Student’s family on [date], Student and his parents state that he prefers working in a supportive environment where noise and distractions are minimal. Student and his parents are in agreement with Student’s preference of continuing his Auto Body Technology education at the local technical school while working part time. Student states he is interested in working on cars, playing video games, sports, and snowmobiling.

REVISED 07/2017

146

APPENDIX E EARLY CHILDHOOD IEP CONSIDERATIONS

REVISED 07/2017

147

This appendix outlines considerations and additional guidance for the Early Childhood IEP intended for young children with disabilities ages 3 through 5 years of age. For the evaluation process for young children ages 3 through 5 years to be "sufficiently comprehensive" and "employ a more focused assessment process related to a student’s area of suspected disability", early childhood teams must use an authentic assessment approach where play is emphasized and interactions are dynamic. All domains of development in young children are interrelated and should be observed through a transdisciplinary approach by a team who has expertise in the primary areas of concern. It is essential that information about routines is gathered from families so that teams can understand what the child is doing in natural environments with familiar people. The information gathered must be sufficient so that teams can prioritize functional and learning needs of the child.

All timelines for beginning the IEP process, ongoing implementation and other IEP actions in this guidance document pertain to Early Childhood IEPs.

Referral to Special Education Individualized screening for children 3 through 5 years old may occur when a child is referred to Child Find for developmental screening. Child Find personnel must follow local policies and procedures as well as State Rules for the Exceptional Children’s Education Act and the federal Individuals with Disabilities Act Regulations. Whether parental consent is required for screening is dependent upon whether a special education referral has been initiated (1 CCR 301-8, 4.02 (3)):   

When screening activities are conducted as a part of the special education evaluation process, those activities must be described in the IDEA Part B Prior Written Notice and parental consent must be obtained. Parental consent is not required for screening by education personnel when the screening is administered to all students, or if it is used to determine appropriate instructional strategies for curriculum implementation (34 CFR 300.300(d)(1) and 300.302) If individualized screening is conducted (meaning due to a concern and not performed on a whole group of children), permission should be received from the parent. It is recommended that it is in writing, but does not need to be a PWN as described in 300.300.

See http://www.cde.state.co.us/early/parentconsentscreeningpk for further information. Review Existing Data The data should help the team to answer the following questions:  What is the student’s level of educational performance including student’s strengths/skills and needs? For children 3 through 5 years old, what is their level of participation in appropriate activities and the extent to which the child successfully participates in daily routines?  Does the measurable information demonstrate that the disability is adversely affecting the student’s learning and participation in appropriate activities?  What are the specific special education instruction and related services, including supplementary aids and services the student may need in order to participate in appropriate activities and daily routines?

REVISED 07/2017

148

Prior Written Notice and Consent to Evaluation All guidance for prior written notice and consent to evaluation in this guidance document pertain to Early Childhood IEPs. It is important, however, for Administrative Units to document the actions that are taken from the time a referral is made to the Administrative Unit until the PWN is signed by the parent. Conduct the Evaluation For young children, assessment is a flexible process of synthesizing qualitative and quantitative information about the child and his or her developmental context to identify strengths and needs, to plan individual programs and promote developmental progress (Bagnato, 2010, p.6). Authentic Assessment is developmentally appropriate and is a deliberate plan to investigate the natural behaviors of young children through observation and probes of facilitated play in typical settings. It is completed and contributed to by familiar and knowledgeable adults in the child’s life. Documentation of an Evaluation Through the full and individual evaluation process, in addition to other guidance in this document, for children 3 through 5 years old there should be sufficient information to identify the adverse effect of the child’s disability/ies on participation in appropriate activities and daily routines.

