Elementary Stories for Reproduction

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Elementary Stories for Reproduction First Series

L. A. HILL

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

1

Jack was a young sailor. He lived in England, but he was often away with his ship. One summer he came back from a long voyage and found new neighbours near his mother's house. They had a pretty daughter, and Jack soon loved her very much. He said to her, ‘My next voyage will begin in a few days’ time, Gloria. I love you, and I’ll marry you when I come back. I’ll think about you all the time, and I’ll write to you and send you a present from every port.’ Jack’s first port was Freetown in Africa, and he sent Gloria a parrot from there. It spoke five languages. When Jack’s ship reached Australia, there was a letter from Gloria. It said, ‘Thank you for the parrot, Jack. It tasted much better than a chicken.’ Words outside the 1000: parrot, sailor

4

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Why did Jack make long voyages? Where did Gloria live? Why did Jack think about Gloria all the time? Where did Jack send Gloria the parrot from? Where did Jack get Gloria’s letter about the parrot? What did Gloria do to the parrot?

B. Which words in the story on page 4 mean the opposite of: 1. short 2. last 3. ugly

4. old 3. little 6.wine

7. worse

C. Write this story. Put one word in each empty place. You will find all the correct words in the story on page 4. Freetown is a . . . . in West Africa. Jack and another . . . . from his ship went into a shop there and saw a beautiful bird. It was a red and grey . . . . and it . . . . ‘Hullo,’ to them. Jack said to his friend, ‘I’m going . . . . it to Gloria. She’s the daughter of my mother’s . . . . It will be a nice . . . . for her,’ Then Jack and his friend . . . . a restaurant and ate . . . . and fried potatoes there. They . . . . very good.

5

2

Fanny and Ethel worked in the same office, and, they were neighbours at home. Fanny was rather a careless girl, and he often lost things. Then she usually went to Ethel to borrow more from her. Ethel was a kind girl, but she sometimes got tired of lending things to her friend. One Saturday afternoon Fanny knocked at Ethel’s front door, and when Ethel came to open it, Fanny said to her, ‘Oh, hullo, Ethel. Please lend me a bag. I’ve lost mine. I’m going to the shops, and I feel very stupid when I haven’t got anything in my hand when I go out in the street.’ Ethel laughed and answered, ‘Well, Fanny, go down to the end of the garden. You’ll find a nice wheelbarrow in the shed there. Take that when you go down to the shops. Then you’ll have something in both of your hands.’ Word outside the 1000: wheelbarrow

6

A. Answer these questions. 1. Why did Fanny often lose things? 2. Why did Ethel lend things to Fanny? 3. Why didn’t Fanny want to go to the shops without a bag? 4. Why didn’t Ethel lend her a bag? 5. What did she want Fanny to take to the shops? 6. Did Fanny take it, do you think? B. Which of these sentences are true? Write the correct ones down. 1. Ethel often borrowed things. 2. Fanny often borrowed things. 3. Ethel often lent things to Fanny. 4. Fanny often lent things to Ethel. 5. One day Ethel lost her bag. 6. One day Fanny lost her bag. 7. Fanny liked carrying something in her hand. 8. Fanny did not like carrying things. 9. There was a shed at the end of Ethel’s garden. 10. There was a shed at the end of Fanny’s garden. C. Write this story, but do not put pictures: put words. Ethel’s house is in a small

. It has a small

at the back, and there is a

in it. Ethel keeps her

there. Ethel is a clever

. She works in a

This is Ethel. She is at the in her left

.

of her house, and she’s got a ? Because she is going to the

7

.

3

Dave married, and when his new wife saw the clothes in his cupboard, she said, ‘Dave, you have only got one good shirt. The others arc very old, and they’ve got holes in them. I’m going to buy you a new one this afternoon.’ Dave liked his old shirts, but he loved his wife too, so he said, ‘All right, Beryl, but please don’t throw any of the old ones away.’ Dave went to work, and when he came back in the evening, Beryl said to him, ‘Look, Dave, I’ve bought you a nice shirt. Here it is. Put it on.’ Dave put the shirt on, and then he said, ‘Look at the sleeves, Beryl. They’re too long.’ ‘That’s all right,’ Beryl answered. ‘They’ll get shorter when I wash the shirt.’ Then Dave said, ‘But the neck’s too small.’ ‘That’s all right,’ Beryl answered. ‘It’ll get bigger when you wear the shirt, Dave.’ Word outside the 1000: sleeve

8

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Why did Beryl want to buy Dave a new shirt? Why didn’t Dave want his wife to throw any of his old shirts away? Why didn’t Dave like the sleeves of his new shirt? What did Beryl say about the sleeves? Why didn’t Dave like the collar of the shirt? What did Beryl say about the collar?

B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place. 1. New clothes do not have holes in them, but . . . ones sometimes do. 2. Sleeves don’t get . . . when you wash them. They get shorter. 3. Good shirts are not cheap. They are . . . . 4. The neck of Dave’s shirt wasn’t too big. It was too . . . . 5. Dave loved his old shirts, but he . . . his new one. C. Choose the right sentence for each picture and write it down.

1. a. None of these shirts has got holes in it. b. Some of these shirts have got holes in them. c. All of these shirts have got holes in them. 2. a. The sleeves are too long, and the collar is too small. b. The sleeves are too short, and the collar is too small. c. The sleeves are too short, and the collar is too big. d. The sleeves are too long, and the collar is too big.

9

4

Mrs. Williams lived in a small street in London, and now she had a new neighbour. Her name was Mrs. Briggs, and she talked a lot about her expensive furniture, her beautiful carpets and her new kitchen. ‘Do you know,’ she said to Mrs. Williams one day, ‘I’ve got a new dishwasher. It washes the plates and glasses and knives and forks beautifully.’ ‘Oh?’ Mrs. Williams answered. ‘And does it dry them and put them in the cupboard too?’ Mrs. Briggs was surprised. ‘Well,’ she answered, ‘the things in the machine are dry after an hour, but it doesn’t put them away, of course.’ ‘I’ve had a dishwasher for twelve and a half years,’ Mrs. Williams said. ‘Oh?’ Mrs. Briggs answered. ‘And does yours put the things in the cupboard when it has washed them?’ She laughed nastily. ‘Yes, he does,’ Mrs. Williams answered. ‘He dries the dishes and puts them away.’ Word outside the 1000: dishwasher

10

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Where did Mrs. Briggs live? Why was Mrs. Briggs surprised? Did Mrs. Briggs’s dishwasher dry the plates and other things? Did it put them away? Did Mrs. Williams’s dishwasher put the things in the cupboard? Who was Mrs. Williams’s dishwasher?

