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Day KENNETH GOLDSMITH

THE FIGURES 2003

Portions of this book have been published in Arras, Drunken Boat, and Tuli&Savu. Housepress issued a chapbook comprised of C10 in 2001. The author wishes to thank the editors of these publications for their interest and encouragement. This book would have been impossible without the camaraderie of Christian Bök, Craig Dworkin, Brian Kim Stefans, and Darren Wershler-Henry. This book was made possible by The Saul Rosen Foundation with special thanks to A.G. and Martin Rosen. The Figures, 5 Castle Hill, Great Barrington, MA 01230 Distributed by Small Press Distribution 1341 Seventh Street, Berkeley, CA 94710-1409 ISBN: 1-930589-20-4

For Allen Ruppersberg

“That’s not writing. That’s typing.” — Truman Capote on Jack Kerouac

A

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“All the News that’s Fit to Print” The New York Times Late Edition New York: Today, mostly cloudy, high 83. Tonight, warm and muggy, low 73. Tomorrow, cloudy with a few showers, high 80. Yesterday, high 83, low 72. Weather map is on Page A20. VOL. CXLIX . . . No. 51, 498 Copyright © 2000 The New York Times NEW YORK, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 $1 beyond the greater New York metropolitan area. 75 CENTS PENTAGON LIKELY TO DELAY NEW TEST FOR MISSILE SHIELD JANUARY DATE EXPECTED Deployment Decision Would Fall to Next President — Treaty Issue Remains By ERIC SCHMITT WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 — The Pentagon will probably postpone the next test of a national missile defense system until January, administration officials said yesterday. Any decision to deploy the antimissile shield now seems certain to pass out of President Clinton’s hands to his successor’s. Administration officials had previously said Mr. Clinton would decide this summer on deploying a $60 billion antimissile system that would be ready by 2005. To meet that schedule, the Pentagon has been under heavy pressure for two years to conduct enough flights to show Mr. Clinton and his advisors whether the system was technologically feasible. But now officials are signaling that Mr. Clinton merely plans to decide whether to go ahead with the program’s initial development. The change follows events that include test failure, opposition from Russia as well as European allies and a legal dispute over how far the system could proceed before violating an important arms control treaty. To keep that option of initial development open for Mr. Clinton, the Pentagon has requested bids for initial construction of a radar site in Alaska, setting Sept. 7 as the deadline for technical and cost proposals from contractors. The first contracts would have to be awarded by December to permit building to begin next spring and to have a working system in place by 2005. Under the schedule the Pentagon has set in light of conditions in Alaska, it has to start the process soon, subject to later presidential approval. The more politically volatile decision of whether to field the system — and break the Antiballistic Missile treaty of 1972 — would be left to the administration, whether that of Al Gore or George W. Bush. In a sign of this political evolution, senior military officers, including the program’s executive officer, Maj. Gen. Willie Nance of the Army, have argued that there is no more reason to rush more tests. Critics of the program have consistently complained that the military operation was on an artificially fast schedule. “General Nance is not going to conduct a test unless he’s fully confident that everything is fully ready for the test,” said Lt. Col. Rick Lehner, a spokesman for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. Mr. Clinton is awaiting a recommendation from Defense Secretary William S. Cohen on the project and Continued on Page A9 Ozier Muhammad / The New York Times

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Exit Agassi The top-seeded Andre Agassi, right, congratulating Arnaud Clément of France yesterday after Clément defeated him, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4, in the second round of the United States Open in Queens. SportsFriday, Page D1. Lazio Closes In On Mrs. Clinton In Money Race By CLIFFORD J. LEVY Representative Rick A. Lazio may be less well known than his opponent in the New York Senate contest (not to mention the Republican who dropped out), but in terms of fundraising, he has already entered her league. Mr. Lazio collected $10.7 million in just seven weeks this summer, his aides said yesterday, leaving little doubt that he will have the means to battle for the seat despite his late start. Mr. Lazio has taken in a total of $19.2 million since jumping into the Senate race in May, nearly as much as Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has been raising money for more than a year and has collected $21.9 million. She raised $3.3 million in the seven-week period this summer: July 1 to Aug. 23. Mr. Lazio’s success with donors suggest that no matter who is on the Republican line — mayor, congressman, school board member — the checks will pour in because of hostility among some people across the country to the Democrat, Mrs. Clinton. And Mr. Lazio, a once-obscure congressman from Suffolk County, has readily harness that sentiment. “I’m Rick Lazio,” he wrote in an unusually short, one-page fund-raising letter this summer. “It won’t take me six pages to convince you to send me an urgently needed contribution for my United States Senate campaign in New York. It will take Continued on Page B7 Religion on the Hastings Signs of Shift in Attitudes Suggest Blurring Of the Line Between Faith and Politics By GUSTAV NIEBUHR When Senator Joseph I. Lieberman urged a greater role for religion in public life in campaign speeches this week, he touched off a new round in the sharp but unsettled debated over the role that personal beliefs should play News Analysis in American politics. Some critics of Mr. Lieberman’s remarks, including the Anti-Defamation League, cast the issue in terms of separation of church and state, suggesting that the senator had infringed on that principle. But another way to look at what Mr. Lieberman, a Connecticut Democrat, said is to ask whether American culture has changed enough of late so that his remarks are more acceptable, socially and politically, than before. Those who say such a change has taken place can cite various reasons — public unease over the political scandals of the late 1990’s, for example, or the longer-term emergence of religious conservatives as a political force or a less tangible but pervasive interest in the personal over the political. “I think the Christian Coalition has added to our dialogue on politics and religion,” said Paul Simon, the former Democratic senator from Illinois, referring both to the conservative organization of that name and also to the broader political movement of religious conservatives. “Now, some of that is not good, but some of that is good, too.” Mr. Simon, who now directs the Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois

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University, said he thought Mr. Lieberman had made his remarks “with great care.” But he also said that some of the religious language used in the presidential campaign had left him uncomfortable. “My overall impression,” Mr. Simon said, “is the deeply religious people don’t talk about it as much.” Mr. Lieberman, the first Jew on a major American presidential ticket, said in a speech last Sunday that Americans needed to “renew that dedication of our nation and ourselves to God and God’s purpose.” And while he said the Constitution “wisely separates church from state,” he added that there must be a place for faith in the nation’s public Continued on Page A23 Bush Approves New Attack Ad Mocking Gore Democrats Say G.O.P. Has Turned Negative By JAMES DAO LOUISVILLE, Ky., Aug. 31 — After struggling for a week to seize the offensive from Vice President Al Gore, aids to Gov. George W. Bush said today that they had approved a new and sharp attack commercial that strikes directly at Mr. Gore’s character and mocks his appearance at a Buddhist temple four years ago. The 30-second spot, paid for by the Republican National Committee, will go on the air Friday in 16 states, and comes just a week after Mr. Bush personally blocked another commercial sponsored by the party that also questioned Mr. Gore’s truthfulness. The move exposed rifts within the Republican camp over how to attack Mr. Gore without violating Mr. Bush’s vow to keep his campaign positive. Mr. Bush’s aides said they had wholeheartedly approved the contents and tone of the new spot, which they described as “tongue-in-cheek.” They said it was a response to critical advertisements run by the Democrats against Mr. Bush. The commercial shows a television set on a kitchen counter with Mr. Gore on the screen and an unseen woman complaining that the vice president is “reinventing himself on television again.” At one point the commercial shows a picture of Mr. Gore at the Buddhist temple event in 1996 and another segment shows him saying, “I took the initiative in creating the Internet.” At that point, the narrator says, “Yeah, and I invented the remote control.” Predictably, the commercial sparked accusations and counteraccusations between the two campaigns over which one had “gone negative” first. Mr. Gore’s camp wasted no time responding to the commercial, which was widely shown on television news programs and on the Internet during the day. Mr. Gore also scaled back plans to focus on a patient’s bill of rights in the belief that the Republican advertisement would backfire and that the Democrats should not create news that would distract public attention from it. The new commercial is part of a broader, coordinated effort by the Republicans to raise doubts about Mr. Gore’s ethics and integrity, which the Bush campaign clearly views as the vice president’s greatest vulnerability. All this week, Mr. Bush has critiContinued on Page A22 PRESIDENT VETOES EFFORT TO REPEAL TAXES ON ESTATES REPUBLICANS VOW A FIGHT Clinton, Echoing Gore, Calls Bill Too Costly and Says It Mainly Helps the Rich By LIZETTE ALVAREZ WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 — President Clinton today vetoed a Republican-spon-

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sored bill to repeal the federal estate tax and stepped up the election-year sparring over tax cuts and how best to spend the budget surplus. In remarks in the East Room of the White House, Mr. Clinton said the bill “fails the test of fairness and responsibility” because it is costly and, according to administration figures, benefits only the wealthiest 2 percent of the population. The president accused Republicans of threatening to hamstring the booming economy by devising a series of tax cuts that he said would leave little money for Medicare, prescription drug benefits, education and a host of other programs. Vice President Al Gore has repeatedly lobbed the same charge at his opponent, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, who supports repealing the estate tax. And in vetoing the bill today, Mr. Clinton adopted the same sort of language heard from Mr. Gore on the campaign trail. “I believe the latest bill, this estate tax bill, is part of a series of actions and commitments that, when you add it all up would take us back to the bad old days of deficits, high interest rates and having no money to invest in our common future,” Mr. Clinton said, echoing Mr. Gore’s attacks on Mr. Bush’s tax plans. The bill “shows a sense of priorities that I believe got is in trouble in the first place in the 1980’s, and that if we go back to those priorities, will get us in trouble again,” he said. In Congress, Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois immediately announced that the House would try to override the veto as its first order of business when it returned next week. The effort, which requires a two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress, is expected to fail in the House, as well. Neither Republicans nor Mr. Clinton ruled out the possibility of a compromise today. “The death tax punishes families for being successful,” Mr. Hastert said, using the Republican’s preferred term for the estate tax. “It punishes farmers. It punishes small business owners. It punishes those who have not planned ahead with an array of lawyers and accountants to keep their money in their family,” he said. “Down the road,” he added, “it will punish our young entrepreneurs, who are just starting their own InterContinued on Page A24 Firestone Struggles in Center of an Ever-Widening Storm By KEITH BRADSHER NASHVILLE, Aug. 31 — Rarely has a leading global company faced such an extraordinary confluence of problems: its flagship product blamed for scores of deaths; its biggest customer undermining its every defense; its stock price plunging along with consumer confidence; its top executive summoned before an angry Congress. This is not how Firestone planned to celebrate its 100th birthday this summer. The centennial, some marketing experts say, has turned into a debacle for one of America’s most familiar brand names. In Washington today, regulators added 26 deaths to the 62 previously attributed to failures of Firestone tires in the United States. In Venezuela, one of 17 countries where Firestone tires have been recalled, the government’s consumer agency asked the state prosecutor to bring criminal charges against Firestone. It also called for prosecuting the Ford Motor Company, saying the design of Ford Explorer sport utility vehicles that were equipped with Firestone tires contributed to dozens of deaths in crashes there.

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Until today, Ford officials insisted that their company would stand by Firestone as a supplier. But Jacques Nasser, Ford’s Chief executive, refused during a news conference in Dearborn, Mich., to reiterate that stance. “This has been an extremely difficult and disappointing period in our relationship, and we’ll take this a day at a time,” he said. Executives of Bridgestone / Firestone and its Japanese parent, the Bridgestone Corporation, insist the Firestone brand will survive. John Lempe, the American subsidiary’s executive vice president, said here this morning that to restore customers’ confidence, the company would soon appoint an independent investigator to look into the company’s products and practices. But Firestone soon may face a fresh storm. As Mr. Lampe spoke in an interview at an airport hotel, angry union workers prepared to demContinued on Page C5 Associated Press STRIKE THREATS Bridgestone / Firestone faces a possible strike tomorrow. Union members rallied in Nashville yesterday. Page C1. Fire Raises Doubts About River Town’s Boom By ANDREW JACOBS EDGEWATER, N.J., Aug. 31 - A day after a devastating fire here, Ann Ring stood in front of her heat-scorched home, its vinyl siding dripping like melted cheese, and marveled at a Hudson River view she thought she had lost forever. As thick smoke rose from stubborn pockets of the blaze, Mrs. Ring said she was thankful that the wall of flame had been kept from consuming her home. It had destroyed a luxury apartment complex under construction, nine nearby houses and an occupied apartment building. But like many residents of this former factory town, Mrs. Ring, 58, said she was also angry about the wave of development that is quickly transforming Edgewater and other waterfront towns into the so-called Gold Coast. “This used to be a quaint place,” said Mrs. Ring, a school crossing guard. “But they’ve gone and put up these ugly monsters. They’re ruining the place.” Coming a month after fires ripped through two Jersey City high-rises, the blaze on Wednesday night raised new questions about whether development is outstripping the ability of local governments to regulate it and favoring the needs of developers over residents. With Edgewater’s population of 6,000 expected to grow by as much as 2,000 in the next few years, many residents worry that growth will overwhelm this narrow river town, which is just two blocks wide and four miles long. “We have one main road and three paid firemen,” said Valory Bardinas, a City Council member. “This development is not only jeopardizing our quality of life, but our safety, too.” As firefighters continued to spray arcs of water on the smoldering Continued on Page B7 gorewillsayanything.com THE WHITE HOUSE PAID FOR BY THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE The ad combines television images of Mr. Gore with scornful dialogue and a not yet operational Web address. BEWARE! IF YOU LIKE STORIES WITH HAPPY endings, avoid reading Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, now unfortunately NYT bestseller! www.lemonysnicket.com — ADVT. SAVE UP TO 80% ON HEALTHCARE, MEDI-Savers 212-279-0279 www.Medi Saver.com. - Advt.

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JEWISH WOMEN / GIRLS LIGHT SHABBAT candles today 18 min. before sunset. In NYC 7:10 PM. Info 718-774-2060. Outside NYC 718-774-3000. In merit of Raizel Gutnick, OMB — ADVT. INSIDE Last Resort for Parents When parents are at wits’ end and their children—often adolescents—are out of control, some turn to government, relinquishing their children to foster care. PAGE B1 Drought’s Toll in Texas This summer’s record stretch of 62 days without rain in North Texas has dried up lakes, helped spark 650 fires and left thousands of acres of crops wasted. PAGE A14 Type-A Mayor Slows Down Fatigued by cancer treatments and sidelined by his party, Rudolph Giuliani, New York’s round-the-clock mayor, has slowed to a less frenetic pace. PAGE B1 Former Lucchese Boss Dies Anthony Corallo, thought to have been the oldest surviving mobster to have risen from one of New York City’s five organized crime families, died in prison at 87. PAGE A25 News Summary A2 Business Day C1-18 Editorial, Op-Ed A26-27 International A3-12 Metro B1-8 National A 14-24 SportsFriday D1-8 Weekend (2 Parts) E1-24; E25-38 Automobiles F1 Obituaries A25 Real Estate B7 Weather A20 Classified Ads F5-7 Auto Exchange F2 Updated news : www.nytimes.com THE NEW YORK TIMES is available for delivery in most major cities. On the Web: homedelivery.nytimes.com, or telephone, toll-free 1-800-NYTIMES. ADVT 354613

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A2 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 B Cartier Must®Tank® Watch Vermeil. Quartz. Small. $1,425. Large 1,500. ©1999 Cartier, Inc. Visit our temporary location 711 Fifth Avenue at 56th Street (212) 753-0111 Trump Tower, Fifth Avenue at 56th Street (212) 308-0840 Madison Avenue at 69th Street (212) 472-6400 The Mall at Short Hills, Short Hills, New Jersey (973) 467-9005 what to wear when the world is watching units per hour ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL SUPERLATIVE CHRONOMETER OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA ROLEX DAYTONA COSMOGRAPH Oyster Perpetual Certified Chronometer 18K yellow or white gold with deployable fliplock clasp on strap. $14,550 NOW OPEN AT WORLD TRADE CENTER TORNEAU NEW YORK • PALM BEACH • BAL HARBOUR • SOUTH COAST PLAZA • HOUSTON SINCE 1900 Torneau TimeMachine: 57th at Madison • Madison at 52nd St. • Madison at 59th St. Seventh at 34th St. • World Trade Center • Garden City, LI: Roosevelt Field • 212•758•6234 News Summary INTERNATIONAL A3-12 Missile Test Delay Likely; No Decision on Deployment The Pentagon will probably postpone the next test of a national missile defense system until January, administration officials said. Any decision to deploy the missile shield now seems certain to pass from President Clinton to his successor. A1 China Official Sued In U.S. Five veterans of the Tiananmen Square democracy movement are suing Li Peng, chairman of the National People’s Congress, in federal court in New York. They accuse him of human rights abuses arising from his role in the 1989 crackdown that killed hundreds of civilians in Beijing. A6 Volkswagen Mexico Strike Ends Workers at Volkswagen Mexico negotiated a raise of more than double the

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inflation rate, ending a two-week battle that included a walkout at the Puebla factory, the only one in the world that produces Beetles. A4 France Proposes Tax Cuts France proposed a large package of tax cuts, nudged by Germany and probably providing an example to Italy. The proposed cuts, totaling roughly $16 billion over three years, are part of a wave of similar measures being enacted across Europe, as governments react to increased tax revenue from expanding economies and declining unemployment. A12 Inquiry on Liechtenstein Courts A government-sponsored inquiry into whether Liechtenstein is a center for money laundering found shortcomings in how the principality’s justice system handles the issue with some cases idle for years. A4 Religious Leaders Pledge Peace Participants at the four-day Millennium World Peace Summit of Religious and Spiritual Leaders in New York signed a detailed statement pledging to work for world peace. A12 World Briefing A8 SCIENCE/HEALTH Mass Extinctions Foreseen Global warming could wipe out many species of plants and animals by the end of the 21st century, the World Wide Fund for Nature, known in the United States as the World Wildlife Fund, warned in a report. A3 NATIONAL A14-24 President Clinton Vetoes G.O.P. Bill To Repeal the Estate Tax President Clinton vetoed a Republican-sponsored bill to repeal the federal estate tax, saying it would benefit only the rich, and he stepped up election-year sparring over tax cuts and how to use the budget surplus. A1 Bush Ad Mocks Gore Character Aides to Gov. George W. Bush said they had approved a television ad-vertisement that strikes directly at Vice President Al Gore’s character. They said the ad was intended as a “tongue-in-cheek” response to criti-cal Democratic ads. Al The Democratic National Committee dropped plans for a commercial questioning Governor Bush’s record in Texas, choosing to yield the spotlight to the new Republican attack ad in hope that it would backfire. A22 Mr. Bush’s running mate, Dick Cheney, called for a re-examination of the nation’s role in peacekeeping missions and said it was time to con-sider pulling American ground troops out of Kosovo and Bosnia. A22 No Logging-Wildfire Link Seen A bipartisan research group reported to Congress that there appeared to be no link between reduced logging in national forests in the last decade and Western wildfires. A14 Affidavits In Secrets Case A federal court made public affida-vits filed by lawyers for the former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee in which two former intelligence offi-cials said they knew of government employees caught in serious cases of espionage but not prosecuted. Dr. Lee, who was born in Taiwan, is seek-ing to show he was singled out be-cause of his race. A14 U.S. Agents’ Masquerade Federal agents posed as members of the news media to take pictures of neoNazi skinheads gathered this week to support the Aryan Nations being sued in an

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Idaho court. A18 Youthful Drug Use Declines The use of illegal drugs by youths aged 12 to 17 dropped sharply from 1997 to 1999, the government said. And while drug use among people 18 to 25 went up, it was still far below what it was 20 years ago. A18 A.C.L.U. Defending Sex Group The civil liberties group will defend the North American Man/ Boy Love Association in a $200 million lawsuit brought by relatives of a murdered boy who say the group’s Web site and literature incited the killing. A14 NEW YORK/REGION B1-8 Lazio’s Fund-Raising Sprint Keeps Him In Money Race Representative Rick A. Lazio raised $10.7 million in just seven weeks this summer, aides said, leaving little doubt that despite his late entry into the Senate race, he will have the means to battle Hillary Rodham Clinton, who raised $3.3 million during the same seven-week period. Over all, however, she has raised $21.9 million to his $19.2 million. A1 Report on Radiation Leak An independent monitor has found that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission conducted inadequate inspections at the Indian Point 2 nuclear plant as far back as 1997 and relied on flawed analyses, inexperienced staff members and the company it was supposed to regulate. The report also criticized Con Edison, the owner of the plant, which was the site of a radiation leak in February. B1 Asbestos Concern After Blast A steam pipe near the entrance of New York University’s main library burst, spewing debris and traces of asbestos onto dozens of people and several cars and buildings. No injuries were reported, but 58 people who were exposed to the material were decontaminated as a precaution. B3 SPORTS D1-8 Andre Agassi Out In 2nd Round The defending United States Open champ, who recently said his mother and sister have cancer, appeared dispirited in a losing effort against Arnaud Clément, 6-3,6-2,6-4. D1 Cycling Star Recovering Lance Armstrong, struck by a car head-on during a training ride in France on Tuesday, said on his Web site that he was “very banged up” but had no serious injuries. D2 Mets Alone Atop N.L. East The Mets, who were off, took sole possession of first place, as Atlanta lost to Cincinnati, 4-3. D6 WEEKEND E1-24; E25-38 OBITUARIES A25 Anthony Corallo The mobster known as Tony Ducks, who led the Lucchese crime family until he began a life sentence in 1987 on racketeering charges, was 87. A25 QUOTATION OF THE DAY “The only thing that will help us now is a hurricane, and there’s no sign of one of those in the forecast.” BILL PROENSA, National Weather Service director in Fort Worth, on the drought, and heat wave. [A14] BUSINESS DAY C1-18

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Ford and Firestone Under Fire Federal regulators added 26 deaths to the 62 that were already attributed to the failure of Firestone tires in the United States. A1 Bridgestone/ Firestone faces a possible strike tomorrow by 8,000 workers at nine American factories. And Venezuela’s consumer protection agency asked that nation’s prosecutor to bring criminal charges against Ford. A1 and Bridgestone/ Firestone. Arrest In Market Hoax Case Federal officials arrested Mark S. Jakob, a 23-year-old California stock speculator, accusing him of distrib-uting a fake news release that sent shares of Emulex plunging for a few hours on Aug. 25. C1 Signs of Slowdown Lift Stocks Factory orders declined 7.5 percent in July, the biggest decline on record and a report showed that industry in the Chicago area contracted in August to the lowest point since 1996. Merchants reported that sales in August rose only 3 percent, below analysts’ expectations. The data suggests that recent interest rate increases may be taking hold and slowing the economy, which may ease Fed concerns about inflation. Stocks advanced sharply. Euro Falls After Rate Rise The European Central Bank raised interest rates for the sixth time in less than a year, by a quarter-point to 4.5 percent, and the euro slid to 88.78 cents, near its all-time low. C1 Business Digest EDITORIAL A26-27 Editorials: Covering prescription drugs; markets of the world, unite; a sour fadeout for the Ewing era; return of the White House turnstile. Columns: Gail Collins. Crossword E34 Public Lives B2 TV Listings E24 Weather A20 Corrections A picture of President-elect Vicente Fox Quesada of Mexico on Tuesday, with an article about a debate over abortion rights, reached The Times with an erroneous caption from Agence France-Presse and was published in error. The man shown with the president-elect was Governor Ignacio Loyola of Queretaro State, not Gov. Ramdn Martin Huecta of Guanajuato State, where the debate is occurring. An obituary on May 24 about Oscar H. Shaftel, a faculty member at Queens College who was fired in 1953 after he refused to answer a Senate subcommittee's questions about Communist affiliation in academia, misidentified the subcommittee and its chairman. It was the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee, headed by Sen. William E. Jenner, not Senator Joseph R. McCarthy. A letter from a reader informed The Times of the error on July 18. This correction was delayed by an editing lapse. Two picture captions on Aug. 24 about a restored salt marsh in Brooklyn misstated the name of one bird found in the marsh and misidentified another bird. The first bird was a double-crested cormorant, not a crested cormorant. The other, shown in silhouette, was most likely a type of heron or egret, ornithological ex-perts said, but they could not identify the species. It was not a glossy ibis. An article on Saturday about two new cases of illness in humans caused by the West Nile virus misstated the surname of a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health who said it was possible that birds in Queens had developed

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immunity to the virus. He is Andrew Spielman, not Spierman. A picture caption on Monday with an article about the recording success of the Baha Men, a Bahamian band, misstated the surname of a band member. He is Marvin Prosper, not Prospect. A highlight entry on the television page on Wednesday for the documentary “The Fall of Newt Gingrich” misstated Mr. Gingrich's title. He was speaker of the House, not a senator. PATENTLY PERFECT ©2000 CHANEL®, Inc.® HOBO-FRAME HANDBAG IN QUILTED PATENT WITH LOGO, $1180 CHANEL CHANEL BOUTIQUE, N˚ 15 EAST 57TH STREET NEW YORK CITY (212) 355-5050 For information on CHANEL fashion, please call 800-550-0005 BVLGARI The Quadrato watch In 18 kt yellow or white gold. 730 Fifth Avenue 315-9000 783 Madison Avenue 717-2300 1-800 BVLGARI www.bulgari.com Happy Birthday! BBB® Sapphires September's Birthstone BAILEY BANKS & BIDDLE® RENOWNED JEWELERS SINCE 1832 New York o Atlanta o Boston o Chicago o Philadelphia Dallas o Houston o Los Angeles o Miami o San Francisco o Seattle 1-800-6514888

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THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 A3 Hard Legacy for Japan Sect Leader’s Family No Easy Times for the Children of the Man Famous for a Sarin Gas Assault By CALVIN SIMS RYUGASAKI, Japan - They were the child princes and princesses of Japan’s most notorious religious sect, Aum Shinrikyo, which released deadly sarin gas into the Tokyo subway in 1995. Their picture were prominently displayed next to their father’s portrait above cult shrines where thousands of Aum disciples hailed them as heirs apparent to the spiritual throne. They were considered child gods. Then their father, Shoko Asahara, founder of Aum, was jailed for masterminding the subway attack, which killed 12 people and injured 5,000, and the children’s utopia crumbled along with the doomsday cult. Today, Mr. Asahara’s six children, four young women and two boys from 6 to 22, are social pariahs. Although they have distanced themselves from the cult, which now calls itself Aleph, the children conceal their identities for fear of reprisals. They are constantly relocating, because everywhere they move neighbors conduct extensive protests. Most public schools will not let them attend class. Although they had no role in the subway attack, the children, some of whom are still too young to understand what occurred, are being held accountable for the worst terrorist assault in modern Japanese history. In a rare interview, four children talked about growing up in Aum Shinrikyo and the virtually impossible task that they face in moving beyond the cult’s infamy in a country where the sins of fathers are often forever visited upon children. “People say that our family is evil because of what happened five years ago, but these little children hardly know anything about it,” Mr. Asahara’s 19-yearold daughter said, referring to her brothers, 6 and 7, and her sister, 11. “To go to school is a very precious thing. It’s a part of life to make friends and become educated. What justice will be accomplished by denying them this basic right.” Last week, Ryugasaki, where the family recently moved, just northeast of Tokyo, refused to let the children register for school, citing residents’ concerns. Masayuki Ono of the city’s educational affairs division said that there was “great anxiety among residents” and that the parent-teacher association of the local elementary school had collected 1,355 signatures opposing the children’s admission. The children said that since the subway attack they had grown accustomed to being despised and rejected. In the last five years, they have moved at least six times, often on short notice and in the wake of large and sometimes violent protests outside their doors. Despite the constant upheaval and emotional stress that the children have endured, they appeared happy, outgoing and well adjusted. But the adults in charge of them said the children had been deeply traumatized but were quite skillful in masking their pain, especially in front of strangers. Aside from one another, the one constant in their lives has been their current guardian, a 39-year-old former cult member who has cared for the children for the last decade. She is a licensed teacher and provides them with home schooling. Two other women also attend to the children’s needs. The cult said it provided financial support for the children for humanitarian reasons. “It has been very difficult for Kaku Kurita for The New York Times

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Four children of the founder of the Shinrikyo cult, Shoko Asahara, playing near their home. Their guardian is a licensed teacher and a former cult member who has cared for the children for 10 years. Sea of Japan Otawara TOCHIGI PREFECTURE JAPAN MR. FUJI Tokyo Ryugasaki Pacific Ocean 0 Miles 30 N. KOREA S. KOREA JAPAN Sea of Japan Area of detail Miles 0 300 The New York Times A Ryugasaki school refused to let Shoko Asahara’s children register. them, because everything and everyone they believed in was suddenly overturned overnight,” the guardian said. “The worst part is the internal struggle that is going on inside them. It’s far worse than the opposition they face from the public.” The children have few if any friends and spend most of their time indoors. Once a month, they are allowed to visit their mother, who is on trial for conspiring with her husband and a cult follower in the murder of a dissident Aum member in 1994. Their father, who is also standing trial, does not receive visits. The oldest sister, 22, is estranged from the others, and the third daughter, 17, lives separately but visits them frequently. Asked what they would like most to do in the world, the youngest children scream with glee, “Go to school!” “There are so many things that are necessary for me to learn at school, and I think it would be fun to make some new friends,” said the 11-year-old. She added that she fully understood the barriers that prevented her from attending school. But when pressed to explain them, she simply smiled and looked down. In the spring, Mr. Asahara’s youngest son, who most closely resembles his father, was allowed to attend an elementary school temporarily in Otawara in Tochigi Prefecture despite opposition from residents. “There were many good teachers there, and we caught a crawfish on a field trip,” the boy said. “The principal gave me a snail, and I still have.” But the 19-year-old daughter expressed deep fear that her classmates would learn that she is one of Mr. Asahara’s children. Although she usually enrolls in college correspondence courses, she attended classes at a university for the first time this summer. “When I meet people who are kind to me,” she said, “I get really scared, because I always feel that the person may suddenly change if they find out who I really am. I don’t get too close to anyone. I try to be nice but I don’t go beyond that.” The cult’s legacy is highly likely to haunt the children for the rest of their

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lives. Major Japanese companies typically investigate the family backgrounds of prospective employees to make sure that there are no skeletons in their closets that would later embarrass them. Quite often, Japanese families hire private investigators to research the backgrounds of their future in-laws. Experts on cult groups said keeping the Asahara children isolated from the rest of Japanese society was far worse than integrating them. “At the moment, the Asahara children are being raised by their servants,” said Shoko Egawa, an investigative journalist who is considered an authority on Aum. “They are being brought up as special children. But I wonder if this is good. If they go to public school, they will be treated the same as other children. If they make friends, they will have contacts with those who don’t have Aum values.” Although they have disassociated from Aum, the children said they had fond memories of growing up in the cult. “They were like my older brothers and sisters, and that’s what we used to call them,” the second oldest daughter said. “We were like one big extended family, and I sometimes miss that.” But the children are careful, perhaps by design, to note that although they were reared in the cult, they do not subscribe to their father’s teachings. They officially left the cult this year when the group changed its name to Aleph and said for the first time that Mr. Asahara had probably been involved in the subway attack and that he would no longer be its leader. Still, the children say they love their parents. The 19-year-old daughter said she remembered her father as an extremely gentle man who despite his many commitments nursed her through a terrible illness and was always available to help her with school work. That depiction contrasts sharply Youngsters tied to an infamous cult become pariahs. with the image that most Japanese have of Mr. Asahara as the pink robed head of the cult whose colony at the base of Mount Fuji included tiny torture rooms and laboratories that made poison gas. As leader of Aum, which once had 10,000 mem-bers, he is accused of ordering the attack in which members planted sarin in crowded subway cars in morning rush hour on March 20,1995. On a recent summer afternoon, as Mr. Asahara’s young sons raced their red and blue bicycles, including one with training wheels, through a park here, they seemed as innocent and rambunctious as other Japanese boys their age. Keeping a close watch, the boys’ polite older sisters seemed equally harmless, as they cheered for their younger brothers in a family outing that a passer-by, who apparently did not know they were the Asahara clan, described as “ever so lovely.” But a few blocks from the park, there was nothing lovely about the hostile banners that neighbors had posted outside the children’s new house. “We Don’t Want Aum Here,” the signs said. “Aum Go Away.” The boys seemed oblivious to them. A Global Warming Report Predicts Doom for Many Species By SARAH LYALL LONDON, Aug. 31 - Global warming could wipe out many species of plants and animals by the end of the 21st century, the World Wide Fund for Nature said in a report issued here today. The fund, known in the United States as the World Wildlife Fund, paints a devastating picture of the ability of species from Arctic polar bears and walruses to New England

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sugar maple trees to survive unless they can migrate quickly or adapt to their new environments. The predictions are based on the standard assumption - which some experts say should be revised - that by 2100, carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere will be double what they were at the start of the Industrial Revolution. They also rely on climate models that lose precision when assessing regional impacts of a warming global climate. Particularly at risk in addition to rare species, the report indicates, are those living in mountainous or isolated places. Among those singled out as vulnerable are the Gelada baboon in Ethiopia; the monarch butterfly, which spends winters in Mexico; the Australian mountain pygmy possum; the northern spruce in New York State; and the spoonbilled sandpiper, which breeds in the far northeastern reaches of Russia. According to the report, as much as 70 percent of the natural habitat could be lost, and 20 percent of the species rendered extinct, in the Arctic and northernmost areas of places like Canada, Russia and Scandinavia, where warming is predicted to be most rapid. Places farther south, including parts of Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Iceland and Kyrgyzstan, could lose more than half of their natural habitat. In the United States, the report predicts, more than a third of the existing habitat in Maine, New Hampshire, Oregon, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas could be irrevocably altered by global warming. “Rapid rates of global warming are likely to increase rates of habitat loss and species extinction, most markedly in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere,” the report reads. Jennifer L. Morgan, director of the World Wildlife Fund Climate Change Campaign in Washington, says that to survive into the following century, some species would have to migrate 10 times faster than after the last ice age. “Climate change is coming at us much faster than many habitats are going to be able handle,” Ms. Morgan said. You can order The Times Book Review by mail. A great gift idea! British Begin Human Testing of H.I.V. Vaccine OXFORD, England, Aug. 31 (AP) — Researchers began clini-cal trials today with a vaccine aimed at an African strain of H.I.V. that causes AIDS. The vaccine is the first specifically designed to combat the Class A H.I.V.-1 virus, the most prevalent strain in many parts of Africa. Eighteen people volunteered to receive injections of the vaccine at Churchill Hospital in Oxford. If the tests are successful, trials will begin in Nairobi, Kenya, within six months, according to the Medical Research Council, a government-funded national research organization. The hope is that the vaccine will stimulate the body to produce killer T-cells that will destroy H.I.V.-infected cells fast enough to stop an infection from taking hold, the council said. If this trial is successful, it will be possible to conduct trials in volunteers who have a high risk of H.I.V. infection, the council added.