When ensuring that the determination is not based on the student’s lack of instruction in reading and math, for children 3 through 5 years old, the team must consider whether or not the child is currently in a childcare setting. If so, information regarding instruction in math and reading should be gathered from the adults in those settings, as well as family members. When interpreting this question, teams can ask and reflect upon questions about early literacy practices in the home and/or child care setting such as, “Has the child been read to by adults?”, “Are there books in the home?”, “What are the kinds of storytelling and singing that happens when your family is together?”. As for math, “Does the child have access to toys or other items that they can sort and count?” Having a dialogue about early literacy and math development also is a good first step toward partnering with families, as families are children’s first teachers often providing appropriate instruction. See the ESSU technical assistance document for Developmental Delay http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/ta_dd.

For preschool children 3 through 5 years old, in cases where an ECSE serves as both the general education teacher and a special educator, that individual may sign as such on the IEP in both places. An Early Childhood Administrator may appropriately represent the general education teacher in some instances where children are not yet in preschool and therefore do not yet have a classroom teacher identified for them.

The IEP document for Early Childhood is based on young children’s unique needs and should support their participation in appropriate activities and daily routines. Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance When the team includes a statement on the child’s present levels, for preschool children 3 through 5 years old, the child’s participation in appropriate activities and daily routines is addressed with all other considerations in this IEP guidance.

REVISED 07/2017

149

Goals and Objectives When writing goals for preschool, they should correspond to the present levels and the Colorado Academic Standards for preschool. They allow the child to be involved in and progress in preschool and address participation in appropriate activities and daily routines. Colorado's Early Learning and Development Guidelines (ELDGs) describe the trajectory of children's learning and development from birth to eight years old and can be used to inform goals and objectives. See Colorado's Early Learning and Development Guidelines.

Accommodations and Modifications For preschool children, accommodations and modifications support participation in appropriate activities and daily routines.

Service Delivery Service delivery describes when the services begin. This is typically the date of IEP meeting for most young children. However, in cases where a preschool child is not yet enrolled in a general education program, the start date should represent the date after which enrollment has occurred and when services are scheduled to begin. For children transitioning from Part C services to Part B, the service start date will be the date the child is projected to begin to receive services, on or before their 3rd birthday (or in some cases, after the 3rd birthdate, for allowable reasons as defined in the Special Education Indicator 12 data collection). In preschool, a child may benefit from an additional teaching assistant assigned to the classroom. This can be documented in the service delivery statement, but not as a provider identified on the service delivery grid.

Making the LRE Decision See the guidance document, Making Least Restrictive Environment Placement Decisions for Preschool: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/ta_lre When preschool children transition to kindergarten, this does not, in and of itself, constitute a change in LRE. As stated in IDEA, children advance from grade to grade (300.101 (c)) in order to receive FAPE. The early childhood LRE setting codes are utilized until a child turns 6. As of the December 1 in the year in which the child turns 6, the LRE setting code must be updated to the related K-12 LRE code.

IEP Amendments When distinguishing significant vs. nonsignificant changes in placement [ECEA 4.03 8(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)] when a preschool child transitions to Kindergarten, the IEP team decides if the child who is transitioning to kindergarten needs more or less time in the general education setting than what they had in preschool. 

A re-evaluation must occur to document an educational justification for any change in LRE setting if, for example, the child will be spending less time in the general education classroom than they were in preschool.

REVISED 07/2017

150



Preschool to kindergarten transition is not considered, in and of itself, a significant change in placement. As stated in IDEA, children advance from grade to grade (300.101 (c)) in order to receive FAPE. o The Early Childhood LRE remains in effect with the child until age 6 or December 1 of each school year, at which time the LRE setting code is updated. o Re-evaluation is not required. Required form=IEP or IEP Amendment

Part C to B Transitions Children transitioning from Part C Early Intervention services require collaboration between the local Early Intervention Colorado program and the local AU. Refer to http://www.cde.state.co.us/early/cfpreresources The Part C Early Intervention Colorado program is required to notify the Administrative Unit of children who are potentially eligible for Preschool Special Education services. The notification is treated as a referral to special education services and the Administrative Unit must conduct an evaluation to determine eligibility for special education services under eligibility criteria as defined under ECEA, or refuse to conduct the evaluation and issue PWN, based upon the reviewed existing data including screening results, when available. For children found eligible, an IEP must be in place for children transitioning from Part C Early Intervention on or before their third birthday.