B. Write these sentences. Put one of these words in each empty place: an

any

no

none

some

1. Mrs. Briggs was rich, but Mrs. Williams was not. Mrs. Briggs had . . . beautiful carpets, but Mrs. Williams didn’t have . . . . 2. Mrs. Briggs had . . . expensive furniture, but Mrs. Williams had . . . . 3. Mrs. Briggs had . . . expensive dishwasher, but Mrs. Williams did not have . . . machines in her kitchen. 4. Mrs. Briggs had . . . nice roses in her garden, but Mrs. Williams had . . . flowers in hers. 5. Mrs. Briggs had . . . big trees in her garden too, but Mrs. Williams had . . . . C. Write this story. Put one of these words in each empty place: he

him

his

her

it

its

she

Mrs. Williams had a good baby: . . . never cried, and . . . clothes were always clean. Mrs. Briggs was very surprised and said, ‘When my daughter was small, I gave . . . lots of food, but . . . cried a lot, and . . . clothes were always dirty. Why is your baby so different? How do you do . . . ?’ ‘Well,’ answered Mrs. Williams, ‘my first child was a boy. I always gave . . . a lot of food, . . . got very fat, and . . . stomach was always full. He cried a lot and was dirty. Now I give my new baby much less, and . . . is happy and clean.’

11

5

One day a man went to see his doctor and said to him, ‘I’ve swallowed a horse, doctor, and I feel very ill.’ The doctor thought for a few seconds and then said, ‘All right, Mr. Lloyd, I’ll help you. Please lie down on this bed.’ The doctor’s nurse gave the man an injection, the man went to sleep, and the doctor went out quickly to look for a horse in the town. After half an hour he found one, borrowed it and took it into his office, so when Mr. Lloyd woke up, it was there in front of him. ‘Here’s the horse, Mr. Lloyd,’ the doctor said. ‘I’ve taken it out of your stomach, and it won’t give you any more trouble now.’ At first Mr. Lloyd was happy, but then he looked at the horse again and said, ‘But, doctor, my horse was white, and this one’s brown!’ Word outside the 1000: swallowed

12

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Did the doctor think, ‘This man has really swallowed a horse’? Why did the nurse give the man an injection? What did the doctor do when he went out? What did Mr. Lloyd see when he woke up? Why was Mr. Lloyd not happy when he looked at the horse more carefully?

B. Which words in the story on page 12 mean: 1. sick 2. pleased

3. visit 4. fast

5. discovered

. Put the number of the correct sentence under the correct picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The nurse gave Mr. Lloyd an injection. The doctor went out into the street. Mr. Lloyd said, ‘I feel very ill.’ Mr. Lloyd woke up. Mr. Lloyd came into the doctor’s office. Mr. Lloyd went to sleep.

13

6

A history teacher was talking to his class about the ancient Romans. ‘They were very strong, brave people, and they were good soldiers,’ he said. ‘They always wanted to have strong bodies, so they played a lot of games.’ ‘Did they like swimming?’ one of the girls asked. ‘That makes people’s bodies strong.’ She was very good at swimming. ‘Oh, yes, some of them swam a lot,’ the teacher answered. Then he told them a story about one famous Roman. ‘There was a big, wide river in the middle of Rome,’ he said. ‘It was the Tiber, and this man swam across it three times every day before breakfast.’ The girl laughed when she heard this. ‘Why are you laughing?’ the teacher asked her angrily. ‘Have I said anything funny?’ ‘Well, sir,’ the girl answered, ‘Why didn’t he swim across the river four times, to get back to his clothes again?’ Word outside the 1000: ancient

14

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did the ancient Romans play a lot of games? Why was one of the girls interested in swimming? Who swam across the Tiber before breakfast? Why was the teacher angry? Why did the girl laugh?

B. Which of the answers to these questions are right? Write the correct ones. 1. What did the teacher in this story teach? a. Swimming. b. Games. c. History.

3. Why did the girl laugh? a. Because the Roman swam before breakfast. b. Because the Roman did not finish swimming near his clothes. c. Because the teacher was angry.

2. When the teacher said, ‘Some of them swam a lot’, who was he talking about? a. The Romans. b. The girls in his class. c. Strong people. Word outside the 1000: puzzle

15

7

Betty Brown was five years old, and her mother wanted her to begin going to school, because she wanted to start working in an office again. A month before the beginning of the school year Mrs. Brown began telling Betty about school. ‘It’s very nice,’ she said. ‘You’ll play games and paint pictures and sing songs.’ Mrs. Brown began doing these things with Betty. Betty liked the games and the painting and the singing very much, but she always wanted to be near her mother, so Mrs. Brown was rather afraid and thought, ‘What will she do when I leave her at school?’ But on the first day at school Betty was very good. She did not cry, and she was happy. On the second morning Mrs. Brown said, ‘Put your clothes on, Betty. I’m going to take you to school in half an hour's time.’ ‘School?’ Betty said. ‘But I’ve been to school!’

16

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did Mrs. Brown want to send her daughter to school? What did Mrs. Brown do to make Betty like school? Why was Mrs. Brown afraid? Did Betty like school when she went there? Why was Betty surprised when her mother said, ‘I’m going to take you to school in half an hour’s time on the second morning? (Because she thought, ‘. . . .’)

B. What words in the story on page 16 mean the opposite of: 1. nasty 2. bad 3. sad

4. young 3. after 6. little

7. far from

C. Write this story. Put one of these words in each empty place: do

does

doing

make

makes

making

Our children don’t . . . much homework, but they . . . a lot of work in school. My son George likes . . . furniture and things like that more than . . . lessons. He sometimes . . . nice chairs out of old boxes in his class. He and his friends . . . a lot of noise while they are working, of course. George is good at sport: he . . . the high jump very well. Such sport . . . children a lot of good, I think. Don’t you?