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More information on the tests, the Oxford AIDS Vaccine Initiative, is on the Web at www.oxavi.org. Prof. Andrew McMichael, director of the council’s human immunology unit, said it would be three to five years before researchers would have a clear indication whether the vaccine might work. After that, it might take another five years to complete development. The trial, announced in July at the International Conference on AIDS in Durban, South Africa, is sponsored by the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, a global scientific organization, and supervised by the immunology unit of the Medical Research Council. Dr. Seth Berkely, president of the international vaccine project, said four vaccines are being developed. This is the first to go to human trials. The vaccine contains small fragments of DNA that are intended to strengthen the immune system. Because the DNA cannot be replicated, there is no danger of developing AIDS from the vaccine, the council said. In another research project, scientists in Thailand said today that they had reached their goal of recruiting 2,500 volunteers to test an AIDS vaccine, the first large trial of such a drug in a developing country. Elsa Peretti Elsa Peretti® “Star of David” pendants in eighteen karat gold. Small, @275. Medium, $450. Large, $600. Extra large, $1450. Also available in sterling silver. TIFFANY & CO. NEW YORK FIFTH AVENUE AND 57TH STREET 800-526-0649 AMERICANA MANHASSET 516-869-0800 • THE MALL AT SHORT HILLS 973-467-3600 RIVERSIDE SQUARE 201-457-1220 • THE WESTCHESTER 914-686-5100 live a little SAKS FIFTH AVENUE The loafer, redefined. Cole Harris with Nike Air technology. In black Italian calfskin, $245. The Men’s Store on Six in New York And in select SFA stores nationwide. ©1999 PIAGET PIAGET PIAGET MISS PROTOCOLE 18 K WHITE GOLD INTERCHANGEABLE BRACELET GENEVE 1874 PIAGET 730 Fifth Avenue at 57th Street New York (212) 246-5555

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A4 THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Ellington, in leather. Old world styling and beautiful wood inlays provide just the right touch to this elegant armchair. Priced as shown. $1885 Maurice Villency Classics The Summer Sale Continues. Manhattan 200 Madison Ave. 212.725.4840 Hartsdale One North Central Ave. 914.428.2200 www.villency.com © Copyright 2000 Maurice Villency, Inc. NYTP-09-01 Lexington Ave at 50th Street 212-980-9810 Columbus Ave. at 71st Street 212-787-5804 Stamford Town Center 203-357-7509 Walt Whitman Mall 516-427-3843 Godiva Chocolatier INTRODUCING THE GODIVA® MILK CHOCOLATE WITH ALMONDS AND TOFFEE BAR Now through Tuesday, visit your local Godiva Boutique and enjoy a sample of our delicious new chocolate bar. Rich Godiva milk chocolate, crunchy toffee and whole almonds come together to make the ultimate personal treat. To order a gift or locate a Godiva Boutique near you, call 1-800-9-GODIVA or visit www.GODIVA.com or AOL (keyword: GODIVA). Godiva® Chocolate Bars, 8 varieties: $2.50 each GODIVA Chocolatier ©2000 Godiva. The Lady on Horse design and the Gold Ballotin are registered trademarks. Offer good while supplies last. Void where prohibited. Ecco MEN’S “CITY WALKER 13764” (below). Black or brown leather or black or brown nubuck. Euro 41-47 (U.S 8-13). $155. Monk strap also available! WOMEN’S “SOFT 19003” (below right). Black, navy, tomato or coffee nubuck; black leather. Euro sizes 36-43 (U.S 5-12). $110. T-strap & slip-on styles also available! The Great New York Family Shoe Store! HARRY’S SHOES The epitome of comfort & quality… …true Fall Classics from Harry’s! MEMPHISTO® MEN’S “ANGELO” (left) from the GOODYEAR WELT SERIES. Black leather. ANGELO: 8-11, 12 M. $325. Monk strap also available! WOMEN’S “RUSH” or MEN’S “MATCH” (near left). From the RUNOFF collec-

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tion. Seasonal colors & materials. RUSH: 7-11 N˚; 5-11 M. $250. MATCH: 9-13, 14 N˚; 7-13, 15 M. $260 *select colors only. Most sizes in most styles/colors. OPEN 7 DAYS including Labor Day 9/4! 2299 Broadway @ 83rd Street NY, NY 10024 Mail or phone orders invited, or visit: www.Harrys-Shoes.com 212-874-2035 OUTSIDE NY: 800-626-5270 BAUME & MERCIER GENEVE • 1830 CAPELAND™ ©1998 Baume & Mercier, Inc. Authorized Jeweler Neves JEWELERS 800-479-1086 732-634-1086 103 Main St. WOODBRIDGE, NJ 732-538-2000 Route 34 Town Square Shopping Ctr. ABERDEEN, NJ 732-741-7757 Route 35 The Grove SHREWSBURY, NJ Liechtenstein Is Found Lax In Monitoring Of Bank Details BY ELIZABETH OLSON GENEVA, Aug 31—A govern-ment sponsored inquiry into whether Liechtenstein is a center for money laundering found today that there were shortcomings in how the princi-pality handles the problem. Liechtenstein’s justice system has been at a “particle deadlock,” with some cases sitting idle for years, and its assistance to prosecutors in other countries has almost ground to a standstill, a special prosecutor, Kurt Spitzer, said today. Criminal proceedings remained unprocessed for years, hampered by factors like judges’ inaction and failures to respond to requests for investigations and searches said Mr. Spitzer, a prosecutor in Austria. In some cases, any possibility of prosecution was eliminated because so much time had elapsed. The principality of 32,000 people between Switzerland and Austria asked Mr. Spitzer to examine allegations that Colombian drug cartels, a Sicilian Mafia group and Russian criminal gangs were laundering money by passing funds through Liechtenstein asset managers and its 300 banks. In the spring, Liechtenstein was listed as one of the 15 countries that had failed to cooperate in fighting laundering. Last month, millions of dollars linked to Sani Abacha, the late Nigerian dictator, were traced to its banks. Mr. Spitzer shook up the clubby atmosphere when he had documents seized from the bank owned by realm’s royal family. The brother of the deputy prime minister and a member of Parliament were detained for questioning. But in his report, Mr. Spitzer found that white-collar crime in Liechtenstein was “no different” from elsewhere in Europe. “Most assets that wound up in the principality to be laundered have already undergone a pre-wash in other countries,” he said. “This ought to serve as a reminder to those countries which are

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now pointing the finger at the principality.” Prime Minister Mario Frick of Liechtenstein acknowledged blunders in pursuing illegal assets but said the report showed that “Liechtenstein in not and never has been a criminal state.” Liechtenstein has become a wealthy enclave by exploiting its status as an offshore banking center. But pressures from the United States and European countries forced the country in July to abandon its system of anonymous accounts. Russia Identifies U.S. Sub By The New York Times The second American submarine in the Barents Sea when the Kursk sank was the Toledo, a Russian news agency reported today. The agency, Interfax, said the Toledo was in the area along with another American submarine, the Memphis, during the Russian naval exercises in midAugust, when the Kursk sank, with the loss of 118 lives. The United States has said two of its submarines spied on the exercises but were far from the Kursk. Alan Chin for the New York Times A recreation of a “milk bar,” down to the “surly waitress,” is a part of a Warsaw exhibition on art and culture from 1956 to 1970, the period in which Wladyslaw Gomulka, the Communist Party boss, was in his heyday. Warsaw Journal When Everything Was Gray, Not Red By STEVEN ERLANGER WARSAW - The tables are set with thick, badly painted china, government standard, with silverware of some cheap, scratched metal alloy. A fan of thin, shiny and somehow unabsorbent napkins pokes out of a thick glass; the salt shaker is a jam jar with holes punched in the lid and rice mixed in, to stop clumping. There are other jars, with a few dusty plastic flowers. The menu on the wall has more than 50 choices, but only a few dishes, like macaroni with butter or with sour cream, pierogi and a tomato, macaroni and meat soup, have prices listed next to them, meaning that they are available. The sour-sweet smell of onions fried in bad oil fills the air. And today’s Poles, amused and nostalgic, file through this re-creation of a socialist cafe, part of an exhibition called, “Gray in Color: 1956-1970.” That was the heyday of Wladyslaw Gomulka, the Communist Party boss who tried to create a socialism in Poland under Soviet eyes that broke with Stalinism and followed a “Polish road.” It was a period of intellectual and artistic energy that ended with enormous disillusion, including a bout of anti-Semitism in 1968 and Polish participation in the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. In December 1070, workers’ strikes in Gdansk and Szczecin left 45 dead and 1,100 injured, and Edward Gierek soon replaced Mr. Gomulka, who died in 1982. These events underpin this exhibition in Warsaw’s Galeria Zacheta, which tries to show the life of the period, particularly its early optimism, without too much overt irony. Photographs show proud mothers and soldiers, a knife grinder plying his trade, a model posing against a lumpy old Czech Skoda car, a couple embracing on the street near a large poster of Lenin. “I don’t know why it surprises me that people look normal and even happy,” said Dorota Dobrowolska, a student at the gallery. “People do the best with what they have.” An older woman, Justyna, did not want to give her surname. “It makes me

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nostalgic, of course,” she said. “We were young, and the war wasn’t so long before.” The exhibition shows the tension between socialist Poland and European Poland, how the regime tried to keep a connection with the culture of the West. There are displays of shop windows with the fashions of the times, with efforts to copy the designers of the West. There are the proud windows of Polish exports: canned Krakus hams and Wodka Wyborowa - as usual, packaged with a care, neatness and design no one bothered with for the domestic market. Ordinary A life of cheap vodka and slab housing on view. Poles got by with cheap vodka in reusable bottles with peeling labels, and few at home ever saw a Krakus ham. But there are also photos of the party elite, alike in their dark suits and white shirts, digging in to lavish buffets. There is a plastic shopping bag with handles - what the Russians call an avoska, or “perhaps bag” - that people carried just in case a store had something worth lining up to buy. The exhibition recreates one of the “International Press and Book Clubs” the regime opened - 18 of them across the country, 4 in Warsaw - to allow Poles to read some of the world’s press, magazines and books (carefully selected, of course, and concentrating on the products of foreign Communist parties, like L’Unita and L’Humanité). Or they could look at picture magazines or listen to some of the world’s music, always a safer proposition. There is a sample of the student clubs the regime initiated in the 1950’s, “to channel cultural expression and help propaganda,” as the gallery’s notes suggest. A small black-and-white television drones on with a speech by Mr. Gomulka at a Communist Party Congress. A number of these student clubs were turned into jazz places and theaters, more subversive than the party intended, and some were closed down in 1968. There is a re-creation of a small arts cinema, its walls covered with fabric and photographs of stars and directors, including Sophia Loren, Gary Cooper, Jean Gabin, Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock. The exhibition concentrates on some of the art of the time, which was graphically bold and somewhat daring, at least in its personal expression. But some of the art feels very dated, which has more to do with the passage of time than ideology. Some of the art is devoted to the politically correct program of the time, to “stop the arms race,” and promote “détente and peaceful co-existence,” as one poster says. Another shows a bomb with an “N,” for nuclear; the heading reads: “N = Nie,” or no. One of the most striking exhibi-tions shows the initial optimism of, the huge tower blocks that the re-gime built, as in Moscow, to house the workers of the postwar, social Poland. There are mock-ups of typical rooms - the living room with its modular wall of shelves and cabinets for storage and display, the lace curtains and blocky sofas; the utilitari-an bathroom, with its plastic plumb-ing and a long water pipe that couldn’t swing between tub and sink, so only one set of pipes needed to be in-stalled; the tiny bedroom, with its wall shelves and record player, a few jazz albums strewn across the floor. On the ground floor of the gallery, as a counterpoint to the failed dreams of socialism upstairs, is another exhibition satirizing the modern consumer society of advanced capitalism. It is called “Buy or Die supermarket” and is an homage

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to “homo shopens” by the artist Pawel Borowski. Products include “whole lamb stuffed with ideology” and a “lolli-pop flower stuffed with hope,” its ingredients including “light in a tunnel, a better future, coloring and confabulation.” The market also offers brainwashing powder (“free your mind from dirt breakthrough formula is the choice for life! “) and Lady Macbeth soap and shower gel (“it cleans even the most nagging stains”). The supermarket’s fast-food offering is a “Happy Meal,” consisting of “a name brand bottle of warm vodka, an excellent piece of fat sausage” and a little vinyl piglet, intended “to make your life more complete.” Throughout the store, the American dollar features as both a lure and a poison, a symbol for greed, globalization and smugness. On the same theme, in the luxury department (Last Supper Edition) is a tiny jar marked “Good caviar.” The label says: “Helps everybody! It contains the annual budget of the United States for charitable activities.” Volkswagen Mexico in Accord With Union By The New York Times MEXICO CITY, Aug. 31 - Workers at Volkswagen Mexico negotiated a raise of more than double the inflation rate, ending a two-week battle that included a walkout at their factory in Puebla, the only one in the world that produces trendy Beetles. Labor leaders hailed the settle-ment. But some economists ex-pressed concern that the 21 percent increase could set off a wave of ex-cessive wage proposals by increas-ingly aggressive unions and threaten efforts to control inflation. The company agreed to raise salaries 13 percent and give workers a 5 percent productivity bonus plus a 3 percent increase in benefits. The union’s general secretary, José Luis Rodriguez, said, “We think that salaries should not be based on inflation, but the performance of the workers and the results of the company.” Although the workers are the highest paid in the industry, they had earned an average $2.30 an hour. VW workers in Germany earn an average $27 an hour, Mr. Rodriguez said. The accord is increasing concern that the raise might become a benchmark for other unions, with increases that far exceed the inflation rate. “It is most likely that other labor unions are going to try to follow this example,” the director of Grupo Economistas y Asociados, Mauricio González Gómez, said. “But it might not be a healthy signal. We are running the risk of starting off an inflationary spiral. THE NEW YORK TIMES 229 West 43rd Street New York, N.Y. 10036-3959 Home Delivery information: 1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637) The New York Times (ISSN 0362-4331) is published daily. Periodicals postage paid at New York, N.Y., and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The New York Times, P.O. Box 3009, South Hackensack, N.J. 07606-1009. Mail Subscription Rates 1 Yr. 6 Mos. Weekdays and Sundays $452.40 $226.20 Weekdays 265.20 132.60 Sundays 234.00 117.00

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A6 L THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000-09-11 Chinese Leader Sued in New York Over Deaths Stemming From Tianamen Crackdown By EDWARD WONG Five veterans of the 1989 Tiananmen Square democracy movement are suing Li Peng, the chairman of China’s National People’s Congress, in a federal court in New York for human rights abuses stemming from his role in the military crackdown that killed hundreds of civilians in Beijing. It is the first time that such a legal action has been taken in this country against a Chinese official. The civil suit was filed on Monday in federal district court in Manhattan by the Center for Constitutional Rights, a nonprofit legal group that specializes in human rights cases. Among the five plaintiffs are Wang Dan, a student leader of the Tiananmen demonstrations, and Zhang Liming, whose sister was shot dead by army troops who overran Tiananmen Square in the chaotic early morning hours of June 4, 1989. Mr. Li, who is in New York this week attending a conference of the world’s parliaments at the United Nations, was served with a court summons yesterday morning at the Waldorf Towers in midtown Manhattan. The summons was handed by a process server to an employee of the United States State Department who was guarding Mr. Li. In Washington today, a State Department spokesman said, “We are not in a position to accept such a document on behalf of a foreign official.” However, earlier this week, Judge Richard Casey ruled that a federal employee guarding Mr. Li could accept the summons, given the difficulty of reaching Mr. Li. The lawsuit charges that Mr. Li, Spencer Platt for The New York Times Lawyers serving a federal lawsuit at the Waldorf to security personnel protecting Li Peng, China’s prime minister during the Tiananmen massacre. Mr. Li is now the chairman of China’s National People’s Congress. who was prime minister during the Tiananmen massacre, was responsible for “crimes against humanity, including summary execution, arbitrary detention, torture and other torts.” “We want to prove that he is accountable for the crime, and that this kind of crime, the human rights violation, is beyond China’s borders,” said Xiao Qiang, executive director of Human Rights in China, a New York-based group that brought together the plaintiffs with lawyers from the Center for Constitutional Rights in anticipation of Mr. Li’s visit to New York. Zhang Yuanyuan, a spokesman for the Chinese Embassy in Washington, did not return calls. The first such across-the-border lawsuit was brought by the Center for Constitutional Rights in 1979, when an opposition leader in Paraguay, whose son was killed by the authorities, sued the chief of police in Asunción, the capital city. Although the plaintiffs were living in Paraguay, the defendant was residing in Brooklyn at the time. In 1984, a federal court ruling awarded $10.4 million to the family. Since then, dozens of these civil suits have been filed in the United States. Several have resulted in favorable rulings for the plaintiffs, including one in a fed-

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eral court in Boston in 1994 that found an Indonesian general responsible for a 1991 massacre in East Timor, ordering him to pay $14 million. In 1996, a federal court in Manhattan found a Hutu leader in Rwanda liable for $110 million in damages stemming from the genocide in that country. In none of the cases has any money been collected. But if the federal court in Manhattan found in favor of the plaintiffs in the case against Mr. Li, it would be the first time that a representative of the Chinese government had been found legally culpable in the Tiananmen massacre. The government continues to insist that the student-led demonstrations of 1989 constituted a “counterrevolutionary rebellion” that justified the military action. “The Chinese perception of this will be that, once again, we are attempting to interfere in what they view as a domestic matter,” said Bob Berring, a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley who studies the Chinese legal system. “But for the human rights community, they have to seize on an opportunity like this to put human rights issues on the table.” The legal basis for the lawsuit comes from the Alien Tort Claims Act, passed in 1789, and the Torture Victim Protection Act, passed in 1992, said Jennie Green, the lead lawyer representing the plaintiffs. The two statutes allow human rights victims to file for claims in United States courts even if both the plaintiffs and the defendants live in another country. The only requirement is that the defendant be presented with a court summons while in the United States. For Mr. Li, that took place early yesterday morning, when a private detective and a process server retained by Human Rights in China walked up to a halfdozen plainclothes police officers standing outside an entrance to the Waldorf Towers. After a tense wait, a supervising officer called for one of the State Department guards. Mr. Li has 20 days to answer the summons. He is scheduled to leave the United States on Friday. Ms. Green said that Mr. Li does not qualify for diplomatic immunity since he is not an appointed Chinese envoy to this country. A State Department official said that the immunity question is not relevant yet but that lawyers will examine it if necessary. Hours after Mr. Li was served, Mr. Zhang sat in the offices of Human Rights in China and held up pictures of his slain sister. “This is something that my family has been working toward, even while I was back in China,” said Mr. Zhang, who came here in 1997 and works as a cook in San Diego. “I hope to continue with the legal procedure to further the interests of my family. But what benefit will come out of that, I’m not sure.” For Iran’s Visiting Legislators, A Useful, Low-Key Exchange By BARBARA CROSSETTE UNITED NATIONS, Aug. 31 - A group of Iranian legislators, in New York for a meeting of parliamentary speakers from around the world, encountered some unusual guests at a reception on Wednesday evening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and Representative Bob Ney of Ohio, both Republicans, who were there to open a dialogue with their counterparts from a country with which the United States has no direct relations. “I went because I think it’s very important to have a dialogue with Iran, and the idea of parliamentarians meeting is one step removed from government-to-

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government,” Senator Specter said in an interview today. “I think it is something that ought to be promoted.” Senator Specter, who said he had been trying to visit Iran since 1989, after the end of the Iran-Iraq war, added: “I’ve always had a strong sense that if members of Congress met with foreign leaders where our relations were not the best, we could open up the dialogue and relations would improve. They ought to hear what we think, and we ought to listen to what they think.” It was no chance encounter. The Iranian lawmakers had been told by one of the reception’s organizers, Hooshang Amirahmadi, who is president of the American Iranian Council, to expect several members of Congress and leaders of American Jewish groups concerned about the recent espionage convictions of a group of Iranian Jews. Mr. Amirahmadi had invited the Americans, who included two New York Democratic representatives, Gary L. Ackerman and Eliot L. Engel, and Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. Mehdi Karroubi, speaker of the Iranian Parliament and leader of his delegation, told reporters today that the conversations had been cordial despite apprehensions on both sides. He said he had told the congressmen of Iran’s objections to the continuing American embargo and had raised other issues, like the denial of visas to two members of his party. Mr. Karroubi is considered a compromise speaker who was chosen to preside over a reformist Parliament aligned with President Mohammad Khatami against a very conserva-tive Islamic hierarchy. He is in New York to attend the first international conference of legislative leaders, with delegates from more than 150 countries. The meeting, organized by the inter-Parliamentary Union, is being held just before a summit meeting of government leaders next week at the United Nations. “We were not supposed to have such talks during our visit to the museum,” Mr. Karroubi said. But he added that after an exchange of pleasantries, the two sides got down to some tough questions on issues that Mr. Karroubi said were “poisoning relations.” Mr. Ackerman said he had accepted the invitation because “strong messages have to be delivered to the Iranians.” He said he had seen very little action in Iran to give credence to reports of a more moderate political climate. But he described the conversations as “extraordinary,” in that the Iranians advocated more cultural exchanges and dialogues beImagine! A chat with U.S. counterparts at a cocktail party. tween the people of the two countries. Mr. Ackerman was also impressed by the inclusion of a woman and the only Jewish member of Parliament in the fivemember Iranian delegation. “They were trying to show inclusiveness,” Mr. Ackerman said, interpreting the gesture as a response to “the noise we were making.” The sole Jewish member of the Iranian Parliament, Mouris Motamed, told reporters today that he had tried to reassure the Americans that the Jews in Iran - numbering 25,000 to 30,000, down from a high of 80,000 to 100,000 before the 1979 revolution, he said - were living as well as their Muslim neighbors. Mr. Motamed added, however, that it was reassuring to Iranian Jews that others outside the country were concerned about their fate. “Of course, we value this kind of solidarity, this sympathy that exists,” he said.

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At the reception, Mr. Ackerman said, he asked the Iranians to consider how more formal exchanges of legislators could be arranged, a request members of Congress made in a letter to Iran this spring that was never answered. Mr. Motamed said today that the idea would be discussed, but would have to be presented first to President Khatami, who will be in New York next week for the summit talks. Stymied by Senate, Would-Be Envoy Quits WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (AP) - A career diplomat, Peter Burleigh, retired today, tired of waiting for confirmation of his ambassadorial nomination to the Philippines. The nomination has been tied up in the Senate for nine months by a Republican legislator retaliating over the State Department’s treatment of a whistle-blower at the United Nations. Mr. Burleigh was named to Manila after widely praised service as acting United Nations ambassador during the Kosovo crisis. But the administration was unable to negotiate the nomination past Senator Charles E. Grassley of Iowa. Mr. Grassley blocked it in a standoff over the State Department’s treatment of Linda Shenwick, counselor at the United States Mission to the United Nations. The senator asserted that Ms. Shenwick had been punished for providing Congress with information on United Nations financial irregularities. Mr. Burleigh took charge of the mission in 1998 after Bill Richardson left to become energy secretary. The year was eventful. Among other things, the United States and Britain bombed Iraq, and NATO bombed Yugoslavia to force a withdrawal of Serbian forces from Kosovo. With President Clinton’s term ending, Senate Republicans hopeful of recapturing the White House are not motivated to move on nominations. Brequet Despuis 1775 TRANSPHERE SA CH-00 To commemorate the 225th anniversary of its foundation, Montres Breguet is pleased to announce the issue of an exclusive, limited-edition wristwatch, created for the occasion. It is reserved strictly for current owners of one or more Breguet timepieces, with an eye for outstanding examples of watchmaking at its finest. Only 225 such watches will ever be made. From the first day of its existence in 1775, the Company has steadfastly pursued its founder Abraham-Louis Breguet’s original values—utter purity of form and line enhancing the elegance of an ongoing succession of inspired inventions and resourceful developments. For 225 years, Breguet timepieces have thus fascinated many of the world’s leading writers, not least Balzac, Stendhal and Pushkin, along with such distinguished patrons as Marie Antoinette, Queen of France (1782) General Napoleon Bonaparte (1798) Empress Joséphine (1806) Tsar Alexander I of Russia (1809) Arthur Rubinstein (1930) Ettore Bugatti (1931) Sir Winston Churchill (1946) Today, Nicolas G. Hayek and Breguet wish to share the Company’s 225th anniversary celebration with Breguet collectors and patrons by offering them an opportunity to acquire a commemorative timepiece in a numbered edition limited to 225 self-winding wristwatches in platinum, saluting the excellence of Breguet

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craftsmanship. Its design is directly inspired by a famous pocket watch made by Breguet in 1813 for Maréchal Ney. It makes the most of the materials and techniques of the period: cambered dial plate with oven-fired enameling, hand-painted with Breguet-style Arabic numerals; 18 carat gold Breguet hands; secret signature; movement with luxury finish and hand-engraved winding rotor; platinum case with fluted caseband and “Breguet 225ème anniversaire 1775-2000” commemorative inscription. Should you wish to acquire this exclusive timepiece, please get in touch with Breguet by December 31, 2000, at the latest, detailing the Breguet model or models you possess. Owners of the earliest specimens will receive priority. Breguet furthermore takes this opportunity to express its deep appreciation to all its patrons for their steadfast support and interest over the years, enabling it to perpetuate an art that has remained without peer since 1775 as an integral part of Europe’s cultural heritage. Nicolas G. Hayek President and CEO of Motres Breguet SA MONTRES BREGUET SA - CH - 1344 L’AABBAYE Tel. 41 21/841 90 90 — Fax 41 21/841 90 84 Internet www.breguet.com BOUTIQUE BREGUET - F-75001 PARIS 20, Place Vendôme Tel. 33/147 03 65 00 — Fax 33/147 03 65 05

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THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A7 U.S. Demands Philippine Captive Be Freed on Medical Grounds ZAMBOANGA, the Philippines, AUG. 31 (AP) - An American held by Muslim rebels in a southern Philip-pine jungle is seriously ill, United States officials said today. They appealed for his immediate release on medical grounds. Thomas Skipper, a spokesman for the United States Embassy, said American officials had learned from the family of the hostage, Jeffrey Schilling, that he had serious health problems and needed regular prescription medicine. “From a humanitarian standpoint, he should be released as soon as possible,” Mr. Skipper said. He said he did not know the nature of Mr. Schilling’s condition. Abu Sayyaf guerrillas announced on Tuesday that they had abducted Mr. Schilling, 24, of Oakland, Calif. They have threatened to behead him if the United States rejected their demands, including the release of several Arabs jailed in the United States on terrorism charges. The group, which says it is fighting for a separate Islamic state in the impoverished southern Philippines, holds 18 other hostages on southern Jolo Island. It released six Western-ers this week for what negotiators said was $6 million paid by Libya. Philippine negotiators said they would send a representative to an Abu Sayyaf camp on Friday to try to arrange the release this weekend of six more Westerners, including two French television journalists. Mr. Shilling is held by a different Abu Sayyaf faction, the same one that was responsible for the kidnapping of about 50 schoolchildren and teachers in March on neighboring Basilan Island. The group beheaded two teachers after the United States ignored its demand for the release of convicted terrorists. The Philippine government, embarrassed by the kidnappings, is considering a tougher approach. “This thing has become a revolving door,” Defense Secretary Orlando Mercado said. “There are hostages coming in and hostages getting out. I think one of these days we should close that door.” The guerrillas said earlier that they were willing to begin negotiations with American Embassy officials as early as today for Mr. Schilling’s release. They demanded that representatives of North Korea, China, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Libya take part, which Mr. Mercado dismissed as “really out of this world.” Philippine officials said they would try to negotiate before resorting to military action. They said the talks were unlikely to involve a third country, apparently referring to Libya, which played a prominent role in the release of the other hostages. The State Department has ruled out paying ransom or making any deals with the rebels. Mr. Skipper said that policy “does not preclude us from negotiating,” though “what we can offer I’m not really certain.” The rebels say they believe that Mr. Schilling is with the Central Intelligence Agency because he introduced himself as a Muslim convert but knew little about Islam. Mr. Schilling’s mother, Carol, said in a radio interview that her son converted to Islam several years ago and had visited the Philippines partly because of an interest in the region, but stayed after he fell in love with a Muslim woman, Ivi V.

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Osani. Her mother, Aida Ajijol, said Ms. Osani and the rebel spokesman, Abu Sabaya, were second cousins. Mr. Sabaya invited the couple to visit the rebels’ camp on Jolo, she said. Elsewhere today, a bomb exploded near a public market in the southern town of Kabacan, wounding at least 13 people, officials said. The police said they suspected that another Muslim rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, was responsible. the original razor scooter [email protected]’s adjustable. collapsible. six pounds. for 99.95 to get yours: visit bloomingdale’s cal 1-800-555-SHOP or go to bloomingdales.com in The Men’s Store. #N936 Razor bloomingdales ALL STORES WILL BE OPEN THIS MONDAY FOR LABOR DAY. 59TH STREET & LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK, 212-705-2000: TODAY 10-10; SAT. 10-8; SUN. 10-7; MONDAY, LABOR DAY 10-8:30. 1750 BLOOMINGDALE RD. WHITE PLAINS, 914-684-6300: TODAY AND SAT. 10-8; SUN. 11-7; MONDAY LABOR DAY 10-8. ROOSEVELT FIELD MALL, GARDEN CITY, 516-873-2700 AND WALT WHITMAN MALL, HUNTINGTON, 516-425-6700: TODAY & SAT 9-10; SUN 11-7; MONDAY, LABOR DAY 10-9:30. RIVERSIDE SQUARE MALL, HACKENSACK, 201-457-2000: TODAY 10-9:30, SAT. 10-9; CLOSED SUN.; MONDAY, LABOR DAY 10-7. THE MALL AT SHORT HILLS, SHORT HILLS, 972-548-2200: TODAY 10-9:30; SAT. 10-8; SUN. 11-6; MONDAY, LABOR DAY 10-7 visit our website at www.bloomingdales.com

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A8 L THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 sale $5 off Nine West & Keds select children’s shoes Nine West Sundae fashion loafer in black leather Girls 10-12; 12 1/2-5 Reg. $49 Sale $44 signs of evolution back to school 2000 Keds Mesa embroidered floral step-in with adjustable straps in wheat or black nubuck Girls 5-12; 12 1/2-4. Reg. $28-$30 Sale $23-25 Keds Dune comfort casual with floral design in black or navy nubuck Girls 5-10. Reg. $30 Sale $25 macys Shop for more at your 24 hour store! www. macys.com REG. PRICES REFLECT OFFERING PRICES WHICH MAY NOT HAVE RESULTED IN ACTUAL SALES. ADVERTISED ITEMS MAY BE OFFERED IN FUTURE SALE EVENTS. Sale items from specially selected groups. Sorry, no phone orders. Macy’s children’s shoes at Herald Square Roosevelt Field, Kings Plaza, Rego park, Brooklyn & Valley Stream. Macy’s is not responsible for pictorial or typographical errors. Collections vary by store. Sale ends 9/4. GRAND THREE-DAY FINE ART, ANTIQUE, SEMI ANTIQUE & CONTEMPORARY AUCTION ON SITE AT 42 Lords Highway, Weston CT. SAT, SUN & MON. SEPT 2,3 & 4 at 2:00 PM PREVIEW FROM 1:00 PM ON SALE DAYS ONLY “A UNIQUE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY” PROPERTY OFFERED AT $4,125,000 Highlight: Late 19th cent. Empire buffet and library table, Renaissance Revival Heavily Carved Buffet and other, French Bedroom set, marble marquetry inlaid coffee table, desks, consoles, marquetry inlaid dining room set w/12 chairs, Dining room table w/10 chairs, Louis XV, XVI style marble top commodes, 5 Pc. Salon Set, English and Victorian style furniture, mirrors, occasional chairs and tables, Secretary desks, curio cabinets and vitrines and many more item of furniture, Also a collection of eastern carpets and tapestries, Fine paintings, Crystal,

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European and Eastern porcelain, Lamps, Clocks, Objects D’art, Fine bronze sculptures, impressive outdoor bronzes & fountains, et al. …too much to list!! CONDUCTED BY National Estate Auction Tel: (201) 994-0600 TERMS: CASH, CHECK, AMEX, VISA, MC, DISC, 12% BUYER PRE. ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE, ERRORS & OMISSIONS World Briefing Europe UKRAINE: ECOLOGICAL DISASTER With hundreds of villagers in south-central Ukraine complaining of skin rashes and other symptoms of environmental poi-soning President Leonid Kuchma, left, declared the region about 320 miles south of Kiev an ecological disaster zone. Some of-ficials said the, outbreak was caused by chemical spills from a Soviet-era missile base, but others said high concentra-tions of nitrites in drinking water and foodstuffs indicat-ed high fertilizer concentrations may have contaminat-ed water supplies. Patrick E. Tyler (NYT) NORWAY: RIGHTISTS GAIN The Progress Party, whose anti-immigration position has made it a political pariah, has moved into a statistical tie with the governing Labor Party for the first time in a new poll. Of the 1,000 people questioned by the Din Mening/Norsk Statistikk institute, 25 percent said they favored Progress among the country’s eight largest parties. Support for the Labor Party slid to 22 percent from 29 percent in July, according to the monthly poll, which had a margin of sampling error of 2 to 3 percentage points. Walter Gibbs (NYT) BRITAIN: SHORT OF OFFICERS The government intro-duced an $11 million television and newspaper ad cam-paign as part of an effort to help recruit police officers. The number of officers is now 124,418 in England and Wales, the lowest in a decade. With key crime rates going up, the government has promised 9,000 new posi-tions but has had trouble attracting people to the profession. Warren Hoge (NYT) NETHERLANDS: LOCKERBIE TRIAL SUSPENDED The Lock-erbie trial was adjourned for three weeks to let Ameri-can intelligence services search their archives for more information about a key witness, Abdul Majid Giaka, who was on a C.I.A. payroll at the time of the bombing. He is expected to testify that he saw the defendants place the bomb on a flight in Malta in May 1998. Mr. Giaka was supposed to testify two weeks ago, but the defense demanded complete transcripts of C.I.A. interviews with him. Donald G. McNeil Jr. (NYT) MIDDLE EAST ISRAEL: ‘FRIENDLY FIRE’ INQUIRY A preliminary army investigation concluded that the three Israeli soldiers who died in a botched raid on a West Bank home were killed by “friendly fire.” The investigation found that serious errors, especially the posting of undercover agents on rooftops, led to the death and injury of Israeli soldiers and to the escape of the raid’s target, Mahmoud Abu Hanoud. Mr. Abu Hanoud, who is wanted in Israel on terrorism charges, is in the custody of the Palestinian authorities, who say they will prosecute him themselves. Deborah Sontag (NYT) ISRAEL, IRAQ: NUCLEAR ROW In a sharp exchange at the United Nations disarmament conference in Geneva, Israel and Iraq accused each other of having weapons that threaten the Middle East. Israel’s delegate said Iraq “devoted a major part of its vast income” from oil to develop weapons of mass destruction,

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including nuclear weapons. Iraq’s representative said Israel “possesses hundreds of nuclear bombs, which threaten not just our region but the entire world.” Elizabeth Olson (NYT) IRAN: RIOTS CONTINUE Riots erupted for the seventh straight night in the western city of Khorramabadas demonstrators smashed bank windows and threw gaso-line bombs, news organizations reported. The daily Kayhan said five people were arrested in the latest troubles, which began when two leading government critics arrived to address a pro-reform student confer-ence. (Agence FrancePresse) ASIA INDIA: PREMIER’S TRIP DELAYED Despite earlier assur-ances that Prime Minister, Atal Behari Vajpayee’s trip to the United States would be unaffected by his poor health, his office announced he is delaying his arrival in New York by two days to Sept. 7 and canceling a visit to Silicon Valley on the advice of doctors. Mr. Vajpayee, 75, has been suffering from a flare-up of osteoarthritis his knees. Celia W. Dugger (NYT) KOREAS: TALKS CONTINUE Negotiators from North and South Korea agreed to extend negotiations in Pyongyang until today in an effort to reach an accord to pave the way for regular talks between military officials. South Korea’s minister of unification, Park Jae Kyu, pressed North Korea to agree to Seoul’s proposal to open a military hot line in an effort to prevent armed clashes. Samuel Len (NYT) MYANMAR: STANDOFF CALLED PLOT The roadside stand-off by the prodemocracy activist Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was a well-orchestrated plan to attract global attention as world leaders prepared to meet at the United Nations next week, the military government charged. Mrs. Aung San Suu Kyi, 55, and 14 members of her opposition party are stranded outside Yangon, camping out in two Vehicles and refusing to return to the capital. In Washington, Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright said, “Ildin appalled at the actions of the Burmese regime in denying Aung San Sup Kyi the freedom to travel within his own country.” (AP) AFRICA SWAZILAND: JOURNALIST CLEARED All charges have been dropped against a journalist who was jailed last year after publishing an unflattering article about a teenage girl picked to join the king’s harem. Bheki Makhubu, who has since started his own monthly newsmagazine, was fired as editor of The Sunday Times of Swaziland and charged with criminal defamation. Henri E. Cauvin (NYT) THE AMERICAS CUBA: U.S. TALKS RESUMING Ending a two-month suspension, Cuba has agreed to resume talks on legal migration of Cubans to the United States under accords signed in 1994 and ‘95. The agreements grant visas to 20,000 Cubans a year. (AP) Compiled by Terence Neilan World Business Briefing, Page C4 Labor Day Sale join now! $0 initiation fee* 4 days only. call or stop by to enroll EQUINOX® fitness clubs

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Delay Likely Until January in New Tests for Missiles Continued From Page A1 the issue could come to a head as early as next week. Among the issues that Mr. Cohen is weighing are the costs of building the system, the building schedule and the need for more tests. This month, Mr. Cohen delayed his recommendation, primarily because of a dispute between the Pentagon and the State Department over how far work on the limited missile shield could proceed before the United States would be required to give notice that it was withdrawing from the A.B.M. Treaty. Russia has vigorously opposed changing the treaty to allow the United States to field even a limited de-fense, fearing that it would be prelude, to a larger system that would undermine Moscow’s long-range nuclear force. Mr. Cohen told the Senate Armed Services Committee last month that administration lawyers bid reached a consensus that building the radar station on Shemya Island in the western Aleutians could continue until 2002 before the United States would be in violation. Policymakers at the State Department and the National Security Council oppose that interpretation, arguing that it is unilateral and sure to anger the Russians. Some diplomats doubt that the decision from Mr. Cohen or the White House would be issued next week, saying the administration would want to avoid a confrontation over missile defense during a United Nations gathering of world leaders. Mr. Cohen suggested this month that the next system test could slip, from October or November to December. But military officials said today that the date would probably fall into January. Pentagon experts are still analyzing why a high-speed interceptor that was supposed to have destroyed a dummy warhead on July 7 failed to separate from its booster rocket. Officials have attributed the cause to an error in the rocket’s “databus,” equipment that transmits electrical signals to the warhead. In addition, the Kwajalein Atoll test range in the Marshall Islands is closed for much of December. Associates said General Nance was in-clined to give his staff a breather after two years at a breakneck pace. Pentagon officials insist that the test program has enough built-in flexibility to absorb the delays. But the Defense Department’s top test official, Phil Coyle, warned top Pentagon officials in a report on Aug. 11 that the system could not reach its goal of 2005 because testing was be-hind schedule and would not include realistic decoy targets for years. “A more aggressive testing pro-gramme will be necessary to achieve an effective capability by 2005 or for even several years thereafter,” Mr. Coyle said in an analysis first reported this week by Bloomberg News. A spokesman for the Pentagon, Rear Adm. Craig Quigley, said Mr. Coyle was “supposed to be an in-dependent voice, but that does not change our goal.” “If directed to do so,” the admiral said, “we’re shooting for 2005.” Intelligence officials have warned that the United States could face a threat from some countries, including North Korea, by that date. Privately, though, some Pentagon officials are questioning the schedule in the light of test failures and delays in building missile interceptors.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L+ A9

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“We have always admitted that this was a high-risk program, and part of being high risk is the deployment date,” the chief Pentagon spokesman, Kenneth H. Bacon, said this month. “We will try our best, and we may meet the deployment date.” U.S. Antimissile Unit May Be Sent to Israel WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (Reuters) - The United States, concerned that Iraq could try to fire ballistic mis-siles at Israel, has alerted an Army Patriot antimissile battery in Germany to prepare for possible deploy-ment to Israel, senior defense officials said today. the officials said that had no indi-cations that Iraq intended to threat-en Israel. they said that in issuing the alert, which was first reported in The Washington Post, the United States was getting ready in case Iraq tried to launch missiles at Israel as part of any renewed campaign against Kurdish or Shiite groups in Iraq. “Historically at this time of year over the past five years, the Iraquis have made threats against the Kurds, the Shiites in Iraq,” one official said. he said officials feared that such a move could be accompanied by the launch of ballistic missiles against Israel. The United States has sent Patriot missile to Israel previously, most notably during the Persian Gulf war in 1991 in an attempt to defend against attacks by Iraqi Scud missiles. HOLIDAY WEEKEND SAVINGS! Think Fall Sale THE MAN’S SHOP 33% OFF Designer sportswear Fall sportshirts, pants and polos from That Free-Spirited American Designer. Orig. $45-68.50, sale 34.99-44.99 25% to 33% OFF All lzod® sportswear Reg. $34-$55, sale 24.99-39.99 39.99 SPECIALLY PRICED Italian merino wool sweaters 15 colors! our own solid and ribbed styles. BUY ONE, $5 OFF ANY SECOND† Casual Classics® sportshirts, sweaters & pants Reg. 21.99-39,99, your second 16.99-34.99 30% to 40% off all fall sportcoats Pure camel hair, pure cashmere, cashmere / wool, Tencel® wool or suede touch. Reg. $245-$575, sale 169.99-399.99 30% OFF All fall suits Reg. $425-$500, sale 279.99-349.99 LOWEST PRICES OF THE SEASON! SALE 27.99 & 29.99* Geoffrey Beene dress shirts Reg. $36-$45 30% To 40% OFF

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All leather & casual jackets & all rainwear Orig. $95-$575, sale 59.99-399.99 (Designer collections excluded.) 25% OFF All Jockey® underwear All Gold Toe® socks SALE 39.99 To 69.99 Casual & dress shoes & sneakers Rockport * Bostonian * Timberland * Bass Nunn Bush * Nike * Sperry * Skechers $10-$25 off. Reg. 49.99-$89 KIDS’ CLOTHES 25% TO 30% OFF Denim jeans, twill pants, tops & sweaters Orig. & Reg. $10-$65, sale 14.99-32.99 25% TO 30% OFF Sets, outerwear, dresses & boy’s dresswear Orig. & Reg. $7-$175, sale 5.25-119.99 (Designer collections excluded.) 30% OFF* ALL Osh Kosh® Genuine Girl & Healthtex® Reg. $12-$44, sale 8.40-30.80 25% TO 30% OFF All Carter’s® layette & sleepwear EXTRA 15% OFF any second† blanket sleeper or sleepwear item COATS FOR HER 30% OFF All coats & jackets Misses * Petites * Women Raincoats * Long & short wool coats Leather jackets * Casual jackets Reg. $145-$875, sale 99.99-599.99 (Selected designer coat collections excluded.) ACCESSORIES $9 to $20 OFF* Dress & casual shoes & boots 30 styles! * Anne Klein 2 * Van Eli * Bandolino Enzo Angiolini * Nine West * Steve Madden Reg. $49-$74, sale 39.99-54.99 30% OFF* All our own shoes & boots 27 styles! Reg. $50-$129, sale 34.9 & 89.99 CLEARANCE! BUY 1, GET 2 FREE† All already-reduced costume jewelry Total savings over 80% (Sterling silver jewelry excluded.)