ESY must be considered for all children, including preschool-aged children, whether or not they have previously been enrolled in school.

REVISED 07/2017

151

TERM

DEFINITION

Accommodations

Activities involving adapting instructional strategies and/or the classroom environment for students with disabilities. Accommodations can be made across educational settings, such as the general education classroom, resource or special class.

Administrative Unit

A Colorado local education agency (LEA) that is responsible for the local administration of special education. An administrative unit may be a school district, BOCES, multi-district administrative unit, or the Charter School Institute.

Annual goals

A statement of the IEP team's estimate of what the student can reasonably be expected to accomplish with specially designed instruction and/or support for the subsequent 365 day period based on the student's current level of performance, potential for learning, and rate of development. An annual goal should:  describe an improvement from the current level of performance, 

reflect an area of need that is related to progress in the general education curriculum,



include a measurable level of attainment, and



describe the conditions under which the student will perform.

Annual review

An IEP meeting held to review and/or revise the IEP as appropriate that must be held at least once every 365 days.

Assessment

In the context of evaluation, a strategy or instrument used in the evaluation process to gather relevant functional, developmental and academic information about the student. A single measure or assessment cannot be the sole criterion for determining eligibility or an appropriate educational program for the child.

Assistive Technology Any item, piece of equipment, or product system that is used to increase, to maintain, or to improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability. Authorizer

The entity that authorizes or grants a charter school its charter such as a school district or the Charter School Institute (CSI).

Behavior Intervention Plan

Developed in conjunction with a functional behavior assessment, a behavior intervention plan is written to address behavior concerns that interfere with the student's ability to gain reasonable benefit from the learning environment. A behavior intervention plan lists positive behavioral interventions that support a student's learning of new behaviors and decreasing problem behaviors. Behavior interventions may include environmental modification, social skills instruction, individual or group support or counseling, adaptations to curriculum materials.

Benchmark

Statements of what students should know and do by certain levels or times written in conjunction with an IEP goal for students with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternative achievement standards. See Objectives:

BOCES

Board of Cooperative Educational Services. An administrative unit that provides special education services over a region that includes multiple small school districts.

REVISED 07/2017

152

TERM

DEFINITION

Case Manager

The designated IEP team member who has primary responsibility for the IEP process for the student including organizing and chairing IEP team meetings, providing notice to parents, and maintaining documentation for IEP progress reports. The role of case manager may vary by administrative unit.

CDE

Colorado Department of Education

Change in placement Occurs when there is a substantive change in a student's special education or related services, or a change in the child's special educational setting. An administrative unit must ensure that the parents of a child with a disability are members of any group that makes decisions on the educational placement of their child. A change in placement may be nonsignificant or significant. See nonsignificant change in placement or significant change in placement. Child Find

The continuous and systematic effort of an Administrative Unit to identify, locate and evaluate students ages 3 to 21 who are in need of special education services.

Communication Plan A plan developed in conjunction with the IEP for a student who has a hearing disability which includes:  a statement of the child's primary communication mode, 

a statement documenting that an explanation was given of all educational options provided by the school district and available to the child, and



identification of the communication-accessible academic instruction, school services, and extracurricular activities the student will receive.

Consent

Consent means the parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which consent is sought; and the parent understands and agrees in writing to the activity. The parent also understands that his or her consent may be revoked.

Consultation

Services may be provided directly to the student or indirectly on behalf of the student. Consultation services are considered “indirect.”

Continuum of Alternative Placements

A continuum of educational settings where special education instruction is provided. The continuum of alternative placements includes instruction in regular classes, special classes, special schools, home instruction, and instruction in hospitals and institutions.