17

8

One morning Mrs. Perry said to her husband, ‘Jack, there’s a meeting of our ladies’ club at Mrs. Young’s house at lunch time today, and I want to go to it. I’ll leave you some food for your lunch. Is that all right?’ ‘Oh, yes,’ her husband answered, that’s quite all right. What are you going to leave for my lunch?’ ‘This tin of fish,’ Mrs. Perry said. ‘And there are some cold, boiled potatoes and some beans here, too.’ ‘Good,’ Mr. Perry answered. I’ll have a good lunch.’ So Mrs. Perry went to her meeting. All the ladies had lunch at Mrs. Young’s house, and at three o’clock Mrs. Perry came home. ‘Was your fish nice, Jack?’ she asked. ‘Yes, but my feet are hurting,’ he answered. ‘Why are they hurting?’ Mrs. Perry asked. ‘Well, the words on the tin were, “Open tin and stand in hot water for five minutes”.’ Word outside the 1000: stand (here meaning ‘put it’)

18

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why didn’t Mrs. Perry want to cook her husband’s lunch? What did she leave him for his lunch? Did Mr. Perry enjoy his lunch? What was the matter with his feet? What mistake did Mr. Perry make when he read the words on the tin?

B. Which of these sentences are true? Write the correct ones down. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Mrs. Perry wanted to belong to a ladies’ club. Mrs. Perry belonged to a ladies’ club. Mrs. Perry did not cook her husband’s lunch that day. Mrs. Perry cooked the lunch for her husband that day. Mrs. Perry had lunch with several ladies. Mrs. Perry had lunch with Mrs. Young only. Mr. Perry didn’t like his lunch. Mr. Perry liked his lunch. Mr. Perry put the tin of fish in hot water. Mr. Perry put his feet in hot water.

C. Write this story, but do not put pictures: put words. Some

are in the kitchen of a big

They are making lunch for a

of their club. One , of.

lady has got some big putting some cutting some like nice

.

in

. Another is , and the third is

into pieces. The ladies of the club . What is that lady doing? Oh, she is sitting are tired.

down, because her

19

9

Miss Green was very fat. She weighed 100 kilos, and she was getting heavier every month, so she went to see her doctor. He said, ‘You need a diet, Miss Green, and I’ve got a good one here.’ He gave her a small book and said, ‘Read this carefully and eat the things on page 11 every day. Then come back and see me in two weeks’ time.’ Miss Green came again two weeks later, but she wasn’t thinner: she was fatter. The doctor was surprised and said, ‘Are you eating the things on page 11 of the small book?’ ‘Yes, doctor,’ she answered. The next day the doctor visited Miss Green during her dinner. She was very surprised to see him. ‘Miss Green,’ he said, ‘Why are you eating potatoes and bread? They aren’t in your diet.’ ‘But, doctor,’ Miss Green answered, ‘I ate my diet at lunch time. This is my dinner.’ Word outside the 1000: diet

20

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did Miss Green go to see her doctor? How did the doctor try to help her? Did she get thinner? Did she eat the things on page 11 of the book? Why didn’t she get thinner?

21

10

Rose left school when she was seventeen years old and went to a college for a year to learn to type. She passed her examinations quite well and then went to look for work. She was still living with her parents. A lot of people were looking for typists at that time, so it was not difficult to find interesting work. Rose went to several offices, and then chose one of them. It was near her parents’ house. She thought, ‘I’ll walk there every morning. I won’t need to go by bus.’ She went to the office again and said to the manager, ‘I want to work here, but what will you pay me?’ ‘We’ll pay you £27 now,’ the manager answered, ‘and £30 after three months.’ Rose thought for a few seconds before she answered. Then she said, ‘All right, then I’ll start in three months’ time.’ A. Answer these questions. 1. Why was it easy to find interesting work? 2. Why did Rose want to work in an office near her parents’ house? Word outside the 1000: manager

22

3. Why did Rose go to one office again? 4. Whom did she talk to there? 5. Why did she want to start working there in three months’ time? B. Put one, two or three words in each of the empty places in these sentences: 1. Rose 60% Sally 70% Judy 90% Rose passed her examinations well. Sally passed them . . . ; and Judy passed them . . . . 2.

73456 x38

14322 x 2452

3

543 126

The sum on the left is difficult. The one in the middle is . . . . The one on the right is . . . . 3.

Office A is quite near Rose’s house, but Office B is . . . , and Office C is ....

C. Choose the right sentence for each picture. Write it down. 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c. 3. a. b. c.

Rose is working in an office. Rose is studying in her college. Rose is doing an examination. Rose is getting on a bus. Rose is getting off a bus. Rose is going past a bus. Rose is talking to the manager. Rose is typing a letter for the manager. Rose is giving the manager a letter.

23

11

Mr. Day was a teacher at a school in a big city in the north of England. He usually went to France or Germany for a few weeks during his summer holidays, and he spoke French and German quite well. But one year Mr. Day said to one of his friends, ‘I’m going to have a holiday in Athens. But I don’t speak Greek, so I’ll go to evening classes and have Greek lessons for a month before I go.’ He studied very hard for a month, and then his holidays began and he went to Greece. When he came back a few weeks later, his friend said to him, ‘Did you have any trouble with your Greek when you were in Athens, Dick?’ ‘No, I didn’t have any trouble with it,’ answered Mr. Day. ‘But the Greeks did!’ Word outside the 1000: puzzle

24

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Where did Mr. Day usually spend some time during his holidays? Why did he want to have Greek lessons? Where did he go to learn Greek? How long did he stay in Greece? How much did his Greek help him while he was in Greece?

B. Which of the answers to these questions are right? Write them down. 1. Why did Mr. Day have Greek lessons? a. Because he liked evening classes. b. Because he wanted to visit Greece. c. Because he did not like French and German. 2. How long did Mr. Day stay in Greece? a. A month. b. A few weeks. c. One year. 3. What did the Greeks have trouble with? a. Mr. Day’s Greek. b. Mr. Day’s friend. c. Mr. Day’s holiday.

25

12

Mr. Pearce liked shooting ducks very much. Whenever he had a free day, he went out shooting with his friends. But one summer he said to himself, ‘I’ve never been to the mountains. My holidays are going to begin soon, so I’m going to go to the mountains and shoot deer. They’re more interesting than ducks, I think.’ So when his holidays began, Mr. Pearce went to the station, bought his ticket and was soon in the mountains. He got out at a small station and walked through fields and forests for a few kilometres. Then he saw a farmer in a field. ‘Good morning,’ Mr. Pearce said to him. ‘Are there any deer here?’ ‘Well,’ answered the farmer slowly, ‘there was one last year, but all the gentlemen from the town came and shot at it, and it’s gone somewhere else now, I think.’ Word outside the 1000: deer

26

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What sport did Mr. Pearce enjoy most? Why did he want to go to the mountains? How did he go to the mountains? Whom did he speak to there? Why did the deer go away from that place?