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CLEARANCE! SALE 29.99* All already-reduced watches Save up to 60%! Orig. $55-$75, currently 40.99-55.99 25% OFF* Sterling silver & cubic zirconia jewelry Our Own. Reg. 14.99-99.99, sale 11.24-74.99 40% TO 50% All Fine Jewelry (Watches, diamond solitaire rings, estate collections excluded.) 25% to 30% OFF* Handbags Nine West * Our Own & more Reg. $45-$108, sale 34.99-44.99 30% OFF* All leather gloves 14 colors! Cashmere-lined * Silk-lined Reg. $50-$65, sale 33.75-$81 INTIMATES BUY 2 GET 1 FREE† Bras or matching panties Warner’s® * Olga® * Maidenform® * Lily of France®* Vanity Fair Reg. 9.50-$36 (Value in Style collection excluded.) Buy 2, GET 1 FREE† Bras or shapers Plus $6 mail-in rebate† All Bali® * Playtex® * All Barely There Reg. 8.50-$45 (Sale ends September 3rd. Buy 2, GET 2 FREE† Bras or shapers 1 free today, 1 free by mail† Maidenform® * Vanity Fair ®* Flexees® Underwonder & Lighten Up™ Reg. 10.50-$46 (Sale ends September 4th.) 25% OFF ALL Jockey underwear & hosiery (Sale ends September 4th) 25% OFF ALL Ralph Lauren intimates (Sale ends September 9th.) COSMETICS FREE ESTÉE LAUDER 8-PIECE GIFT With any Estée Lauder purchase of $20 or more. Only at Lord & Taylor. Worth $60. SPORTSWEAR 89.99 TO 199.99 SPECIALLY PRICED Leather & suede separates Misses * Petites * Women Our own jackets, skirts, blazers and pants. Women’s, 129.99-259.99 79.99 SPECIALLY PRICED Two-ply cashmere sweaters 17 colors * 5 styles! Our Own 39.99 SPECIALLY PRICED 25% To 30% OFF

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Career separates & casuals Misses * Petites * Women Jackets, pants, skirts, blouses, knit tops, knit dresses. Orig. & Reg. $24-$189, sale 19.99-124.99 39.99 SPECIALLY PRICED LT Sport pants Misses * Petites * Women 15 colors * 5 styles! Our Own Women’s, 44.99 25% OFF* All activewear Misses * Women Jockey® * Champion * Danskin® * Marika Reg. $14-$36, sale 10.50-$27 DRESSES & SUITS 25% TO 30% OFF Career dresses & pantsuits Misses * Petites * Women A-lines, 2-piece looks, wedges. Jackets or tunics over pants. Orig. & Reg. 79.99-$180, sale 59.99-125.99 25% TO 30% OFF Cocktail dresses & gowns Misses * Petites * Women Long or short. Orig. 99.99-$298, sale 74.99-207.99 69.99 SPECIALLY PRICED Stretch faux suede dresses Misses * Petites 30% OFF Suits Misses * Petites * Women Designer and famous maker skirt suits and pantsuits. Orig. $172-$4428, sale 119.99-299.99 (Designer suits available at selected stores.) Lord & Taylor Final Summer Clearance! EXTRA 50% OFF* SUMMER FASHIONS ALREADY REDUCED 50% STOREWIDE! EXTRA 40% OFF* thousands of items already reduced 25% to 40% 4 Day Bonus Coupon BONUS 15% OFF Any Single Sale or Specially Priced Item This Lord & Taylor coupon excludes cosmetics, fragrances and personal care electrics. Also excluded: St. John, Coach, Dooney & Bourke, Lenox, Lauren by Ralph Lauren shoes, handbags, accessories and jewelry; Clairborne for men; all men’s and children’s Polo Ralph Lauren and Sport, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica and DKNY, men’s and ladies’ coats, outerwear, leathers and rainwear; Best Buys, watches and special event promotions in Fine Jewelry. 10% discount on total Fine Jewelry purchase of 299.99 and under, men’s suits, sportcoats and dress slacks.

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Coupon cannot be combined. Not valid on prior purchases or at Lord & Taylor Clearance Centers. Bonus savings % applied to reduced prices. Valid Friday, September 1st through Monday, September 4th 4 Day Bonus Coupon BONUS 15% OFF Any Single Sale or Specially Priced Item This Lord & Taylor coupon excludes cosmetics, fragrances and personal care electrics. Also excluded: St. John, Coach, Dooney & Bourke, Lenox, Lauren by Ralph Lauren shoes, handbags, accessories and jewelry; Clairborne for men; all men’s and children’s Polo Ralph Lauren and Sport, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica and DKNY, men’s and ladies’ coats, outerwear, leathers and rainwear; Best Buys, watches and special event promotions in Fine Jewelry. 10% discount on total Fine Jewelry purchase of 299.99 and under, men’s suits, sportcoats and dress slacks. Coupon cannot be combined. Not valid on prior purchases or at Lord & Taylor Clearance Centers. Bonus savings % applied to reduced prices. Valid Friday, September 1st through Monday, September 4th Lord & Taylor gift card A PERFECT GIFT The Lord & Taylor Gift Card to give in any amount from $10 to $500. Available in the store, by telephone or now form our website www.lordandtaylor.com *Reduction off ticketed prices will be taken at the register. No adjustments to prior sale purchases. Selected collections, not every style and size in every store. One gift to a customer, please; while supplies last. Final Summer Clearance not in Providence or Broomfield. † Free or additional item must be of equal or lesser value. Postage and delivery fees will apply to mail in offer. Sale ends Sunday, September 10th, except for clearance items or as noted. Final Summer Clearance: Extra 50% off ends Sunday, September 24th; Extra 40% off ends Sunday, September 10th. Our regular and original prices are offering prices only and may or may not have resulted in sales. Advertised merchandise may be available at sale prices in upcoming sale events. Charge it with your Lord & Taylor Charge Card. We also accept American Express, MasterCard® Visa® and the Discover® Card. For the Lord & Taylor location nearest you, please call 1-800-223-7440, 8 am to 10 pm (ET) any day.

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A10 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 MACY’S gift card works like a gift certificate, looks like a credit card! macy’s giftcard macy’s giftcard Available in any gift amount from $10 to $1,000, with complimentary holiday greeting card. good in any Macy’s, in any department! macy’s THE Perfect GIFT Pick up the Macy’s Gift Card at any of our stores. Or, pick up the phone and call 1-800-456-2297 Christian Dior MACY’S PRESENTS 3 STEPS TO BEAUTY Discover the Christian Dior 3-Step Skincare System So easy to follow, so great for your skin. So easy to follow, so great for your skin. Step One/Cleansing: A new range of Cleansing Care Treatments that leave skin fresh and balanced. Cleansers 22.50 Toners $20 Step Two/Time Fighting: Two drops a day of Capture Essentiel Time-Fighting Serum brings smoother, more radiant, younger-looking skin. For all skin types. 1 oz. $48 1.7 oz. $70 Step Three/Firming Expert: Model Lift offers a three-in-one action that you can see and feel. Gives an instant “lift”: firmer, more toned skin, and tightened contours. I oz. $45 1.7 oz. $68 Plus, create your own 6-piece personalized gift according to your individualized skincare needs, when you purchase any two Christian Dior beauty products, one of which must be skincare. GEL FRAÎCHEUR NETTOYAGE À L’EAU Christian Dior PARIS REFRESHING WASH-OFF CLEANSING GEL CAPTURE ESSENTIEL ULTRA-SÉRUM RÉACTIVATEUR JEUNESSE TIME-FIGHTING SERUM Christian Dior PARIS MODEL LIFT CRÉME FERMENTÉ OPTIMALE LIFT AND FIRM CRÈME

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FOR FACE AND THROAT FPS 10 SPF Christian Dior PARIS macy’s Shop for more at your 24 hour store! www.macys.com take the expressway Our Herald Square Macy’s By Appointment Personal Shoppers can have the Main Floor basics you need ready to pick up in an hour, or sent to you UPS. Visit us on the 3rd floor or call Main Floor Express at 212-494-KWIK (FAX 494-2699). To order call, 1-800-456-2297. #RTD. Delivery charges apply. One free gift per customer, while supplies last. Christian Dior beauty products not available in all stores. Collections vary by store. WEEK OF AUGUST 27: Shop Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-9:30 Herald Square Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-8:30 Shop Sun. 11-6 at Valley Stream, Yorktown, Menlo Park, Ocean County, Hamilton, East Brunswick & Trumbull Short Hills Sat. 10-9 Sun. 11-6 Queens Sun. 11-9 Mon.-Sat. 10-10 Fulton St. Brooklyn Sun. 12-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-8 Parkchester Sun. 11-6 Mon. 10-9 Tue.-Wed. 10-7 Thur.-Fri. 10-9 Sat. 10-7 Paramus closed Sun. Carle Place & Rte. 46 Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-9:30Furn. Stores Sun. 12-6 Mon.-Fri. 11-9 Sat. 10-8 Rte. 1 Sat. 10-9

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A11 Labor Day Sale Storewide savings, values & clearances through Monday! Save 25%-75% storewide on thousands of sale and clearance items for me, women and kids, plus terrific savings for your home! 25% to 50% off girls & boys favorites Fleece, active, sweaters, knit tops, jeans, wovens and more. For boys 8-20 and girls 7-16 Reg. / Orig* $16-$46 Sale $8-$33 50% + extra 10%-15% off Atlantic Infinity III luggage Tote, duffel, carry-on Pullman garment bag. Reg. $120-$340 Sale 49.99-149.99 sale 9.99 to 29.99 junior necessities Athletic and basic tees, sweaters, jeans and more from Energie, One Step Up, Mudd, l.e.i. Reg. 14.99-$38 33% off all Van Heusen dress shirts Solids and patterns. Cotton/polyester. Reg. $34-37.50 Sale 22.78-25.13 25%-40% off fall handbags A variety of the season’s coolest styles from Esprit, Candie’s, famous American designers, others. Reg. $32-$94 Sale 21.60-70.50 sale 49.99 any size bed-in-a-bag by Jessica Sanders Comforter, flat & fitted sheets, bedskirt, sham(s) & case(s) in four great patterns. Cotton/polyester. Twin-king. Reg. 99.99 sale 39.99-49.99

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back-to-school shoes A variety of classy looks from Steve Madden, Skechers, Candie’s, Nine West, others. Reg. $58-$59 sale 14.99 select bras from Bali® and Warner’s® Reg. $24-24.50 sale 21.99 to 49.99 Sag Harbor fall separates Jackets, trousers, sweaters, skirts, more. For misses petites and women. Reg. $30-70 Women’s prices are slightly higher 40% off fall suits & sportscoats Traditional and contemporary styles. Suits Reg. $375-$475 Sale 199.99279.99 Sportcoats. Reg. $165-$300 Sale 98.99199.9 You must bring in your coupons for extra savings! extra 15% off A SINGLE SALE OR CLEARANCE PURCHASE STOREWIDE (10% OFF HOME, WOMEN’S SHOES & SUITS, COATS & JACKETS FOR HER & HIM) VALID 9/1/00-9/2/00 ONLY macy’s 2 9 10013 652487 †Excludes DEPARTMENTS: Designer Collections, Cosmetics, Fragrances, Designer Handbags, Cashmere, Maternity, Small & Personal Care Electrics, Vacuums, Furniture, Mattresses, Food & Candy, Bridal Salons. WOMEN’S DESIGNERS: Ralph Lauren/Polo DKNY. MEN’S/KIDS DESIGNERS: all Calvin Klein, all Ralph Lauren/Polo, all Tommy Hilfiger, all DKNY, all Claiborne for Him, all Guess, all Nautica. HOME DESIGNERS: Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Timmy Hilfiger, Nautica. COLLECTIONS: INC, Levi’s, Kenneth Cole, Watches, Fashion, Jewelry, Status Crystal and China, Sterling Silver flatware, Calaphon, Henckels, Charisma, Royal Velvet, The Razor Scooter. Not valid on super buys, best values, price breaks, 2-day specials, prior purchases, services, gift

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bonds/certificates/cards, selected leased departments, macys.com or Macy’s By Mail. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Macy’s employees not eligible. extra 15% off A SINGLE SALE OR CLEARANCE PURCHASE STOREWIDE (10% OFF HOME, WOMEN’S SHOES & SUITS, COATS & JACKETS FOR HER & HIM) VALID 9/1/00-9/2/00 ONLY macy’s 2 9 10013 652487 †Excludes DEPARTMENTS: Designer Collections, Cosmetics, Fragrances, Designer Handbags, Cashmere, Maternity, Small & Personal Care Electrics, Vacuums, Furniture, Mattresses, Food & Candy, Bridal Salons. WOMEN’S DESIGNERS: Ralph Lauren/Polo DKNY. MEN’S/KIDS DESIGNERS: all Calvin Klein, all Ralph Lauren/Polo, all Tommy Hilfiger, all DKNY, all Claiborne for Him, all Guess, all Nautica. HOME DESIGNERS: Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Timmy Hilfiger, Nautica. COLLECTIONS: INC, Levi’s, Kenneth Cole, Watches, Fashion, Jewelry, Status Crystal and China, Sterling Silver flatware, Calaphon, Henckels, Charisma, Royal Velvet, The Razor Scooter. Not valid on super buys, best values, price breaks, 2-day specials, prior purchases, services, gift bonds/certificates/cards, selected leased departments, macys.com or Macy’s By Mail. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Macy’s employees not eligible. macy’s Shop for more at your 24 hour store! www.macys.com REG./ORIG.*/IF PURCH. SEP PRICES REFLECT OFFERING PRICES WHICH MAY NOT HAVE RESULTED IN ACTUAL SALES. LUGGAGE SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. ITEMS MAY BE OFFERED IN FUTURE SALE EVENTS. Sale items are from specially selected groups. Sorry, no phone orders. Final cost prices reflect extra savings. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. Exclusive to Federated Dept. Stores. All textiles made in USA, unless noted. Men’s suits not at Parkchester, Augusta, Northlake, Southlake, Deptford, Brockton and Hyannis. Sportcoats not at Brockton. Luggage not at Brockton. Macy’s is not responsible for typographical or pictorial errors. Coupons may or may not apply to the items on this page and are not available in the store. Sale ends 9/4. WEEK OF AUGUST 27: Shop Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-9:30 Herald Square Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-8:30 Shop Sun. 11-6 at Valley Stream, Yorktown, Menlo Park, Ocean County, Hamilton, East Brunswick & Trumbull Short Hills Sat. 10-9 Sun. 11-6 Queens Sun. 11-9 Mon.-Sat. 10-10 Fulton St. Brooklyn Sun. 12-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-8 Parkchester Sun. 11-6 Mon. 10-9 Tue.-Wed. 10-7 Thur.-Fri. 10-9 Sat. 10-7 Paramus closed Sun. Carle Place & Rte. 46 Sun. 11-7 Mon.-Sat. 10-9:30 Sun. Stores Sun. 12-6 Mon.-Fri. 11-9 Sat. 10-8 Rte. 1 Sat. 10-9

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A12 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Reuters A French Protest Ends Trucks in Britain awaiting access to the Channel Tunnel yesterday after French fishermen ended a wave of protests and port blockades. France agreed to offset rising fuel prices by easing fishing compa-nies’ taxes. The tunnel was shut for hours, but many French ports were in turmoil more than a week. France Joins Wave of Plans for Big Tax Cuts By JOHN TAGLIABUE PARIS, Aug. 31 - Nudged by Germany, and probably providing an example to Italy, France today became the second of Continental Europe’s big three economies to propose a large package of tax cuts. The proposed cut, totaling roughly $16 billion over three years, is part of a wave of similar measures being enacted across Europe, as governments react to increased tax revenue because of expanding economies and declining unemployment. The cuts, while differing by country, are intended to give a measure of stability to a tenuous spurt of economic growth. Economists and government planners hope the lower taxes will help offset climbing interest rates. The French cuts came as the European Central Bank in Frankfurt raised a key interest rate by a quarter point to 4.5 percent, its fifth increase this year, in an effort to cool inflation. The tax cuts by the Socialist gov-ernment of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin come only weeks after Germany’s Social Democrat-led government announced even more radical tax changes to reduce annual payments by individuals and corporations by as much as $24 billion by 2005. The French proposals are not only more modest, but also differ substantially from the Germans in how they apportion the cuts. In July, Chancellor Gerhard Schröder of Germany pushed pro-business measures through Parliament to reduce taxes for corporations and promote their reorganization by sweetening the sale of industrial cross-shareholdings, a builtin obstacle to the kind of industrial consolidation that is now engulfing EuEurope moves to keep its economies growing. rope. Though a Social Democrat, Mr. Schröder has a strong pro-business record. Indeed, the Finance Ministry Official responsible for much of the tax change, Heribert Zitzelsberger, is a former senior tax executive of the Bayer chemical group. The French measures, by contrast, favor big business less than small and mid-sized companies, households and low-wage earners. The cuts proposed by Economics Minister Laurent Fabius foresee a drop in the top marginal personal income tax rate by 2003 to 52.5 percent, from 54 percent. But the burden for large corporations will probably remain unchanged, since proposed corporate tax cuts will be largely offset by levies imposed to help finance a job-creation plan that re-duced the workweek to 35 hours from 40. In Italy, the government of Prime Minister Giuliano Amato has said it will propose similar tax cuts in September. Given the leftist component of Mr. Amato’s coalition, economists believe that they will more closely resemble those of France than Germany, favoring small businesses - the backbone of the Italian economy - and households. Still, economists said the French measures should help the whole economy,

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if indirectly, as tax relief to low-wage earners widens the earnings gap between the lowest-paid employed and the unemployed, raising the incentive for the jobless to seek work. That in turn should relieve the labor market, moderating wage increases. Moreover, fuel tax cuts and lowered social security payments should provide relief to businesses and increase employees’ take-home pay. Cuts in fuel taxes became a pressing issue in recent days after French fishermen, truckers and taxi drivers blocked ports and roads and refused to work to protest the recent steep climb in diesel fuel prices. Experts judged the net effect of the French changes positively. In a note to clients, economists at Credit Suisse First Boston said that while the “focus seems clearly on households and particularly on low-paid workers, with also a clear impact on small and medium companies,” large corporations also “should benefit from the general boost to domestic demand.” World’s Religious Figures Sign a Pledge for Peace By GUSTAV NIEBUHR As an international conference of religious leaders ended yesterday in New York, many participants, representing a wide array of the world’s faiths, pledged to work for world peace. Their commitment came in a statement titled “Commitment to Global Peace,” which was the main document to emerge from their four-day gathering, the Millennium World Peace Summit of Religious and Spiritual Leaders, an event unusual for its religious diversity and for its having convened at the United Nations. The document, which briefly acknowledges that war and violence “are sometimes perpetuated in the name of religion,” pledges its signers to work with the United Nations and “all men and women of good will” toward peace. It asks its signers to work for freedom of religion, toward narrowing the wealth gap between rich and poor, and on behalf of environmental protection. But how any of this will be carried out, or indeed, how a continued dialogue will be conducted among the Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu and other leaders who gathered here, remain open questions. In attending the conference, whose sessions have been held at the WaldorfAstoria Hotel since Wednesday, many of the hundreds of religious leaders who attended said they felt drawn by the event’s association with the United Nations and by its theme of peace. Although not an official United Nations event, and largely funded through foundations’ donations, the conference was held in collaboration with the office of the United Nations’ secretary general. “I think the evidence is, they voted with the hearts in coming here,” said Lawrence E. Sullivan, director of the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard University, in an interview on Wednesday afternoon. But to engage in a continuing discussion with other religious groups and to work with international agencies on social issues, he said, the leaders here would have to “commit senior staff in their organizations” to those duties. “If the religious people want to bring a new voice, they really have to go to school on the issues,” said Dr. Sullivan, who has served on an advisory board for this event. “Some of them have, most have not.” Nonetheless, one of the speakers at the gathering, Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, chief rabbi of Great Britain, said there would be value for many participants sim-

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ply in having met and become acquainted with people of other faiths. And some here said that the meeting, simply in bringing together such a diverse group, could ultimately have a wider spiritual effect. Sant Rajinder Singh Ji Maharaj, an Indian meditation teacher who heads an international organization called (in the United States) the Science of Spirituality, said the conference was useful in introducing people who would otherwise have been more aware of their differences than what they might share in common. “When we sit and talk with them, we realize they are not much different,” he said. The conference, he said, had created “a beautiful environment. I think if we can take it back to our communities, that sweetness will filter through.” Doubts That Suharto Will Ever Go to Court But Jakarta Prosecutors Insist They’ll Solve a $590 Million Puzzle By MARK LANDLER JAKARTA, Indonesia, Aug. 31 - By calling in sick on the first day of his corruption trial, Indonesia’s former leader, Suharto, has put up another hurdle to this country’s tortuous effort to come to terms with its past. Government prosecutors said today that they would plow ahead with their prosecution of Mr. Suharto on charges that he siphoned about $590 million in state funds through several charitable foundations under his control when he was president. But with the trial adjourned until Sept. 14 - and then only to hear testimony from doctors who declared Mr. Suharto unfit to attend the opening session today - it is far from clear that the 79-year-old former president will ever stand in the dock. “Suharto will never be convicted,” A.M. Fatwa, a member of Parliament, said as he stalked angrily out of the courtroom. “This is only a game, a conspiracy between the politicians and lawyers.” Still, for a hushed moment after the judge asked whether the defendant was present, there was palpable drama in the courtroom. To hear Mr. Suharto’s name read out in a criminal case was a momentous event in a country where for three decades he was synonymous with untold wealth and unassailable power. When the judge’s question was met with silence, the 300 spectators in the cavernous courtroom booed halfheartedly, like people who had hoped for more but did not expect to get it. Outside, a small crowd of rain-soaked protesters called for Mr. Suharto to be brought to justice, by force if necessary. “If he does not come in two weeks, I will drag him to the court myself,” said Bambang Dwi, a 23-year-old student at the Institute of Technology in Jakarta, who held a megaphone over his head to ward off the downpour. But given the judgment of Mr. Suharto’s doctors, it is not clear that the government can compel him to attend. The attorney general, Marsuki Darusman, says he cannot be tried in absentia, so the two sides are in a standoff. For now, the prosecutors have asked for an independent panel of doctors to examine Mr. Suharto. His own doctors say he suffers from ailments including heart trouble, by hypertension. and diabetes. They say Mr. Suharto, who has had three strokes, has lost his memory and ability to speak. “My client is not in a position to defend himself,” said Juan Felix Tampubolon, Mr. Suharto’s chief lawyer. The former president may be unable to mount a defense, but he has mobilized an army of lawyers and doctors to do it for him. Twenty-three doctors gath-

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ered this morning to examine him at his house on a leafy street here. Later, more than 100 police officers took up positions to protect the house from demonstrators. Mr. Subarto tried to wrap his dealThe corruption case is seen as a test of Indonesia’s effort to cleanse the nation. ings in a cloak of legitimacy. In the 45-page indictment, he is accused of issuing presidential decrees that funneled hundreds of millions of dollars from state banks, companies and even employees into his seven charitable organizations. In a 1995 decree, Mr. Suharto ordered the government to transfer 2 percent of the total revenue from taxes paid by Indonesian companies into one of the foundations. In another decree, he ordered state-owned banks to contribute a chunk of their revenues to two other foundations. According to the indictment, he then distributed the proceeds - nearly $600 million - to companies controlled by his children and friends. Those accusations cover only a fraction of the financial legerdemain that Mr. Suharto is accused of during his 32 years in power. But the government says it did not have enough evidence to try him on the broader charges. “It is very difficult to deal with the excesses of an autocratic regime through democratic means,” said H. S. Dillon, a member of Indonesia’s Human Rights Commission. Although Indonesia is awash in trials and investigations these days, protesters have channeled their passions into the Suharto case. People here view the trial as the litmus test of the government’s campaign to cleanse Indonesia - not just of cor-ruption, but of its legacy of human rights abuses. “You have to find this man culpable, or you won’t be able to find all his cronies culpable,” Mr. Dillon said. “They will just say, ‘We were acting on orders.’” Mr. Dillon acknowledged that Indonesia had made paltry progress so far. While Indonesia’s president, Ab-durraham Wahid, authorized the investigation of Mr. Suharto, he too has been implicated in two parliamentary investigations of misappropriated funds that seem an echo of the Suharto era. There may be more disappointment to come. On Friday, Attorney General Darusman is expected to disclose the names of officials who will prosecuted for human rights abuses in East Timor, during the rampage that followed last summer’s referendum on independence for the former Indonesian province. According to people who have seen the list, it does not include two rank-ing military officers, retired General Wiranto, who was defense minister during that period, and the retired chief of military intelligence, Gen. Zaki Anwar. While the 30 names do include the former regional military command-er and the former police command-er, the lack of top-level officials could sow doubts about how far Indonesia is willing to go in assigning blame for the bloodshed that erupted in East Timor while its troops were supposed to be keeping order. More doubts were raised by a recent amendment to Indonesia’s Constitution that prohibits individuals from being prosecuted under laws that did not exist when their crimes were committed. Rights groups protested that the amendment would allow military of-ficers accused of abuses in East Timor to claim immunity from prosecution. The United Nations, which has so far held off convening a tribunal to investigate East Timor, said the amendment might lead it to reconsider.

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Long Nomads, the Inuit Find a Settled Life Unsettling By JAMES BROOKS IQALUIT, Nunavut, Aug. 29 - In this brand new territory, where new government buildings rise on nameless muddy streets, people had barely learned that the former speaker of the legislature had been convicted of sexual assault when they heard today that their education minister had been charged with beating up a woman. This dual attack on the pride of this 17-month-old territory seemed to highlight the rocky cultural transition of the Inuit, who compose 85 percent of Nunavut’s 27,000 residents. Telescoping centuries of sociological change into two generations, the Inuit, known as Eskimos in Alaska and Greenland, have moved from the life of nomadic hunters who survived for centuries in one of the world’s harshest environments to a modern, sedentary life marked by snowmobiles, heated homes and satellite television. One price for this wrenching change has been Canada’s highest rate of violent crime, with one attack reported each year for every 19 residents. Last year Nunavut registered 204 sexual assaults, about 10 times the national per-capita average, and 1,115 assaults, nearly six times the national average. In the past, when attacks on women were debated, callers to radio stations sometimes criticized women’s shelters for interfering in traditional family life. Elders reminded listeners that in traditional Inuit society, a man was allowed to beat his wife if she lied to him, was unfaithful or talked too much. “Men would call in and say, ‘The shelters are ruining my marriage,’” said the wife of a territorial minister. “Older women would say: ‘I was beaten. If we talk too much, we are beaten.’” Arctic Ocean Greenland 0 Miles 300 Iqaluit NUNAVUT Coral Harbor NORTHWEST TERRITORIES CANADA SASKATCHEWAN MANITOBA Hudson Bay ONTARIO QUEBEC The New York Times Iqaluit, the tiny capital, is mired in mud and rapid social change. Closeness breeds violence, especially against women. But now younger Inuit, separated by a generation or more from the harsh life of surviving in a wilderness of snow and ice, are saying Inuit should adapt their relations to their new lives in houses and villages. “We as an Inuit nation need to sit down and reflect,” said Simona Arnatsiaq, women’s program coordinator of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association. “There has been so much change in 50 years. We used to live as families in camps. Now we live in settled communities. We have to discuss getting along in large groups.” Across this vast territory, three times the size of Texas, alcoholism, high

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unemployment and crowded housing contribute to high rates of sexual assault. Noting that there are two people per room in the territory, twice the national average, Ann Roberts, the chief medical officer, said, “With the drinking, the ennui, the crowded housing stock - this is the recipe for sexual assault.” For territorial legislators, who have some of the highest-paying jobs in the Arctic, the problem may stem from alcohol mixed with domineering attitudes about women. But even with two members now charged in cases of violence against women, there has been mostly silence from the 19-member Legislative Assembly, 18 of whom are men. Although women across Nunavut have started signing protest petitions, there has been little public reaction from Peter Kattuck, the minister responsible for the status of women. From Rankin Inlet, Nunavut’s second-largest town, Evelyn Thordarson, director of the women’s shelter, said of members of the Assembly, “When you go, you take an oath to serve the people, not to harm the people, not to break the law.” Last March, in the first blow to the Assembly, the police arrested Levi Barnabas, the 36-year-old speaker, and charged him with sexual assault. According to the police, Mr. Barnabas, after a night of heavy drinking, tried to have sex with a friend’s wife at a house here. The woman resisted and woke up her husband, who chased the legislator into the street, hitting him three times with a baseball bat. Two weeks ago, Mr. Barnabas was found guilty and received a one-year jail sentence, which was suspended on the condition that he pay $1,000 to the women’s shelter here, perform 240 hours of community service and stay out of Iqaluit’s two bars for six months. Under pressure from the Assembly’s leaders, Mr. Barnabas resigned his seat. But the politician, who has represented Canada’s northernmost Arctic villages for the last five years, before and after the creation of Nunavut, soon announced that constituents were urging him to run in the special election for his seat. “With the Levi Barnabas case, people are seeing this and asking: ‘What is the point of bringing charges? He only got community hours,’” Ms. Thordason said. Newspaper editorialists say the Assembly, through its silence, is sending out a message of male impunity. “The male-dominated legislature has been strangely silent over the issue,” News North Nunavut, a weekly, wrote in an editorial Monday. “The government had a golden opportunity to take a stand against violence directed at women. Their silence trivialized the severity of Barnabas’s crime.” But this week’s case may make addressing the issue of violence against women unavoidable. On Saturday, Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers arrested James Arvaluk, 52, the education minister, and charged him with assault. The police say the victim was a woman at his home in Coral Harbor, about 435 miles west of here. In 1995, when Mr. Arvaluk represented that area in the legislature of the Northwest Territories, he spent time in jail after being convicted of two charges of sexual assault. “People were having trouble with him as minister of education with the sexual assault conviction,” said the wife of another minister. “Now this charge involves bringing booze into a dry community.” When the Legislative Assembly resumes session in mid-October, Ms. Amatsiaq said, the first order of business should be to set an example by adopt-

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ing a code of ethics and a policy of zero tolerance among members for assaults on women. Associated Press Berenson Is Taken to Lima for a New Trial Lori Berenson is escorted by officers to the airport in Arequipa, Peru, on her way to Lima, where she will get a new trial. The New Yorker has been jailed since 1996 when a military court convicted her of treason.

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A14 L + K NATIONAL REPORT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 THE NEW YORK TIMES Drought Devastates Rural Texas Economy Ranchers Are Reeling; Cities May Be Next By ROSS E. MILLOY LOCKHART, Tex., Aug. 31 - At the weekly livestock auction on the outskirts of town, there is something in the air even heavier than the dust and stench: fear of the devastation this summer’s drought is bringing. “We’re hurting all right, and it may get to be a lot worse before it gets any better,” said M. M. Pogue, a cattle rancher from Lytton Springs near this Central Texas stopping point on the Chisholm Trail, 25 miles southeast of Austin. Mr. Pogue, who can tick off the memorable droughts of his 84 years as easily as some might list their Selling cattle because food and water are scarce. children’s names, said this summer’s drought may turn out to be one of the worst. “A lot of people are going to be knocked right out of the cattle business by this one,” he said. This summer’s record stretch of 62 days without rain in North Texas, after four years in which some areas of the state have had almost no appreciable rain, has left thousands of acres of crops wasted, dried up lakes and helped spark 650 fires. “We are in the midst of an unmitigated disaster,” said Allen Spelce, a spokesman for the Texas Department of Agriculture, “and it has been accumulating in magnitude over the last five years.” It is little better in much of the South and West. The Great Plains and the Southeast have been baking in 100-degree temperatures this week, fires are destroying tinder-dry forests in most Western states and Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and North Florida continue to suffer from drought, despite intermittent rain. Bill Proensa, director of the National Weather Service’s Southern regional office in Fort Worth, said there was little hope of immediate relief. More than 89 people have died from the heat nationwide, Mr. Proensa said, 52 of them in Texas. “We’re seeing record temperatures and record series of consecutive high temperatures in many places,” he said, citing Wednesday’s record of 111 degrees at Little Rock, Ark. But Texas is bearing the brunt of the drought, he said. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, the temperature was 100 or higher in 39 of the last 60 days, Mr. Proensa said. “The only thing that will help us now is a hurricane,” he said, “an there’s no sign of one of those in the forecast.” In Texas and adjacent states, 177 counties have been declared disaster areas for crop losses so far by the federal Department of Agriculture, and state officials predict those losses, currently calculated at $595 million for Texas alone, will soar past a billion dollars by year’s end. Droughts since 1996 have cost Texas farmers and ranchers over $5 billion, Mr. Spelce said.

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North Texas today blew past a 66-year-old record by posting 62 consecutive days without rain, eclipsing-even the notorious drought of 1950 and the “Dust Bowl drought” of 1934. And, as lake levels continue to drop, at least three power plants in West Texas warned customers that they may be forced to shut down because there would not be enough water to cool the plants’ electricity generating equipment unless the area gets rain soon. “This is an uncommon event and a very real danger,” said Jim Calloway, a senior engineer with the Texas Public Utilities Commission. Associated Press Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman, holding a watermelon, joined a family farm, from right, Bryson Gentry, Jimmy Genty and Samie Erwin, on Tuesday in looking at drought damage at their field near Boyd, Tex. “There’s a definite possibility that we’ll have to shut those plants down if we don’t get rain by November.” Power to those served by the plants, Mr. Calloway said, could be provided from other sources in Texas, but at a potentially higher cost. In parched Central Texas, reduced water levels in the Edwards Aquifer have cut flows to Comal Springs, the state’s largest spring, to the point that endangered species of fish are threatened. At the popular Jacob’s Well spring midway between Austin and San Antonio, which has never been known to go dry, water flow has been cut from a normal 75 gallons per second to less than 7 gallons per second. “The canary in the coal mine is on its back, kicking its legs up in the air,” said David Baker, who lives near Jacob’s Well. In Georgia, the drought is ravaging the state’s thirsty cities and farms in the northern and central parts of the state. David Stooksbury, the state climatologist, estimates that it will take two winters of normal rainfall to replenish aquifers, rivers, creeks, ponds, and reservoirs and to saturate the soil depths needed to nurture crops and lawns. At least 721 wells have run dry in southwest Georgia this summer. Last year only a few were reported dry in the same region, said Mel Jones, an environmentalist for the state health agency. A statewide survey found approximately 23 cities, primarily in northern Georgia, face critical water shortages, said Harold Reheis, director of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Many have a water supply of only 30 days or less. In Carrollton, approximately 50 miles southwest of Atlanta, Lewis Mason, water plant superintendent, said, “We estimate we’ve got around 60 to 65 days of water left. We’re obviously on a total ban - no outside watering or anything like that.” Crop losses in Texas and Georgia have been staggering. By midsummer the drought had already damaged approximately 39 percent or an estimated $738 million in the Georgia’s corn, cotton, peanuts, soybeans, tobacco, pecans and forage crops, said Charles McPeake of the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service. Texas officials say cotton, grain, and wheat losses already top $425 million. But with pastures scorched, and stock tanks reduced to mud puddles, it is the cattlemen who seem to be suffering the most. Miguel Carrillo, at the Lockhart auction with his father to sell 20 cows, said

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he just could not afford to feed them through the winter. “Our hay crop never really made this year,” Mr. Carrillo said, “and all our fields are burned to a crisp. We’ve got to sell now or go broke later.” Mike Alonzo, a cattle rancher near here, said: “If you’ve got water but no feed, you can haul feed. If you’ve got feed but no water, you can haul water. But if you don’t have feed or water, the way it is with this here drought, you’re in big trouble.” Fires Not Caused by Reduced Logging, Congressional Report Finds Associated Press Firefighters in the Custer National Forest in Montana got some mild relief yesterday with light rain, high humidity and lower temperatures. By TIMOTHY EGAN There appears to be no link between reduced logging on national forests over the last decade and the wildfires now raging through much of the West, a report by a bipartisan research group for Congress has found. If anything, heavy logging from earlier years may have contributed more to the conditions that have made Western forests ripe for big fires, because more flammable small trees and heavy brush are often left in the forest after the larger stands of timber have been taken out, said the report, by the Congressional Research Service, which analyzes policy for Congress. Over the last month, Western Republicans, and Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois, have said that logging reductions under the Clinton administration have been a cause of fires that have burned more than six million acres this year. Logging in national forests has been reduced by more than 75 percent since 1989. Speaking in Oregon earlier this month, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, the Republican presidential nominee, said Clinton administration policies that restricted logging “made the forests more dangerous to fire,” although he did not blame the president for the fires. But some of the years with the most fires over the last two decades were those in which logging was at record high levels, the report states. “Timber harvesting removes the relatively large diameter wood that can be converted into wood products, but leaves behind the small material, especially twigs and needles,” wrote Ross W. Gorte, author of the report. “The concentration of these ‘fine fuels’ on the forest floor increases the rate of spread of wildfires.” The report was done at the request of Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, but it was conducted by the agency that analyzes policy for all of Congress. Some Republicans who have linked Clinton forest policies to the fires say the report is not conclusive enough to determine policy. “It presents a mixed picture,” said Gov. Marc Racicot, Republican of Montana. “This year is the lowest ever for timber harvesting and it could be the worst fire year in decA political debate swirls around the cause of wildfires. ades.” Next week, the Clinton administration plans to release its recommendations on how to manage more than 40 million acres that are considered to be at extreme risk of wildfires. “These fires are being used by both the timber industry and envi-

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ronmentalists,” Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt said. “One side says in ‘ crease logging; the other side says no logging, even thinning. Neither position is the accurate way to ad-dress forest health problems.” Mr. Babbitt said the commercial logging program for national forests would not play a significant role in the plan to be presented next week. The plan will try to restore forest health through controlled bums and some thinning, and try to get people who live in forested areas that are high-fire risks to clear the hazards near their homes, he said. The report looked at logging and fires for each of the last 20 years. The years in which there was the highest volume of logging - 1987 and 1988 - were also years in which the highest number of acres of national forest lands burned. The report does not address this year, when logging has been at a historic low, and the fires are at near-record highs. “The assertion has been that we’re getting more acres burned as we have reduced the timber harvesting levels,” Mr. Gorte said in an interview. “In fact, for the most part, we were getting fewer acres burned.” In the West, 77 large fires were burning 1.6 million acres on Thursday, but forecasters held out hope for residents and firefighters as their predictions called for rain and cooler temperatures across the northern Rockies through Monday. The fires have been at the heart of a clamorous debate in the West. On Tuesday, on the day that Vice President Al Gore made a campaign stop in Oregon, a number of groups that favor more logging took out full-page advertisements in the state, blaming the vice president for the fires. Senator Gordon H. Smith, Republican of Oregon, has been critical of Mr. Clinton’s timber policies, saying forest neglect and mismanagement have contributed to the fires. “If you look at things on a short-term basis, we could concede some of the points made in this report,” said Joe Sheffo, a spokesman for Mr. Smith. “But the fact is we have a cumulative problem. And the Clinton administration has known about it for years.” A.C.L.U. Will Defend Group That Advocates Legalizing Sex Between Men and Boys By DON TERRY The American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts has decided to defend a group that advocates legalization of sex between men and boys in a $200 million federal lawsuit brought by the family of a murdered boy. “It’s not a real popular case,” John Roberts, the executive director of the Massachusetts A.C.L.U., said yesterday. “But the First Amendment issues are clear.” Last May, the parents of the boy, 10-year-old Jeffrey Curley, sued the North American Man/Boy Love Association in Federal District Court, charging that the group’s Web site and literature had incited the killing and attempted sexual assault of their son three years ago in East Cambridge, Mass. The child, who was lured into a car by the promise of a new bicycle, was missing for several days before his body was found in a tub of concrete in a river. Two neighbors, Salvatore Sicari and Charles Jaynes, were convicted of kidnapping and murder and are serving life sentences. Lawrence Frisoli, the lawyer for the boy’s parents, said Mr. Jaynes was a