Direct Services

Special education and related services provided directly to the student by a special educator or related service provider inside or outside of the regular education classroom.

Dispute Resolution

Procedural safeguards available to resolve disputes when the parents or administrative unit disagree about a child's evaluation, eligibility, educational placement or provision of FAPE. Dispute resolution methods include requesting mediation, filing a state complaint, and filing for a due process hearing.

Due Process Hearing The most formal of dispute resolution processes. A due process hearing request may be filed by a parent or administrative unit on any matters relating to identification, evaluation, or educational placement of a child with a disability. An expedited due process hearing may be requested for matters related to a manifestation determination or disciplinary change in placement. A due process hearing is conducted by an administrative law judge (ALJ).

REVISED 07/2017

153

TERM

DEFINITION

ECEA

Exceptional Children's Educational Act. The Colorado special education statute.

Educational Surrogate Parent

An individual who has training and is assigned to represent the student's interest and makes all special education decisions when no parent can be identified, a parent cannot be located by the administrative unit of attendance, or the child is a ward of the state or homeless. An Educational Surrogate Parent has the responsibility to ensure that the school provides the student with a free appropriate public education. An Educational Surrogate Parent attends and participates in school meetings, participates in eligibility determinations and IEP development, signs or withholds consent for assessment or placement, and may file a complaint or request mediation or due process hearing.

Eligibility Determination

A meeting that is held after a child is evaluated for special education to discuss assessment results and to determine whether the child has a disability and is eligible for special education. If a child is eligible for special education, an IEP may be developed at this meeting.

EL

English Learner

Employment

A domain for students of transition age that encompasses full or part-time employment in the competitive labor market in an integrated setting at or above the minimum wage.

Evaluation

The process of utilizing formal and informal assessments to determine specific areas of a child's strengths, needs and eligibility for special education services.

Extended School Year (ESY)

Extended School Year (ESY) is for children with disabilities that experience a loss of skills or regression that is so great, it takes a significant length of time during the next school period to regain or recoup those skills. ESY is for maintaining learned skills derived from the child's IEP goals.

Independent Living Skills

A domain for students of transition age that encompasses skills or tasks contributing to the successful independent functioning of an individual in adulthood in the areas of leisure/recreation, maintenance of home and personal care, community participation.

Indirect Services

Special education and related services provided indirectly to the student by a special educator or related service provider such as co-teaching or consultative services.

Individualized Education Program

A written statement for a child with a disability that is developed in accordance with IDEA regulations for students identified as having an educational disability and in need of special education services. An IEP must be reviewed at least once every 365 days. See Annual Review.

Learning Media Plan A plan developed in conjunction with the IEP for a student with a visual impairment, including blindness. Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)

REVISED 07/2017

The setting where a student with disabilities receives his or her special education and related services.

154

TERM

DEFINITION

Manifestation Determination

A meeting held within 10 school days of any decision to make a disciplinary change in placement for a student. A disciplinary change in placement occurs when a student is removed from his or her current placement for 10 consecutive days due to a violation of a school code of conduct; or is subjected to a series of removals that constitute a pattern.

Mediation

A method of dispute resolution that allows parties in a special education dispute to resolve the issue through a mediation process conducted by an impartial mediator at no cost to the parents, school districts or agencies. If the parties come to an agreement in mediation, the parties execute a legally binding agreement that sets forth the resolution and is enforceable in any State court of competent jurisdiction or in a United States district court.

Modifications

Activities involving changing the program/curriculum when reasonable accommodations will not be effective in allowing the student to participate in the general education classroom. Modifications are greater or more extensive changes that significantly alter the scope or content of the general education curriculum based on the student's needs.

Multidisciplinary Team

A group of qualified professionals, knowledgeable about the child, who are able to interpret the evaluation data and make a determination about the eligibility of the child for special education services.