B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Mr. Pearce wasn’t free last week. He was very . . . . His holidays began on the 15th of June, and they . . . on the 29th. The farmer did not speak . . . he spoke slowly. When the gentlemen from the town shot at the deer, they never hit it: they always . . . it. 5. Mr. Pearce has often shot ducks, but he has . . . shot a deer. C. Put the number of the correct sentence under the correct picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Mr. Pearce got into a train. ‘The deer has gone away.’ Mr. Pearce met a farmer. Mr. Pearce often shot ducks. Mr. Pearce was in the mountains now. Mr. Pearce got out again.

27

13

Mr. Leonard was twenty-three years old and not very rich. He was not married and he lived in two rooms in a small house in a city. Every summer, Mr. Leonard went down to the sea for a holiday. He stayed in small, cheap hotels, but he always wanted to have a clean, tidy room. He hated dirty places. One summer a friend of his said, ‘Go to the Tower Hotel in Whitesea. I went there last year, and it was very nice and clean.’ So Mr. Leonard went to the Tower Hotel in Whitesea. But there was a different manager that year. The new manager took Mr. Leonard to his room. The room looked quite nice and clean, but Mr. Leonard said to the manager, ‘Are the sheets on the bed clean?’ ‘Yes, of course they are!’ he answered angrily. ‘We washed them this morning. Feel them. They’re still damp.’ Word outside the 1000: manager

28

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did Mr. Leonard stay in cheap hotels? What kinds of rooms did Mr. Leonard not like? Who gave Mr. Leonard the name of the Tower Hotel? Why was the new manager angry? Where were the damp sheets?

B. Which of these sentences are true? Write them down. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Mr. Leonard did not have a wife. Mr. Leonard’s wife was quite young. Mr. Leonard went to cheap hotels because they were usually clean. Mr. Leonard went to cheap hotels because he did not have much money. Mr. Leonard’s friend liked the Tower Hotel. Mr. Leonard’s friend did not like the Tower Hotel much. The sheets on Mr. Leonard’s bed were not very clean. The sheets on Mr. Leonard’s bed were clean. His sheets were not dry. His sheets were quite dry.

C. Write this story. Put a word in each empty place. You will find all the correct words in the story on page 28. Mr. Jones went to the sea for a holiday one . . ., and he . . . in a cheap . . . , because he was not a . . . man. At 7 a.m. on the first morning a woman came and said, ‘Please get up.’ Mr. Jones . . . getting up early, so he said, ‘I don’t want to yet. I am still . . . tired.’ The woman went away, but at 8 a.m. a ... one came and said to Mr. Jones, ‘Mr. Jones, please get up. We need the . . . from your bed.’ Mr. Jones still . . . to sleep, so he answered . . . , ‘Why?’ ‘Because breakfast is starting,’ answered the woman, ‘and we need to put them on our tables. They’re our table-cloths too.’

29

14

Two years after Tom and Elizabeth married, they went to live in a small flat in a big city. They were both quite young: Tom was twenty-six and Elizabeth was twenty-two. Tom worked in a bank, and Elizabeth worked in a big office. Elizabeth always cooked the dinner when they got home, and when they had meat, Tom always cut it up when they sat down to eat. While Tom was cutting the meat up one evening, Elizabeth said to him, ‘When we were first married, Tom, you always gave me the bigger piece of meat when you cut it, and you kept the smaller one for yourself. Now you do the opposite: you give me the smaller piece and keep the bigger one for yourself. Why do you do that? Don’t you love me any more?’ Her husband laughed and answered, ‘Oh, no, Elizabeth. It isn’t that! It’s because you’ve learned to cook now!’

30

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Who cooks in Tom's house? What work does Tom do during meals? What did Tom always do when he and Elizabeth first married? What does he do now? Why has he changed?

B. Which words in the story on page 30 mean: 1. arrived 2. like very much

3. into pieces 5. made 4. became husband and wife

C. Write this story, but do not put pictures: put words. is near a big

This

. Hundreds of

people work in it. They bring

in,

it into small

it, and then put

,

it in tins. One woman worked here for ten years, and then she a man from her

One day he .

said to her, ‘Why do we never your factory?’ She

a tin of meat from and answered, ‘I see enough

of it while I’m working!’

31

15

Mrs. Jenkins went to see her doctor one day, because her heart was giving her trouble. The doctor listened to her heart carefully and did a few other things. Then he said, ‘Well, Mrs. Jenkins, stop smoking, and then you’ll soon be quite all right again.’ ‘But doctor,’ answered Mrs. Jenkins quickly, ‘I’ve never smoked. I don’t like smoking.’ ‘Oh, well,’ said the doctor, ‘then don’t drink any more alcohol.’ ‘But I don’t drink alcohol,’ answered Mrs. Jenkins at once. ‘Stop drinking tea and coffee then,’ the doctor said to her. ‘I only drink water,’ answered Mrs. Jenkins. ‘I don’t like tea or coffee.’ The doctor thought for a few seconds and then said, ‘Well, . . . er . . . do you like fried potatoes?’ ‘Yes, I like them very much,’ answered Mrs. Jenkins. ‘All right, then stop eating those,’ said the doctor as he got up to say goodbye to Mrs. Jenkins. A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What was Mrs. Jenkins having trouble with? Why did Mrs. Jenkins not smoke? What did Mrs. Jenkins drink? What did she like eating? What did the doctor want her to do?

Word outside the 1000: alcohol

32

B. Do this puzzle. Across: 2. The doctor sent Mrs. Jenkins . . . for £2. 4. Mrs. Jenkins never drank tea or . . . . 6. The doctor said, ‘. . . , then stop eating fried potatoes.’ (two words) 7. Not I, not you, and not anyone else. 8. Mrs. Jenkins said, ‘I . . . fried potatoes.’ 9. I’ve never smoked. I don't like . . . .

2. This is the opposite of ‘stop’. 3. A man burned his finger while he was . . . a cigarette with a match. 5. Mrs. Jenkins never drank this.

Down: 1. Mrs. Jenkins liked fried . . . very much.

C. Write this story. Choose the correct words (to . . . or -ing): When Helen finished to work working to drive driving

to work working

in Iran, she came back to England

in a bank. She wanted a car, so I offered to . She enjoyed

to learn learning

to turn turning

went

to take taking

to put putting

, and she did not always remember

when she needed it, but she soon stopped

to make making

her test*, she passed easily.

Word outside the 1000: puzzle – *A kind of examination.