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member of the group, known as Nambla, and just before the murder was emboldened by its Web site. “This lawsuit isn’t about money,” Mr. Frisoli said yesterday. “Jeffrey’s parents are doing this to ensure that it never happens to someone else’s child.” Mr. Roberts and other A.C.L.U. officials said Nambla did not advocate the rape and murder of children. It advocates changing the law to make sex between men and boys legal, and political advocacy, Mr. Roberts said, is protected speech. “Regardless of whether people agree with or abhor Nambla’s views,” the A.C.L.U. said in a statement yesterday, “holding the organization responsible for crimes committed by others who read their material would gravely endanger our important First Amendment freedoms.” The A.C.L.U. said, “We join with all others in deploring the heinous crimes committed against Jeffrey Curley,” adding, “those who commit illegal acts can be punished for wrongful conduct. “But the expression of even offensive ideas is protected by the Constitution,” the A.C.L.U. said. Mr. Frisoli said Nambla’s activities passed “far beyond free speech.” “We allege an ongoing criminal conspiracy for the rape of children in America,” he said. “They’ve been hiding behind the First Amendment for a long time.” Last week in a Massachusetts state court, in a suit against the two men who were convicted of killing their son, the boy’s parents were awarded $328 million, one of the largest wrongful death verdicts in Massachusetts history, Mr. Frisoli said. Now, the family hopes a federal jury will do the same. “I respect the A.C.L.U., and on most occasions I agree with the positions they take,” he said. “But we’re not talking about gay rights. We’re not talking about consensual sex between adults. We talking about the rape of children.” The A.C.L.U. office in Boston was deluged with phone calls yesterday, mostly from the news media. “The threats haven’t started yet,” said Harvey Silverglate, a board member. “That usually comes a day later. But the phones haven’t stopped ringing. I find it extraordinary that people find what we’re doing extraordinary. You’d think by now that people would know that we take the Supreme Court seriously when it says that the First Amendment is there to protect unpopular speech.” Some Suspects In Spying Not Prosecuted Affidavits Unsealed In Lab Secrets Case By JAMES STERNGOLD LOS ANGELES, Aug. 31 - A federal court today made public affidavits filed by lawyers for the former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee in which two former intelligence officials said they were aware of instances in which government employees had been caught in serious cases of espionage but not prosecuted. The defense has introduced the statements in its efforts to prove that Dr. Lee, who has been indicted on charges that he illegally downloaded a wealth of nuclear weapons secrets with the intent of helping a foreign country, was unfairly singled out for prosecution because of his race. Dr. Lee, 60, a naturalized American citi-

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zen, was born in Taiwan and, although he is not accused of spying, he was initially investigated on suspicions he had passed secrets to China. The defense has previously released statements in which government intelligence officials said that Dr. Lee had been unfairly targeted because of concerns that because he was of Chinese descent he might be inclined to commit espionage for China. The fact that Dr. Lee was born in Taiwan, a strident enemy of the People’s Republic of China, had been ignored, they said. The affidavits released today go further, though, by providing details of serious espionage cases in which admitted spies apparently escaped criminal prosecution altogether. Robert Vrooman, the former head of counterintelligence at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where Dr. Lee worked, provided one affidavit. Mr. Vrooman, who has since retired from Los Alamos and who was reprimanded for not pursuing Dr. Lee more vigorously, disclosed for the first time an intelligence investigation code-named “Buffalo Slaughter.” In this investigation, he wrote, sometime in the late 1980’s a person working at an Energy Department laboratory was caught after having passed secrets to a foreign country. “That individual was granted full immunity in return for agreeing to a full debriefing on the information that he passed,” Mr. Vrooman said. That person, he added, was not of Chinese origin. The second affidavit unsealed today was by Charles E. Washington, the former acting head of counterintelligence at the Department of Energy. Mr. Washington, who still works at the department as an international policy analyst, said that while he was head of counterintelligence he read an administrative report on the investigation of Dr. Lee and believed it “was wholly lacking in any support to identify Dr. Lee as a suspect.” Mr. Washington said that he knew of a number of department employees who were not prosecuted “for committing offenses that are much more serious than the ‘security infractions’ alleged to have been committed by Dr. Lee.” “I am personally aware of a D.O.E. employee who committed a most egregious case of espionage that cost our nation billions of dollars and drastically impacted our national defense,” he said. “That D.O.E. employee was not prosecuted.” No further details were provided. “The department aggressively pursues all such allegations,” said Natalie Wymer, an Energy Department spokeswoman, but she would not comment on the specific cases mentioned. These affidavits, unsealed today in Federal District Court in Albuquerque, follow by several days an order by the federal judge in Dr. Lee’s case, James A. Parker, in which he gave the government two weeks to hand over thousands of pages of classified internal documents to determine if there is evidence that Dr. Lee was a victim of selective prosecution. If the judge finds that that was the case, the charges against him could be dropped. In previous statements, Mr. Vrooman had disputed F.B.I. assertions that Dr. Lee had been singled out for investigation because he fit the description of a spy they were searching for. Mr. Vrooman said again in today’s affidavit that dozens of people who also met the criteria, but who were not ethnically Chinese, were not pursued. The intelligence official said that even though he had investigated Dr. Lee for years, he considered him “naïve,” but not a spy. Everything you need to know for your business day is in Business Day. The New York Times

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A15 Speed. Quality. Individual ink tanks. $99* After $50 Mail-In Rebate. (Only from Canon.) Canon BJC-3000 Color Bubble Jet™ printer High-speed printing at approx. 6ppm black / 4ppm color. High-quality printing at 1440 x 720 dpi.** Optional IS-32 Color Image Scanner Cartridge. $149-$50 Mail-In Rebate=$99. Canon Think Tank System™ saves money. Unique ink sensor alerts you when ink levels are low. Clip this rebate coupon today and save. BJC-3000 Color Bubble Jet™ Printer $50 Rebate Offer Mr./Mrs. First Name Initial Last Name Company Name Daytime Phone E-mail Address City (check one) Home Business School Government Store Where Purchased date of Purchase Address City State Zip BJC-3000 Printer Serial Number (found on outside of printer box under UPC code and inside printer next to cartridge holder): Sample of the UPC code located on the BJC-3000 printer box Sample 7 50845 72483 7 How the offer works: 1. Purchase new BJC-3000 Color Bubble Jet Printer between January 30, 2000, and September 30, 2000. 2. Completely fill out this coupon or the coupon found on our Web site: www.ccsi.canon.com. Incomplete or illegible coupons will not be processed. 3. Cut out the product UPC code (7 50845 72483 7) from the BJC-3000 printer box. 4. Attach the original or legible copy of the sales receipt showing the store name and location of where the product was purchased, date of purchase and the purchase price (circle the qualifying product) on the receipt. 5. Mail the completed coupon, original UPC code and original or legible copy of the sales receipt to: BJC-3000 Printer Rebate Offer, Dept. #22739, P.O. Box 13199, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-3199 Terms of the offer: Your envelope containing the completed coupon, original UPC code and sales receipt showing the purchase of a new BJC-3000 Color Bubble Jet Printer must be postmarked no later than October 30, 2000, and received by November 20, 2000, to qualify for the offer. All required information on the coupon must be hand printed; mechanical reproductions or labels accepted. The printer purchase must be made between January 30, 2000, and September 30, 2000, to be eligible for the BJC-3000 printer $50 mail-in rebate offer. One coupon is required for each rebate requested. Keep copies of materials

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submitted; originals submitted become Canon property and will not be returned. Allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Handwritten invoices or sales history receipts and photocopied UPC codes will not be accepted. Claims that do not comply with the terms and conditions of this offer will be rejected. Canon has the right to substantiate sales receipts. Dealers, distributors and other resellers are not eligible for this offer. Offer does not apply to purchases of refurbished or used products. Offer good in the U.S.A. on products purchased in the U.S.A. only. Void where prohibited, taxed or restricted. Canon is not responsible for lost, stolen, misdirected or undelivered mail. Not valid with any other offer. For questions regarding this offer, call 1-888-864-6781 from 6:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. EST, Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Cash value $.001. Canon KNOW HOW™ 1-800-OK-CANON www.ccsi.canon.com/3000 Get the BJC-3000 printer at: Best Buy, BigCityExpress.com, Circuit City, CompUSA, Global Computer Supplies, J&R, Micro Center, Micro Warehouse, Office Depot, Outpost.com, PC Connection, PC Richard & Son, Staples, The WIZ, TigerDirect and Viking Office Products ©2000 Canon Computer Systems, Inc. BJ, BJC, Bubble Jet, Canon Think Tank System and Canon Know How are trademarks of Canon Inc. All other products and brand names are trademarks of their respective owners. Specifications subject to change without notice. *MSRP $149-$50 Mail-In Rebate=$99. Dealer price may vary. Offer valid for a BJC-3000 printer purchased between January 30, 2000 and September 30, 2000. See mail-in coupon for details. **On Canon Specialty paper. All print speeds based on high-speed draft mode. Print speed will vary depending on system configuration, software, document complexity, print mode and page coverage.

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A16 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE SALE 12.99 REG. 14.99 Arizona tie-dyed cotton tee. Juniors’ sizes. SALE 14.99 JUNIORS’ TOPS Reg. 19.99. Energie® embroidered top. energie® Reg. 19.99 Energie® graphic tee. SALE 29.99 SHIMMERY GLIDER PANTS... INSTANT GLAM! Tops on sale, too! l.e.i. Sale 29.99 ea. Reg. $36 l.e.i. skin-print or shiny glider pants. Juniors’ sizes 1-13 Sale 19.99 Reg. 24.99 l.e.i.® glider top. Sale 12.99 Reg. 14.99. Screen-print tee. SALE 24.99 SHIRT, SWEATER, PANTS OR JEANS Sale 24.99 Reg. $32 Wearfirst® zip-off microfiber pants. Sale 24.99 Reg. 29.99 Anxious® burnout camp shirt. Cotton/polyester. S-XL Sale 24.99 Reg. 29.99 Arizona Jean Co.® waffle-knit sweater. M-XL Sale 24.99 Reg. 29.99 Muddy Blues denim utility jeans LEVIS® RED TAB™ & SILVERTAB® JEANS ON SALE SALE 39.99 JEANS Sale 39.99 Reg. $54 Levi’s® SilverTab®

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straight-leg, super deconstructed jeans. (Shown at left and on figure at right.) Levi’s® 26.99 JEANS 26.99. Levis® 505® Red Tab™ Rinsed Jeans. Regular Fit. SILVERTAB® A LEVI’S BRAND SILVERTAB® A LEVI’S BRAND JCPenney VISA MasterCard Discover Novus JCPenney® Sale prices effective 8/27-9/4, 2000 unless otherwise noted. Percentages off regular prices, as shown. Regular prices are offering prices which may not have resulted in actual sales. “Now” prices represent savings off regular prices which may vary. Any event designated as a “sale” excludes ValueRight merchandise. Merchandise selection may vary from one JCPenney store to another.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 LK A17 BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE GIRLS’ ARIZONA ON SALE SALE 9.99 TOP Sale 7.99 Reg. 11.99 Rib cotton top. S-XL for girls’ sizes 7-18 SALE 15.99 TOP Sale 15.99 Reg. 19.99 Fleece crewneck. Polyester/cotton. S-XL for girls’ sizes 7-18 SALE 15.99 CARGO JEANS Sale 15.99 Reg. 19.99. Flare-leg cotton cargo jeans. Girls’ sizes 7-16. Slims also available SALE 19.99 JEANS Sale 19.99 Reg. 24.99. Embellished flare-leg jeans. Girls’ sizes 7-16. Slims also available. A Sale 11.99 Reg. 14.99 Next Era® beaded screenprint top. S-XL for girls’ sizes 7-18 B Sale 21.99 Reg. 24.99 l.e.i.® flare-leg jeans. Girls’ sizes 7-16 Slims also available. SALE 21.99 JEANS Sale 21.99 Reg. $26 Zana di® belted flare-leg jeans. Girls’ sizes 7-16. GIRLS ROCK SALE 11.99 TOP A i. e. B l. SALE 11.99 TOP

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Sale 11.99 Reg. 14.99 Anxiety® puckered top. S-XL for girls’ sizes 7-18. SALE 21.99 L.E.I.® OR ZANA DI® FLARE JEANS SALE 12.99 JEANS D SALE 9.99 SHIRT A Z AZ AZ KIDS’ MULTIGEAR SALE ARIZONA FILLS IN THE DETAILS MULTIPOCKETS! BUNGEES! ZIPPERS! COOL FABRICS! C. Sale 9.99 Reg. 12.99 Pieced logo shirt. Boys’ sizes S-XL D. Sale 12.99 Reg. 14.99 Relaxed-fit cotton denim jeans. Boys’ sizes 8-14, including 9 and 11, regular or slim. Preschool, husky and student sizes also available. E. Sale 19.99 Reg. 26.99 Nylon microfiber cargo pants. Boys’ sizes 8-18 F. Sale 14.99 Reg. 17.99 Loose-fit cotton denim jeans. Boys’ sizes 8-14, including 9 and 11, regular or slim. Student and husky sizes also available. SALE 19.99 CARGO PANTS E SALE 14.99 JEANS F SALE 9.99 SHIRT G 7.99 TEE J SALE 17.999 JEANS K

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7.99 TEE L SALE 19.99 PANTS M G Sale 9.99 Reg. 12.99. Pieced logo shirt. Boys’ sizes S-XL. H Sale 19.99 Reg. 24.99. Cotton utility jeans. Boys’ sizes 8-20, regular or slim. J 7.99. Screenprint cotton tee. Boys’ sizes S-XL. K Sale 17.99 Reg. 19.99 Cotton carpenter jeans. Boys’ sizes 8-14, regular or slim. Preschool and husky sizes also available L 7.99. Screenprint cotton tee. Boys’ sizes S-XL M Sale 19.9 Reg. 26.99. Nylon microfiber cargo pants. Boys’ sizes 8-18 JCPenney VISA MasterCard Discover Novus JCPenney® Sale prices effective 8/27-9/4, 2000 unless otherwise noted. Percentages off regular prices, as shown. Regular prices are offering prices which may not have resulted in actual sales. “Now” prices represent savings off regular prices which may vary. Any event designated as a “sale” excludes Value Right merchandise. Merchandise selection may vary from one JCPenney store to another.

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A 18 L++ THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Save Up To 30% During Our Labor Day Sale! Its one of our best sales of the year. Up to 30% off showroom samples. Up to 20% off custom-crafted orders. Plus savings on fabrics, sofa beds, decorative trim, down and more. So take a break. Visit one of our shops. And save hundreds on the sofa or chair you’ve always wanted. You’ve earned it! Sale ends soon! CLASSIC SOFA NEW YORK CITY 5 WEST 22ND. ST. (212)620-0845. OPEN EVERYDAY 10-6. TUES. & THUR. 10-8, SUN 12-5 GREENWICH, CT 70 EAST PUTNAM AVE. (203)863-0005. OPEN MON. TO SAT. 10-6 RIDGEWOOD, NJ 125 EAST RIDGEWOOD AVE. (201)447-5800. OPEN MON. TO SAT. 10-6, TUES. & THUR. 10-8 MANHASSET, LI 1900 NORTHERN BLVD. OPEN MON. TO SAT. 10-6, TUES. & THUR. 10-8 www.classicsofa.com PUBLIC NOTICE - PUBLIC NOTICE - PUBLIC NOTICE URGENT NOTICE - 3 DAYS ONLY ESTATE AUCTION OF HIGH INTERNATIONAL MERIT AND VALUE Received now for liquidation at Nominal Bid, Or No Reserve Don’t miss this outstanding opportunity to attend this Auction, offering the most magnificent collection of fine art, Antique furniture and reproduction, 19th & 20th Century. French, English, and Italian Furniture, Dining Table With 12 Chairs, Art Deco Bedroom sets, Clocks, Bohemia Crystals, Old and modem oil paintings. Bronzes, Hand made Persian & Oriental Rugs from 2 x 3 to 12 x 18, Palace size part-silk Persian 13 x 20. Hundreds of unusual Porcelain, Collectibles, and much more. Sat. Sept. 2nd At 1:00 PM Sun. Sept. 3rd At 1:00 PM Mon. Sept. 4th At 1:00 PM VIEWING BEGINS 1 HOUR PRIOR TO EACH SALE 187 Brinkerhoff Court, Englewood NJ DIRECTIONS: From George Washington Bridge Take Palisades Interstate Parkway North to Exit 1, Englewood Cliffs. At end of ramp, make right onto Palisade Ave. Go through light and continue west on Palisade Ave, at fourth light, make right onto Lydecker St. Woman’s Club is at the first corner, at Lydecker and Brinckerhoff, SELL YOUR ESTATE HOUSE AND CONTENTS THROUGH AUCTION, ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. ERRORS AND OR OMISSIONS. ITEMS FROM THE ABOVE COLLECTIONS. ET. AL. NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS. TERMS: CASH, VERIFIED CHECK, AMEX, VISA, MC., DISC. DINERS. 10% BUYER’S PREMIUM WWW.METROPOLITANANTIQUE.COM AUCTION CONDUCTED BY METROPOLITAN ANTIQUES THE TOURNAMENT TENNIS SALE racquets, clothing, bag & shoes

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Paragon® 18th & Broadway Est. 1908 PARAGON SPORTS® 867 Broadway at 18th St., N.Y.C. 10003 (212) 255-8036 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 - 8:00 Sun. 11:00 - 6:30 Phone, Internet Orders Accepted 7 Days A Week www.paragonsports.com PARIS HIGH FASHION SHOES MILAN for PROBLEM FEET We cordially invite you to preview our new Collection of fashion shoes, sandals, and boots hand-crafted in Europe, designed with comfort in mind. Our shoes are made to accommodate orthotics. DRAMATIC RELIEF for PROBLEM FEET Our custom-made foot orthotics and shows can alleviate aches and pains caused by improper support. Designed for dress, casual, and athletic footwear. 24-hour service available. YORKE FASHION COMFORT CENTRE 140 East 55th Street, New York, NY 10022 call for free catalog 1-800-746-3397 www.comfortable-shoes.com . www.bunions.com Use of Illegal Drugs Is Down Among Young, Survey Finds By DAVID STOUT WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 - The use of illegal drugs by youths aged 12 to 17 dropped sharply from 1997 to 1999, the federal government said today. And while drug use among people 18 to 25 went up, it was still far below what it had been 20 years ago. The trend among those 12 to 17 is the most important finding of the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, said Dr. Donna E. Shalala, the secretary of health and human services, and Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, director of the White House office on drug control policy. Both officials said that nationwide educational and preventive efforts were working, especially among the young. “Most of our young people are obviously getting the message that drugs are not the stuff of dreams, but the stuff of nightmares,” Dr. Shalala said. General McCaffrey said: “Watch this population. It’s cheaper to deal with them now than when they enter the criminal justice system.” The study found a 21 percent drop from 1997 to 1999 among those 12 to 17 who said they had used an illegal drug in the month before they were surveyed. That is, 9 percent of those 12 to 17 reported using an illicit drug in 1999 compared with 11.4 percent in 1997.

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The use of marijuana in that age group showed a steeper decline than overall drug use, declining by 26 percent. While 9.4 percent of the young people surveyed in 1997 said they had used marijuana in the preceding month, only 7 percent of those surveyed last year said they had. Since marijuana remains the most popular illicit drug among youths, the officials said that they found its decline in popularity encouraging. But the survey results among people 18 to 25 - who are among those most likely to commit crimes - showed a worsening problem, at least recently. Use of illicit drugs by that group rose 28 percent in two years; that is, 14.7 percent reported drug use in 1997, compared with 18.8 Susana Raab for The New York Times Donna E. Shalala discussing a new survey on drug use yesterday. Evidence that drug education and prevention efforts are working. percent in 1999. A statement issued with the findings predicted that those in the 18-to-25 group, “which includes many of those who formed their attitudes about drug use and began to use them in the early 1990’s,” will continue to use drugs at a relatively high rate as they age. A far higher percentage of people who were in the 18-to-25 group two decades ago were drug users, government data released today showed. About 38 percent in that age group used illegal drugs in 1979. The percentage declined steadily to just under 15 percent in the mid-1990’s before climbing again. The change in the 12-to-17 group is less stark. About 16 percent reported UPDATE Mixed Signs on Drug Use A new survey on drug use by Americans shows a decline among those aged 12 to 17, but an increase in those aged 18 to 25. Before 1991, the survey was not taken consistently every year. Percentage who reported using illegal drugs* in the past month 18 to 25 12 to 17 26 to 34 35 and older All Americans, aged 12 and over 40% 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 ‘79 ‘85 ‘88 ‘91 ‘93 ‘95 ‘97 ‘99 *includes marijuana and hashish, cocaine, inhalants, hallucinogens (including

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ecstasy), heroin or any psychotherapeutic prescription drug used non-medically. Source: National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, Department of Health and Human Services The New York Times using illegal drugs in 1979. The percentage declined until 1992, when it began a see-saw pattern. For the total population aged 12 and older, the rate of illicit drug use has remained flat for several years. The government estimated that 14.8 million Americans, or 6.7 percent of those 12 and older, had used drugs in the month before they were surveyed. In 1979, the percentage was roughly twice as high. The annual survey released today was done by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, headed by Dr. Nelba Chavez, in Dr. Shalala’s department. Previous surveys relied on a sample of about 18,000 people who were questioned in person or through paper forms. The latest survey used the old methodology and a new, computer-based questionnaire that expanded the sample size to almost 70,000 people. In this way, Dr. Shalala and General McCaffrey said, they can reliably gauge the latest trends while establishing a more comprehensive base of data for future studies. Detailed findings from the study are available at www.samhsa.gov on the Internet. The government noted that the latest study did not cover active-duty military personnel, people in prison or drug-treatment centers or homeless people not in shelters when the survey was conducted. Alaska had the highest rate of illicit drug use (10.7 percent of those aged 12 and older) and Virginia the lowest (4.7 percent). The rate among American Indians and Alaska Natives was 10.6 percent. For blacks, it was 7.7 percent, and for whites, 6.6 percent. Asian-Americans had the lowest rate, 3.2 percent. The survey is a cornucopia of information, and not just on illegal drugs. It estimates that 6,400 people tried marijuana for the first time in 1998. That year, an estimated 1.6 million people - half younger than 18 - took up cigarette smoking. And 4.9 million tried cigars for the first time in 1998, up from 1.5 million new cigar smokers in 1991. “We have a long way to go,” Dr. Shalala said, “miles to go in our journey to a drug free America.” Federal Agents Posed as Photographers to Trick Skinheads COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho, Aug. 31 (AP) - Federal agents posed as members of the news media to take pictures of neo-Nazi skinheads gathered this week to support the Aryan Nations at the trial of a lawsuit against them. The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department revoked credentials issued to seven people late Wednesday after learning they were undercover agents for the F.B.I. and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. Capt. Ben Wolfinger of the Sheriff’s Department had initially directed the agents to obtain media passes so they could blend in with photographers covering the trial. But after a reporter complained, Sheriff Rocky Watson revoked media credentials for the undercover agents, who were on the scene wearing photographers’ vests, glasses, hats and camera equipment.

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“I was surprised it became an issue,” Captain Wolfinger said. Officials of the Federal Bureau of Investigation did not immediately return telephone messages. Representatives of the firearms bureau were at the trial to help inspect packages for possible explosives, said Tony Woo of the agency’s Seattle office. Asked if any of the agents were posing as journalists, Mr. Woo said, “On that I would have no comment.” “There are numerous investigative techniques we are deploying out there,” he said. The skinheads, many carrying Aryan Nations banners, have gathered outside the Kootenai County Courthouse each day since the trial began on Monday in District Court. Security is heavy. SWAT teams patrol the grounds and escort trial participants, while bomb-sniffing dogs and metal detectors are used to detect weapons because law enforcement officers have concerns about a possible terrorist attack. Because of those concerns, reporters were required to obtain new photo-ID badges from the sheriff’s office, and access to the courtroom has been tightly controlled. Two people - Victoria Keenan and her son Jason - are suing the white supremacist group and its officers for damages stemming from a 1998 confrontation in which they were assaulted and shot at by Aryan Nation security guards. The civil rights lawyer Morris Dees is using the lawsuit in an effort to bankrupt the Aryan Nations. Members of the news media said it was a bad idea for law officers to pose as journalists. The Society of Professional Journalists may protest the agents’ ruse, said Kyle Niederpruem, the organization’s national president. “No law enforcement officer should ever pose as a media person,” said Ms. Niederpruem, city editor for The Indianapolis Star. Reporters have enough trouble gaining public trust without having people “worried that the reporter knocking on their door” might be an F.B.I. agent, she said. National News Briefs Interior Dept. Reviews Ties With Boy Scouts WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (AP) - Citing a presidential order against discrimination, the Interior Department said it was reviewing some of its ties to the Boy Scouts of America because of the group’s ban on gays. The department asked the Justice Department for advice on dealing with the Boy Scouts in light of an executive order in June barring federal involvement in educational and training programs with any group that discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation. That request prompted a mid-August memorandum that was widely circulated in the department seeking details of “all activities, events and programs” involving the Boy Scouts to determine whether they conflicted with the executive order. Word of the review was criticized today by Republicans in Congress. “The Boy Scouts are not a hate group,” said Representative J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, chairman of the House Republican Conference. An Interior spokesman, ion Wright, said the department did not intend to sever its ties with the scouts. The memorandum was part of an effort to clarify how the executive order might affect the relationship, Mr. Wright said. The department helps scouts obtain conservation merit badges, and scouts

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often help clean up campgrounds and trails. Legionnaires’ Disease Linked to Potting Soil ATLANTA, Aug. 31 (AP) - At least two people in the Northwest are believed to have contracted Legionnaires’ disease from potting soil in the first such cases reported in the United States, the federal government said today. A third case of the disease, involving a California man who died in May, may also have been connected to potting soil, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. A rare strain of bacteria that causes the disease infected a woman in Oregon and another in Washington in May. Both had worked with everyday gardening soil within 10 days of their first Legionnaires’ symptoms, and the bacterial strain was found in soil they had used, the centers said. The strain, Legionella longbeachae, also infected the California man, but government scientists said they could not be sure he contracted it from potting soil. Potting soil has previously been blamed for outbreaks in Australia and Japan. The government cautioned that it was too early to question the safety of potting soil or recommend precautions for using it. Bond Hearing Halted In Palestinian Case BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 31 (AP) - A judge granted a motion today to halt bond proceedings in the case of a Palestinian immigrant being held as a suspected terrorist. The immigrant, Mazen Al-Najjar, has been jailed for three years without charges on the basis of secret evidence. His bond hearing today was stopped so a federal judge can rule on the handling of that evidence. The former instructor of Arabic at the University of South Florida is seeking to be released while he appeals a deportation order. The Immigration and Naturalization Service arrested him in May 1997 after the order was issued. At issue is whether a judge should review the secret evidence before giving Mr. Al-Najjar’s attorney, David Cole, a chance to see a summary. A conference call with the immigration judge and lawyers is scheduled for Sept. 18. The decision came one day after a federal agent acknowledged that the government lacks direct evidence that Mr. Al-Najjar had raised money for a terror group or had helped organize any violence. Many States Lack Funds For Monitoring Insurers WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (AP) - About three-quarters of Americans live in states whose insurance departments do not meet minimum standards of funding to oversee the insurance industry, the Consumer Federation of America said today as it released a nationwide survey. Consumers in Arizona, Georgia, Indiana, Nevada, South Dakota, Tennessee and Utah are getting the least supervision of insurance companies, the survey found. The District of Columbia, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon and Wyoming - representing 17 percent of the population - had the best-funded insurance departments, the survey found. Alaska, Delaware, Illinois, Nebraska, New Jersey, the United States Virgin Islands and Vermont - representing another 9 percent - met a minimum funding standard.

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To meet that standard, as defined by Consumer Federation, a state’s insurance department budget must equal at least 10 percent of the tax revenues collected by the state from insurance premiums paid by residents. About 2 percent or 3 percent of premium payments go to states. Independent Counsel Closes Arkansas Office WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (Reuters) - The independent counsel Robert W. Ray, who last month formed a new grand jury to hear more evidence about President Clinton’s handling of the Monica Lewinsky affair, announced today that he was closing his office in Little Rock, Ark., Effective immediately. The closing “represents the tangible end” to Arkansas phase of the investigation, Mr. Ray said in a statement released by his office. The Little Rock office had played an important role in investigating the Whitewater land deal, a failed Arkansas real estate venture of Bill and Hillary Clinton that was linked to the collapse of state-chartered thrift Madison Guaranty. That inquiry ended last year. Mr. Ray said all records from the Arkansas office had been transferred to the Washington area to ease completion of the investigation, which is now focused on any perjury committed by the president in the Lewinsky scandal. Shark Kills Florida Man Swimming Off Backyard ST. PETE BEACH, Fla., Aug. 31 (AP) - A man swimming in shallow water a few feet from his backyard was killed by a shark on Wednesday in the Intracoastal Waterway. The man, Thadeus Kubinski, 69, was dead by the time emergency workers arrived, the St. Pete Beach fire chief, Fred Golliner, said. Mr. Kubinski’s son Edward said his mother, Anna, told him that she and Mr. Kubinski had gone swimming in 5 feet of water about 10 feet off their dock in Boca Ciega Bay. Mrs. Kubinski said she noticed her husband struggling and leaped out of the water to seek help. She told another son, Richard, that she saw a dorsal fin, “like the Jaws situation.” Mr. Kubinski suffered wounds from his armpit to his thigh. Edward Kubinski said his parents frequently swam in the shallow waters behind their home, where they have lived since 1984 after retiring from Enfield, Conn. The authorities said they rarely, if ever, had seen sharks in the Intra-costal Waterway.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A19 A first, but very important step in the right direction. We’ve reached a tentative agreement with our pilots, and we’re optimistic that we’ll soon be back to what we do best—bringing people together. The past few months have been difficult for United customers and employees alike. We’re grateful to everyone for their patience during this period of uncertainty. Nothing would make us happier than to get things back on track. We want you to know that we’re working tirelessly to reach fair agreements with all our employees. Now, this company shares a single focus— winning back your confidence. And we’re committed to taking the step necessary to reach that goal. UNITED

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A20 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 “” You can quote us. The quotation of the day: noteworthy remarks daily on page 2 of The New York Times. If you aren’t already enjoying the convenience of home delivery, call 1-800NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637). New subscribers get 50% off the first eight weeks. The New York Times Expect the World® | homedelivery.nytimes.com Waco Inquiry Whistle-Blower Said to Be Facing Indictment By The New York Times AUSTIN, Tex., Aug. 31 - A federal prosecutor who warned Attorney General Janet Reno last year that Justice Department officials might have withheld evidence in the investigation of the standoff with the Branch Davidians outside Waco, Tex., may soon be indicted by prosecutors working for the special counsel, John C. Danforth. People close to the former assistant United States attorney in Waco, Bill Johnston, said today that he had been told by Mr. Danforth’s office that he would soon face charges that could include obstruction of justice and making false statements to federal investigators. Neither Mr. Johnston nor Mr. Danforth could be reached for comment. But Mr. Johnston’s lawyer, Michael J. Kennedy of New York, confirmed to The Dallas Morning News that Mr. Johnston was facing indictment. “This law office and Mr. Johnston believe that he was unfairly targeted for his frequent criticism of the U.S. government and for blowing the whistle on the government’s efforts Get new ideas on the Op-Ed Page. to mislead the public about the government’s use of pyrotechnic devices against the Branch Davidians,” Mr. Kennedy said in a written statement quoted on the newspaper’s Web site this afternoon. Last August, Mr. Johnston helped re-ignite controversy over the Waco standoff when he wrote to Ms. Reno. “I have formed the belief that facts may have been kept from you - and quite possibly are being kept from you even now, by components of the department,” he wrote. Although he remained on the government payroll for six months after sending the letter, it effectively ended his career with the federal government. He resigned in February The letter sparked further inquiry into the Waco incident that led to the deaths of about 80 people when the Branch Davidian compound burned on April 19,1993, and helped convince Ms. Reno to appoint Mr. Danforth to reopen the matter. Last month, Mr. Danforth issued his preliminary report and found that there was no evidence of a “massive conspiracy and cover-up” after the 51-day siege and that there was no evidence to support allegations that the military had played an active role in the incident. Postal Work Unfairly Maligned, Study Says By The New York Times WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 — There is far less on-the-job homicide in the Postal Service than at other workplaces, and the term “going postal” is unjustified and unfair, according to a commission formed to study aggressive behavior at the post office.

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“Going postal is a myth, a bad rap,” said Joseph A. Califano Jr., the head of the commission and the secretary of health, education and welfare in the Carter administration. “Postal workers are no more likely to physically assault, sexually harass or verbally abuse their co-workers than employees in the national work force.” Mr. Califano, the president of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, said the commission found that postal employees were only a third as likely to be victims of homicide at their jobs as other workers. The term “going postal” became common after several violent incidents involving Postal Service employees, most notably when a letter carrier fatally shot 14 co-workers and wounded 6 other employees at a post office in Edmond, Okla., in 1986. The commission did conclude, however, that there were an inordinate number of grievances and equal-employment complaints filed by postal workers and that these complaints can take years to resolve. The postmaster general, William J. Henderson, established the commission in 1998 as part of an effort to make employee relations his “No. 1 priority.” Mr. Henderson said today “Going postal is a myth, a bad rap,” says the leader of the report. that he supported the major findings of the study. Negotiations are under way with union representatives, Mr. Henderson added, to modernize the grievance system and to reduce friction between management and workers. Tension between labor and management is high, the study concluded, because of a backlog of more than 100,000 grievances. In addition, a dual compensation system, in which managers but not labor are rewarded on the basis of performance, adds to resentment among employees. Among postal workers, 37 percent said they were confident of the fairness and honesty of their managers while in the overall national work force, 60 percent said they had such confidence, the study found. The commission issued a 249-page report today, a result of two years of study costing nearly $4 million. Mr. Califano said the reputation for violence and hostile working conditions caused “unnecessary apprehension and fear” for the 900,000 postal employees who deliver roughly 3 billion pieces of mail a week. The Postal Service says that it is the nation’s second-largest civilian employer, after Wal-Mart Stores. Postal workers, the study found, are more likely than others in the work force to believe that they will be victims of violence by a co-worker; 17 percent of postal employees reported feeling this way, compared with 3 percent outside the post office. The study surveyed 12,000 postal workers and 3,000 employees in other jobs around the country. More than 300 interviews were conducted with postal managers and union representatives. One concern perhaps unique to the post office: fear of dogs. Ten percent of postal employees listed this as the thing they fear most on the job. ONLINE Forecasts and conditions for 1,500 cities are available from The New York Times on the Web: www.nytimes.com

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Weather Report Meteorology by Pennsylvania State University Vancouver 50’s Seattle Spokane Regina 70’s Winnipeg H 50’s 60’s Quebec 70’s 60’s Halifax Montreal Portland Eugene 60’s Boise Helena Billings Bismarck Fargo Minneapolis St. Paul Ottawa Toronto Burlington 80’s Albany Portland Manchester Boston 70’s San Francisco Reno 70’s Salt Lake City Casper Cheyenne 80’s Pierre Sioux Falls Omaha Des Moines Chicago Detroit Cleveland Pittsburgh Philadelphia New York Hartford Los Angeles

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70’s San Diego Fresno 80’s Las Vegas Salt Lake City 60’s Colorado Springs Denver Topeka Wichita Kansas City St. Louis 90’s Springfield Indianapolis Louisville 70’s Charleston Washington Richmond Norfolk Phoenix Tucson Santa Fe Albuquerque El Paso Lubbock H Oklahoma City 100+ Little Rock Memphis Nashville Raleigh Charlotte Columbia Atlanta 80s Jacksonville Orlando Miami Nassau Tampa 90’s Mobile New Orleans Jackson L Baton Rouge

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Houston Corpus Christi San Antonio Little Rock 100+ Honolulu 80s Hilo 90’s 80’s Monterrey Weather patterns shown as expected at 2 p.m. today. Eastern time. TODAY’S HIGHS <0 0’s 10’s 20’s 30’s 40’s 50’s 60’s 70’s 80’s 90’s 100+ Honolulu 80’s Hilo 50’s Fairbanks 60’s Anchorage Juneau COLD WARM STATIONARY COMPLEX HIGH LOW MOSTLY RAIN SHOWERS ICE FLURRIES SNOW FRONTS COLD PRESSURE CLOUDY PRECIPITATION Highlight: Precipitation DRY NEAR NORMAL MOIST DRY Percentage of normal precipitation in August 200%+ 125%-200% 75%-125% 25%-75% <25% August was exceptionally dry across much of the South and in the northern Rockies. Texas and Montana were particularly parched. Persistent onshore breezes contributed to above normal rainfall near the Middle Atlantic coast. National Forecast Unrelenting heat will cover much of the southern Plains and lower Mississippi Valley as sinking currents of air in a strong high pressure zone continue to suppress clouds. Isolated afternoon thunderstorms may form near the western Gulf of Mexico Coast. Meanwhile, cooler air will remain north of a stalled front in the northern Plains. A sluggish low pressure area surrounded by clusters of clouds and showers will continue to drift west across the eastern Gulf Coast States. Clouds and rain will be most persistent near the central and southern Appalachians where moist

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winds ascend the sloping terrain. The Northeast will remain humid with early fog yielding to areas of limited sunshine. Cool air and scattered rain will prevail over the Northwest States while the Southwest is warm with ample sunshine. FOCUS: SUMMER’S CRESCENDO In Little Rock, Ark., the heat and drought of the summer reached a peak on Wednesday. Under a cloudless sky, the mercury soared to 111 degrees, a record high temperature there. Combined with a stifling low of 83 degrees, the average daily temperature of 97 degrees was also the highest recorded in Little Rock. In addition, Wednesday was the 26th straight day without rain, the longest dry period in Little Rock weather history. Cooling showers spreading west across the Gulf States are unlikely to reach Little Rock this weekend. Metropolitan Forecast TODAY More clouds than sun High 83. Mostly cloudy skies will linger today, especially south and west of the city, as light onshore breezes continue. It will remain warm, especially in those areas that receive peeks of sunshine. Isolated showers and thunder will develop. TONIGHT Partly cloudy, muggy Low 72. It will remain warm and muggy tonight under partly cloudy skies. A few showers will linger. TOMORROW Not quite as warm High 80. Isolated afternoon showers and thunderstorms will develop as a front sags south through New England. Skies will remain mostly cloudy, keeping readings closer to seasonal values. Breezes will be light. SUNDAY Partly cloudy. Skies will again have a mixture of clouds and sunshine, although increasing breezes from the south and west will continue to supply muggy air to the region. MONDAY TUESDAY Thunder, cooler An approaching cold front will yield scattered thunder on Monday; cooler air arrives by Tuesday. 100˚ 90˚ S M T W T F S S M T TODAY Record highs 80˚ Normal highs 70˚ 60˚ Normal lows 50˚ Record lows Forecast range High

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Low Actual High Low Metropolitan Almanac In Central Park, for the 16 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday. Temperature Record high 100˚ (1953) 90˚ 80 80˚ 3 p.m. Normal high 81˚ 70 72˚ 7 a.m. Normal low 65˚ 60 50 WED. YESTERDAY Record low 50˚ (1976) 4 p.m. 12 a.m. 6 a.m. 12 p.m. 4 p.m. Avg. daily departure from normal this month -3.1˚ Avg. daily departure from normal this year -0.1 Reservoir levels (New York City water supply) Yesterday 94% Estimated normal 81%

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Precipitation (in inches) Yesterday 0.00 Record 3.76 (1911) For the last 30 days Actual 3.39 Normal 3.90 For the last 365 days Actual 49.27 Normal 47.24 LAST 30 DAYS Air pressure High 30.21, noon Low 30.17, 4 p.m. Humidity High 100%, 7 a.m. Low 72%, 3 p.m. Cooling degree days An index of power use that tracks how far the day’s mean temperature rose above 65˚ Yesterday 13 So far this month 238 So far this season (since Jan. 1) 780 Normal to date for the season 949 Air pollution Uhealthful Index Moderate Very Primary pollutant Good unheathful New York City O 18 White Plaines O 18 Hempstead S 6 Fort Lee P 83 C Carbon monoxide N Nitrogen dioxide O Ozone P Particulates / smoke S Sulfur dioxide Recreational Forecast Sun, Moon and Planets New First quarter Full Last Quarter Aug. 29 Sept. 5 Sept. 13 Sept. 20 3:37 p.m. Sun RISE 6:23 a.m. Moon R 9:50 a.m. SET 7:28 p.m. S 9:39 p.m. NEXT R 6:24 a.m. NEXT R 10:55 a.m. Jupiter S 2:03 p.m. Mara R 4:42 a.m. R 11:22 p.m. S 6:42 p.m. Saturn S 1:13 p.m. Vanua R 8:16 a.m. R 10:56 p.m. S 8:23 p.m. Boating From Montauk Point to Sandy Hook, New Jersey, out to 20 nautical miles, including Long Island Sound and New York Harbor. Winds from the south at 5 to 10 knots. Visibility of 4 miles or more, less dur-