Nonsignificant When a child’s special education program is altered, such as a change in the amount of Change in Placement a given service, the change in program/services is a nonsignificant change in placement. Prior written notice of such changes must be provided to the parent, but consent and reevaluation is not required. Objectives

Statements of what students should know and do by certain levels or times written in conjunction with an IEP goal for students with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternative achievement standards. See Benchmarks

Occupational Therapy

A related service provided by a qualified occupational therapist that includes (i) improving, developing, or restoring functions impaired or lost through illness, injury, or deprivation; (ii) improving ability to perform tasks for independent functioning if functions are impaired or lost; and (iii) preventing, through early intervention, initial or further impairment or loss of function.

Parent

A person generally authorized to act as the child’s parent or authorized to make educational decisions for the child, e.g., guardian(s) and educational surrogate parent(s)

Parental Involvement A parent’s rights and responsibilities in accordance with the IDEA, the ECEA and their and Rights regulations in all aspects of planning and implementing a FAPE for students with disabilities. Parental rights and responsibilities include any legal challenges to the evaluation, planning and implementation of an IEP or the provision of a FAPE. Physical Therapy

REVISED 07/2017

A related service provided by a qualified physical therapist.

155

TERM

DEFINITION

Placement

The provision of special education and related services, and the educational setting in which a child with a disability receives those services as determined by the child's IEP team.

Planned Course of Study

A multi-year description of coursework to achieve the student's desired post-school goals, from the student's current to anticipated exit year.

Positive Behavioral Interventions

Approaches such as changing systems, altering environments, teaching skills and appreciating positive behavior used to decrease a student's problem behavior and increase prosocial behaviors.

Post-school goal

Post-school goals are required for the domains of postsecondary education and/or training, employment and independent living skills as appropriate.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP)

Statements describing the student’s current level of academic achievement and functional performance based on the results of assessment findings and recent performance data in all relevant academic and non-academic areas in which the student requires specialized instruction. The statements should include how the student's disability affects the child's involvement in the general education curriculum and should be stated in measurable terms and allow for clear determinations of student progress toward annual goals.

Prior Written Notice

A record for the student, parent, and school of special education decisions that have been made, the basis for those decisions, and actions such as evaluation, change in placement, or disciplinary change in placement that will or will not be taken.

Procedural Safeguards Notice

A notice that informs parents of special education students of their rights. This notice must be provided: (i) at least once a school year; (ii) upon initial referral or parent request for evaluation; (iii) upon receipt of the first state complaint/due process complaint in a school year; (iv) in accordance with IDEA discipline procedures, and (iv) upon parent request.

Progress Reporting

A description of when periodic reports on the student's progress toward meeting the annual goals will be provided. The frequency of progress reporting may be on a calendar basis (e.g. quarterly) or concurrent with other school progress reporting such as report cards.

Reevaluation Conducted in accordance with evaluation procedures. A reevaluation must occur at least once every 3 years unless the parent and the administrative unit agree that reevaluation is unnecessary. Referral

A formal process for reviewing information related to students who are suspected of having disabilities and who show signs of needing special education and related services. A special education referral is the initial step of the special education process.

Related services

Supportive services to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.

REVISED 07/2017

156

TERM

DEFINITION

Resource Room

A supplementary service for direct special education instruction outside of the general class, provided in conjunction with general class placement.

Screening

A quick checklist, survey or probe about a student's development or skills conducted by a teacher or specialist to determine appropriate instructional strategies for curriculum implementation.

Self-Contained Class

An educational setting outside of the general education classroom where students who have disabilities that require intensive intervention receive special education instruction for a majority or all of their school day.

Service delivery

The system to ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of students with disabilities with special education and related services and that LRE issues are considered in placement decisions.

Services Plan

A written statement that describes the special education and related services the administrative unit will provide to a child with a disability, enrolled in a private school, who has been designated to receive services, including the location of the services and any transportation necessary.