33

her

teaching

very much, and she learned

very quickly. Of course, she sometimes forgot she wanted

to teach

to drive driving

well,

her hand out when to get getting

petrol

mistakes, and when she

16

John liked chocolates very much, but his mother never gave him any, because they were bad for his teeth, she thought. But John had a very nice grandfather. The old man loved his grandson very much, and sometimes he brought John chocolates when he came to visit him. Then his mother let him eat them, because she wanted to make the old man happy. One evening, a few days before John’s seventh birthday, he was saying his prayers in his bedroom before he went to bed. ‘Please, God, he shouted,’ make them give me a big box of chocolates for my birthday on Saturday.’ His mother was in the kitchen, but she heard the small boy shouting and went into his bedroom quickly. ‘Why are you shouting, John?’ she asked her son. ‘God can hear you when you talk quietly.’ ‘I know,’ answered the clever boy with a smile, ‘but Grandfather’s in the next room, and he can’t.’ Word outside the 1000: prayer

34

A. Answer these questions. 1. Why didn’t John get any chocolates from his mother? 2. Why did his grandfather give him chocolates? 3. Who did John really mean when he said ‘them’ while he was saying his prayers? 4. Why did John’s mother go into his bedroom quickly? 5. What did John want his grandfather to do on Saturday? B. Opposites. What words in the story on page 34 mean the opposite of: 1. good 2. small 3. loudly

4. always 5. hated 6. slowly

7. stupid

C. Put the number of the correct sentence under the correct picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

John said his prayers. His mother ran into his bedroom. John’s mother did not want to spoil his teeth. John’s grandfather gave him some chocolates. He shouted loudly. John smiled and said, ‘Grandfather can’t hear me well.’

35

17

It was Jimmy’s birthday, and he was five years old. He got quite a lot of nice birthday presents from his family, and one of them was a beautiful big drum. ‘Who gave him that thing?’ Jimmy’s father said when he saw it. ‘His grandfather did,’ answered Jimmy’s mother. ‘Oh,’ said his father. Of course, Jimmy liked his drum very much. He made a terrible noise with it, but his mother did not mind. His father was working during the day, and Jimmy was in bed when he got home in the evening, so he did not hear the noise. But one of the neighbours did not like the noise at all, so one morning a few days later, she took a sharp knife and went to Jimmy’s house while he was hitting his drum. She said to him, ‘Hullo, Jimmy. Do you know, there’s something very nice inside your drum. Here’s a knife. Open the drum and let’s find it.’ Word outside the 1000: drum

36

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

When did Jimmy get the drum? Whom did he get it from? Why didn't his father hear it? Why did the neighbour really want Jimmy to cut the drum open? What did she say to Jimmy to make him cut it open?

B. Write these sentences. Put one of these in each empty place: a lot

a lot of

many

much

‘How . . . did Jimmy’s drum cost?’ ‘Oh, it didn’t cost . . . ; but his toy horse cost quite . . . .’ ‘How . . . other birthday presents did he get?’ ‘He got quite . . . nice things.’ ‘Did he get . . . other toys?’ ‘Oh, yes, he got quite . . . . And he got . . . chocolate, but not . . . sweets.’ ‘Did he get . . . chocolate from his parents?’ ‘No, he didn’t get any from them.’ C. Which of the answers to these questions are right? Write the correct ones down: 1. Who gave Jimmy the drum? a. His father. b. His grandfather. c. His mother. 2. Why did Jimmy’s father not stop him making a noise with the drum? a. Because he didn’t mind. b. Because he wasn’t at home then. c. Because Jimmy only played it in the evening. 3. What did Jimmy’s neighbour really want him to do? a. To spoil his drum. b. To find something nice in his drum. c. To make a noise on his drum with a knife.

37

18

When Torn Howard was seventeen years old he was as tall as his father, so he began to borrow Mr. Howard’s clothes when he wanted to go out with his friends in the evening. Mr. Howard did not like this, and he always got very angry when he found his son wearing any of his things. One evening when Tom came downstairs to go out, his father stopped him in the hall. He looked at Tom’s clothes very carefully. Then he said angrily, ‘Isn’t that one of my ties, Tom?’ ‘Yes, Father, it is,’ answered Tom. ‘And that shirt’s mine too, isn’t it?’ his father continued. ‘Yes, that’s yours too,’ answered Tom. ‘And you’re wearing my belt!’ said Mr. Howard. ‘Yes, I am, Father,’ answered Tom. ‘You don’t want your trousers to fall down, do you?’ Word outside the 1000: tie (n.)

38

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4.

When did Tom begin to borrow his father’s clothes? When did he put them on? What did Tom’s father do when he borrowed his clothes? Which of his father’s clothes was Tom wearing in this story?

B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Tom was not a . . . boy. He was a tall boy. Mr. Howard was not . . . when Tom borrowed his clothes: he was angry. Mr. Howard did not . . . his clothes to Tom; but Tom borrowed them. Tom didn't borrow his father’s oldest clothes. He borrowed his . . . ones. Tom did not want his father’s trousers to fall down: he wanted them to . . . .

C. Choose the right sentence for each picture. Write it down. 1. a. Joe is as tall as his father. b. Joe is less tall than his father. c. Joe is taller than his father. 2. a. Tom is going upstairs. b. Tom is coming upstairs. c. Tom is coming downstairs. 3. a. Tom is wearing a belt. b. Tom isn't wearing a belt. c. Tom's belt has broken.

39

19

Mr. Yates was nearly ninety, so it was often difficult for him to remember things, but he still liked travelling very much, so he and his wife went to Spain every year. One summer when they were there, they went to visit some friends. These people had two young daughters. One afternoon Mr. Yates was talking to one of the girls in the garden after lunch. ‘You and your sister were ill when my wife and I were here last year, weren’t you?’ he said to her. ‘Yes, we were,’ answered the girl. ‘We were very ill.’ The old man said nothing for a minute, because he was thinking. Then at last he said, ‘Oh, yes, I remember now! One of you died. Which one of you was it, you or your sister?’ The girl answered, ‘It was me.’ ‘Oh? I'm very sorry to hear it,’ said the old man.

40

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did Mr. Yates not remember things very well? Where did his friends live? Who were ill when Mr. and Mrs. Yates visited Spain another time? Who really died then? Was the girl having a joke with Mr. Yates?