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ing late afternoon scattered thundershowers. Wave heights will be 1 to 2 feet on the Sound, 1 to 3 feet on the ocean. High Tides The Battery 11:34 a.m. 11:53 p.m. Bridgeport 1:34 a.m. 1:57 p.m. City Island 2:17 a.m. 2:40 p.m. Fire Island Lt 11:34 a.m. 11:53 p.m. Montauk Point 10:44 a.m. 10:56 p.m. Northport 1:51 a.m. 2:15 p.m. Port Washington 2:17 a.m. 2:39 p.m. Sandy Hook 10:50 a.m. 11:05 p.m. Shinnecock Inlet 11:15 a.m. 11:32 p.m. Stamford 1:54 a.m. 2:18 p.m. Tarrytown 12:35 a.m. 1:12 p.m. Willets Point 2:13 a.m. 2:35 p.m. Beaches and Ocean Temperatures Today’s forecast Kennebunkport 82.63 Partly sunny, warm 50’s Cape Cod 79/65 Partly cloudy 60’s L.I. North Shore 79/68 More clouds than sun L.I. South Shore 78/69 Variable clouds N.J. Shore 82/69 Few showers 70’s Eastern Shore 83/71 Few showers Ocean City, Md. 83/72 Few showers Virginia Beach 85/73 Few showers 80’s Color bands indicate water temperature Much of the Atlantic Seaboard will have a mixture of clouds and sunshine again today as light onshore winds continue to direct very humid air inland. Scattered showers will develop over much of the coastal Middle Atlantic States, although most showers should be light. Skies will be brighter in New England. Cities High/low temperatures for the 20 hours ended at 4 p m. yesterday, Eastern time, and precipitation (in inches) for the 18 hours ended at 2 p.m. yesterday. Expected conditions for today and tomorrow for U.S. cities; normal temperature range for this time of year for foreign cities. C Clouds S Sun F Fog Sn Snow H Haze SS Snow showers I Ice T Thunderstorms PC Partly cloudy Tr Trace R Rain W Windy Sh Showers Not available N.Y.C. region Yesterday Today Tomorrow New York City 83/72 0 83/ 72 C 80/ 72 C Bridgeport 79/70 0.02 79/66 PC T9/ TO C Caldwell 83/68 0 83/ 68 C 78/ 69 C Danbury 82/64 0 84/ 66 PC 81/ 68 T Islip 83/69 0 78/ 66 C 77/ 67 C Newark 84/72 0 83/ TO C 80/ 71 C Trenton 84/72 0.05 82/ 70 C 83/ 70 Sh White Plains 82/70 0 82/ 69 C 79/ 69 C United States Yesterday Today Tomorrow Albany 83/66 0 86/ 69 PC 77/ 67 T Albuquerque 78/57 0.01 86/57S

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86/59S Anchorage 55/43 0 56/ 51 PC 58/ 47 Sh Atlanta 75/70 0.39 82/ 70 Sh 85/70 T Atlantic City 81/73 0.13 82173 C 82/73 Sh Austin 106/68 0 105/708 105/70S Baltimore 82/73 0.05 80/ 68 C 82/ 68 C Baton Rouge 98/75 0 99/ 76 T 98/ 76 T Billings 75/43 0 81/ 53 T 77/55 Sh Birmingham 91/70 0 89/ 70 Sh 88/ 70 C Boise 80/57 0 73/ 58 Sh 70/53 Sh Boston 86/66 0 86 / 70 PC 73/ 69 C Buffalo 86/66 0 84/ 69 PC 78/ 68 C Burlington 85/62 0 82/ 67 PC 73/61 Sh Casper 78/50 0.24 80/ 51 PC 83/ 52 PC Charleston, W.V. 82/64 0 84/ 64 C 82/ 64 C Charlotte 86/72 0.16 83/ 69 T 85/ 69 C Chattanooga 88/72 0 89/ 71 T 89/ 71 C Chicago 92/68 0 90/ 71 PC 82/ 68 PC Cincinnati 89/70 0 86 / 69 PC 84/ 69 PC Cleveland 86/66 0 85/ 67 PC 80/ 67 C Colorado Springs 72/55 0 79/ 54 PC 82/ 56 PC Columbia, S.C. 85/72 0.76 87/ 70 T 89/ 71 PC Columbus 86/66 0 85/ 68 PC 81/ 69 C Concord, N.H. 86/62 0 86/ 65 PC 73/ 66 C Dallas-Ft. Worth 106/81 0 108/79S 106/77 S Denver 65/54 0.05 82/ 54 PC 84/55S Des Moines 96/75 0 95/ 74 PC 96/72S Detroit 84/68 0 86/70 S 84/69 PC El Paso 86/63 0.01 93/ 69 PC 94/69S Fairbanks 56/37 0.03 63/ 40 R 60/ 42 C Fargo 61/53 0.94 68/ 52 C 75/ 56 PC Hartford 86/68 0 86/ 68 PC 78/ 69 C Honolulu 84/77 0 88/75 3 88/75S Houston 107/77 0 107/77 S 105/77 S Indianapolis 87/69 0 90/95 89/ 70 PC Jackson 104/77 0 98/ 72 PC 96/73 S Jacksonville 88/71 0 91/71 T 93/ 72 C Kansas City 103/73 0 103/72 S 104/72S Key West 88/75 US 90/81 PC 90/ 79 PC Las Vegas 83/66 0 86/ 65 PC 87/64S Lexington 87/68 0 83/ 68 PC 83/ 68 PC Little Rock 106/75 0 106/75 S 105/76S Los Angeles 74/66 0 74/ 65 PC 77/ 64 PC Louisville 89/70 0 86/ 70 PC 85/ 70 PC Lubbock 92/66 0 99/69S 99/68S Memphis 103/79 0 102/78S 102/77 S Miami 90/79 0.04 91/ 77 PC 90/ 78 PC Milwaukee 88/68 0 84/ 71 T 75/ 65 PC Minn.-St. Paul 86/74 0 73/ 62 C 78/ 60 PC Mobile 93/75 0 93/ 73 T 93/71 T Nashville 89/72 0 90/ 71 PC 90/ 70 PC New Orleans 97/82 0 98/ 78 T 97/ 77 T Norfolk 86/73 0.23 86/ 73 C 87/73 PC Oklahoma City 102/72 0 103/74S 103/748 Omaha 91/73 0 89/ 64 PC 92/683 Orlando 89/72 0.03 91/ 74 T 91/ 74 PC Philadelphia 84/73 0.06 84/ 72 C 84/ 72 Sh Phoenix 91/71 0 95/ 75 PC 97/73 PC Pittsburgh -81/64 0 82/65 C 82/ 68 C Portland, Ore. 67/61 0 66/55 Sh 67/52 Sh Portland, Me. 82/61 0 84/66 PC 72/66 Sh Providence 83/68 0 85/ 69 PC 76/ 69 C Raleigh 84/72 0.14 85/ 72 T 85/ 72 C Reno 80/59 0 70/ 52 Sh 72/ 45 PC Richmond 83/72 0.23 83/ 68 C 84/ 68 T Rochester 86/64 0 84/ 69 PC 76/ 66 C Sacramento 72/58 0 73/ 56 C 73/ 52 PC Salt Lake City 72/59 1.17 76/ 60 Sh 76/ 57 PC San Antonio 102/75 0 103/75 S 103/75 S San Diego 73/66 0 71/ 65 PC 74/ 65 PC San Francisco 67/59 0 68/ 58 C 68/ 56 PC San Jose 72/61 0 71/ 58 C 74/ 56 PC Seattle 64/55 0 63/51 Sh 64/ 50 Sh Shreveport 108/75 0 110/74 S 108/74S Sioux Falls 81/62 0 74/ 52 Sh 58/ 61 PC Spokane 73/46 0 66/ 48 C 59/ 45 Sh St. Louis 93/77 0 97/77 S 95/755 Syracuse 86/64 0 86/67 PC 77/ 66 C Tampa 89/75 0 90/ 76 T 90/ 76 T Toledo 87/63 0 87/65 S 83/ 67 C Tucson 87/64 0 89/66 PC 93/66S Tulsa 104/75 0 105/78 S 106/ 75 S Virginia Beach 86/73 0.30 85/ 73 C 87/ 73 PC Washington 81/73 0.06 81/ 70 Sh 83/ 72 C Wichita 103/75 0 104/72 S 106/74S Wilmington, Del. 82/73 0 84/ 72 C 84/ 72 Sh Africa Yesterday Normal Algiers 95/68 0 82/72 Cairo 90/73 0 93/70 Cape Town 62/57 008 64/46 Dakar 86/79 028 88/75 Johannesburg 76/45 0 70/45 Nairobi 78/57 0 72/52 Tunis 107/78 90/68 Asia/Pacific Yesterday Normal Auckland 62/55 0.13 59/48 Bangkok 90/77 0 90/75 Beijing 86/66 0 82/64

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Bombay 88/77 0.28 84/75 Damascus 91/61 0 95/63 Hong Kong 91/79 0.30 86/79 Jakarta 87/73 0.43 88/73 Jerusalem 87/72 0 86/61 Manila 89/77 0.71 B8/ 75 New Delhi 93/82 0.02 93/77 Riyadh 110/86 0 106/ 73 Seoul 82/77 0 84/66 Shanghai 87/75 3.43 86/72 Singapore 90/73 0.04 98/75 Sydney 69/48 0.02 64/50 Taipei 89/82 Tr 90/75 Tehran 96/84 0 93/68 Tokyo 87/81 Tr 82/70 Europe Yesterday Normal Amsterdam 68/45 Tr 66/ 59 Athens 85/68 0 88/70 Berlin 71/57 Tr 70/52 Brussels 70/48 Tr 72/54 Budapest 73/63 Tr 77/57 Copenhagen 63/48 0.04 66/ 52 Dublin 68/57 0.02 64/52 Edinburgh 60/50 0.01 63/50 Frankfurt 74/57 0 73/55 Geneva 64/61 1.61 73/55 Helsinki 67/55 0 61/50 Istanbul 82/64 0 79/64 Kiev 70/57 Tr 70/52 Lisbon 79/63 0 81/63 London 73/50 0 68/52 Madrid 86/59 0 86/61 Moscow 72/55 0 66/48 Nice 86/66 0.02 79/63 Oslo 65/50 0.16 63/46 Paris 77/55 Tr 73/54 Prague 75/54 0 70/52 Rome 85/66 0 82/64 St. Petersburg 71/57 0 64/48 Stockholm 63/46 0 63/50 Vienna 69/61 0.16 75/55 Warsaw 74/48 0 70/54 North America Yesterday Normal Acapulco 91/77 0 90/75 Bermuda 86/77 0.02 86/75 Edmonton 51/41 0.01 6B/ 41 Guadalajara 79/ 63 0 79/61 Havana 92/75 0 91/72 Kingston 92/81 0 88/77 Martinique 89/79 0.01 88/ 73 Mexico City 71/57 0 73/54 Monterrey 100/75 0 90/72 Montreal 83/66 0 73/54 Nassau 92/79 0.02 90/75 Panama City 94/77 0.08 88/75 Quebec City 71/55 0.08 70/50 San Juan 98/77 0.21 98/75 Santo Domingo 92/77 0 88/ 73 St. Thomas 87/79 0.32 90/ 77 Toronto 84/64 0 75/54 Vancouver 62/59 0 68/54 Winnipeg 61/45 0.71 70/48 South America Yesterday Normal Buenos Aires 54/41 63/45 Caracas 87/77 0.24 98/77 Lima 66/61 Tr 63/67 Quito 62/42 0 73/45 Recife 89/75 0 81/72 Rio de Janeiro 80/68 0 75/64 Santiago 69/32 0 84/ 41

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A21 YOUR SAFETY IS OUR TOP PRIORITY, “You have my personal guarantee that no one at Ford will rest until every recalled tire is replaced.” JACQUES NASSER President and CEO Ford Motor Company You’ve been exposed to a whirlwind of information about the Firestone Tire recall. If you’re still confused, that’s understandable. Ford Motor Company would like to lay out, in four simple steps, the easiest way to ensure your safety and the safety of your family. All the following information is presented in even greater detail on our website at www.ford.com. 1. Which tires are affected? All Firestone ATX and ATX IIs of P235/75R15 size P235/75R15 Firestone Wilderness AT tires produced in Firestone’s Decatur, Illinois plant NO OTHER FIRESTONE TIRES ARE PART OF THIS RECALL. Examine Your tires. To determine if your 1511 Wilderness ATs are affected, find the U.S. DOT Safety Standard Code. (Simply look under your vehicle with a flashlight. There is no need to raise the vehicle.) If the code reads DOT VDHL, your tires should be replaced. DOT Code DOT VDHL IPO The DOT code is located on the inboard sidewall of Wilderness AT tires. Inspect tire DOT code with vehicle on ground. Which vehicles are involved? ‘91 -’00 Ford Explorers ‘91 -’94 Ford Broncos ‘96-’00 Mercury Mountaineers ‘01 Ford Explorer Sport Tracs ‘91 -’00 Ford Rangers ‘94-’00 Mazda B-Series ‘91 -’94 Ford F-Series ‘91 -’94 Mazda Navajos 2. Make an appointment. If your tires are part of the Firestone recall, contact one of the following authorized replacement outlets. As of this moment, there are over 13,000 outlets nationwide. Any one of them will be happy to assist you. Ford Motor Company at www.ford.com or (800) 660-4719 Firestone at www.firestone.com Midas at www.midas.com Sunoco Ultra Service Centers at (800) 786-6261 Monro Muffler/Brake at www.monro.com Costco Wholesale Member Services at (800) 774-2678 To find the outlet nearest you, go to www.ford.com, click on the Firestone Information box and select your preferred outlet under “Locate An Authorized Replacement Center.” 3. Choose from over 30 replacement tires. To date, over a million tires have been replaced. That’s good progress, but not good enough. That’s why we’ve now gained commitments from other tire manu-

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facturers, including Goodyear, Michelin and Continental to double their production and help make replacement tires available sooner. Select tires from nine manufacturers have been approved as certified replacement tires. The complete list appears at www.ford.com. Click on the Firestone Information box and select “Recommended Replacement Tires” under Owner Information. Also, the tire professionals listed above will be familiar with these tires and can help make the selection that’s best for your vehicle. 4. Let us know if we can still help. For the latest news and information, click on www.ford.com. If you have any further questions or concerns, call us 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at (800) 6604719, or e-mail us at [email protected] Ford Motor Company

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A22 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: The Republican Offensive THE TEXAS GOVERNOR Republicans Unveil Ad That Ridicules Gore Continued From Page Al cized Mr. Gore as being a weak lead who broke promises made during the 1992 campaign, to cut taxes and prescription drug coverage. And today, in a speech at a high school in Holland, Ohio, Mr. Bush accused Mr. Gore of using “empty rhetoric” that had disillusioned young people. But this more aggressive strategy also comes at the end of a two-week period in which Mr. Gore, clearly enjoying a post-convention bounce in the polls, has forced Mr. Bush to “defend himself” on issues like tax prescription drug prices and when the candidates would be debating. Since the Democratic National Convention last month, Mr. Gore has pulled even with Mr. Bush in many national polls, and is even ahead in some swing states where he had previously trailed. For that reason, Democrats asserted today that Mr. Bush was turning negative in an effort to stanch weakening poll numbers and reinvigorate a lackluster campaign. They also accused Mr. Bush of hypocrisy, citing his pledge at the Republican National Convention in early August “to change the tone of Washington to one of civility and respect.” Douglas Hattaway, a spokesman for the Gore campaign, said Mr. Bush had “broken his own promise not to engage in personal, negative attacks.” “We’ve seen this from Bush before, in the primaries,” Mr. Hattaway added. “When his back was against the wall, he went negative on John McCain. Now he’s talked out of both sides of his mouth about changing the tone of the debate.” Mr. Bush’s aides have said they had every intention of endorsing commercials that raised questions about Mr. Gore’s ethics. But the content of such advertisements has been a subject of debate among Mr. Bush’s top advisers and among Republican officials. While campaign officials said they viewed questions about Mr. Gore’s credibility as an important part of their message, they have also been mindful of their candidate’s pledge to run a positive campaign. Just this afternoon, as the Republican Party was releasing the new commercial, Mr. Bush was telling a boisterous audience at a high school here that “politics doesn’t have to be ugly and mean.” Strategists in the Bush campaign and in the Republican Party have said that the best way to deliver a tough advertisement questioning Mr. Gore’s ethics was to use humor, so as to avoid appearing mean-spirited. “It’s a good-natured way of making a very important point,” Karen P. Hughes, Mr. Bush’s director of communications, said of the new Republican spot. “That is, the gaping credibility gap between what Vice President Gore says and what Vice President Gore does.” Political analysts were divided about whether the honey-thick sarcasm of the advertisement would help soften its negative message, or turn voters off. Ken Goldstein of the University of Wisconsin, who analyzes political advertisements, argued that a lighter touch could make a negative message more palatable. “This ad gets at what Al Gore’s weaknesses are, but it doesn’t do it in what I think some people would consider an unfair way,” Mr. Goldstein said on Political Points, a joint Webcast of ABC News and the New York Times.

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But Bill Carrick, a Democratic consultant, said the commercial would undermine what has been one of Mr. Bush’s prime selling points: his genial personality. “The guy’s biggest asset is his sunny, hopeful presentation of himself,” Mr. Carrick said. “Since the Democratic convention, the Bush people have been trying to become the very mean-spirited Republicans they have been trying to run away from.” In the spot, titled “Really,” a woman can be heard commenting on various television images of Mr. Gore. Mr. Gore is then shown standing beside Buddhist monks at the Hsi Lai Temple near Los Angeles in 1996. Mr. Gore contends he did not know the luncheon was a fund-raiser. But two Democratic fund-raisers were later found guilty for their roles in soliciting illegal campaign contributions from people, including monks, who attended the event. The woman narrator then says: “Who’s he going to be today? The Al Gore who raises campaign money at a Buddhist temple? Or the one who promises campaign finance reform?” The spot will start running on Friday in closely contested states, including Arkansas, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Similar information will be on a Web site that appears in the spot: gorewillsayanything.com. The Republican commercial that Mr. Bush ordered canceled last week featured excerpts from a six-year old interview in which a stammering Mr. Gore said President Clinton had never lied in his political career. The commercial, which was never broadcast, suggests that Mr. Gore was refusing to acknowledge that Mr. Clinton had made deceptive remarks about his relationship with a White House intern. But the advertisement was actually based on an NBC News interview in which Mr. Gore was talking about his criticism of Oliver L. North, who was then a Senate candidate in Virginia. Mr. Bush later said he objected to the commercial because Mr. Gore’s comments had been taken out of context and “had nothing to do with the affairs of the White House.” The last two weeks have been difficult for Mr. Bush. Last week, Mr. Bush acknowledged that he needed to do a better job selling his proposed across-theboard income tax cut and then struggled to provide a coherent explanation of the plan. This week, Mr. Bush’s aides had pledged he would stick to his education agenda. But almost every day, other issues have intruded to dilute his message. Still, Mr. Bush has been able to ratchet up his criticisms of Mr. Gore’s character. In two rousing speeches today Mr. Bush laced time and again into Mr. Gore’s character and credibility. “After seven and a half years of empty rhetoric, I can understand why the young of America become disillusioned,” he told 3,000 students, parents and Republican partisans at a high school in Holland. “It’s time to put somebody in office who will do in office exactly what he tells the American people he intends to do. And that is what I’m going to do should I become the president of the United States.” Stephen Crowley / The New York Times Gov. George W. Bush greeting students yesterday at Springfield High School in Holland, Ohio, after addressing a rally there. THE AD CAMPAIGN

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Revisiting Several Moments That Have Embarrassed Gore The Republican National Committee is to begin running this 30-second commercial, titled “Really,” in 16 states today. It features some of the most embarrassing aspects of Vice President Al Gore’s career, including his raising money at a Buddhist temple and his claim to have created the Internet. It is being shown in Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan’ Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin. PRODUCER Cold Harbor Films ON THE SCREEN The setting is a peach-colored kitchen, with a small television atop a counter. On the television screen Vice President Gore is seen speaking, though there is no sound, in the White House briefing room on the day he said there was “no controlling legal authority” over how he raised money in the 1996 campaign. The screen goes fuzzy and then shows Mr. Gore nodding to a Buddhist monk, who is bowing at him. The screen shows monks in saffron robes testifying under oath and then shows Mr. Gore, a near smirk on his face, speaking at the Democratic National Convention. It then shows him in a “Larry King Live” interview saying, “I took the initiative in creating the Internet.” The camera returns to the kitchen. Flashed on the screen is a Web site, gorewillsayanything.com. THE SCRIPT A female narrator says: “There’s Al Gore, reinventing himself on television again. Like I’m not going to notice. Who’s he going to be today? The Al Gore who raises campaign money at a Buddhist temple? Or the one who promises campaign finance reform? Really. Al Gore, claiming credit for things he didn’t even do.” Mr. Gore: “I took the initiative in creating the Internet.” Woman: “Yeah, and I invented the remote control, too. Another round of this, and I’ll sell my television. ACCURACY The commercial, a compendium of some of Mr. Gore’s most embarrassing public moments, uses Mr. Gore’s own words and pictures of him to suggest that he has no credibility. The statement that Mr. Gore “raises campaign money at a Buddhist temple” is technically not correct because he did not actually ask for money at the temple, but that point has been lost. The larger question is whether it is fair to link these events and cast them as Mr. Gore’s reinventing” himself. Earlier this year, Mr. Gore publicly acknowledged that he was “an imperfect messenger” on the subject of fixing the campaign The New York Times A Republican commercial showing Al Gore at a Buddhist temple, top, will run in 16 states, above. finance system, a point the commercial ignores. He has also said that he thinks his comment about the Internet was the biggest mistake of his campaign, although at the time his aides defended the claim and had various leaders in the high-tech field vouch for Mr. Gore’s involvement in legislation that helped pave the way for the Internet. SCORECARD Perhaps the most striking aspect of the commercial is the sarcastic tone of the narrator. Analysts say sarcasm is a dangerous weapon in commercials because if no actual humor is evident, sarcasm can come across as petty and malicious and turn off swing voters. The tone may also detract from the message, which seeks to exploit Mr. Gore’s vulnerability on the matter of credibility. The timing of this commercial - unusually early and coinciding with the slide of

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Gov. George W. Bush in the polls suggests a certain desperation by Republicans and an implicit assumption that negative advertising works. Whether it will prove to be a breakthrough commercial of some sort remains to be seen, but it is certainly laying the groundwork for harsher attacks to come, from both sides. KATHARINE Q. SEELYE THE REPUBLICAN RUNNING MATE Cheney Urges Rethinking Use of U.S. Ground Forces In Bosnia and Kosovo By MICHAEL COOPER FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Aug. 31 - Dick Cheney, the Republican vice-presidential candidate, called today for a re-examination of the nation’s role in peacekeeping missions around the world and said it was time to consider recalling American ground troops from Kosovo and Bosnia. “I think it is important that we make sometimes difficult choices about when we’re going to actually use military force, that we need to avoid situations where we commit troops because we can’t think of anything else to do,” said Mr. Cheney, who was the secretary of defense during the Persian Gulf war. “The difficult part is deciding what’s in our strategic interest, what’s of sufficient significance in terms of U.S. interests so its worth the commitment of resources and the potential loss of American lives. And not every problem around the world is.” Mr. Cheney made the comments after being asked by reporters today to elaborate on a speech he delivered in Atlanta on Wednesday in which he said that the military had been “overused and under resourced” during the Clinton administration. The speech drew an angry response from Vice President Al Gore’s campaign, which called Mr. Cheney’s approach “irresponsible,” and it was sharply questioned at the White House as well. Joe Lockhart, a spokesman for President Clinton, said that Mr. Cheney “now has an obligation to come forward and say which deployments he was opposed to.” “Was he against our action in Haiti?” Mr. Lockhart asked. “Was he against our action of returning peace to Sarajevo and Bosnia? Was he against reversing ethnic cleansing in Kosovo? Was he against eight years of containment of Saddam Hussein and his weapons of mass destruction? I think those are questions he should answer.” As the Bush and Gore campaigns continued to debate military preparedness today, the Pentagon released a quarterly report that found most of the nation’s combat forces ready to perform their wartime missions. “America’s armed forces remain capable” of achieving the military goals of the Clinton administration, the report stated. But the report supported Mr. Cheney’s claims that the armed forces face shortages in personnel, training problems and aging equipment. It also warned that an inadequate capability to move, protect and supply forces meant that higher casualties might occur should the United States be forced to fight two major conflicts at the same time, as called for in the national war plan. Mr. Cheney did not spell out a specific doctrine that he and Gov. George W. Bush, the Republican presidential nominee, would follow if they won the election. But he called for applying a more rigorous standard of whether United States military intervention was warranted before committing troops to the field. “Sometimes,” he said, “I think we get into a situation where we have, because of the publicity given to a particular event - you may have a real tragedy unfold-

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ing someplace in the world, but it doesn’t affect vital U.S. interests. And you have to make a decision that you’ll do whatever you can diplomatically, working through the international community or perhaps providing sustenance and medical supplies and support for humanitarian purposes, but you’re not going to commit U.S. troops to combat to deal with that particular situation. Those are choices that presidents get paid to make. They are not easy choices. If they were, they wouldn’t land on his desk.” Without addressing the merits of the Clinton administration’s initial decision to send troops into Bosnia and Kosovo, Mr. Cheney said today that it was time to consider pulling the remaining American ground troops out of the Balkans, perhaps while still keeping a small presence there to gather intelligence and help the remaining international force with logistics. “We might continue to do that,” he said. “But troops on the ground, in Europe, in the Balkans in particular, now that the crisis supposedly has passed in Bosnia and Kosovo, strikes me an appropriate role for our European friends and allies.” The Gore campaign was quick to note that the United States has already sharply scaled back the number of troops it has on the ground in the Balkans. Kym Spell, a Gore campaign spokeswoman, said American troops accounted for 14 percent of the force in Kosovo and 18 percent of the force in Bosnia. “Dick Cheney’s approach would be irresponsible,” Ms. Spell said “It would leave our allies in the lurch, erase the progress we’ve made toward peace, and only cost the United States in the long run.” Associated Press Dick Cheney campaigned yesterday in Lake Worth, Fla. The one deployment that Mr. Cheney said he disagreed with was the mission in Haiti in 1994, but he did not specify why. The Clinton administration sent 20,000 troops into Haiti as part of an international force that restored to power the country’s democratically elected president after he was ousted in a military coup. About 75 American troops remain in Haiti today, on a temporary mission to provide humanitarian aide. Ms. Spell said the vice president stood by the administration’s decision to send troops to Haiti. “We went into Haiti to begin the process of defeating a dictator and restoring a democratically elected president,” Ms. Spell said. “We inherited the situation and showed the resolve and took the initiative to help the people of Haiti. Working to restore democracy is never a bad decision.” And although Mr. Cheney has criticized cutbacks in the size of the military repeatedly in recent days, culminating with his speech in Atlanta, in his remarks today he did not call for increasing the size of the armed forces. “I’m not ready to say that yet,” said Mr. Cheney, who began the cutbacks as secretary of defense, reducing the military by a quarter after the end of the cold war. “I think we’d want to do a broad strategic review of our overall posture with respect to the kind of defense planning guidance that’s out there now,” he said. “Then you’d have to size the force to execute the strategy.” THE REACTION Yielding to G.O.P. Attack Ad, Democrats Put on Hold a Plan for Their Own

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By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 - The Democratic National Committee abandoned plans today to release a commercial that seriously questions Gov. George W. Bush’s record in Texas, choosing to yield the spotlight to a new Republican attack advertisement against Vice President Al Gore in the hope that it will backfire. And after news reports about the Republican advertisement appeared this morning, Mr. Gore himself immediately revised his plans for the day, backing away from a speech about health care so that the Republicans’ message - an assault on Mr. Gore’s credibility - would come through loud and clear. Mr. Gore then deployed Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, his vice presidential running mate, to denounce the commercial. “I’m very sad to tell you that today, rather than focusing on the serious issues before our country, our opponents have hit the airwaves with paid political negative personal attack ads,” Mr. Lieberman said at a rally in Seattle, with Mr. Gore standing behind him. “And that’s wrong.” Democratic officials said they believed that the Republican commercial would backfire as being unfair, and they did all they could to promote that impression. They also said that releasing their own attack against Mr. Bush now would have undermined their own credibility in trying to brand Mr. Bush as too negative, though they acknowledged that they were saving that commercial for later. “We’ll track it over the weekend and see what happens,” said one Democrat. The Democratic commercial was based on a federal court ruling last month that Texas had failed to abide by the terms of a 1996 consent decree that it improve health care for poor children. When Mr. Gore followed Mr. Lieberman to the lectern, he delivered his standard stump speech, with only a modest emphasis on the planned topic of the day: a patients’ bill of rights. In stark contrast to the other health-care speeches he delivered this week, Mr. Gore pointedly chose not to criticize Mr. Bush’s record. The point, Gore aides said, was not to distract from news of the Republican commercial. The commercial uses pictures of Mr. Gore greeting monks at a much maligned fund-raising event at a Buddhist temple in California and at a separate event taking credit for creating the Internet. The Republicans, meanwhile, maintained that the commercial would not backfire and said that their investment of millions of dollars to broadcast it in 17 states was proof that they believed it was valid and would be effective. Asked whether the commercial was negative, Bill Pascoe, spokesman for the Republican National Committee, said: “This is not a personal attack. This deals specifically with Gore’s credibility on campaign finance, the issue that he says is his No. 1 priority, and that makes a discussion of his credibility fair game.” He added, “What’s negative about merely showing video clips of Al Gore saying things?” The New York Times Magazine illuminates the news.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L+ A23 THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: Issues and Personalities THE SPEAKER Hastert Speaks Softly but Carries A Formidable Political War Chest BY LISETTE ALVAREZ GLENDALE, Calif., Aug. 28 - To most people at the barbecue fundraiser here, J. Dennis Hastert, the most powerful Republican in the House, looked like just another middle-aged, gray-haired car buff admiring the antique black Ford parked on the lawn. “Who is that?” one Republican donor asked, nudging a photographer. Unlike his predecessor, Newt Gingrich, a legendary fund-raiser for Republicans, Mr. Hastert does not make a grand entrance: He does not travel with a large entourage. His roly-poly face scarcely jogs the memory. He often flies coach, and his ego does not snub a night at the Ramada. “I’m not very pretentious,” Mr. Hastert says. But Republican leaders say that Mr. Hastert, in his own quiet way, is outdoing even Mr. Gingrich in raising record sums of money for the party and for House candidates through personal appearances. It is a feat few would have expected from a man who, while lauded by his colleagues, lacks star wattage and a national following. Since the last election in 1998, Mr. Hastert has raised $40 million, but this includes only the money he has collected by appearing at fund-raisers. The next two months should increase that total considerably, since the season directly before an election is the busiest for contributors. It is a testament both to the power of the position of speaker and his relentless schedule on the road. Direct comparisons to the amount of money Mr. Gingrich raised are difficult to make, House Republicans say, mostly because members add up their dollars in different ways. Mr. Gingrich raised a total of $60 million to $75 million for the last election, a sum that takes into account many donations he received through telemarketing and direct mail, Republican leaders say. Nowadays, Representative Thomas M. Davis III of Virginia and other Republican leaders are as likely to sign off on mail as Mr. Gingrich was when he was speaker. “The key with Denny is he is indefatigable,” said Mr. Davis, the chairman of the House Republican campaign committee. “He is not as high profile as Newt Gingrich, but he has raised more money than Newt Gingrich ever did.” “Gingrich, everybody knew who he was,” he added. “The faithful ‘The key with Denny is he is indefatigable,’ a colleague says. would come out to see him in a blizzard. They don’t do that for Denny. Newt had that. But Denny overcomes that by working slowly and methodically.” In an election year awash in money, critics of the campaign finance system say it should come as no surprise that Mr. Hastert has managed to raise $40 million so far. As anonymous as he is to the public, his job is a powerful one. Had Mr. Gingrich still been speaker, he would almost certainly have outstripped his own fund-raising records, working to maintain the razor-thin Republican margin of seven House seats, analysts say. House Democrats, led by Richard A. Gephardt, are breaking their own records, raising more money than ever before. Mr. Gephardt, one of the party’s

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most prolific fund-raisers, has so far raised $41 million, a figure that includes direct mail contributions. In total, the House Republican campaign committee has collected $90 million and the Democratic committee has raised $60 million; both Mr. Hastert and Mr. Gephardt raise money for their respective committees, as well as for individual candidates and the party as a whole. “It’s what’s at stake,” said Larry Makinson, executive director of the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. “If you are the speaker of the House, like any politician, the sense of preservation leads you to do almost anything to retain your job. For Hastert, it’s not winning his seat; it’s keeping hold of the speaker’s chair, which means he has to keep Republicans in control.” When he is not in Washington, Mr. Hastert approaches fund-raising with yeoman-like devotion, crisscrossing the country for Republican candidates and the party and doing little else. He has visited 66 districts in 33 states, and so far has attended 104 fund-raisers this year. This is Mr. Hastert’s third fundraiser in Los Angeles for Representative James E. Organ, a California Republican, a pit stop he sandwiched between events in Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Missouri, Arizona and Washington. It raised $45,000 for Mr. Organ. Mr. Hastert’s focus on fund-raising on his off time is single-minded ‘ House Republicans and party officials say. Unlike his more famous predecessor, they say, Mr. Hastert, who accepted the job of speaker only after colleagues beseeched him, harbors no presidential, senatorial or gubernatorial ambitions that colleagues know of. He is not writing a book of any sort. He does not lecture at universities. “I see this as a task that comes with the job,” Mr. Hastert said, sitting in an armchair inside the house of Tom and Eva Jeffery, the hosts of the barbecue fund-raiser for Mr. Organ. “You just have to do it. Newt was a great speaker and a great Mish Earwig for The New York Times Speaker J. Dennis Hastert at the recent California fund-raiser for Representative James E. Rogan, left. Without fanfare, through his single-minded devotion to fund-raising, Mr. Hastert has raised $40 million. political thinker. I’ve always had success just by going to work and getting things done. Sometimes it’s just plodding away to get it done.” All the fund-raising, he said, is one reason why he does not make the television news show rounds on Sunday morning. “It’s hard to do that and to do this at the same time,” Mr. Hastert said. His style is diametrically opposed to Mr. Gingrich’s, but that was one of the qualifications for the job during the tumult of 1998, when House Republicans suffered stinging losses in the polls. Mr. Gingrich’s persona overshadowed the party, and while at first, this served the party well, by 1998, it was seen as counterproductive. There is no flash to Mr. Hastert; he does not advertise his power. He arrives quietly at the Sunday barbecue in a black Suburban, with two aides and two security agents assigned to guard him. A slightly rumpled figure in brown blazer and khaki pants, Mr. Hastert poses for photographs with the host committee members alongside the Jeffers’ house, then mingles with the crowd on the lawn, chitchatting un-self-consciously. On the stump, Mr. Hastert sticks to a meat-and-potatoes speech, stripped

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clean of lofty phrases. He talks about what House Republicans have done and will do before the election: “common sense” tax cuts, as he calls them, a prescription drug benefit, protecting Social Security. He pronounces pundits as “pundints,” a hated group among politicians. He is what he is - a onetime high school wrestling coach. “Newt was a great speaker and had a great mind,” Mr. Hastert said, “He was off talking about new paradigms all the time and what the 21st century was going to be, and I think what I try to do, is put in place good things for us.” All this work on the road has earned him the respect of House members, especially those with safe seats who are under strict orders to raise a total of $15 million for those candidates and incumbents who face competitive races in November. Few members actually enjoy fund-raising. “He just focuses on it like a laser beam,” said Representative Deborah Pryce of Ohio, a Republican leader. And while Mr. Hastert’s style may not inspire awe, Ms. Pryce said, he connects with people on a level that does not intimidate. “He comes across folksy and real because he is,” she said. “There are no airs about him.” Edward Keating / The New York Times Ralph Nader, The Green Party presidential nominee, made several stops in New York City yesterday. After touring the New York Stock Exchange, Mr. Nader criticized tax breaks used to keep business in the city and called the exchange the “bastion of global capitalism of welfare.” THE GREEN PARTY Crisscrossing Manhattan, Nader Criticizes Corporate Misdeeds By JAYSON BLAIR Ralph Nader, running for president as the Green Party nominee, railed against big business from the heart of corporate America yesterday, crisscrossing Manhattan to condemn environmental pollution, the exploitation of workers and the abuse of taxpayer dollars through “corporate welfare.” He also dismissed his opponents, Vice President Al Gore and Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, as candidates whose similarities (favoring businesses over workers, in Mr. Nader’s view, and taking millions from corporate donors) outweighed their differences. Mr. Nader, the consumer advocate whose long-shot candidacy has received comparatively little national media attention, began his salvos from a prominent platform: a morning interview with Matt Lauer on NBC’s “Today” show. “They are different in a few areas, but the rhetoric is more different than the reality,” Mr. Nader said of Mr. Bush and Mr. Gore on “Today,” as about 300 people milled about on a Rockefeller Center sidewalk outside the studio. Some held signs demanding that the major candidates open the presidential debates to Mr. Nader and one of the Reform Party candidates, Patrick J. Buchanan. Two men made the point by wearing chicken suits to represent Mr. Bush and Mr. Gore. After “Today,” Mr. Nader gave a separate interview on NBC’s cable cousin, MSNBC, then crossed the street to the headquarters of the network’s corporate parent, General Electric, where he criticized the company for polluting the Hudson River. He also attacked Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush for taking contributions from the company. “It is time for General Electric to obey the law and pay for its poisoning of the Hudson River and stop lying and deceiving the public about the dangers,” Mr.