Significant Change in A significant change in placement for educational purposes includes placement or Placement referral to a private school or eligible facility by the administrative unit, the addition or termination of an instructional or related service or any substantive change in placement. Special Education

Specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability. Specially designed instruction means adapting, as appropriate to the needs of a child with a disability, the content, methodology, or delivery of instruction to address the unique needs of the child that result from the child's disability and to ensure access of the child to the general curriculum so that the child can meet the educational standards of the administrative unit.

Special Education Director

A district, BOCES, or CSI administrator who supervises special education within the administrative unit.

Special Factors

Certain IDEA factors considered by the IEP team. The IEP team determines whether the factors could impede the student's learning and/or have instructional implications then develops a plan to address the factors in the IEP meeting. These factors include: behavior, limited English proficiency, blindness or visual impairment, communication for children who are deaf or hard of hearing, assistive technology, physical or health impairments, and special transportation needs.

REVISED 07/2017

157

TERM Speech Language Pathology Services

DEFINITION A special education service that includes  identification of children with speech or language impairments; 

diagnosis and appraisal of specific speech or language impairments;



referral for medical or other professional attention necessary for the habilitation of speech or communicative impairments;



provision of speech and language services for the habilitation or prevention of speech or communicative impairments; and



counseling and guidance of parents, children, and teachers regarding speech and language impairments.

State Complaint

A method of dispute resolution in which a parent may file a written complaint with CDE if they believe that the administrative unit is violating a special education law. A state complaint is reviewed by the State Complaints Officer.

Supplementary Aids and Services

Aids, services and other supports that are provided in general education classes, other education- related settings, and in extracurricular and nonacademic settings, to enable children with disabilities to be educated with children without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate.

Transition Services

A coordinated set of activities for a student with a disability that are designed within a results-oriented process focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability in order to promote movement from school to post school activities documented on a student's IEP beginning at age 15, but no later than the end of the 9th grade.

Transportation

A related service that includes travel to and from or between schools; travel in and around school buildings; and specialized equipment if required to provide transportation to a child with a disability.

REVISED 07/2017

158

Loading...

iep procedural guidance - Colorado Department of Education

IEP PROCEDURAL GUIDANCE: EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT SERVICES UNIT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE REVISED 07/2017 1 Joyce Rankin (R), Chairwoman 3rd Congressional ...

14MB Sizes 1 Downloads 14 Views

Recommend Documents

RITS Guidance - Colorado Department of Education
Below is some general guidance to address questions regarding the Record Integration Tracking System (RITS) and student

1939 - Colorado Department of Education
an act relating to Workmen's compensation and to amend Sec- tions 333, 342, 350, 351 and 356 of Chapter 97 ..... of any

2015 - Colorado Department of Education
Jan 12, 2016 - PO Box 9443, Rancho Santa Fe, CA. A-1 Chipseal & Rocky Mtn. Pavement, LL. 15AD5823A Earth ...... 422 Arno

Procedural Safeguards - Florida Department Of Education
ang kasunduan o kautusan na ang espesyal na edukasyon at ang mga nauugnay na serbisyo ( na inirekumenda ..... empleyado

IEP Manual and Forms - Connecticut State Department of Education
Jan 4, 2006 - date of the most recent evaluation which served to determine eligibility for special education services an

Polling Questions - Colorado Department of Education
Sep 22, 2015 - Childhood Autism Rating Scale, 2nd Edition (CARS-2). • Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale (ASDS). • G

07 - Colorado Department of Education
Confirmation of Attendance, Admission to Specific Undergraduate Programs, Admission ...... Failure to answer all questio

Population Ecology - Colorado Department of Education
Mar 31, 2014 - Science. Grade Level. High School. Course Name/Course Code. Biology. Standard. Grade Level Expectations (

Seventh Grade - Colorado Department of Education
The Colorado Academic Standards in science represent what all Colorado students should know and be able to do in science

Alcohol, Tobacco & Drugs - Colorado Department of Education
presentation to showcase their knowledge of how drug and alcohol abuse may create possibilities for risky situations, po