B. Which words in the story on page 40 mean: 1. almost 2. not forget

3. sad 4. hard

5. stopped living

C. Write this story. Put one word in each empty place. You will find all the correct words in the story on page 40. Mr. and Mrs. Yates lived together for 52 years, and then she became very . . . . After a month she . . . , and Mr. Yates was alone. It was . . . for him to live in a big house without anybody else, so he married again. His new . . . was much younger than he was, and she liked . . . to foreign countries, so they began to go to Africa every . . . , in the winter. Mrs. Yates had a younger . . . , and she usually went with them too. Everybody thought, ‘Those girls are that old man’s . . . .’ One day in Kenya a man said to him, ‘Do you . . . me? I was your neighbour in Southampton.’ Mr. Yates did not answer for a few seconds, because he was . . . . Then he said, ‘Oh, yes! That’s right! I married your daughter, didn’t I?’

41

20

Mr. Knott was a teacher. He taught in a big school in London. He lived a long way from the school, so he was usually quite tired when he got home. At nine o’clock one evening, when he was in bed, the telephone bell rang in the hall of his small house, so he went downstairs, picked up the telephone and said, ‘This is Whitebridge 3165. Who’s speaking, please?’ ‘Watt,’ a man answered. ‘What’s your name, please?’ said Mr. Knott. ‘Watt’s my name,’ was the answer. ‘Yes, I asked you that. What’s your name?’ Mr. Knott said again. ‘I told you. Watt’s my name,’ said the other man. ‘Are you Jack Smith?’ ‘No, I’m Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott. ‘Will you give me your name, please?’ said Mr. Watt. ‘Will Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott. Both Mr. Watt and Mr. Will Knott put their telephones down angrily and thought, ‘That was a rude, stupid man!’ A. Answer these questions. 1. Why was Mr. Knott usually tired in the evenings? 2. Why did he get up and go downstairs when he was already in bed? 3. Who telephoned him? Word outside the 1000: rude

42

4. Whom did Mr. Watt want to speak to? 5. When Mr. Knott said, ‘Will Knott,’ what did Mr. Watt think? (He thought, ‘. . . .’) B. Do this puzzle. Across: 1. The name of the teacher in this story is . . . . . . (two words). 5. ‘Whom did Mr. Knott speak . . . on the telephone?’ ‘Mr. Watt.’ 6. Perhaps Mr. Knott went to the . . . on Saturday evenings to see a film. 8. Trees and other plants grow in . . . . 10. Not yes. 11. Both men in this story . . . angry when they did not understand each other. 12. Less polite. 13. Mr. Knott went downstairs because the . . . rang.

4. Mr. Knott was a . . . . 5. Mr. Watt . . . , ‘That was a rude, stupid man!’ 7. Mr. Watt waited . . . someone answered the telephone, and then he spoke. 9. Perhaps Mr. Knott listened to the news on the . . . before he went to bed.

Down: 2. We cut fruit up with this. 3. In how many schools did Mr. Knott work? ‘In . . . .’

C. Write this story. Put the or nothing in each empty place. George and Dorothy go to . . . school by . . . bus in . . . morning, but they usually come home in . . . 5.15 train. George is Dorothy’s brother. He doesn’t like school: when he is at . . . home, he listens to . . . radio or plays . . . trumpet, and then he is happy. On . . . Monday morning he sometimes says, ‘I have a terrible pain in . . . stomach,’ and he does not go to . . . school with Dorothy. His father and mother are already at . . . work, so they do not know. They go to . . . work very early. Dorothy plays . . . tennis a lot. When she leaves school, she wants to go into . . . army. Word outside the 1000: puzzle

43

21

Carol Roberts left school when she was seventeen and then thought, ‘What’s going to happen now? I want to marry a nice, young man and have children, but no nice, young men have asked me yet. Will I meet one soon, and will he want to marry me?’ She spoke to her best friend about these questions, and her best friend said. ‘Go and ask a fortune-teller. Perhaps she’ll give you the answers.'’ So Carol went to see a fortune-teller. The fortune-teller said to her, ‘I’ll give you answers to two questions. It’ll cost you five pounds.’ Carol was surprised. She thought for some time, but at last she paid the money. Then she said to the fortune-teller, ‘Isn’t that very expensive for only two questions?’ ‘Yes, it is,’ answered the fortune-teller. ‘And now what’s your second question?’ A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What did Carol want to do after she left school? What questions did she want to ask the fortune-teller? Why was Carol surprised? How much money did she give the fortune-teller? How did she spend half that money?

Word outside the 1000: fortune-teller

44

B. Put one, two or three words in each of the empty places in these sentences. 1. Bill is young. Peter is . . . . Joe is . . . .

2. The first fortune-teller is friendly, the second one is . . . , and the third is . . . . 3. The girl on the left is surprised. The one in the middle is . . . . And the one on the right is . . . .

C. Write this story, but do not put pictures: put words. This

is a teacher in

. The small

in his classes are very good at mathematics. When he asks them all the

about

, they know

. He says, ‘One hundred

840 French francs today. Oranges

are one franc

twenty each. How many will I get for one pound? Quick! ’ And he is not

when they all answer, ‘Seven, sir! They’re

rather

, aren’t they?’

45

22

Jack had a small, red car, and he liked driving it very fast. This was all right when he was out in the country, but in towns and big villages driving fast is dangerous, so there is always a speed limit. In Jack’s country it was fifty kilometres an hour. Jack often drove faster than that through towns. One day Jack was driving his small, red car through a town when a very young policeman stopped him and said, ‘You were driving at more than fifty kilometres an hour, sir. Please give me your name and address.’ Jack looked at the young policeman carefully for a few seconds and then said to him, ‘But I started my journey less than an hour ago!’ The policeman was new to this work and did not know the answer to Jack’s excuse. He thought for a few seconds and then let Jack go. Words outside the 1000: speed limit

46

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why is there a speed limit in towns and big villages? How fast did Jack sometimes drive through towns? Why did the young policeman stop Jack? What was Jack’s excuse? (He said, ‘. . .’) Why did the policeman let Jack go?

B. Opposites. What words in the story on page 46 mean the opposite of: 1. slowly 2. wrong 3. carelessly

4. more 5. big 6. slower

7. safe

C. Which of these sentences are true? Write them down. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

There was no speed ‘limit outside towns and big villages. The speed limit outside towns and big villages was 50 kilometers an hour. Jack often drove faster than 50 kilometers an hour in towns. Jack often drove faster than the speed limit. The policeman wanted Jack’s name and address. Jack wanted the policeman’s name and address. Jack’s excuse was a good one. Jack’s excuse was a bad one. The policeman let Jack go because he thought, ‘Perhaps that’s a good excuse.’ 10. The policeman let Jack go because he was new at that work.