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Nader said, referring to G.E.’s legal discharge of PCB’s into the Hudson until 1977, when the chemicals were banned by the federal government. He called for Mr. Bush and Mr. Gore to give back the money their campaigns had received from General Electric. From there, Mr. Nader went to the Bowery, where he protested with union workers at the New Silver Palace Restaurant, a 900-seat dim sum parlor and banquet hall that once was the only unionized restaurant in Chinatown. Former employees have waged a three-year battle with the restaurant’s management, which has been accused by federal labor officials of antiunion hiring practices. Mr. Nader finished his campaign day on Wall Street, where he criticized the City and State of New York for offering multimillion-dollar tax breaks and other incentives to persuade companies like the New York Stock Exchange to stay in Manhattan. “Here is this bastion of global capitalism on welfare,” Mr. Nader said, after taking a private tour of the New York Stock Exchange. “It will take hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars in order to build them a new building. At the same time, hundreds of neighborhoods are suffering from inadequate funding of their vital needs.” Mr. Nader said that such “corporate welfare” was emblematic of the problems of America’s current twoTaking a stand against big business in the business capital. party political system. Mr. Nader’s candidacy is widely seen less as an attempt to capture the White House in November than an effort to influence the public debate. At various points since announcing his candidacy, it appeared as if Mr. Nader could garner a high enough percentage of the vote - mostly from Mr. Gore - in several important states, including California and Michigan, to push Mr. Bush ahead. But recent polls have suggested that Mr. Nader’s moment appears to be fading, given Mr. Gore’s surge in the polls after the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. or example, a Field poll released last week showed that Mr. Nader was supported by 4 percent of California voters, compared with 7 percent in a similar survey in June. Mr. Nader’s swing through New York City yesterday followed a series of fundraisers and appearances on the East End of Long Island on Wednesday. Earlier in the week, he and his running mate, Winona LaDuke, staged a boisterous rally in Portland, Ore., that drew more than 10,000 people. At his Manhattan appearances, Mr. Nader was trailed by small but loyal bands of supporters: college and high school students, environmentalists and those who said they were concerned about the influence of large corporations. “I don’t care how much of a threat he is to Bush and Gore,” said David Joseph, 33, a graduate student in French at Hunter College, outside the NBC studios yesterday morning. “I want to see something new something fresh in the debates.” Steve Rogovin, 59, of River Vale, N.J., who moved off the steps of a building for Mr. Nader’s Wall Street news conference, said he would probably not vote for

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Mr. Nader, but was happy to see him in the race. “He is a man for the people,” Mr. Rogovin said. “I don’t believe he will get elected or get a chance to debate the two power brokers. Think, he would act as devil’s advocate.” That is why, Mr. Rogovin said, he answered, “By all means” when Mr. Nader asked if he could use the steps. NEWS ANALYSIS New Views Blur Division Of Religion From Politics Continued from Page A1 life. In reacting to his remarks, some harkened back to the example set by John F. Kennedy, who sought to reassure voters in 1960 that his Roman Catholicism would not dictate his policies as president. Religious belief, Kennedy’s words implied, is private. But four decades have elapsed since then, a long stretch in the cultural life of a still-young nation. In the United States, as Mr. Lieberman noted on Monday, polls show that religious belief remains unusually widespread, certainly when compared with Europe. Surveys report that 19 out of 20 Americans say they believe in God. What is more, the American marketplace - both a guide to and an influence upon the broader culture - recognizes no separation of the sacred and the profane, such that books by the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual leader, can soar onto the best-seller lists, and CBS can broadcast a reverent mini-series on Jesus during its spring sweeps period. There is some statistical evidence, too, that public attitudes about religion and politics have shifted since the 1960’s, blurring whatever boundary might have existed between the two. A new book, “The Diminishing Divide: Religion’s Changing Role in American Politics” (Brookings Institution, 2000), reports that whereas a narrow majority of Americans in 1968 wanted churches to stay out of politics, that opposition had eroded by 1996, when a narrow majority said churches should freely express their views. One of the book’s four authors, John Green, a professor of political science at the University of Akron, said that “a greater demand” existed for religious talk in political life and that there was also “a greater supply of it.” “I think the public is more interested in values these days, particularly questions of morality, than they have been in the recent past,” said Professor Green, who directs the Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at his university. Professor Green said several factors were at work, among them diminishing worry over economic and international threats and a growing concern over the turmoil of political scandals, high school shootings and hate crimes. Political leaders “have sensed this disquiet, and want to respond to it,” Professor Green said, either by speaking of religious faith or talking more about broad values, as Gov. George W. Bush, the Republican presidential nominee, does in speaking of the need for “prosperity with a purpose.” One person critical of Mr. Lieberman this week, Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, agreed in part with some of Dr. Green’s assessment, saying Americans had been shaken by the

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personal scandals involving political leaders, notably President Clinton and the former House speaker Newt Gingrich. “It’s a general sense that our political leaders have failed us because they lacked moral grounding,” Mr. Lynn said. As a result, he said, candidates “feel compelled not just to say, here’s my moral vision, but here’s the religion that underlies it.” Mr. Lynn called that “unhealthy” for a diverse society and a threat to Perhaps using religion to respond to a sense of public ‘disquiet.’ provoke a sort of spiritual one-upmanship among candidates, each feeling so compelled to cite Scripture that the race for office becomes like “a final exam in Bible studies.” Yet others suggest that the high profile that religion is receiving in the current presidential campaign reflects a subtler, longer-term trend, a growing interest among Americans in hearing the personal narratives, not simply the technical ideas, of their leaders. “People want to hear your story,” said Richard J. Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. “I think today the question is, What kind of person is this, what kind of leader will he be?” In that case, Dr. Mouw said, “having that person speak out of the depths of his own human experience, that kind of comes to be a value thing.” Dr. Mouw, who found Mr. Lieberman’s statements pleasing, said that American society was more open to public expressions of religious identity than it was 30 years ago, when he received his doctorate in philosophy from the University of Chicago. “As a philosopher, you had to hide your religious convictions,” he said, contrasting that with the present situation, in which Christian philosophers have their own association, which publishes a journal. “It’s much more acceptable in the academic world than it was in 1970 to identify your religious convictions and speak openly about them,” Dr. Mouw said.

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A24 L THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Campaign Briefing THE VOTERS MANY STAYED AT HOME The front-loading last spring of the presidential primaries combined with the long-term trend of increased voter apathy to drive down voter turnout to near historic lows. A new analysis by the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, a nonpartisan group, shows that only 17.7 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in states where both the Republican and Democratic parties held presidential primaries. That was the second-lowest turnout in primaries in 40 years, and a mere 0.8 percentage points above the 16.9 percent of voters who took part in the 1996 primaries. Steven A. Holmes (NYT) THE REPUBLICANS A TEST FOR CHENEY Pop quizzes, more often than not, spell troubles for politicians. So the Republican vice-presidential candidate, Dick Cheney, looked vaguely concerned when he got one yesterday morning as he walked into a classroom full of 6-year-olds in an elementary school in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. His task, explained the teacher, Rosalyn Robinson, was to guess which solution an egg would float in: corn starch, food coloring or salt. Mr. Cheney chose salt, and as he dropped eggs into cups filled with each solution, he was borne out. “Just don’t ask me to spell potato,” he said, referring to another quiz met with less success by Dan Quayle, another Republican vice-presidential candidate. Michael Cooper (NYT) NATURAL LAW PARTY 2 NOMINATIONS, 1 CANDIDATE John Hagelin, already the presidential nominee of a rump faction of the Reform Party, was chosen yesterday to also be the nominee of another small, independent political group, the Natural Law Party. Mr. Hagelin, an Iowa physicist and founder of the Natural Law Party said in accepting the second nomination that he would run under both party banners. He was named the nominee of the Reform Party faction last month when that party split, with its hard-right members nominating Patrick J. Buchanan. The Natural Law Party’s nominating convention was held in Alexandria, Va., attended by 400 people. The Natural Law Party hews to the teachings of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the transcendental meditation leader, and promotes preventive health care, increased use of renewable energy sources and peaceful remedies for international conflicts. (NYT) THE AD CAMPAIGN WITHDRAWN AD RUNS Last week, the Republican National Committee announced that it would not go through with plans to run a television advertisement that challenged the veracity of Vice President Al Gore. It conceded the advertisement could be considered misleading and notified stations that had received advanced copies of it not to broadcast it. But on Wednesday, the ad began running anyway in New Orleans after a technician at the local CBS affiliate pushed the wrong button. The advertisement included an excerpt from a 1994 television interview in which Mr. Gore said he could not think of a single lie told by President Clinton. It did not mention that the interview took place before Mr. Clinton met Monica Lewinsky. Officials at the New Orleans station, WWL-TV, said the advertisement was pulled after several viewers complained. But Gore campaign officials are not complaining; several had said last week they hoped it would run, to create a backlash against Gov. George W. Bush. David Firestone (NYT) Compiled by B. Drummond Ayres Jr.

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TODAY’S SCHEDULES GEORGE W. BUSH Lafayette, La. DICK CHENEY No public events AL GORE No public events JOSEPH I. LIEBERMAN Portland, Me. Clinton Vetoes Repeal of Estate Tax; G.O.P. Vows Fight Continued From Page A1 net or high-tech ventures.” Mr. Hastert has said he will also try to override Mr. Clinton’s veto of a bill to give married couples a tax break, one in a series of bite-size tax cut proposals that Republicans have sent to the president in recent weeks. The bill to repeal the estate tax had drawn broad Democratic support in Congress, especially in the House, where members recognized its allure to voters. Today, Mr. Clinton was careful not to dismiss the idea of curbing the estate tax and highlighted his party’s proposals, which the Democrats say will provide more modest tax breaks for a greater number of people but which Republicans dismiss as having little impact. “We are not against wealth and we are not against opportunity” Mr. Clinton said. “If I were against creating millionaires, I have been an abject failure in my years as president.” The current tax applies to estates worth more than $675,000, or $1.3 million for a family-owned farm or business, and by 2006 the limit would rise to $1 million. The Republican plan would have phased out the tax entirely over 10 years. Only 2 percent of the families of those who die pay the estate tax, but Republicans argue that no one should have to pay the tax, which has a 55 percent top rate. According to Congressional and White House estimates, the bill would cost $105 billion in the first 10 years, as the tax is phased out and then $750 billion in the decade after the tax is repealed. Although recent public opinion surveys show that the bill has proven popular among voters, Mr. Clinton’s advisers say that is largely because Susana Raab for The New York Times President Clinton talked yesterday with John Sumption, a farmer from Frederick, S.D., after vetoing a bill that would repeal the estate tax. it has been misunderstood. “Of the $750 billion the repeal costs, one-half nearly $400 billion - goes to the top one-tenth of one percent of estates,” said Gene Sperling, the president’s national economic adviser. Governor Bush, who has proposed a $1.3 trillion tax cut over 10 years, has endorsed the Republican estate tax repeal, incorporating it in his own plan. Today, Mindy Tucker, Mr. Bush’s press secretary, accused Mr. Gore of “showing weak leadership” in “standing by while his administration vetoed a bill that would help so many hard-working Americans and their families.” Mr. Gore’s proposal is more in line with the Democratic alternatives. Instead of phasing out the estate tax entirely, it would exempt all estates worth less than $5 million, and the results would be immediate. “Most of the benefits under the Republican plan goes to the extremely wealthy,” said Douglas Hattaway, a Gore campaign spokesman. Since the national conventions, both Mr. Bush and Mr. Gore have jousted over the scale and wisdom of tax cuts at a time when the country is prospering economically.

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The two have used the debate to underscore the two parties’ traditional political philosophies, a theme House and Senate lawmakers are also pitching on the campaign trail. Republicans say the surplus - money not spent on protecting Social Security - should be returned to the taxpayer and not spent by the government. Democrats believe it should be steered toward education, health care, Medicare and other programs. “You let the surplus sit there in this town and people will spend it Mr. Hastert said at a recent fundraiser. “The best thing we can do is take that surplus off the table.” Setting aside their campaign rhetoric, though, both sides have inched toward the center, promising to pay down the debt and protect Social Security. While Democrats are devising their own tax cuts, Republicans are talking about spending more money on education. Each party is also repackaging its ideas. House Republicans, for example, devised a different approach to tax cuts this year, after Mr. Clinton vetoed their mammoth tax-reduction bill last year. (“A cannonball that was too heavy to fly,” Mr. Clinton said today.) They divided the bill into smaller pieces and portrayed them as commonsense tax breaks for married couples and grieving families who do not want to break up the family farm to pay the tax man. The idea of breaking up the bills has proved relatively fruitful, since it drew Democratic votes and appeared to please voters. Mr. Clinton called the approach clever today, but then excoriated the. end result, saying it would still cost too much and do little for low and middle-income taxpayers. “Everybody knows there is a lot more hard work to be done, and there are differences of opinion about what we ought to do and how we ought to do it,” Mr. Clinton said. “That’s why we’re having another election this year. And that’s up to the American people to decide. “But I believe that prosperity imposes its own difficult choices, because there are so many temptations to do things that seem easy that will have adverse consequences.” Film Dance MUSIC Theater if you enjoy reading about any or all of them in the Sunday Arts & Leisure section, don’t miss the bright, bountiful coverage of their world in The Arts pages of The Times ... Monday through Saturday. LATINO VOICES Wednesday, October 11, 2000 | 6:00-8:00 p.m. at AMC Empire 25 | 234 W. 42nd Street, New York City The voice of the Hispanic author is increasingly being heard - and read. Discover the unique challenges of writing about place and, in some instances, displacement, when New York Times staff writer Mirta Ojito moderates a panel of Latino literary luminaries from this country and beyond. The event includes a panel discussion with a question-and-answer opportunity and a book sale and signing after the discussion. Moderator Mirta Ojito Staff writer, Metro The New York Times Ana Castillo

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“Peel My Love Like an Onion” (Doubleday) Antonio Perez Oscar Hijuelos “Empress of the Splendid Season” (Harper Collins) Nancy Crompton Ana Veciana-Suarez “Birthday Parties in Heaven” (Plume) Randi Leigh Sidman For additional information regarding this event, or to purchase tickets please call 1-888-NYT-1870 Tickets are $30 per person ($25 for TimesCard members). Please note: TimesTalks programs and speakers are subject to change. Tickets are available on a first—come, first-served basis. There are no refunds for TimesTalks events. There is a $3.00 per ticket handling charge for all credit card purchases talks THE NEW YORK TIMES SPEAKER SERIES The New York Times Expect the World® | www.nytimes.com In Partnership with: el diario LA PRENSA AMC Changing the way THEATRES you see movies Book sale provided by Lectorium

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THE NEW YORK TIMES OBITUARIES FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A25 Anthony Corallo, Mob Boss, Dies in Federal Prison at 87 By ALAN FEUER Anthony Corallo, the salty and stoical former boss of the Lucchese crime family who went to jail for life after the authorities overheard him chatting to his driver about the mob’s control of New York City’s construction industry, died Aug. 23 in a federal prison hospital in Springfield, Mo. He was 87. Mr. Corallo, who was serving a 100-year sentence, was said to be the oldest living gangster to have risen from one of the city’s five organized crime families. He was a sitting member of the Mafia politburo, known as the commission, when he was arrested in 1985. A year later, he was found guilty on federal racketeering charges at what came to be known as the commission trial - a 10-week smorgasbord of gangland lore that resulted in the conviction of the city’s top crime leaders. It also paved the way for a new era of crime leader, a more rough-and-tumble Serving a 100-year sentence for racketeering. crew of underlings, like John Gotti, who dressed in a flashy way and seemed to bask in the limelight. Mr. Corallo, known to mobsters -and federal agents alike as Tony Ducks because of his knack for ducking subpoenas and convictions - was widely regarded as an old-time don, a crusty but gentle son of La Cosa Nostra, who believed in honor, staked his reputation on his word, adored his family and considered loose lips a treachery worse than murder. It was in some ways curious, then, that investigators captured hours of conversation between him and his driver, Salvatore Avellino Jr., by planting a listening device inside the dashboard of Mr. Avellino’s black Jaguar as it sat in a parking lot of the Huntington Town House, a Long Island catering hall, in 1982. The taped conversations became one of the primary building blocks of the federal case against Mr. Corallo and two other Mafia bosses - Anthony Salerno of the Genovese family, who was known as Fat Tony, and Carmine Persico of the Colombo family, known as Junior - as well as five other gangland counselors and underbosses. Among the more dramatic allegations against Mr. Corallo and some of his codefendants was the charge of conspiracy to murder Carmine Galante, the head of the Bonanno family, and two associates in 1979. They were killed in a hall of gunfire as they ate lunch on the patio of a Brooklyn restaurant. The commission trial, which opened in Federal District Court in Manhattan on Sept. 9, 1986, and ended on Nov. 19, 1986, was a sort of Waterloo for the New York mob. No previous trial had ever focused directly on the highest levels of Mafia leadership, and some investigators have said that the five families never truly recovered. Anthony Corallo was born in 1913 and raised in East Harlem, where he worked, at least for a while, as a tilesetter. He rose in the ranks of a Lucchese family that was governed at the time by Gaitano, or Tommy, Lucchese, whose illicit businesses from gambling and loan-sharking to truck hijacking and labor racketeering were centered in the Bronx. When Mr. Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, Mr. Corallo was the early favorite to be his successor.

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But Mr. Corallo did not immediately get the job. He was in prison for bribing James L. Marcus, then the New York City water commissioner, in exchange for contracts to clean and repair parts of the city’s enormous water reservoir system. Carmine Tramunti was installed as the Lucchese boss, but when Mr. Tramunti himself was arrested a few years later, Mr. Corallo took over. Mr. Corallo’s reign atop the Lucchese family was marked by an interest in labor racketeering, particularly in the private trash-hauling business and in million-dollar Manhattan construction projects. According to federal wiretap transcripts, Mr. Avellino once told his boss that they were being followed in the car, probably because the, authorities believed that Mr. Corallo controlled the toxicwaste disposal industry. Mr. Corallo gave a simple response. “They’re right,” he said. By all accounts, Mr. Corallo continued the Lucchese family’s long-standing penchant for shying away from the limelight. In a time when a mob boss’s suit could light up a room, he was given to wearing gray cardigan sweaters, one former investigator said. Michael Chertoff, the lead prosecutor on the commission trial, who later became the United States attorney for New Jersey, said Mr. Corallo was as stoical as they came. “He was very impassive in court, unlike some Associated Press Anthony Corallo, entering court in 1986 before the trial in which he was convicted of racketeering. of the other defendants, who, at least, would kid around a bit,” he said. “He sat there like one of these big stone idols.” According to Ronald Goldstock, the former director of the New York State organized crime task force who spent nearly a year listening to the secret tapes from Mr. Avellino’s car, Mr. Corallo never really became acclimated to the flashier world of the mob that emerged in the 1980’s. “At the time he ascended,” Mr. Goldstock said, “bosses tended to be insulated, prison sentences were fairly minimal and people who rose to his level were tested. They were trained and they were proven. But by the time the 80’s rolled around everything had changed. The new people didn’t grow out of the gangs of Little Italy or Brooklyn. They were untested and untrained.” Friends of Mr. Corallo, who spoke on the condition that they not be named, said he enjoyed pasta, opera and working in the garden outside his home in Oyster Bay Cove, on Long Island. They said he cherished his privacy and that his family was the dearest thing to him in the world. They would not provide any information about his survivors, a son and a daughter. Paul Yager, 80, a Mediator in Labor-Strikes By ERIC PACE Paul Yager, a veteran federal labor mediator who helped resolve several important labor strikes in the New York City region, died Monday at a hospital in Edison, N.J. He was 80 and lived in Metuchen, N.J. The cause was heart failure, his daughter Deborah Yager said. Mr. Yager was the director of the Northeastern Region of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, based in New York City, from 1973 until his retirement from the service in 1986. He held lesser posts in the service from 1951 to 1973. He was active in 1984 in negotiations that led to a settlement of a 68—day strike by unionized workers against 11 nursing homes York City. In 1976, he was

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involved in negotiations that led to the 11-day strike at 57 hospital nursing homes in New York City by nonmedical workers. The many other labor disputes he mediated included strikes involving the Philadelphia Orchestra that were settled. Former colleagues recalled yesterday that Mr. Yager was skilled at getting parties on opposite sides in a dispute to think that, through a comPaul Yager in 1973. promise, they might be able to achieve part of what they were seeking. He also had an acute sense of timing, an ability to present an idea to the opposing parties at a time when it would be accepted by both sides. And he had enough stamina to be on hand for as much as 40 hours of nonstop bargaining. “His personality was a key factor in his success,” said Kenneth C. Kowalski, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service’s director for the northeastern United States and the Caribbean Islands. Hezekiah Brown, a former mediat-ing colleague, recalled: “He taught me to observe every single thing about the parties, from the time the individuals walk in the door until they sit at the table, and to watch the body language and what they say. He said, ‘What you have to do to be a good mediator is to listen to what’s not being said across the table.’” A native New Yorker, Mr. Yagen received a bachelor’s degree from New York University and, after Navy service in World War II, a master’s degree in 1949 from Cornell’s New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Besides his daughter Deborah, of Philadelphia, he is survived by his wife, Naomi; another daughter, Marion Harnermesh of Wilmington, Del.; a sister, Florence Levy of Jamesburg, N.J.; and two grandchildren. Annie Devine, 88, Rights Advocate in Mississippi By WOLFGANG SAXON Annie Devine, a no-nonsense Mississippi trailblazer for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, died on Aug. 22 at a hospital in Ridgeland, Miss. She was 88 and lived in nearby Canton. Mrs. Devine, a soft-spoken woman with a ready smile, became deeply involved in the civil rights movement of the early 1960’s. She helped organize voter registration drives in Canton and surrounding Madison County, where fewer than 100 of the county’s estimated 10,000 black adults were registered. At the time, blacks in the Deep South were kept from the ballot boxes by legal chicanery and worse; in Mississippi 94 percent of black adults were not registered. Thanks largely to Mrs. Devine, blacks began to show up at the county courthouse almost daily, demanding to register. She attended the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City along with Victoria Gray-Adams and Fannie Lou Hamer. Their objective was to unseat their state’s all-white delegation and be recognized as delegates of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, of which Mrs. Devine was a founder. After that failed, the three sought to run for the House of RepresentaAssociated Press Annie Devine, shown in 1965. tives, but were shunned by the white party establishment and blocked from running as independents. When the new Congress was sworn in January 1965, the three women, backed by hundreds of protesters, demanded that the House deny membership to Mississippi’s representatives-elect

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because blacks had consistently beep prevented from registering and voting in the state. Their effort, called the Mississippi Challenge, failed in the short run, but led to a nationwide lobbying drive by the Mississippi Freedom Democrats and calls for Congressional investigations into voting in Mississippi. Thus, the three women’s resolve fed into the groundswell that produced the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Annie Devine was born in Mobile, Ala., and reared in Canton. She graduated from Tougaloo Southern Christian College, now Tougaloo College, and taught in the public schools. Shef was an executive for a life-insurance, company before she threw her energies into the civil rights struggle. In the 1960’s she also helped found the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Under its aegis she was a longtime volunteer in the Head Start program, involving parents and marshaling community support. Mrs. Devine’s husband, Andrew, died in 1973. She is survived by two daughters, Monette Watts of Harvest, Ala., and Barbara Russell of Canton; a son, Andrew, of Omaha; a brother, Garfield Heath of Detroit; & grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. John Watkins, 87, Publisher And World War II Fighter Pilot By NEIL MacFARQUHAR John C. A. Watkins, the longest serving publisher of The Providence Journal, died Wednesday in Newport Hospital in Rhode Island. He was 87. Mr. Watkins, a decorated World War II fighter pilot, was publisher of The Journal for 25 years, from 1954 to 1979, and retired as chairman of The Providence Journal Company in 1985. He led the paper’s transformation from a 40,000-circulation daily overshadowed by its afternoon rival, The Bulletin, to a respected regional newspaper whose circulation peaked at more than 218,000. He also pushed the company to expand into other areas, acquiring two radio stations and a cable television system. In addition to shepherding the business side of the Providence Journal, he was dispatching page proofs to editors with grammatical errors or misused words circled in red, the newspaper said. Mr. Watkins was born in Corpus Christi, Tex., on Oct. 12, 1912, and started in journalism in 1934 as a reporter at The Dayton Herald and Journal in Ohio. A year later he moved to The Sun in Baltimore, where his reporting assignments included riding aboard Pan American Airways’ Yankee Clipper on the first transAtlantic passenger flight in 1939. Mr. Watkins inherited a love of aviation from his father, a military pilot, and he left The Sun in June 1941 and joined the Army Air Force. He served as the operations officer for the 325th Fighter Squadron in the Mediterranean, flying 49 combat missions in P-40 and P-47 fighter planes and surviving at least one crash landing unscathed. After three of his five brothers were killed in the War, he was ordered out of combat. His decorations included the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. Mr. Watkins left the military in 1945 as a lieutenant colonel and joined The Providence Journal as assistant to the publisher. He was named assistant publisher in 1950, then associate publisher in 1953. A year later, at age 41, he was named publisher. In 1961, he was named Journal Company president, a post he retained until

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1974. He then became chairman and chief executive. In 1983, he left the chief executive job, and stepped down as chairman two years later. United Press International, 1971 John C. A. Watkins A decorated pilot who led The Providence Journal for 25 years. During his tenure as publisher, The Journal won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 1974 for a story detailing President Nixon’s small tax payments. Mr. Watkins married Helen Danforth in 1943 and the couple had four children before divorcing in 1959. In 1960, he married June Watkins, a former actress, who died in 1989. Mr. Watkins is survived by two sons, Fanchon M. Burnham of Washington and Stephen D. of San Francisco; a daughter, Jane P. Watkins of Ketchum, Idaho; a stepdaughter, Izetta Smith of Portland, Ore.; and five grandchildren. Deaths Altman, David Auerbach, Norma Barbolata, Victor Behom, William Benloff, Florence Byrne, Grace Cayton, Doris Dick, Stuart Drach, Martin Ezzard, Yvonne Glasser, Libby Greenfield, Myron Gronningsoter, Ame Howard, Lillian Kumro, Arthur Leiderman, Simon Molina, Jean Maruco, Janice Mover, Robert MussBadner, Rita Oppenhelm, Robert Penson, Pearl Phillips, Lawrence Portnoy, Isidore Schling, Daniel Schwartz Sy Tishelmon, Joseph Wilson, Philip ALTMAN-David. The Producer Circle Co. mourns the loss-of our cherished friend David, a warm and wise and talented gentleman. Our deepest condolences to his family. his dear wife Florio V. Lasky, and their daughters Emily and Dora. Martin Richards, Maryanne Dittmonn, Sam Crothers, Monique Bell, Dan Gallagher, Michael Milton ALTMAN-David. Floria, beloved friend, and dear Emily and Dara. Separated by an ocean I share your grief and long to shield you from the unremitting pain from which David sought to protect those he loved. We are and will be there for you, as You were here for us. Lovingly, Regina Resnik and Michael Davis ALTMAN-David R. It is with great sorrow that we say goodbye to the husband of our partner Florio-V. Lasky. His visits to our office were always a pleasure. We shall miss him. Fitelson, Lasky, Asian & Couture AUERBACH-Norma Tick. Age 78, of Guilderland, NY, on August 30, 2000. Wife of the late Philip, mother of David and Jonathan, mother-in-law of Elaine, grandmother of Sarah and Jeremy, sister of Louis. Services on Sunday, September 3, 2000, 10AM at Congregation Beth Emeth, 100 Academy Road, Albany, NY. For information call the Levine memorial Chapel, Albany, New York at 800-427-0280. BARBALATA-Victor. Kateri Residence notes the sad passing of Victor Barbalata, M.D. A venerable physician he was a loving husband, devoted father, and adoring grandfather. We are all lessened by this loss. L.L. Bond, Exec. Vice Pres. and Medical Staff Kateri Residence BEHAM-William. In his 93rd Year. Much loved husband of the late Miriam

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(Marcus). Dear companion of Fanny Glixman. Wonderful father, grandfather, great-grandfather, colleague and friend. Never bored, always teaming, he loved life and life returned the compliment. Services Wednesday, September 6, 12:45PM The Riverside, Amsterdam Ave. and 76th St. Memorial contributions can be mode to the NYU Hematology Research Fund, C/O Bruce Raphael, MD, 53015t Ave, NY, NY 10016. BETOFF-Florence. The Jewish Braille Institute of America joins in mourning the Passing of the beloved mother of our President, Barbara Friedman. Throughout her life she was truly honored by her family In the devotion shown to her, the respect for her independence of spirit and the warmth that she Inspired. She encouraged Public service and nurtured the talents and values of those who were close to her. May those who will miss her find comfort in loving memories. BYRNE-Grace E. On August 31, 2000 in Goshen, NY, formerly of Chappaqua. Wife of J. Howard Byme. Mother of James Byrne, Ann Byrne, Kathleen Lindquist and Christine Byrne. Grandmother of 5 Great grandmother of 1. Resting Friday (today) 4-8 PM at Beecher Funeral Home, Pleasantville, NY Funeral mass Saturday 10 AM Church of St. John & St. Mary, Chappaqua NY. Interment Oakwood Cemetery, Mt. Kisco, NY. CAYTON-Doris. The partners and staff of Porker Duryee Rosoff & Haft note with sorrow the death of Doris Cayton on August 3, 2000, and express their deepest sympathies to Bill Cayton and the entire family. DICK-Stuart. Departed this life on August 30,2000 at home following a long and courageous battle with lung cancer. Beloved husband of Docota; devoted father of Aviva, Christina, Melissa and Maxwell. Dedicated son to his mother, Frances. He was cherished by his extended families and dear friends. Stuart loved life and most of all considered it a privilege to have been a professor. His work was his passion and he had the wonderful opportunity to have touched many lives through his teaching. His passing leaves a void that will never be filled. He will be fondly remembered by those whom he has loved and by those who have loved him. In lieu of flowers, contribution in his name should be made to Cabrini Hospice, 227 East 19 Street, New York, NY 10003. DRACH-Martin. You were the patriarch to us all. We will miss your love and guidance. The Spector Family EZZARD-Yvonne M. On August 29, 2000. Long time resident of Astoria and Auburndale, New York. Beloved wife of the late George. Loving mother of Richard, Dodd, George, Edward, Diana Kuruc and Barbara Klugh. Cherished grandmother of 17 and great-grandmother of 22. Dear sister of the late Elaine Fozlo and Louis Drokeford. Reposing at the Frederick Funeral Home of Flushing, Northern Blvd. at 193rd Street. Visiting hours Monday and Tuesday 2-5 and 7-1012M. Funeral Services Wednesday. Leaving Funeral Home at 12:30PM to Fresh Pond Crematory. GLASSER - Libby Sallmon. 1913-1999. Left to mourn: son Lewis, daughter Terry, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. God rest her soul. GREENFIELD - Myron “Mike”. Beloved husband of Adina (nee Grama) whom he adored in life and will never be parted from her heart. Beloved father of Sari and Ari Bwon, Drs. Debra and Sol Genuth Benjamin and Sara Greenfield, Aviva and Rabbi Avram Skurowitz, Gila and Steve Stone, and Yehuda and Faigie Greenfield. Beloved grandfather of 26. Brother of the late Hindy Schreiber, Miriam Szolmary, the late Saul Greenfield, Lillian Shulmam, Evelyn Reese, Vivian

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Sherman. Larry Greenfield, Judy Tannenbaum and Ruth Masyr. A great man and pillar of the community who always meant what he said. A Torah scholar and Baal Tzedakah who embodied the Ideal of “Torah Im Derech Eretz”. He dealt with everyone with honesty and integrity in both his personal and business life. You will always be with us, our dear husband and father. We will continue in the path that you have set for us. Shiva will be observed at 2 Barbara La. Monsey, N.Y. Donations may be made to Kupas Ezra, Route 306, Monsey, N.Y. 10952. Deaths GRONNINGSATER-Arne Howell. April 12 1912-August 29, 2000, died on Tuesday, August 29th, 2000 in Elizabethtown, NY. He was the son of Anton and Annie (Howell) Gronningsater. Born In Kristiansand, Norway, on April 12, 1912, he immigrated to America with this family when he was 9 years old. He graduated from the University of Toronto, and obtained his PhD. in English literature from Columbia University. He taught high school English at Lawrenceville Academy before joining the faculty at Riverdale Country Day School, Bronx, NY where he taught English for 35 years and also served as Dean of Faculty. A passionate teacher and devoted father and husband, he is survived by his children; Arne Jr. of New Haven, CT, Allan of North Granby, CT, Annie G. McKinley at Westport, NY, Kenny of Brooklyn, NY, and Kori of Nevada City, CA and 12 grandchildren. His wife of 45 Years, Ann Mendelson Gronningsater and his brother, Adolphus Gronningsater, predeceased him. There will be a memorial service on Saturday, September 23rd, 12 noon, at All Souls Unitarian Church in Manhattan, NY. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Keene Valley Neighborhood House, The Horace Nye Home in Elizabethtown, NY, or Riverdale Country Day School. GRONNINGSATER-Arne. The Trustees, faculty and administration of Riverdale Country School regret the passing on August 30, of Arne Gronningsater, teacher and friend to generations of students. Our deepest sympathies go to his children, Ame, Howell, Alan, Karl and Annie. An English teacher, he came to the school in 1951, remained until 1978 and returned to teach part time from 1980 to 1987. A founder of the ILS (integrated liberal studies) Program, he trained young minds to think critically. Memorial Service at All Souls Church, New York City, on Saturday, September 23 at 12:00 Noon. HOWARD-Lillian Lee. Passed away in her 88th Year Peacefully Aug. 29, 2000 in Stuart, FL. Devoted wife of 66 years to Mike Howard. Beloved mother of Bob Howard (Jon Wilner) and Sandy Kelley (Mike Marshall). Loving sister of Pearl Fish and Charles Halpern. KUMRO-Arthur C. Age 74. On Tuesday, August 29th, 2000, of Arlington, VA. Beloved husband of 48 years of the late M. Louise Kumro. Loving father of Kathy L. Bradish and her husband Stephen of Woodbridge, VA, and Richard A. Kumro and his wife Kaare Phillips of New York City. Grandfather of Richard M. and Amanda R. Bra-dish, of Woodbridge, and Alison P. and Olivia S. Kumro of New York, NY. Brother of Harriet Woods of Kansas, Marguerite Searcy of California, and the late Rose Kumro. Also surviving are several nieces, nephews and cousins. Friends may call at Mountcastle Funeral Home, 13318 Occoquan Rood, Woodbridge, VA, on Monday, September 4, from 2-4 and 6-8 PM. A Mass of Christian Burial will be said 11 AM, Tuesday, September 5, at Our Lady of Angels Catholic Church, 13752 Mary’s Way, Woodbridge, VA. Interment Quantico National Cemetery. Contributions may be made In his memory to the American Heart Association, PO Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058.

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LEIDERMAN-Simon. Loving husband to Melia. Devoted father of Yannek (Genevieve) Liederman, Fania (Louis) Samuels. Cherished grandfather of Rose, Sara and Marissa: Services Friday, 20 PM at “Riverside-Nassau North Chapels”, 55 North Station Plaza, Great Neck, New York. LEIDERMAN-Dr. Simon. Temple Beth-El of Great Neck records with profound sorrow the passing of its long time member. We extend heartfelt sympathy to his bereaved family. Shelley M. Limmer, President Jerome K. Davidson, Rabbi Deaths MALINA-Jean. On August 30, 2000. Beloved wife of the late William. Loving mother of Michael and Anita, and Robert and Fran. Dear sister of Anne. Cherished grandmother of Rachel (Edwin), Stuart (Martha), Toby, Joel (Nancy), Joshua (Melissa) and Nicole. Adoring great grandmother of six. Beloved aunt. Service on Friday 12:45 PM at “The Riverside”, 76th Street and Amsterdam Avenue. MALINA-Jean. Yeshivas Bais Yisroel, Jerusalem, Israel mourn the death of Jean Malina, beloved wife of the late William and extends heartfelt condolences to the entire family. Rabbi Daniel Lehrfield, Rosh Yeshiva MARUCA-Janice C. On August 29, 2000. Beloved wife of Domiano G. Loving sister of Marie De Moss of Sarasota, Fla. Funeral from the Chas. Peter Nagel Inc. Funeral Home, 352 E. 87 St. NYC on Tuesday, 10AM. Interment St. Charles Cemetery. Visiting hours on Sunday and Monday 2-5 and 7-9PM MAYER-Robert G. On Saturday August 26th 2000, of Chatham Township, NJ, formerly of West Orange, NJ, and Brooklyn NY. Husband of June Driscoll Mover and the late Shirley S. Mover. Father of Robert G. Mayer and J. Ridgeley Weinberg. Grandfather of Ian C., Bret N. and Lyndsey A. Mayer. Relatives and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service at Wyoming Presbyterian Church, 432 Wyoming Avenue, Milburn on Sunday September 3 at 3:00 PM. In lieu of flowers contributions to the charity of your choice in his name would be appreciated. For information The Jacob A. Hole Funeral Home, 2122 Milburn Avenue, Maplewood, New Jersey. MUSS-BADNER- Rita. A courageous, charming women, always with a smile and a good word. She’ll be missed by many. Sincere condolences to Elizabeth, Marion and Saundra. We all hope for happier days to come. Peter Schwalbe OPPENHEIM- Robert. On August 30, 2000. Beloved husband of Joan, loving father of Nancy and David Schubert and Richard and Lynda Oppenheim. Caring grandfather of Dustin, Brandon, Kristl and Jaime. Funeral will be private. PENSON-Pearl. Temple Beth-El of Great Neck records with profound sorrow the passing of Its long time member. We extend heartfelt sympathy to her bereaved family. Shelley M. Limmer, President Jerome K. Davidson, Rabbi PHILLIPS-Lawrence E. Jr. On August 31, of Ridgewood, NJ. Survived by his wife Doris, 2 sons Lawrence III and Thomas G. of NY, NY, a grandson Lawrence H. and two brothers Nicholas of Wyckoff, NJ and Robert of NY, NY. Mr. Phillips was a graduate of Columbia University and Harvard Business School. He retired as a securities analyst with Lehman Management Co. after serving with other Wall Street firms. A Mass will be held Saturday, September 2, 9:30 AM at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Ridgewood, NJ. Friends may call Friday, 2-4, 7-9PM at the

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C.C. Van Emburgh Funeral Home, 306 E. Ridgewood Ave, Ridgewood, NJ. A memorial Mass will be held in New York City In late September. Deaths PORTNOY-Isidore, M.D. August 25th 2000. Loving husband of Charlotte Sari. Beloved father at Miriam, Barbara, Gall and Joyce, and father-in-law of Jack. Paul, Stan and Robert. Adored grandfather of Garrett, Joshua, Hilary, Deborah, Hana, Gregory, Elie, Liono and great-grandfather of Isabella. Proud graduate of Dalhousie University Medical School, veteran (US Medical Army Corp), esteemed physician, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst and teacher. Associate Dean, American Institute of Psychoanalysis, co-founder, Karen Horney Clinic, life fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. A memorial service will be held at the Karen Horney Psychoanalytic Clinic. 329 E. 62 St. NY, NY 10021 on Saturday, September 16, 11:00AM. Contributions may be made to the Karen Horney Clinic or the Workmen’s Circle, 45 East 33 Street, New York, NY 10016. SCHLING-Daniel A. “Bucky”. Formerly of Edgemont, NY in his 34th year on August 5 in Los Angeles where he resided while pursing his career in film as a screenwriter and film technician. Devoted son of Joseph M. and Phyllis E. Schling of Bolton, MA. Beloved grandson of Mildred Sutain and the late Abraham Sutain. Nephew of Leslie and Cory Sutain and the late Valerie Sutain. Loving cousin of Noren Caceres. Cherished grandson of the late Frederick and Frances Hochhouser Schling. Bucky graduated from Goddard College, received his graduate degree from the Virginia Commonwealth University and did post graduate work at UCLA. Graveside services at the Beit Olam Cemetery, Wayland, MA. on Sunday, September 3 at 2 PM. A scholarship fund has been established In Bucky’s name at Goddard College attn: Development Department 123 Pitkin Rd. Plainfield, VT 05667. For Information the Levine Chapels, Brookline, AA. SCHWARTZ-Sy. The City University of New York deeply mourns the passing of beloved friend and colleague Sy Schwartz, Executive Vice President of Howard J. Rubenstein Associates. Sy assisted the City University of New York for almost eighteen years, providing wise counsel and expert help in communication with media and other external organizations. His dedication, talent and unflagging good humor will be long remembered. We extend condolences to both his family and everyone of Howard J. Rubenstein. The Honorable Herman Badillo, Chairman, The Board of Trustees Dr. Matthew Goldstein, Chancellor The City University of New York SCHWARTZ-Sy. It is with deep sorrow that we note the passing of a longtime friend to our agency. The Officers, Board of Trustees and all our members extend our condolences to his wife Sheila, his sons and his entire family. He will be missed by all who had the pleasure of working with him. Brooklyn Hebrew School for Special Children Sam S. Fierstein, President Edmund DiGiacomo, Chairman Board of Trustees Rabbi Morris J. Block Executive Director Sandra L. Grunes

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Assistant Executive Director Deaths SCHWARTZ-Sy. The staff of Rubenstein Associates mourns the passing of one of the finest professionals in the public relations industry. For forty years he set the standard for excellence at an agency he was proud to call home. We join his loving spouse, Sheila, his sons Laurence and Matthew in their grief and offer our heartfelt condolences In the knowledge that his warmth and friendship will remain an indelible part of our company. Funeral services will be held today (Fri. Sept. 1) at 11:45 A.M. at Riverside Chapels, 76th and Amsterdam in the Gothic Chapel. TISHELMAN-Joseph, 89 passed away Wednesday evening, August 30, 2000 in Pembroke Pines, Florida, surrounded by loved ones, in peace and tranquility. A beloved father, grandfather, husband and brother, he was a strong and loving but work to his family. In addition until retirement, he served his community in the Bronx and New Jersey as a pharmacist with friendship, devotion and respect for all human beings for what they were and could become. His time has passed on Earth and he accepted that with grace and dignity but his legacy to those who knew him remains with us for all time. Interment will occur in a family gathering at Old Montetfiore Cemetery in Queens, New York. Those desiring to memorialize Joseph Tishelman may send a donation in his honor to the Israeli school for orphaned and disadvantaged children which he visited and loved c/o American Friends of Migdal Ohr, Inc. 250 West 57th Street, Suite 1730, New York, NY 10107 TISHELMAN-Joseph. The Law Firm of Hartman & Craven express sincere condolences to the family of our partner Ed Tishelman on the passing of his father. WILSON-Philip C. MD. The entire St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center family joins with the physicians and staff in the Department of Psychiatry in acknowledging with sadness the passing of our dear friend and devoted teacher, C. Philip Wilson, MD. a member of the hospital’s medical staff for 50 years. To his wife Christine, his family and all his loved ones, we extend our heartfelt condolences. Sigurd H. Ackerman, M.D. President and CEO Thomas Barnard, M.D. President, Medical Board Stephen Relbel, M.D. Gary Lefer, M.D. Acting Co-Chairmen, Department of Psychiatry In Memoriam AKPATA-Toks. Gone from our soul. Forever in our hearts. Mom, Reggie, Family and Friends BRONSTEIN-Melvin, M.D. 4/9/24-9/1/96 A unique man, so dearly missed by his wife and children. You are In our hearts and minds every moment. Gloria and children SHEPPS-HOWARD. 9/l/53-7/9/92 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, WISHING YOU WERE HERE...NOT ONLY TODAY...EACH AND EVERYDAY...WE ALL MISS YOU SO. SOSLER-Carolyn Atlas. April 10, 1940-September 1, 1993. “The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very

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gentle arid the very brave.” Hemingway. You are always with us. Pop, Neil, Andree ANNOUNCEMENTS OF DEATHS MAY BE TELEPHONED FROM WITHIN N.Y.C. TO (212) 354-3900; OR OUTSIDE N.Y.C. TO TOLL FREE 1-800-468-5522 FOR THE FOLLOWING EDITIONS: Until 5:30 P.M. the day before for Tuesday through Saturday editions, Until 10:00 A.M. Saturday for Sunday’s Nationwide edition, until 12:45 P.M. Saturday for Sunday’s New York Region edition, until 2:00 P.M. Sunday for Monday’s editions.

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A26 L THE NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIALS/LETTERS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 The New York Times Founded in 1851 ADOLPH S. OCHS, Publisher 1896-1935 ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER, Publisher 1935-1961 ORVIL E. DRYFOOS, Publisher 1961-1963 ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER, Publisher 1963-1992 ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER JR. Publisher JOSEPH LELYVELD, Executive Editor BILL KELLER, Managing Editor GERALD M. BOYD, Deputy Managing Editor JOHN M. GEDDES, Deputy Managing Editor Assistant Managing Editors SOMA GOLDEN BEHR CAROLYN LEE TOM BODKIN ALLAN M. SIEGAL CRAIG R. WHITNEY HOWELL RAINES, Editorial Page Editor PHILIP M. BOFFEY, Deputy Editorial Page Editor JANET L. ROBINSON, President, General Manager SCOTT H. HEEKIN-CANEDY, Senior VP, Circulation JILL F. HOLZMAN, Senior VP, Advertising LIAM J. CARLOS, VP, Chief Financial Officer MARC Z. KRAMER, VP, Production and Labor Relations ALYSE MYERS, VP, Marketing Services DENNIS L. STERN, VP, Human Resources DENISE F. WARREN, VP, Planning MICHAEL G. WILLLAMS, VP, Chief Information Officer THOMAS K. CARLEY, President, News Services Covering Prescription Drugs Both political parties launched advertising blitzes this week pledging that their candidates would help the elderly pay for costly prescription drugs more effectively. Vice President Al Gore has put forward a detailed plan for a Medicare drug benefit. Gov. George W. Bush is scrambling to produce a plan of his own to be unveiled next week. The need for a prescription drug benefit is undeniable. A third of Medicare’s 40 million beneficiaries have no drug coverage at all, even though drug costs are soaring and drugs are now essential to managing chronic illnesses. At the same time, drug coverage for the elderly through other health plans is becoming more limited. The Gore plan would pay for all drug costs of elderly people with incomes below about $12,000 a year for an individual or $14,000 a year for couples. Those with higher incomes who choose to participate would pay monthly premiums that would start at $25 and increase over time to $44. In return, Medicare would pay for half the cost of their prescriptions up to $5,000 a year. Once a beneficiary had paid $4,000 out of pocket in a year, the government would pay all remaining costs. The program is estimated to cost $253 billion over 10 years. Mr. Bush has said generally that he wants a drug benefit to be part of an overall Medicare reform. Ideally, Congress should both modernize Medicare - by increasing competition, improving quality and controlling costs - and create a

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long-overdue drug benefit. But given voter demand, it seems more likely that Congress will first pass a drug benefit and leave restructuring for later. The question is how to design a drug benefit that will provide affordable coverage and will not interfere with future Medicare reforms. Mr. Bush says he will offer full drug coverage now to the low income elderly. He also says he will “build on” proposals in Congress that rely on private insurers to offer prescription drug coverage, with government subsidizing the costs. But many private insurers have rejected this approach as unworkable because they say they will not be able to sell policies at rates that retirees can afford. The private-market model also means that benefits would vary, and insurers would be able to pull out of any market they thought unprofitable. Any new drug benefit will carry a substantial price tag. The House Republican bill that passed in June and relies on private insurers would cost the federal government more than $150 billion over 10 years. Mr. Bush has not proposed spending any new money. His aides say that savings from other Medicare cuts could cover the tab, an unlikely proposition that Mr. Bush will need to document. Mr. Bush seems to be leaning toward a private market model for Medicare drug coverage. He will have to explain how his plan would keep premiums down, induce insurer participation and guarantee the elderly benefits that cannot be withdrawn. Mr. Gore’s proposal will spend substantial money on a new public program. It will be interesting to see how Mr. Bush hopes to achieve the same outcome with less government involvement and less money. Markets of the World, Unite They have refused to surrender their beloved pound sterling for a newfangled Continental currency, but the British are about to cede some control over their venerable stock exchange. Swedish and German concerns are vying to be a partner with the London Stock Exchange. It is the latest sign that for all Britain’s stiffupper-lip talk of sovereignty, further economic integration in Europe is inevitable. Much like the companies they list, traditional stock exchanges are under a great deal of pressure to expand globally. It makes sense for truly multinational companies to be traded around the clock on truly multinational exchanges with greater liquidity and lower transaction costs. If the old financial centers fail to provide this, new electronic trading systems are eager to fill the gap. Faced with this reality, the 200-year-old London Stock Exchange announced in May that it would merge with the Deutsche Börse in Frankfurt. The merged entity, to be called iX for “international exchange,” would then create a partnership with the American Nasdaq market as well as the Madrid and Milan exchanges. Earlier in the year the Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam stock exchanges announced a union of their own. The joining of the Frankfurt and London exchanges was carefully presented as a “merger of equals,” so as not to ruffle nationalist feathers. But from the outset, because of the deal’s terms, there was much grousing in London financial circles about a German takeover of the exchange. Enter the Swedes. OM Gruppen A.B., a company that owns the Stockholm stock exchange and sells trading technology around the world, made a hostile cash-and-stock bid worth $1.12 billion this week for the London Stock Exchange. OM Gruppen, which is also developing a pan-European electronic trading network with Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, is representative of Scandinavia’s new tech-savvy, entrepreneurial corporate culture. Priced like a tech stock, OM

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Gruppen has a market value three times that of the London Stock Exchange, even though the Stockholm exchange is about one-seventh as large. It is not clear who will prevail in the bidding war. What is clear is that Europe’s stock exchanges will continue to consolidate. The European Union has created a single market, and its 11 core “euro zone” nations now share a single central bank. A pan-European stock exchange cannot be far behind. A Sour Fadeout for the Ewing Era There was joy in local gyms and skywriting over Manhattan when the New York Knicks drafted Patrick Ewing in 1985 in the hope of bringing the National Basketball Association championship back to Madison Square Garden. Fifteen years later the Ewing championship has failed to materialize, and though he may yet remain in New York, the team is preparing for a divorce from one of the most durable and influential players in franchise history. Ewing’s eagerness to go elsewhere is understandable, given the drubbing he has endured for failing to win that elusive N.B.A. championship. But the failure to win it is attributable less to Ewing than to the coaches who misused him and to the executives who failed to provide him with a credible supporting cast until too late in his career. Ewing emerged from college as an excellent defensive player with limited offensive skills. Instead of playing to his strengths, however, the Knicks made him the centerpiece of an unimaginative offense that consisted of four players who stood around watching him dribble and shoot. The strategy created a team of bit players who seemed at a loss to act when the star was swarmed under and shut down during the playoffs. The rap on Ewing was that he demanded the ball. But no player could really do that unless backed up by the coaches. By contrast, the Chicago Bulls, instead of standing pat with Michael Jordan, brought in Scottie Pippin and a raft of supporting players who propelled the Bulls to six championships. Meanwhile, the Knicks’ front office stumbled through a series of unfortunate trades and draft choices that occasionally brought strong players but left the team and its strategy essentially unchanged. As the star with the big paycheck, Ewing has been a convenient target for these failures. His stoic style, which strikes many people as surly, has also left him exposed. But the blame for the missing championship rests elsewhere. Return of the White House Turnstile Well after the 1996 fund-raising scandals brought charges that President Clinton had effectively “sold” the Lincoln Bedroom for campaign contributions, big donors continued to gain easy access to the White House in return for their donations. The famous White House turnstile was alive and well at least through last year, when a generous donor named David Chang, who subsequently pleaded guilty to channeling illegal contributions to Senator Robert Torricelli of New Jersey, was granted a number of visits with Mr. Clinton, in both formal and informal settings. As outlined in The Times this week by Tim Golden and David Kocieniewski, Mr. Chang and his employees gave more than 100 contributions totaling $325,000 to various candidates of both parties. Although no specific favors from the White House were reported, Mr. Chang was able to meet with National Security Council officials and attend various functions with the president, including two state dinners and a “movie night.” He also had pizza with Mr. Clinton at a hotel in Seoul in 1998. Mr. Chang appears not to have won support

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from the administration for his main effort, which was to get repayment of what he said he was owed by North Korea for grain shipments. But Mr. Chang apparently tried to use the perception that he was close to the president and other politicians to secure various business deals. The White House should come forward to explain who arranged for his inappropriate access. The case raises questions about the judgment of Senator Torricelli and of Mr. Clinton’s chief fundraiser, Terry McAuliffe. The Justice Department is reportedly investigating whether the senator accounted properly for Mr. Chang’s donations. Mr. Torricelli’s office says he was a victim of Mr. Chang’s maneuvers, not a collaborator in them. Mr. McAuliffe says he had no fund-raising ties to Mr. Chang but was simply hired by him in 1998 to help him try to buy a life insurance company in South Korea. Both Mr. Torricelli and Mr. McAuliffe should have been more cautious in their choice of political or business associates. With unregulated campaign donations, everybody gets tainted, and the entire process is diminished as a result. When the Talk Is of Faith, What Is the Message? To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): Joseph I. Lieberman is proud of his faith and his heritage. His comments reveal not an effort to proselytize but rather to inspire others who have faith to reach within their beliefs for the common good and betterment of all. The question ultimately is whether the proponent of the religious call is advocating the need or preference for others to believe in the same religious views, imposing the religious doctrine on another or assuming some moral superiority, or whether he is only crediting his faith with his motivation and intentions to help build a better society. While the former is objectionable, the latter should not be rejected or admonished. ARTHUR LIEDERMAN Hollis Hills, Queens, Aug. 31, 2000 Outside the Fold To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): The Anti-Defamation League has said that Senator Joseph I. Lieberman’s displays of religion are “inappropriate and even unsettling.” Indeed, such strutting and posturing, usually the domain of Republicans, creates a hostile environment for those who (by birth or by subsequent choice) are members of non-JudeoChristian faiths, as well as for those of us who do not believe. PULAK DUTTA Evanston, Ill., Aug. 31, 2000 To Believe or Not To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): It is a most disheartening day in America when the Anti-Defamation League, which speaks of tolerance, says that Joseph I. Lieberman is speaking about religion too much. As I listen to Senator Lieberman address the role of religion in America, I hear someone who advocates that one has the right to believe or disbelieve. As a rabbi, I have taught that my religion is not better than anyone else’s, except that it is better for me. Senator Lieberman has never professed that this should be a Jewish nation or that Judaism be the state religion. Rather he has spoken of the greatness of

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America where one can be both a proud Jew and American simultaneously. Growing up, I heard that one should be a Jew inside the house and a mensch outside. Senator Lieberman has shown that one can be the same inside and out. (Rabbi) JOSEPH POTASNIK Brooklyn, Aug. 31, 2000 Ring of Truth To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): Joseph I. Lieberman’s adherence to Jewish law in his daily life and his statements on morality and faith strike a responsive chord in all people who follow the ethics discussed in all religions. DONALD SPITZER Bayside, Queens, Aug. 31, 2000 Unbroken Barrier To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): Al Gore broke a barrier by selecting Joseph I. Lieberman as his running mate. Perhaps Senator Lieberman, in his recent remarks about religion in public life, has opened the door to the day when nonbelievers will be seen as acceptable candidates for highest offices. ROSAMOND BLIZARD Yarmouth Port, Mass., Aug. 31, 2000 Religion’s Burdens To the Editor: Re “Mr. Lieberman’s Religious Words” (editorial, Aug. 31): Representing a true minority (a devout atheist deep in the Bible Belt), I find Joseph I. Lieberman’s message both offensive and anti-American. I wish that his faith in the Constitution were as strong as his faith in God. Listening to his religious speeches, one would think that he is running for rabbi, not for vice president. Immorality (and irrationality) has been shackled through the years to religions of all faiths. It is science and technology that have brought greater knowledge and freedom to the people of this world, generally over the protests of religious voices. CHARLES CUTTER Appomattox, Va., Aug. 31, 2000 Justice in East Timor To the Editor: Re “Indonesians Differ on Penal-ties for the Past” (news article, Aug. 27): Forceful prosecutions of those who committed rights abuses in Indonesia and East Timor are necessary if Indonesia is to build a demo-cratic future. Elements of the Indo-nesian military continue to create mischief - for example, by backing militias that harass East Timor and block the return of refugees. An international tribunal should be set up to deal with crimes against the East Timorese since 1975, when Indonesia illegally invaded its neighbor. Last January, a United Nations investigation recommended a tribunal for military and militia violence during last year’s independence plebiscite. Creating a tribunal is especially urgent now that Indonesia’s consultative assembly has amended the Constitution to let the abusers off the hook, crippling its own prosecutors’ ability to try past injustices. JOHN M. MILLER

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Brooklyn, Aug. 27, 2000 The writer is media coordinator for the East Timor Action Network. Certified Teachers To the Editor: Re “Deal Is Struck on Placement of Instructors; Certified Teachers to Go to Worst Schools in City” (news article, Aug. 25): This decision means that a new, qualified, but inexperienced teacher looking for a job will know that New York City would place her in one of its toughest schools. What potential recruit would want to take that deal? Surely this settlement will only make it harder for the city, already short of certified teachers, to attract and retain qualified teachers. It is a mystery why the state education commissioner, Richard P. Mills, who brought the suit, considers this approach to be sound education policy. DANIEL A. SIMON New York, Aug. 28, 2000 Organic Food Safety To the Editor: John Tierney’s concern about the “danger” of organic food (Big City column, Aug. 25) is easily addressed by the use of common sense. Wash-ing fruits and vegetables before eating them should remove any residual bacteria from improperly treated manure. But the same common-sense approach will not eliminate the health risks posed by pesticide-treated produce. Some of the most toxic pesticides used on fruits and vegetables penetrate the skin of the produce and cannot be removed by simply washing. SARAH MATTHEWS Vineyard Haven, Mass., Aug. 29, 2000 Facing Your Mortality at 30,000 Feet To the Editor: I can assure Mary R. Lefkowitz (“No Words Capture the Fear,” Op Ed, Aug. 26) that not all passengers on endangered planes are “uncannily calm.” A decade ago, after an uneventful flight from San Francisco to New York, the plane I was on tried to land in a powerful thunderstorm. The wind shear was severe, and the plane repeatedly plunged with no warning. The left wing was struck by a bolt of lightning that left an eerie blue aura, and the pilot failed in his first three attempts to land. By the time he lined up for the fourth attempt, at least half the passengers were screaming, weeping or praying. After we finally did land successfully, I overheard one of the flight crew say it was the worst he had ever experienced. I would bet that the naked and very vocal terror inside that cabin is far from uncommon when helpless passengers are surprised by a confrontation with eternity. DAVID HAYDEN Wilton, Conn., Aug. 26, 2000 Progress on Drug Abuse To the Editor: Colombia’s president, Andrés Pas-trana, is correct when he says the United States must do more to reduce the demand of its citizens for illegal drugs (front page, Aug. 30). Yet like so many Americans, he seems unaware of just how much progress has been made toward this goal. Of all the anti-drug efforts under-taken by this country, none have been as successful as the fight to reduce demand. Since 1985, regular use of illegal drugs

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is down by 50 percent; regular use of cocaine is down more than 70 percent; and there are 9.7 million fewer regular adult users of illegal drugs. Since there is widespread agree-ment that the availability of drugs has not declined appreciably, the only explanation for these shifts is reduced demand. RICHARD D. BONNETTE President and Chief Executive Partnership for a Drug-Free America New York, Aug. 31, 2000 California Energy Crisis To the Editor: Re “States Deregulate Energy at Their Peril,” by Gregory Palast (OpEd, Aug. 25): Mr. Palast stated that the chairman of Green Mountain Energy Company, Sam Wyly, is a former business partner of George W. Bush. He is not. Recent price increases in California have resulted from a capacity crunch and a failed market structure. The demand for energy in California has overwhelmed supply. Since 1995, California has added only 672 megawatts, but demand in just the last three years has grown by 5,500 megawatts. California has set up a market structure in which few companies can compete. our company is one of a handful that have chosen to come into the state. We are succeeding because many Californians understand the connection between cleaner air and cleaner energy and thus choose Green Mountain Energy products that feature cleaner and renewable sources like wind, water and solar. SUZIE QUINN South Burlington, Vt., Aug. 29, 2000 The writer is corporate communication manager, Green Mountain Energy Company. NYT The New York Times Company 229 West 43rd St., N.Y. 10036-3959 ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER JR., Chairman RUSSELL T. LEWIS, President Chief Executive Officer MICHAEL GOLDEN, Vice Chairman Senior Vice President JOHN M. O’BRIEN, Senior Vice President Chief Financial Officer CYNTHIA H. AUGUSTINE, Senior Vice President SOLOMON B. WATSON IV Senior Vice President Secretary JAMES C. LESSERSOHN, Vice President Treasurer Release Ray’s Report To the Editor: Re “Mr. Ray’s Ill-Timed Report” (editorial, Aug. 30): You urge Robert W. Ray, the independent counsel investigating the Clintons, to delay the release of his report until after the election. That is exactly the wrong advice. If Hillary Rodham Clinton is innocent of any wrongdoing in Whitewater or

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other matters under investigation, then she has nothing to fear. But if she is found to have engaged in unethical behavior, what better time for voters to know this than upon entering the voting booth? GREGG NELSON New York, Aug. 30. 2000 Giving Energy to Evil To the Editor: Re “Real Confessions” (editorial, Aug. 26): There is another reason in addition to those you cite that confessions of convicted murderers and rapists should not be shown on television. Publicity is a form of currency. Attention paid by the public is energy fed to the perpetrator’s thoughts and actions. Thus, we are rewarding criminals by dwelling on their deeds, not to mention reinforcing weak minds in our midst who may have dormant antisocial urges waiting to be inspired. If we give energy to evil, it will grow. We should be starving these people of our attention, not feeding them. The decision-makers at Court TV may gain a few points in their ratings by airing this footage, but we all pay the cost in additional erosion of our peace of mind and physical safety. Is it worth it? BARBARA BOOTZ Jersey City, Aug. 28, 2000 Vote the Environment To the Editor: When it comes to protecting the earth (editorial, Aug. 28) - rightly a big-picture issue - voters need to keep the smaller picture in mind, too. Local and state elected leaders make in-your-backyard decisions affecting a wide range of environmental issues, from curbing sprawl and conserving farmland to water-quality protection and smart transportation planning. By Election Day, our organization will have issued candidate endorsements for races all over New York, informing voters who the best pro-earth candidates are. Then it’s up to everyone to get out and vote for a cleaner, healthier environment, both locally and globally. MARCIA BYSTRYN Executive Director, New York League of Conservation Voters New York, Aug. 29, 2000 The Times welcomes letters from readers. Letters must include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Those selected may be shortened to fit allotted space. Send e-mail to [email protected], faxes to (212) 556-3622 or postal mail to Letters to the Editor, The New York Times, 229 West 43rd Street, New York, N.Y. 10036-3959.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L A27 The Wrong Argument About Readiness BY William A. Owens As a 30-year veteran of the United States military, I’m glad that national security has become an issue in the presidential campaign. But I’m disheartened that the debate as it has played out so far has been far more partisan than enlightening. Al Gore has said, “Our military is the strongest and the best in the entire world.” But in a speech on Wednesday, Dick Cheney, the Republican vice presidential nominee, said the Clinton administration had neglected national defense and was “running down” the military. This echoes statements by George W. Bush that today’s servicemen and women battle “back-to-back deployWilliam A. Owens was vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1994 to 1996. He is the author of “Lifting the Fog of War.” ments, poor pay, shortages of spare parts and equipment, and rapidly declining readiness.” In his speech at the Republican convention, Mr. Bush charged that two of the Army’s 10 divisions were The candidates ignore a perilous military future. not ready for a major war. This sort of interchange does not begin to address the important defense challenges facing the nation. It exaggerates problems that don’t threaten our national security while ignoring problems that do threaten it. Let’s examine the issues. Lack of military readiness. Mr. Bush’s charge that two army divisions were unprepared for war sounds serious, but is not particularly relevant. Every active duty force, every national guard and reserve unit is currently judged ready for combat according to a list of standards that are in many ways more appropriate for cold war missions and less appropriate for our troops that served in Bosnia, Kosovo and Rwanda. Troops need to be less like a tightly packed, hierarchical combat force, and more like a sophisticated, flexible police force. Moreover, the list of standards fails to include equipment that may be especially important in today’s missions, like high technology information systems, defenses against chemical and biological weapons and adequate numbers of precision weapons. The Clinton administration has spent too much money to assure that our forces can, by and large, meet this outdated standard - even troops who would not, in any circumstance be used for months into a conflict, Certainly, the fact that all units don’t meet every standard means far less than politicians may imply, and our current level of readiness is certainly not a significant threat to our national security. Too many missions around the world. True, our forces are deployed too broadly, in dozens of places around the globe. And some units are overextended. But the grand mass of the American military is not deployed. The percentage of troops overseas is small. With management, both people and money could be

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moved from other parts of the services into overextended units. Low morale and poor recruitment. We need to do more for our troops, including increasing their pay. And it is difficult to recruit and retain people, especially in a hot economy. But over the last decade, the military has been able to maintain its fighting force, and in the coming year, the services are expected to meet their recruiting goals. Moreover, today’s morale, while low and needing attention, is not the kind of issue that is likely to bring down our national security. The situation today is not the post-Vietnam military that many decry. A failure to look ahead. So what issue should our presidential candidates be concerned with? The military’s ability to meet challenges five to 15 years from now. The Clinton administration, to avoid charges of military unreadiness, made sure that today, every division is combat-ready. But that required billions of dollars and precluded buying enough equipment - ships, tanks, tents - for the future. The military procurement budget has been cut by about 60 percent since the end of the cold war (the overall budget is down by only 35 percent). Some of the results can be seen today. The average age of vehicles is much older than in the past, Indeed, some Marine and Army helicopters are older than the pilots who fly them. Because it takes many years to replace equipment, in 10 to 15 years, there could be 30 percent fewer airplanes, ships, tanks and trucks. The ones that do exist will be older - and harder to keep running - than the ones today. Moreover, the military has been unable to invest in America’s information technology. For instance, it has not been able to buy enough battlefield sensors and communications, which would allow commanders to have information about an entire battlefield. Both the White House and the Republican Congress are responsible for this situation. Our presidential candidates should address it. And the next administration and Congress should fix it. Public Interests GAIL COLLINS Laborers Anonymous The service economy has created some strange and wonderful forms of employment. A friend of mine once went to a party in Los Angeles where the host had covered one room with fuzzy shag carpet - floor, walls and ceiling - and hired a man whose sole job was to fluff up the nap whenever it got matted. “Survivor” drove home the lesson that farmers and truck drivers are no match for people with titles like “corporate trainer” or “whitewater rafter.” At the Democratic convention, thanks to the presence of Christie Brinkley in the New York delegation, we were alerted for the first time to the existence of a career path known as model/ activist.” Until recently, America chose its presidents pretty exclusively from the national pool of lawyers and generals. But lately the candidates’ backgrounds have gotten more varied. This year, of the Democrats and Republicans on the national tickets, only Joe Lieberman is a lawyer, and only Al Gore was ever a fulltime soldier. It’s never been clear how much voters care if a president’s experience with the world of work in any way resembles their own. Do weary parents juggling two careers and child-rearing resent hearing about George W. Bush’s afternoon naps? Would middle-aged professionals who are too humiliated to admit they don’t know

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the difference between a money market and a mutual fund feel an affinity for Al Gore, who keeps his savings in a passbook account? Both Mr. Bush and his running mate, Dick Cheney, are rich men, while Mr. Gore and Mr. Lieberman are not. Economically speaking, Mr. Gore may actually be downwardly mobile. He says he doesn’t buy stock because it might look like a conflict of interest, and Fortune magazine, analyzing what passes for the Gore portfolio, once suggested the vice president “could be a financial dolt.” So which team better understands the working stiff? The Democratic candidates are less wealthy, but on the other hand, they’re both career politicians who have held elective office practically since puberty. (Mr. Lieberman did have a twoyear hiatus after he lost a House race in 1980, during which he worked as a lawyer and represented at least one client in the liquor industry who had issues before the Connecticut state legislature. The senator’s staff says this doesn’t mean he used to be a lobbyist, but the experience probably gave Mr. Lieberman a certain sympathy for the trials of a carpet-fluffer.) Mr. Bush, who was about as successful at drilling oil wells as Mr. Gore is in investing, struck it rich when he persuaded a group of wealthy associates to help him buy the Texas Rangers and then persuaded the town of Arlington to build said team a new stadium. Mr. Bush’s own $600,000 investment thus became $14.9 million when the franchise was sold. The work he performed as the managing general partner included encouraging team spirit, and reportedly involved a lot of autograph-signing. This may not have given him much in common with the nation’s stevedores, but Ms. Brinkley and the other model/activists of the world undoubtedly know what he’s been through. Mr. Cheney spent most of his career in government, but the arrival of the Clinton administration left him They also toil who fluff the carpets. cooling his heels at a conservative think tank. Happily, in 1995 he went salmon fishing with Thomas Cruikshank, chairman of the Halliburton Company, a huge energy services business, who liked Mr. Cheney so much he recommended him as his successor, at a salary of more than $1 million a year and oodles of stock options. During his tenure there, the future vice-presidential candidate’s big coup was a merger with the company’s chief rival, Dresser Industries, whose chief executive Mr. Cheney won over during a quail hunt. Mr. Cheney’s ability to fish and shoot his way to serious money should be an inspiration to all careerists who worry that an inability to play golf is standing between them and success. Sure, there were some failures at Halliburton, including the time his company was banned from bidding on road construction contracts by the state of North Carolina. But they might provide a much-needed humanizing touch. We’ve all had our little career setbacks. Getting tossed out of North Carolina might not be one of them, but the concept is there. Happy Labor Day weekend. Buy a steelworker a drink. Milton Glaser A Languid Sort of Suicide By Mario Vargas Llosa LONDON Although, since I stopped smoking 30 years ago, I have detested cigarettes and their manufacturers, I have not been as pleased as other ex-smokers to see damage awards in lawsuits against tobacco companies reach the hundreds of bil-

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lions of dollars, for reasons I would like to try to explain. In Cochabamba, Bolivia, when I was 7 or 8, my cousins Nancy and Gladys and I invested our allowances in a packet of Viceroys and smoked them all. Gladys and I survived, but the weakling Nancy began vomiting, and her grandparents had to call the doctor. This first smoking experience greatly disgusted me, but my passion for being grown up was stronger than the disgust, and I went on smoking. My adolescence at university is inseparable from the oval-shaped Nacional Presidente brand with its piquant black tobacco, which I smoked incessantly while reading, watching movies, arguing, falling in love, conspiring or attempting to write. Drawing in the smoke and blowing it out, in rings or as a cloud that dissolved into dancing figures, was a great felicity: a companion, a support, a distraction, a stimulus. When I arrived in Paris in 1958, the discovery of Gitanes catapulted my tobacco habit, and soon I was smoking three packs a day. After a strong coffee and a croissant, the first drag of thick smoke had the effect of the true awakening, the start-up of the organism. A lighted cigarette in the hand was an indispensable prerequisite for any action or decision: opening a letter, answering a telephone call, requesting a loan at the bank. I took the last drag of the day when already halfway asleep. A doctor warned me that cigarettes were harming me; I was tormented by bronchial problems, and the Parisian winters kept me sneezing and coughing incessantly. I paid no attention to him, convinced that without tobacco my life would be terribly impoverished and that I might even lose my urge to write. But, on moving to London in 1966, I Mario Vargas Llosa is the Peruvian novelist. This article, which appeared in a longer form in the Spanish newspaper El Pais, was translated by James Brander. tried a cowardly compromise, trading the beloved Gitanes for the blond Players No. 6, which had a filter and less tobacco and which I never really liked. It was my neighbor, a medical professor, in the town of Pullman, Wash., who finally made me decide to stop smoking. I was in that remote place of snowstorms and red apples as a visiting professor, and he asked me one day to go with him to his office. I warned him that I was genetically allergic to conversions, but went. For three or four hours he gave me a practical lecture against cigarettes. I returned convinced that human beings are even more stupid than we seem, because smoking constitutes an unmitigated cataclysm Why beleaguer those who choose destruction puff by witless puff? for any organism, as anyone may see who takes the trouble to consult the encyclopedic scientific information on the subject. Perhaps what most impressed me was the absolute disproportion which, in the case of the cigarette, exists between the pleasure obtained and the risk run, unlike other practices, also dangerous to health, but infinitely more succulent than the foolery of breathing smoke in and out. Still, I went on smoking for at least a year more, in an agitation of fear and remorse every time I lit up. I quit the day in 1970 that I left London to go and live in Barcelona. It was less difficult than I had feared. The first weeks I did nothing else but not smoke it was the only activity in my head - but it was a great help, from the first moment,

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to begin to sleep like a normal person and to wake up in the morning feeling fresh. It was most amusing to discover there were different smells in life - that the sense of smell existed - and above all, flavors, that is, that a steak did not taste the same as a plate of chick peas. Quitting smoking did not at all affect my intellectual work; on the contrary, I was able to work longer hours without the chest pains that used to wrench me away from the writing desk. The negative consequences were appetite, which burgeoned, obliging me to exercise, diet and even fast; and a certain allergy to the odor of tobacco, which, in countries where people still smoke a lot and smoke everywhere, as in Spain or Latin America, may complicate life for the ex-smoker. As often occurs with converts of the tiresome sort, for a while I became an anti-tobacco apostle. In Barcelona, one of my first conquests was Gabriel García Marquez, who, one night, livid with horror at my missionary stories about the havoc wreaked by nicotine, threw a packet of cigarettes on the floor and swore he would never smoke again. He kept his promise. My zeal waned over the years, especially when, in much of the world, campaigns against cigarettes proliferated and the matter began, in certain countries like Britain and the United States, to assume a complexion of paranoia and witchhunting. Nowadays it is impossible, in the these countries, not to feel a certain civic solidarity with the smokers. It is, of course, quite fair that the tobacco companies should be penalized if they have concealed information or have used prohibited substances to increase addiction. But is it not hypocrisy to consider them enemies of humanity while the product they offer has not been the object of a specific prohibition by law? Nor should there be such a prohibition. The obligation of the state, in a democratic society, is to make citizens aware that tobacco is harmful, so that they can decide with adequate knowledge whether to smoke. This, indeed, is what is happening in most Western countries. If a person in the United States, France, Spain or Italy smokes, it is not out of ignorance of what this means for health, but because he does not wish to know, or does not care. commit suicide by degrees is a choice that ought to figure on the list of basic human rights. This is the only possible approach if we wish to preserve the freedom of the individual, which must include the freedom to opt not only for what is beneficial to him, but also for what harms or injures. And so, though at first sight, the decision of juries to impose astronomical penalties on the tobacco companies may seem a progressive measure, it is not so. What sort of freedom would it be that allowed us only to choose what is good for us? Taiwan: Ready for Closer Integration into the Global Community Perhaps like no other time in human around the world, people everywhere can history, the future is ours to make. The benefit from the economic expansion, greater past 25 years have seen unprece-dented levels of prosperity, the end of East-West Cold War rivalry, and technological advances that are bringing us closer and closer together. This is basically what the G-8 components. Its agile manufacturing sector leaders concluded about the entire world at a meeting in Okinawa earlier this year, but it also describes perfectly today’s Taiwan. And they could just as well have been talking about Taiwan when they noted that this has

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been driven by the basic principles and values of democracy, a free-market economy, social progress, sustainable development, and respect for human rights. Indeed, the historic election in March of the opposition party candidate Chen Shui-bian as President of the Republic of China demonstrated the maturity and stability of Taiwan’s democratic development. President Chen has committed the ROC to further integrating Taiwan into the international human rights order. He has also declared that everything should be done to ensure that Taiwan’s NGOs have a greater presence in the international community. This will mobilize Taiwan’s prodigious resources to help jointly deal with the various challenges facing our increasingly interconnected world. In fact, Taiwan has the right combination of strengths to be a strategic partner with other members of the international community in working toward one of the G-8’s primary goals-greater prosperity in the 21st century. As information technology spreads rapidly around the world, people everywhere can benefit from the economic expansion, greater public welfare, and democratic development that it brings. Taiwan plays a pivotal role in the IT world, as the leading producer of many of the world’s key silicon chips and computer components. Its agile manufacturing sector has a proven track record of adapting quickly to the changing needs of economic development and market forces. When the ROC’s economic prowess is coupled with the determination of the new government to play a more active role on the global stage, Taiwan is ready to help the international community bridge the growing international information and knowledge divide. As our world grows closer through technological advances, issues of national sovereignty will more and more take a back seat to matters of common concern. Sustainable development that leaves the environment of our fragile planet intact for future generations will be the responsibility of all countries. The new ROC government is committed to making Taiwan a “Green Silicon Island,” where the environment is protected while high-tech industries remain at the cutting edge. The people of Taiwan know that they have an important role to play in the increasingly integrated world of the 21st century. They are ready to join organizations such as the WHO and take their place on the front line of global efforts to overcome economic instability, disease, and disasters. Taiwan extends a hand in partnership. Together, we can indeed achieve greater prosperity in the new century. TODAY’S TAIWAN REPUBLIC OF CHINA Taiwan Benevolent Association in New York 135-09 38th Avenue, Flushing, NY 11354 Access more extensive information through the internet at http://www. taipei.org Your comments are also welcome via e-mail: [email protected]

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The Metro Section L+ B1 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 The New York Times Nuclear Agency And Con Ed Faulted in Leak At Indian Point By DAVID W. CHEN WHITE PLAINS, Aug. 31 - In the most scathing report prompted by the accident at the Indian Point 2 nuclear plant in February, an independent monitor has found that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission con-ducted inadequate plant inspections as far back as 1997 and relied on flawed analyses, inexperienced staff members and the company it was supposed to regulate. The report, released today by the Office of the Inspector General, was no more sparing in its criticism of Consolidated Edison, the owner of Indian Point 2. The plant, in the Westchester County town of Buchanan, 35 miles north of Midtown Manhattan, was shut down in February when a steam-generator tube ruptured and caused a radioactive leak. Describing the utility as lacking a “commitment to excellence,” with employees who sometimes did only “enough to get by,” the report says that Con Edison may have been able to prevent the accident — the worst in the plant’s 26-year history — had it not “missed the vast majority” of defects in the generators during a 1979 inspection. For months, local officials, residents of the area and environmental groups have railed primarily against Con Edison with a litany of technical, communications and inspections problems related to Indian Point 2. But today’s report marks the most comprehensive criticism of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with blunt comments about how senior managers may have frowned upon tougher plant inspections for the sake of expediency and how senior engineers treated the steam generators as low risk and low priority. The report comes three weeks after Con Edison announced that it would replace the generators before reopening the plant. So while the findings by the Office of the Inspector General, which operates as an internal affairs department within the N.R.C., are supposed to spur reform, specific steps have already been taken to address technical deficiencies. Even so, the report comes three weeks after Con Edison announced that it would replace the generators before reopening the plant. So while the findings by the Office of the In-spector General, which operates as an internal affairs department within the N.R.C., are supposed to spur reform, specific steps have already been taken to address techni-cal deficiencies. Even so, the report raises larger ques-tions about whether the commission’s laxity at Indian Point 2 was an isolated case of part of something more widespread. “What you’ve got here is a very protec-tive regulatory agency protecting the busi-ness Questions about whether one case implies widespread problems. it’s supposed to be regulating,” said Representative Sue W. Kelly, a Republican who represents the district and pushed for the investigation. In response, Neil A. Sheehan, a spokes-man for the commission, said that “we

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take very seriously the critical report of the agency’s Inspector General of the handling of the Feb. 15 steam generator tube failure of Indian Point 2.” He said that the N.R.C. chairman, Richard A. Meserve, had direct-ed the commission’s staff to do a compre-hensive analysis of the Inspector General’s criticisms and come up with recommenda-tion for corrective actions by Nov. 1. Michael Clendenin, a spokesman for Con Edison, said tonight that he had not yet seen the Inspector General’s report. But he re-peated the position that the company has held since February: “The inspection in 1997 was done with the most up-to-date technology available at its time,” he said. “We complied with all neces-sary procedures, and our inspection was even approved by the N.R.C. However, we’ve moved on and are proceeding with the replacement of the steam generators, and expect to have the plant running by the end of the year.” James P. Riccio, senior policy analyst for Public Citizen, a nonprofit advocacy group, said the report showed, “that senior staff is more concerned with allowing these reac-tors to run, rather than to insure that they’re running safely.” Had there been tougher oversight - par-ticularly since the generators at Indian Point 2 were among the oldest of their kind still in use - inspectors would probably have detected that a tube in one of them had corroded by almost 100 percent, and would have been able to prevent a subsequent rupture, the report says. As for Con Edison, the report says that, among other deficiencies, the company demonstrated chronic problems with emer-gency preparedness, even during scheduled drills. In short, the report suggests that both the agency and the company, on many occa-sions, simply did not bother to take the extra step, preferring instead to do the minimum and act passively. As a result, some watch-dogs of nuclear power have urged Congress to hold hearings. “If there is not a Congressional oversight hearing,” said David Lochbaum, a nuclear safety engineer with the Union of Concerned Scientists, based in Washington, “and there was an accident a month or year from now, where the N.R.C.’s lack of review is again a factor, I don’t know how the federal govern-ment could tell the American people, we did everything to protect you.” Despondent Parents See Foster Care as Only Option Voluntary Cases Add To a Strained System By SOMINI SENGUPTA Filled with a mixture of dread and relief one summer morning two years ago, Yahya Abdul-Hakam, an unemployed father of two, did what many fathers would find unthinkable: he turned his eldest daughter, then 11 years old, over to the city’s foster care system. Today, reluctantly recalling that moment, he says he had no choice. For several years, his daughter had been acting out at school, throwing things, screaming in class. At home, her angry outbursts resulted in fights with a younger sister, a cousin, sometimes even with him. Mr. Abdul-Hakam even admitted her to a psychiatric hospital once. The morning he took her to the Lower Manhattan offices of the city’s Administration for Children’s Services, a tangle of emotions raced through him. “Fear, uneasiness, nervousness,” he recounted. “It really came to a point where that was the only thing I could do.”