47

23

Dick was seven years old, and his sister, Catherine, was five. One day their mother took them to their aunt’s house to play while she went to the big city to buy some new clothes The children played for an hour, and then at half past four their aunt took Dick into the kitchen. She gave him a nice cake and a knife and said to him, ‘Now here’s a knife, Dick. Cut this cake in half and give one of the pieces to your sister, but remember to do it like a gentleman.’ ‘Like a gentleman?’ Dick asked. ‘How do gentlemen do it? ‘They always give the bigger piece to the other person,’ answered his aunt at once. ‘Oh,’ said Dick. He thought about this for a few seconds. Then he took the cake to his sister and said to her, ‘Cut this cake in half, Catherine.’ A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did the children’s mother leave them at their aunt’s house? What did Dick’s aunt want him to do with the cake? What do gentlemen do when there are two pieces of cake? Which piece did Dick’s aunt want him to give Catherine? What did Dick do with the cake?

48

B. Which of the answers to these questions are right? Write the questions and the correct answers down. 1. Which child was younger? a. Catherine was. b. Dick was. 2. Who wanted Dick to cut the cake? a. A gentleman. b. His aunt. c. Catherine. 3. Why did Dick lake the cake to Catherine? a. Because he wasn’t hungry. b. Because he wanted to be like a gentleman. c. Because he wanted the bigger piece. C. Put the number of the correct sentence under the correct picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Dick went to Catherine with the cake. Dick’s aunt showed him a cake. Dick went into the kitchen with his aunt. Dick said, ‘Cut this cake in half. The children’s mother left them with their aunt. His aunt gave him a knife.

49

24

A small boy and his father were having a walk in the country when it suddenly began to rain very hard. They did not have their umbrellas with them, and there was nowhere to hide from the rain, so they were soon very wet, and the small boy did not feel very happy. For a long time while they were walking home through the rain, the boy was thinking. Then at last he turned to his father and said to him, ‘Why does it rain, Father? It isn’t very nice, is it?’ ‘No, it isn’t very nice, but it’s very useful, Tom,’ answered his father. ‘It rains to make the fruit and the vegetables grow for us, and to make the grass grow for the cows and sheep.’ Tom thought about this for a few seconds, and then he said, ‘Then, why does it rain on the road too, Father?’

50

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Where were the small boy and his father when it began to rain? Why did they get wet? Why didn’t the small boy feel happy? How is rain useful? Was Tom happy with his father’s answer?

B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The small boy did not like being wet: he preferred to be . . . . The boy did not think for a . . . time: he thought for a long time. He thought, ‘Rain isn’t nice. It’s . . . .’ But rain isn’t . . . : it’s very useful. The boy was not . . . : he was clever.

C. Write this story. Put one word in each empty place. You will find all the correct words in the story on page 50. A lady and a . . . girl were getting very wet, because they were walking in the . . . and they were not wearing coats or carrying . . . . The girl did not like being . . . , so she did not feel . . . . Then they saw a star between two clouds. ‘Do you know,’ the lady . . . , ‘that star’s much bigger than our world.’ The small girl . . . about that for a few . . . , and then she . . . to the lady and answered, ‘Well, why doesn’t it keep the rain off us then?’

51

25

A man went into a bar, sat down, called the barman and said to him, ‘Give me a drink before the trouble starts.’ The barman was busy with other people, so he did not say anything, but he gave the man the drink, and the man drank it quickly. Then he put his glass down, called the barman again and said to him, ‘Give me another one before the trouble starts.’ Again the barman was too busy to say anything, so he gave the man his drink and went away. The man drank that too, and then again he called the barman and said to him, ‘One more drink before the trouble starts, please.’ This time the barman was not very busy, so when he brought the man his third drink, he said to him, ‘What trouble are you talking about?’ The man answered, ‘I haven’t got any money.’ A. Answer these questions. 1. Why didn’t the barman ask any questions when he gave the man his first two drinks? 2. How many drinks did the barman bring the man? Word outside the 1000: barman

52

3. How did the man drink his first drink? 4. Why did the barman have time to ask the man a question when he brought him his third drink? 5. What was the man’s trouble? B. Do this puzzle. Across: 4. The man wanted a drink before this started. 6. Before he cleans the floor, the barman ... up the carpets like this: . 7. We usually find expensive bars in important . . . in a city. Down: 1. The trouble in a bar … when a man doesn’t pay for his drinks. 2. The barman caught the man by the …of his coat and threw him out. 3. Least shallow.

5. When the man asked for his first two drinks, the barman was…than he was when he asked for his third one. 8. The first two times, the barman was too busy to talk …the man.

C. Choose the right sentence for each picture. Write it down. 1. a. b. c. 2. a.

This lady is in a bar. This lady is in a restaurant. This lady is in a hotel. This man is calling the barman. b. This man is calling the waiter. c. This man is calling the servant.

3. a. This barman is very busy. b. This barman is not very busy. Word outside the 1000: puzzle

53

26

A man and his wife had a small bar near a station. The bar often stayed open until after midnight, because people came to drink there while they were waiting for trains. At two o’clock one morning, one man was still sitting at a table in the small bar. He was asleep. The barman’s wife wanted to go to bed. She looked into the bar several times, and each time the man was still there. Then at last she went to her husband and said to him, ‘You’ve woken that man six times now, George, but he isn’t drinking anything. Why haven’t you sent him away? It’s very late.’ ‘Oh, no, I don’t want to send him away,’ answered her husband with a smile. ‘You see, whenever I wake him up, he asks for his bill, and when I bring it to him he pays it. Then he goes to sleep again.’ Word outside the 1000: barman.

54

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did people come to drink in the bar after midnight? Why did the barman's wife want him to send the man at the table away? What was he doing at 2 a.m.? Did her husband send the man away? Why did he let him stay?

B. Which words in the story on page 54 mean: 1. 12 o’clock at night 2. sleeping 3. place for drinking

4. more than two 5. from his sleep

C. Write this story, but do not put pictures: put words. in England, there is a

On some Passengers go there to have a

and to talk to the

. There are no

. People stand at the

bar, drink, pay their reach their At

and then get out when they . one night a woman was cleaning an empty ,

train when she found a man in the bar. He was and there was a beautiful

on his face. The woman

put the man’s bag under his head and let him sleep.

55

27

Two friends were camping together. Their names were Jim and Tim. Tim was very lazy. The first evening of their holiday, Jim said to Tim, ‘Here’s some money. Go and buy some meat.’ ‘I’m too tired,’ answered Tim. ‘You go.’ So Jim went to buy the meat. When he came back, he said to Tim, ‘Now, here’s the meat. Please cook it.’ But Tim answered, ‘No, I’m not good at cooking. You do it.’ So Jim cooked the meat. Then Jim said to Tim, ‘Cut the bread,’ but Tim answered, ‘I don’t want to,’ so Jim cut the bread. Then he said to Tim, ‘Go and get some water, please.’ ‘No, I don’t want to get my clothes dirty,’ Tim answered, so Jim got the water. At last Jim said, ‘The meal’s ready. Come and eat it.’ ‘Well, I’ll do that,’ answered Tim. ‘I don’t like saying “No” all the time.’

56

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What was Tim’s excuse for not buying the meat? What was his excuse for not cooking it? What was his excuse for not cutting the bread? What was his excuse for not getting the water? What did he do when Jim asked him to eat?

B. Write this story. Put one of these in each empty place: it was there was

there were

they were

Jim and Tim were friends, and . . . camping. . . . September . . . raining, and . . . quite a lot of water on the roads, so Tim didn’t want to go and buy the meat. . . . cold outside the tent, and . . . no chairs to sit on, so Tim didn’t want to go out and cook the meat. . . . a lot of mud near the river, and . . . quite deep, so Tim didn’t want to go and get the water. . . . a knife in the tent, and . . . quite sharp, but Tim was too lazy to cut the bread. C. Which of these sentences are true? Write them down. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Jim did all the work in this story. Tim did all the work in this story. Tim did not buy the meat because he did not have any money. Tim did not buy the meat because he was tired. Jim cooked the meat because Tim was not good at cooking. Jim cooked the meat because Tim was a lazy boy. Tim got his clothes dirty when he went to get some water. Tim did not get his clothes dirty because he did not go to get the water. Tim was not too tired to eat. Tim was too tired to eat.

57

28

One morning a man was crossing a narrow bridge when he saw a fisherman on the shady bank of the deep, smooth river under him, so he stopped to watch him quietly. After a few minutes, the fisherman pulled his line in. There was a big, fat Fish at the end of it. The fisherman took it off the hook and threw it back into the water. Then he put his hook and line in again. After a few more minutes he caught another big fish. Again he threw it back into the river. Then, the third time, he caught a small fish. He put it into his basket and started to get ready to go. The man on the bridge was very surprised, so he spoke to the fisherman. He said, ‘Why did you throw those beautiful, big fish back into the water, and keep only that small one?’ The fisherman looked up and answered, ‘Small frying-pan.’ Word outside the 1000: frying-pan

58

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did the first man in this story stop on the bridge? What did the fisherman do when he caught the first fish? What did he do when he caught the second? What did he do when he caught the third? Why didn’t he keep the first two fish?

B. Opposites. What words in the story on page 58 mean the opposite of: 1. thin 2. ugly 3. shallow

4. rough 5. wide 6. sunny

7. noisily

C. Put the number of the correct sentence under the correct picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The fisherman caught a small fish. A fisherman was fishing in the river. The fisherman threw the big fish into the water. The fisherman had a small frying-pan. A man was on a bridge. The fisherman caught a big fish.

59

29

When the Americans were getting ready to send their first men to the moon, an old Irishman was watching them on television in the bar of a hotel. There was an Englishman in the bar too, and he said to the Irishman, ‘The Americans are very clever, aren’t they? They’re going to send some men to the moon. It’s a very long way from our world.’ ‘Oh, that’s nothing,’ the Irishman answered quickly. ‘The Irish are going to send some men to the sun in a few months’ time. That’s much farther away than the moon, you know.’ The Englishman was very surprised when he heard this. ‘Oh, yes, it is,’ he said, ‘but the sun’s too hot for people to go to.’ The Irishman laughed and answered, ‘Well, the Irish aren’t stupid, you know. We won’t go to the sun during the day, of course. We’ll go there during the night.’ Word outside the 1000: television

60

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Who were in the bar of the hotel? What was the Irishman watching on television? What did the Irish want to do? Why was the Englishman surprised? Is the sun really cool during the night?

B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The Irishman in this story was not . . . : he was old. The Irishman did not speak . . . . He spoke quickly. The sun is not . . . than the moon: it is farther away. The sun isn’t . . . . It is very hot. The Irishman said, ‘The Irish aren’t stupid: they’re . . . .’

C. Write this story. Put one of these words in each empty place. at

in

on

Pat lived . . . a farm . . . a small village . . . Ireland. He always got up very early . . . the morning to work . . . the fields or to milk the cows. He always had breakfast . . . the kitchen . . . 7 a.m. after that. It was still dark then . . . winter. His wife cooked the breakfast . . . a big stove. She did not buy much … the shops, but sometimes she went to the town . . . foot or . . . the bus to get a few things. She was born . . . that town, so she always stopped . . . several houses, knocked . . . their doors and talked to her old friends.

61

30

Dave’s class at school were studying English history, and one day their teacher said to them, ‘Well, boys, on Friday we’re all going to get on a bus and go to Conway. There’s a beautiful castle there, and we’re going to visit it.’ The boys were very happy when they heard this. ‘Now, has anybody got any questions?’ the teacher asked. ‘How old is the castle, sir?’ Dave asked. ‘It’s about seven hundred years old, Dave,’ the teacher answered. ‘What’s the name of the castle, sir?’ another boy asked. ‘Conway Castle,’ the teacher said. On Friday the boys came to school at 9 o’clock and got into the bus. They visited Conway Castle, and then they came back and went home. ‘Well,’ Dave’s mother said to him when he got home, ‘Did you like the castle, Dave?’ ‘Not very much,’ Dave answered. ‘The stupid people built it too near the railway.’ Words outside the 1000: castle, railway

62

A. Answer these questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why did the boys go to Conway Castle? Who did they go with? When was the castle built? Did Dave enjoy visiting the castle? Why didn’t he like it?

B. Which of the answers to these questions are right? Write the questions and the correct answers down. 1. Why were the boys happy? a. Because they liked Conway Castle. b. Because they liked getting away from their lessons. c. Because they liked asking questions. 2. How did the boys go to Conway Castle? a. By bus. b. On foot. c. By train. 3. Why was the castle near the railway? a. Because people built the railway near the castle. b. Because people built the castle near the railway. C. Choose the right sentence for each picture. Write it down. 1. a. These girls are studying history. b. These girls are studying mathematics. c. These girls are studying English. 2. a. This castle has got a lot of towers b. This castle hasn’t got any towers. c. This castle has got a lot of chimneys. 3. a. This castle is very near a railway. b. This castle is not very near a railway.

1

2

3

63

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Elementary Stories for Reproduction

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