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Extreme as his action may seem, Mr. Abdul-Hakam’s sense of frustration is shared by parents throughout the city. The range of options available to the privileged - military-style private schools, private psychiatric treatment - are not readily available to poor parents like him. So instead, every day, dozens of them stream into a sixth-floor courtroom in Manhattan Family Court designated for these so-called voluntary placements citywide. There is the father who quickly wearied of caring for his teenage son after the boy’s mother died. There is the father who sent his daughter into foster care after a series of violent outbursts. There is the mother who initially sought court-ordered supervision for her misbehaving daughter, and when that did not work, signed her over to the city. The other day, M. Jay Segal, the court referee hearing that case, turned to the girl’s mother. “Ma’am, you don’t want to take her home?” he asked. Without a glance at her daughter, the woman shook her head. “She’s going to run around,” she said. The girl, told she had no place to go other than back to her group home, sat in court, sobbing uncontrollably. Citywide, just as involuntary admissions to foster care have declined in recent years, so have the number of voluntary placements. But the share of voluntarily placed youngsters among all children admitted to foster care has inched up slightly. One in 10 children admitted to foster care in the 1999 fiscal year were voluntarily placed, according to city figures. Children’s lawyers estimate that voluntary placements make up 10 to 20 percent of the city’s total foster care caseload. Although hard numbers are not available, lawyers and social workers who work on these cases say adolescents, especially the disobedient and the emotionally disturbed, make up a significant and growing share of voluntary placements. For some youngsters, a life in foster care can be a road to further decline. For others, especially those who need round-the-clock attention, it can be better than being at home. Either way, it exposes the peculiar predicament of overwhelmed parents who relinquish their children to an equally overwhelmed government bureaucracy - one that is hardly equipped to care for, let alone Continued on Page B6 Learning to Leave the Office Before He Leaves Office Mayor Who Never Slept Now Golfs, Rests and Looks to Legacy CBS By ELISABETH BUMILLER He is in the low tide of his mayoralty, a time when he has been tired by his cancer treatments, sidelined by his party, distracted by a new love and made wistful by his short time left in office. Rudolph W. Giuliani, the round-the-clock mayor who never slept or took vacations, is now as likely to be on a golf course or at nightly dinners with his new friend, Judith Nathan, as presiding over weekend news conferences and racing to city disasters. “He’s not in the rush he used to be,” said Peter F. Vallone, the City Council speaker, who meets with Mr. Giuliani each week. The mayor himself said while discussing his cancer treatment last week that “I’d like to take a break, actually, probably to play golf, more than to get treated.” “He’s turned inward,” said Alan G. Hevesi, the city comptroller, who also

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meets regularly with Mr. Giuliani. “He’s focused on his health problems and his mortality.” Mr. Giuliani now plays golf up to three days a week, usually at such public courses as Forest Park in With 16 months left in office, Rudolph W. Giuliani has found time to joke with David Letterman, golf three times a week, enjoy dinners with Judith Nathan, and still hold almost daily news conferences. Associated Press Mike Roman / WPIX-TV Queens, Split Rock in the Bronx or Dyker Beach in Brooklyn. “We try to hit one of those three every Friday,” said Anthony V. Carbonetti, the mayor’s chief of staff and a favorite golfing partner. Last Thursday, on a day that Mr. Giuliani had no public schedule until an evening town meeting, he played golf with his flamboyant and New Agey friend, Elliot Cuker. More often than not, the mayor now takes off Friday afternoons and all day Saturday. He has said that three months of hormone treatments, to be followed soon by radiation or surgery, have left him “a little fatigued.” Of course, a more low-key Mr. Giuliani - who throughout much of his mayoralty worked seven long days a week - may simply mean that he is keeping something close to normal hours. The mayor still arrives at City Hall before his daily 8 a.m. staff meeting and often does not leave until 7 p.m. He still has a news conference almost every day. He still controls $37 billion in city spending, the fourthlargest government budget in the United States. And he and his staff continue to work quietly on the initiatives that the mayor promised when he withdrew from the Senate race, pledging to be a better person and to reach out to the minority residents he has alienated. In June, the mayor and his top advisers had a daylong retreat in Queens to discuss how to burnish and reshape the Giuliani legacy, focusing on some of the social Continued on Page B3 Richard Perry/The New York Times Newly Certified Teachers, Looking for a Job, Find a Paradox By ABBY GOODNOUGH and TINA KELLEY As a newly certified math teacher, Melanie Walker assumed that she would have no problem getting a job close to her new home in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. John F. Kennedy High School, in nearby Marble Hill, needs math teachers like her. But a court order issued last week compels the Board of Education to assign all newly hired certified teachers to the city’s 94 lowest-performing schools until about 400 vacancies there are filled. So when Ms. Walker applied for a job on Wednesday at Kennedy, which has not been classified as a failing school, she was turned away. “This is just ridiculous,” Ms. Walker, 26, said yesterday after scrambling to find a failing school within commuting distance of Riverdale, where she and her husband are buying an apartment. “I want to be able to make the best decisions for my family, and this makes it impossible.” Ms. Walker is among dozens of new certified teachers whose job searches have been thrown into chaos by the court order, which is the result of a lawsuit filed against the Board of Education by Richard P. Mills, the state education commissioner. In a paradox, they have found that having certification is a barrier to getting into a school

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of their choice and that being uncertified would have made their search easier. Rather than work in a failing school, some are choosing to seek jobs outside the city. Others, like Ms. Walker, are grudgingly resigning themselves to longer commutes and to jobs at troubled schools they fear will be exhausting and depressing. By late yesterday, Board of Education officials said they had filled all of the roughly 100 vacancies in the lowest-performing elementary schools. But dozens of job openings still exist in the lowest-performing middle and high schools, they said. Marie DeCanio, deputy executive director of the board’s Division of Human Resources, said schools that were not on the state’s list of failing schools would not be allowed to hire certified teachers at least through next week. “We have to ensure that certified teachers who have accepted assignments actually report for service next week,” she said. “Until then, these rules remain in place.” That news infuriated one new teacher who had hoped to land a job in Community Continued on Page B6 Aaron Lee Fineman for The New York Times From left, Luis A. Cartagena, Kristin Naughton and Mack Ragin were at a job fair Tuesday on Court Street in Brooklyn, hoping to be hired as public school teachers. INSIDE PUBLIC LIVES Eric Fischl unlocks the unconscious. PAGE B2 A broken steam pipe spews debris and asbestos at N.Y.U. PAGE B3 Roosevelt schools superintendent abruptly resigns. PAGE B4 A National Guard pilot ditches his F-16 in the Atlantic. PAGE B4

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B2 L THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Time Warner Cable is The Place to be With Time Warner Cable you’ll receive over 70 channels-including TBS’ suspense, action, romance and comedy flicks, with the stars that make it all happen. ®2000 Turner Network Television. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. TBS SUPERSTATION™ 15 Days of 007 connect to Standard Service for only $9.95 and get HBO & Cinemax for the price of 1 premium channel for 1 year call 212-CABLE-TV TIME WARNER new york CABLE at its best www.twcnyc.com MONEY BACK 30 day GUARANTEE Offer expires 9/30/00 and is available to Time Warner Cable customers in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Tax applies on connection. A connection to Basic Service is only $55.00. A $25 cable box deposit is required per household. Basic Service ($15.72/mo. Manh: $15.26/mo. Bklyn./Qns.). $5.00 charge for each new additional outlet installed. Cost for HBO and Cinemax is $12.95 for one year. After one year, first premium will cost $12.95/mo., and second premium will cost $9.00/mo. in MHTN; $8.00/mo. in BKLYN/QNS. Thirty-day money-back guarantee is applicable to connection and monthly serv-ice charge only when full disconnection is requested and does not apply to charges for Time Warner Home Theatre. HBO and Cinemax are registered service marks of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP. Not all programming is carried in full or available on all service tiers and may be subject to preemption. 5% NYC franchise fee not included. All prices are subject to change. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED PROJECT AND ISSUANCE OF REVENUE BONDS BY THE DORMITORY AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK FOR CERTAIN MEMBERS OF THE NEW YORK STATE REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION Public notice is hereby given that, at the time and place designated below, the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (the “Dormitory Authority”) will conduct a public hearing for the purpose of giving interested persons an opportunity to be heard an the projects described below (the *Projects”) and the proposed Issuance by the Dormitory Authority of its tax-exempt New York State Rehabilitation Association Insured Revenue Bonds, in one or more series (the “Bonds”) In an estimated aggregate principal amount not to exceed $36,000,000. The public is invited to comment either in person or In writing with respect to the Project and the Issuance of the Bonds. Proceeds of the Bonds are expected to be used to finance new costs of all or some of the Projects, or to refinance certain existing commercial or tax-exempt loans that originally financed costs of all or

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some of the Projects, of certain members (the Borrower of the New York State Rehabilitation Association, Inc. (4NYSR), a New York non-profit corporation. The Borrowers assist persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities, as well as other disabilities and needs, throughout the state through housing, education, vocational training, and other support. The Projects consist of the original payment or refinancing of all or a portion of the costs of the acquisition, construction, renovation, rehabilitation, repair, purchase, equipping, and/or otherwise providing of community residence facilities housing persons with mental retardation, developmental disabilities, and other disabilities and needs, or facilities for the training and support of such Individuals, throughout the State of New York, and other related costs, including costs of issuing the Bonds, providing required reserves, and financing fees for credit enhancement. The owner(s) and operators of the Project are as follows: (i) Claddagh Commission, Inc. (“Claddagh”), a New York not-for-profit corporation licensed by OMRDD that provides services to developmentally disabled adults In Southern Erie County, (ii) Community Services for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc. (Community Services”), a New York not-for-profit organization licensed by OMIRDD and OCFS, located In Buffalo, New York, that provides home- and community-based services, Individualized residential alternatives, Medicaid service coordination, and respite and safe-dwelling services; (iii) Association for C.R.M.D., Inc., d/b/a Lifespire (“Lifespire”), a New York not-for-profit membership corporation located In New York, New York, licensed by OMIRDD to provide residential, day treatment Article 16 clinic, Medicaid service coordination, rehabilitation, provocational, long-term sheltered employment, and supported employment services, and licensed by OMH to provide clinic, continuing day treatment, case management, and vocational services to dually-diagnosed individuals; (iv) Lifetime Assistance, Inc, (“Lifetime”), a New York not-for-profit corporation located In Rochester, New York, and licensed by OMRDD to provide comprehensive services to adults and children with developmental disabilities over a geographic area Including Genesee, Monroe, and Orleans Counties; (v) Cattaraugus Rehabilitation Center, Inc. (“The Rehab Center”), a New York non-profit organization located In Cattaraugus County providing program services to the mentally retarded and developmentally disabled; (vi) St. Christopher-Ottille (“St. Christopher-Ottille”) a New York not-for-profit corporation associated jointly with Catholic Charities and the Diocese of Brooklyn and a member of the Protestant Welfare Agencies, Inc., providing a wide range of services and programs to young children, adolescents, and families in the metropolitan New York City and Long Island areas, including foster boarding homes, adoption services, group homes; apartments for supervised living. Specialized care for the developmentally disabled, residential treatment facilities, mental health services, preventive services, homeless shatters, substance abuse programs, schools and day care programs, and other related child care programs; and (vii) Young Adult Institute, Inc. (“YAI”), a New York notfor-profit corporation providing a variety of services to people of all ages with developmental and learning disabilities in 10 counties throughout New York State. The locations of the Project are as described below. The public hearing with respect to the proposed Issuance of the Bonds will be hold by the Dormitory Authority in the Main Conference Room of the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York, 515 Broadway, Albany, New York 12207 at 1:00 pm on Monday, September 18, 2000.

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Written comments regarding the proposed issue of Bonds must be received by the Dormitory Authority at the Dormitory Authority’s address given below no later than the date of the hearing. Materials relating to the proposed Issuance of the Bonds will be available for inspection between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the offices of the Dormitory Authority, located at 515 Broadway, Albany, New York 12207. Such material will also be available at the hearing location one hour before the hearing. PROPOSED PROJECT(S) Owner/Operator: Project Address Claddagh Commission, Inc.: 793 Bannon Road, Derby, NY 14047; 6007 Shorsharn Drive, Lakeview, NY 14085; 7200 Lakeshore Road, Derby, NY 14047; 3 Bartus Lane, Angola, NY 14006; 482 Detroit Street, Farnham, NY 14081 Community Service for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc.: 452 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202; 1179-1181 Kenmore Avenue, Kenmore, NY 14217; 248-258 Parkridge Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14215; 2118 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216; 24M2415 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216; 2421 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216; 2425 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216; 695 Parkskle Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216; 590 Kenmore Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216 Lifespire, Inc.: 25-52 5th Street, Jackson Heights, NY 11369; 87-30 Chevy Chase Street, Jamaica Estates, NY 11432; 35-84 163rd Street, Flushing, NY 11358 Lifetime Assistance Incorporated: 5 Cross Gates Road, Rochester, NY 14608; 95 Norlane Drive. Irondequoit, NY 14612; 111 Windsorshore Drive, Rochester, NY 14624; 70 Brandon Circle, Rochester, NY 14612; 198 Culver Road, Rochester, NY 14607 Catteraugus Rehabilitation Center, Inc.: 3799 South Nine Mile Road, Allegany, NY 14706; 483 Prospect Avenue Olean, NY 14760, 1126 West Henley Street, Olean, NY 14760; 417 North 13th Street, Olean, NY 14760; 3575 Buffalo Road, Allegany, NY 14706; 1951 West Fall Road, Olson, NY 14760; 3617 Five Mile Road, Allegany, NY 14706; 903 Osgood Avenue, Olean, NY 14760; 1448 South Avenue, Olean, NY 14760 St. Christopher-Otille: One Janet Lane, Farmingville, NY 11738; 2 Strathmore Village Drive, Centereach, NY 11720; 41 Main Avenue, Wheatley Heights, NY 11798; 116 Merritt Street, Lindenhurst, NY 11757; 151 Burrs Lane, Dix Hills, NY 11746; 570 Fulton Street Brooklyn, NY 11217; 94-11 Hollis Court Boulevard, Queens Village, NY 11428; 72 Wilson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11237; 218-41 9th Avenue, Queens Village, NY 11429; 229 Bayshore Road, Deer Park, NY 11729; 161st Street, Jamaica, NY 11432; 19-19 113th Avenue, St. Albans, NY 11412; 112-42 200th Street, St. Albans, NY 11412; 100 Pulaski Road, East Northport, NY 11731; 32 East 110th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11218; 122 Vernon Valley Road, East Northport. NY 11731; 760 Conklin Street, Farmingdale, NY 11735; 49 West Merrick Road, Freeport, NY 11620; 84-20 120th Street, Kew Gardens, NY 11415; 101 Downing Avenue, Seacliff, NY 11579; 164 Suydam Street, Brooklyn, NY 11221; W70 148th Street, Briarwood, NY 11435; Young Adult Institute, Inc.: 150 Van Guilder Avenue, Now Rochelle, NY 10801; 24 Belvedere Place, New Rochelle, NY 10801; 1241 Round Swamp Road, Old Bethpage, NY 11604; IS LaMarcus Avenue, Glen Cove, NY 11542; 656 Commack Road, Commack, NY 11725 For further Information, contact the Office of Counsel, Dormitory Authority of the State of New York, 515 Broadway, Albany. New York 12207. Tel. (518) 257-

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3120. soft” rs use presurns said his make passes make perfect n the Bruins age for 1:52 ice w les. Thessists b Geoff Sanderson can free, low in the right ing a team-wide forec Brown made it 5:57 of the secon ie Byron Dafor Don Sweeny of the to 2 on the powe thi eriod with a S Dixon War ad a ear th uffalo This Do Try this at home. Home delivery of The New York Times is the most convenient way of being sure you don’t miss a day’s worth. To order, call 1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637). The New York Times Expect the World® | [email protected] BETTY BUCKLEY ‘Cats,’ Now And Until Sept. 10 With “Cats” scheduled to close on Sept. 10 after 18 years on Broadway, next week is sure to bring nostalgia for the days when Eliotian whiskers were new, when the actress BETTY BUCKLEY believed that “Cats” really would be now and forever, when she was on stage every night as Grizabella. and had the dressing room Barbra Streisand had had for “Funny Girl.” Forget about next week: she started reminiscing yesterday. “I think she had the whole suite,” Ms. Buckley said, referring to Ms. Streisand and the dressing room, “but when we were there, one room went to Ken Page, and I had one room. But I got the one with the bathtub.” This was followed by memories of how she got the part in which she sang “Memory.” After her audition, “the word went back to my agent that they thought I radiated health and well-being and they wanted somebody who radiated death

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and dying.” It was months before she was called back for a second audition. “TREVOR NUNN made me sing ‘Memory’ three times, and each time it was more suicidal, more suicidal, more suicidal,” she said. “I said, ‘Mr. Nunn, surely by this point you’ve auditioned the entire talent pool here in the United States and you’ve seen a lot of women who can do this part as well as I can do it, but there’s nobody who can do it better.’ He seemed kind of amazed that I would speak to him.” She got the part that day. Now she is scheduled to sing “Memory” in “Broadway on Broadway,” an annual concert in Times Square, on Sept. 10, the day “Cats” closes. Is she downcast? “I’m excited,” she said. “It’s not a song to me anymore - It’s like my favorite recurring dream.” AL LEITER One Diagnosis, In the Strike Zone MARCIA STEIN, the executive director of Citymeals-on-Wheels, says that the Mets left-hander AL LEITER is a good diagnostician. And she is not talking about figuring out when to throw a fastball. One day last month, Ms. Stein went to Shea Stadium to be photographed with Mr. Leiter. She rode onto the field in a van because her leg had been hurting for several weeks and she had been limping. Her doctor had sent her to a rheurnatologist. There was a suspicion the problem was arthritis, she said. “I stuck my hand out and said, ‘Hi, I’m Marcia Stein.’ He said, ‘How come you’re walking like that? Do you have a torn meniscus” (The meniscus is a cartilage in the knee.) Ms. Stein had more tests, and the diagnosis was two torn meniscuses. “I never knew the knee had one, let alone two,” she said, “but he diagnosed it from the way I was walking. He even bent over. He poked it in the front, he poked it on the side. I said, what happens when you have a torn meniscus?’ He said, ‘It’s just some surgery,’ and walked away.” Film Frenzy It was a pep rally for the pep-rally movie. How else to explain why cheerleaders were jumping and turning cartwheels in the lobby of the AMC Empire Theater on West 42nd Street? The cheerleaders, from Newtown High School in Elmhurst, Queens, were spelling out the name “J-E-S-S-E” as JESSE BRADFORD, one of the stars of the sleeper “Bring It On,” arrived for a screening. Mr. Bradford is beginning his senior year at Columbia University, majoring in - what else? - film. He has three films scheduled to be released between now and graduation, if he stays in school that long - he said he would leave “if a good enough offer comes up.” He signed autographs for a couple of hours, even saying hello to a fan on a cell phone. He had trouble with some of the spellings: “Is that Mary with a Y?” he asked, and that was before a Fuschia and a Siobhan presented them-selves. But he did not stick around for the screening. “I don’t like watching myself enough to see it again.” JAMES BARRON with Paula Schwartz PUBLIC LIVES In Capturing Star, Artists Goes for the Spirit

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By JOYCE WADLER WALKING around the National Tennis Center during the United States Open this week, you may happen upon a 14-foot statue of a man, nude, rendered in heroic, classic style. His arm will be raised as if he is about to serve a tennis ball. The statue, by Eric Fischl, is a tribute to the late tennis champion Arthur Ashe, though it bears no likeness. “It’s a representation, but not a representation of Ashe,” says Mr. Fischl, 52, an agreeably rumpled fellow, in the large TriBeCa studio that signals a very successful artist - or one who’s been at it a long time. “It remembers and honors him. There are different ways you can do that. There’s a spirit in which I remember him, his energy. It’s those intangibles which do not necessarily show up on the face.” We deal now with the question of representation: What does it mean that the artist is yawning and will yawn more and more, as questions grow increasingly personal? Tired, Mr. Fischl says, it was a late night. Do we take this at face value? If we had a picture, would we call it “Man Weary After the Unveiling of his Arthur Ashe Statue,” or would we speak, as many do with Mr. Fischl’s work, of the tensions lurking beneath the pleasant surface? Mr. Fischl, at any rate, is a star. He hit it in the early 80’s with his figurative paintings, many of which involved disturbing sexual and social images in the supposedly safe setting of the suburbs. Mr. Fischl knew the suburbs, having been, a Port Washington kid. One of his most talked about early works was “Bad Boy,” in which a woman lies naked on her bed while a young man reaches surreptitiously into her purse. Ibis year a painting, “Noonwatch,” sold for $1 million. Mr. Fischl and his wife, April Gornick, a highly regarded landscape artist, have a home in Sag Harbor and a duplex in the Village. This is all very impressive for someone, who, as Mr. Fischl says, “wasn’t a good kid.” Mr. Fischl’s father was a salesman. His mother? A brief pause, then an equally brief description. “Housewife.” Mr. Fischl speaks of flunking out of his first college; of living as a hippie in San Francisco; of his parents moving to the Southwest. But what he seems to enjoy discussing most is his work. He speaks wryly of trends in the art world, dryly funny Librado Romero / The New York Times “Painting unlocks the unconscious,” says Eric Fischl, in his studio. in the style of Steve Martin and Mike Nichols, who are collectors and friends. When Mr. Fischl talks art, it is often Art Forum sort of stuff: “I was of a mind that you could paint from experience towards experience.” Something feels as if it’s missing. Could he give us a better sense of his parents? The answer comes back so bluntly and directly it is like a shot. “My mother was a ferocious alcoholic who ultimately killed herself,” Mr. Fischl says. “My father was trying to hold the whole thing together as best he could. And they just had this incredibly intense, really horrible relationship. She died in a car accident - went out extremely drunk, to run herself off the road. I was 22. She did not want to live. That’s what I think.” Why was Mr. Fischl’s mother so unhappy? “Aha, the mystery of mysteries,” Mr. Fischl says with a bitter and slightly unpleasant edge. “I always thought she just lacked discipline. She was very creative and her fantasy of herself was as an artist, and she always approached everything as if it had to be a masterpiece or it wasn’t worth doing. She tried

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everything: painting, sculpture, crafts, writing, but every time she put something out it was never good enough, it humiliated her.” The painting “Bad Boy” shows a boy seemingly taking money from a purse. Was that boy ever Mr. Fischl? “Yeah, I stole money all the time.” The woman in the painting might at first glance, be passed out. Did Mr. Fischl, as a boy, ever see his mother passed out on the bed? A nod of assent. “Or on the floor or in the backyard or in the car, waiting to pick you up.” Would the artist speak about how this painting came to be? He will, and happily. “The painting ‘Bad Boy’ is probably the greatest journey I ever took, because I started out simply wanting to paint this bowl of fruit.” Mr. Fischl describes the process, He paints a still life - a bowl of fruit on a table - then decides to put a phone on the table, then tries to figure out what sort of room to put the table in. Looking through a magazine, be sees a room with bamboo and decides those blinds would be fun to paint. He then paints the stripes the afternoon sun would make on the fruit. “The painting is starting to talk to me now,” Mr. Fischl recalls, excited. “It’s talking to me about the time of day, I’m thinking Southwest, noon, siesta. I paint a man and a woman in a bed, but I can’t really make the guy stick. It’s not coming out right. I keep thinking there are two people in the room, maybe a small child. I put that in, but it doesn’t work. Then I get this idea, maybe it’s an older child, an 8, 9 or 10-year-old boy. I put him in, I see him looking over his shoulder and realize that he’s doing something. I change the telephone on the table to a purse and the painting is finished.” “Painting unlocks the unconscious; it’s a process of free association. The painting has to talk to the artist. The artist goes to it with a certain amount of stuff just to get it going, but what you’re looking for is the painting to tell you where to go... If the painting doesn’t talk it’s because it’s not alive, it’s dead.” LONG ISLAND FARMINGDALE MENS S&B WAREHOUSE BROOKLYN 6124 4th AVENUE & 63rd ST. LABOR DAY MENSWEAR MARATHON 4 DAYS ONLY SEPTEMBER 1 FRIDAY 10AM-9PM SEPTEMBER SATURDAY 10AM-9PM SEPTEMBER 3 SUNDAY 10AM-6PM LABOR DAY SEPTEMBER 4 MONDAY

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1-800-757-MENS 1-800-757-MENS BROOKLYN 6214 4th AVENUE & 63rd St. Take R or N Train to 60th St. Station Belt Parkway / Exit 1 to 4th Ave. Only Minutes to Manhattan By Subway Take the 4 or 6 to Atlantic Ave. Transfer N or R. 1-800-834-MENS 30 DAY REFUND POLICY ON ANY UNALTERED GARMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED PROJECT AND ISSUANCE OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT REVENUE BONDS BY THE DORMITORY AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK Public notice is hereby given that, at the times and places designated below, the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (the ‘Authority’) will conduct public hearings for the purpose of giving interested persons an opportunity to be heard on the Project described below and the proposed issuance by the Authority of tax-exempt Dormitory Authority of the State of New York Mental Health Services Facilities Improvement Revenue Bonds in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $18,000.000 (the “Bonds”). The public is invited to comment either in person or in writing with respect to the Project and the Issuance of the Bonds. Proceeds of the Bonds are expected to be used, together with other available monies, (i) to finance the cost of acquiring, constructing, furnishing, equipping, renovating or otherwise providing the projects described below; (ii) to fund the Debt Service Reserve Fund requirements; and (iii) to pay the costs of Issuance of the Bonds. A public hearing with respect to the proposed issuance of the Bonds will be hold In the Authority’s main conference room at 515 Broadway, Albany, New York at 6:00 p.m. on September 20, 2000; and in the Authority’s New York office at 1 Penn Plaza, 52nd Floor, New York, New York on September 21, 2000 at 11 a.m. Written comments can be sent to Office of Counsel at 515 Broadway, Albany, New York 12207-2964 no later than September 21, 2000. Materials related to the issuance of the Bonds are available for Inspection at the Office of Counsel at 515 Broadway, Albany, New York from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on any business day preceding the hearing and at the hearing. Further information may be requested from the Office of Counsel, at the above address or by calling (518) 257-3120. THE PROJECT, OOC OASAS 1008: Neighborhood Youth & Family Services, a not for profit corporation, will acquire, renovate and own buildings(s) for use as a drug free outpatient treatment program providing services for persons with varying degrees of chemical dependency. The project, of approximately 9,250 sq. feet comprised of 80 Clients and located at 4135 - 4137 Third Avenue in Bronx, Bronx County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $2,921,000. THE PROJECT, OOC OASAS 1010: Young Men’s Christian Association of Greater New York, a not for profit corporation, will acquire, construct and own buildings(s) for use as a drug free outpatient treatment program providing services for persons with varying degrees of chemical dependency. The project, of approximately 6,700 feet comprised of 75 clients and located at 3911 Richmond

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Avenue in Staten Island, Richmond County, has’* total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $2,183,000. THE PROJECT, OOC OASAS 1009: New Hope Guild for Emotionally Disturbed Children, Inc., a not for profit corporation, will acquire and own buildings(s) for use as a drug free outpatient treatment program providing services for persons with varying degrees of chemical dependency. The project, of approximately 21,000 sq. feet comprised of 50 clients and located at 2400 Linden Boulevard In Brooklyn, Kings County, has a total project cost to be Minced estimated not to exceed $1,588,000. THE PROJECT, OOC OASAS 1002: Canersle AWARE, Inc., a not for profit corporation, will renovate and own buildings(s) for use as a drug free outpatient treatment program, adolescent day treatment program and family prevention program providing services for persons with varying degrees of chemical dependency. The project, of approximately 19,500 sq. feet comprised of too clients, 50 clients and 25 clients and located at 1285 Rockaway Avenue In Brooklyn, Kings County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $4,453,000. THE PROJECT, OOC OASAS 1011: Bronx Lebanon Hospital, a not for profit corporation, will renovate and own buildings(s) for use as a alcoholism Community residence providing services for persons with varying degrees of chemical dependency. The project, of approximately 4,989 sq. feet comprised of 20 beds and located at 742 - 744 Kelly Street in Bronx, Bronx County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $421,000. THE PROJECT, 00C OMM 1610: Weston United Community Renewal, Inc., a not for profit corporation, will renovate and own building(s) for use as a community residence providing services for persons with varying degrees of mental illness. The project, of approximately 30,400 sq. feet comprised of 48 beds and located at 203 West 113th Street in Manhattan, New York County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $375,000,000. THE PROJECT, OOC OMH 1611: Transitional Services of New York for Long Island, Inc., a not for profit corporation, will lease and renovate building(s) for use as a community residence providing services for person with varying degrees of mental illness. The project, of approximately 21,300 sq. feet comprised of 32 beds and located at Building 70, Circle Drive West, Pilgrim Psychiatric Center. In Brentwood, Suffolk County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $2,060,000. THE PROJECT, 00C: OMR 2111100: Community Resource Center for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc., a not for profit corporation, will acquire, construct and own building(s) for use as an Intermediate Care Facility providing services for persons with varying degrees of mental retardation. The project of approximately 4285 sq. feet comprised of 9 beds and located at 755 East 147 Street/Wales Avenue In Bronx, Bronx County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $1,800,000. THE PROJECT, CAMP NATCHEZ (OMRDD): NYSARC, Inc., New York City Chapter, also known as the Association for the Help of Retarded Children, a not for profit corporation will lease land and buildings for use as a summer Camp providing services for persons with varying degrees of mental retardation. The project, of approximately 50 acres and 14 buildings with facilities for a total of approximately 600 campers per summer and located at County Route 7 and Four Comers Road, In Ancram, Columbia County, has a total project cost to be financed estimated not to exceed $6,000,000.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L B3 Blast Spews Asbestos Near N.Y.U. Library By NICHOLE M. CHRISTIAN A steam pipe near the entrance to New York University’s main library burst yesterday morning, spewing debris and traces of asbestos onto dozens of people and several cars and buildings in the area. The explosion, at 7:12 a.m., created a 15-foot-deep, 30-foot-wide crater in front of the entrance to the Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, which occupies most of one block on Washington Square South. It also caused parts of the street to buckle, forcing the authorities to reroute pedestrian and vehicle traffic in that part of Greenwich Village for hours. No injuries were reported and officials said it was fortunate that Classes had not yet started. The cause of the explosion was still being investigated last night. “You couldn’t see anything, just this huge cloud of debris and steam,” said Steve Wolenski, a mechanic at N.Y.U.’s central power plant, who was in his car at the other end of the block when the pipe burst. “In an instant, mud was splattered all over my car. People were high-tailing it out of there big time.” As a precaution, city emergency management officials set up a decontamination site nearby for 58 people had been exposed to the material that had rained down. Most of them were construction workers at the site of a student center being built around the corner on La Guardia Place; others were university employees and police officers. They showered inside either a special truck or an inflatable tent, and were issued white hazardous-material suits while their clothing was laundered, said Frank McCarton, a spokesman for the city’s Office of Emergency Management. Following standard procedures, firefighters responding to the scene tested the area for asbestos, suspecting that it had been used to insulate the steam pipe, which was at least 30 years old. Their tests were positive. Asbestos, once commonly used in home insulation and fireproofing, poses a health risk when it breaks down, becomes airborne and is inhaled. It has been linked to cancer and other diseases. But officials said they did not expect any lingering danger from the asbestos. “There is nothing to be worried about,” Mr. McCarton said. “We just need to get the streets cleaned, cars cleaned and get this up and running again.” N.Y.U. hired a private team of hazardous-materials workers, and they washed down cars, buildings and the construction site. The work was expected to continue through the night. It was too early to determine what caused the explosion, Mr. McCarton said, but he and N.Y.U. officials ruled out any connection to the student center construction site. John Beckman, a university spokesman, said the pipe that exploded was part of a system that provided more than 25 percent of the college’s energy needs. The pipes are visually inspected weekly and internally examined once a year, he said, though the date of the most recent inspection was not available. While the library is expected to reopen to employees tomorrow, it remained unclear whether students would be allowed inside on WednesAndrea Mohin/The New York Times Construction workers who were near the site of the steam-pipe explosion outside the Bobst Library at New York University took decontamination showers in a special truck after traces of asbestos were found.

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day, when classes begin. Mr. Beckman said concerned employees and students should call a temporary phone line, (212) 998-1220. All in all, he said, the school was fortunate. “Normally, our library is open 24 hours.” Because the university is closed for summer break, Mr. Beckman said, only a handful of people - a cleaning crew and some security guards - were in the library at the time of the explosion. “It’s an unlucky circumstance that happened in the luckiest possible time.” Before He Leaves Office, Learning to Leave the Office Continued From Page B1 problems that critics of the law-and-order mayor say he has ignored. In July, the mayor’s senior staff met with religious leaders for detailed discussions of plans for low-income housing, a need Mr. Giuliani recently acknowledged. “It was like a door got opened,” said Archdeacon Michael S. Kendall all of the Episcopal Church’s New York Diocese, who was at the meeting. “It was not adversarial. It was, ‘Yeah, we really do want to provide housing. We really want to talk to you.” As recently as last week, a member of Mr. Giuliani’s staff told an intermediary that the mayor still wanted to meet with the family of Patrick M. Dorismond, the unarmed black man shot dead by the police in March and then excoriated by Mr. Giuliani in remarks that appalled even many Republicans. The family has made no decision. But Mr. Giuliani has spent the last two Sundays attending services at minority churches with his new police commissioner, Bernard B. Kerik, whose mandate includes improving police relations with the city’s ethnic and racial groups. Immediately after Mr. Giuliani announced the appointment of Mr. Kerik on Aug. 19, the mayor said recently, “We sat down together and I said it would a nice thing if we went to an African-American church tomorrow, and then do some other events, and therefore show people that we want to be open, that we want to do everything we can to make people feel included.” At home, the mayor’s failed marriage remains in a holding pattern. Mr. Giuliani announced in May that he was seeking a separation from his wife, Donna Hanover, ,after publicly acknowledging Ms. Nathan’s importance in his life. But the mayor is not known to have hired a divorce lawyer, as Ms. Hanover has. And although Ms. Hanover announced in May that she and the couple’s two children would remain at Gracie Mansion, the mayor’s official residence, for “at least the next few months,” Ms. Hanover’s press secretary, Joannie Danielides, said this week that Ms. Hanover had “no plans to leave Gracie Mansion at this time.” Friends say the mayor and his wife have agreed that she and the children should remain at the mansion until Mr. Giuliani’s term ends on Dec. 31, 2001. The reasons include security concerns and a desire to avoid the spectacle and embarrassment of a move. Ms. Hanover, Ms. Danielides said, will continue to appear in public as the city’s first lady, promoting her community service work, including her “Cool Schools” awards program and her support for “Race for the Cure,” a September run in Central Park to benefit breast cancer research. In October, Ms. Hanover will also assume a starring role in “The Vagina Monologues,” the Off Broadway hit that includes monologues on topics like orgasm and childbirth. Ms. Hanover was to have appeared in the play in May, but postponed her performance shortly after

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her husband announced he had prostate cancer. Politically, Mr. Giuliani’s future is in limbo. Although former campaign advisers like Bruce J. Teitelbaum speak-glowingly of the warm reception the mayor received at the Republican National Convention this month - Mr. Giuliani did not sit with the New York delegation but in a box with Nancy Reagan and Cindy McCain, the wife of Senator John McCain - state Republicans are increasingly exasperated by what they see as the mayor’s failure to play well with the party. Mr. Giuliani, for example, has not decided what he will do with the $3.8 million left in the bank from his aborted race against Hillary Rodham Clinton, and this week he seemed to indicate that the money was not going to Mrs. Clinton’s new opponent, Representative Rick A. Lazio - or to any Republican - any time soon. “We’ll figure out over the next couple months what we can do with it, and what we can do with it over the next couple of years,” Mr. Giuliani said at a news conference in Harlem. The mayor also had to return about $2.8 million in checks to individual donors, but he urged those contributors to sign the money over to Mr. Lazio. Mr. Teitelbaum said this week that Mr. Giuliani had directly given Mr. Lazio $12,000 so far, and was prevented by law from giving more. But lawyers specializing in election law said Mr. Giuliani could transfer the money to the state or national Republican Parties, which could spend it on Mr. Lazio’s behalf. “The money was raised to defeat Hillary, and I think it should be used for that purpose,” said Michael R. Long, the chairman of the Conservative Party, who has had a contentious relationship with Mr. Giuliani. If the mayor keeps the money, Mr. Long added, “it’s going to leave a lasting bad Richard Perry/The New York Times He still works long hours, but the mayor is taking most Friday afternoons off. taste.” As it is, there is still much bitterness in the state Republican Party about Mr. Giuliani’s behavior in the Senate campaign, a race he often treated with ostentatious indifference. “He has a tremendous amount of fence-building to do with Republican leaders around the state,” said James Cavanaugh, the Westchester County Republican chairman. “He never really established the kinds of relationships that he should have as a statewide candidate. And to some degree, he probably lost ground with the people in the party.” The mayor’s circle responds with the revisionist view that a man who raised $20 million against Mrs. Clinton was not actually running at all and therefore should not be blamed for his leisurely pace and for not spending a single night out of New York City. They also point out that he never made an official announcement of his candidacy. “I don’t think there was a race,” said Raymond B. Harding, the chairman of the Liberal Party and a close adviser to the mayor. “He never entered it.” (Actually, at a sparsely attended and little noticed rally at the Westchester County Republican headquarters on Feb. 12, Mr. Giuliani finally managed to get out a half-hearted “Give me a break, I’m running,” after repeated urging from the crowd.) Mayor, Backtracking, Is Undecided On Treatment for Prostate Cancer. By ELISABETH BUMILLER After saying definitively last week that he had decided on a course of treatment for his prostate cancer, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani has said three times this week, including yesterday, that he has not made a decision. “I’m not going to express my leanings until I actually decide it,” Mr. Giuliani said yesterday in extensive remarks about his cancer treatment during a news

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conference at City Hall. Mr. Giuliani’s public comments in the last month about his treatment for his illness have sometimes been confusing. On Aug. 1, in a live television interview with Tom Brokaw on MSNBC, the mayor said for the first time that he had been undergoing preliminary hormone treatments for two and a half months and that the hormones had reduced the levels of prostate specific antigens in his blood to “minuscule” amounts. He said he would decide on a final treatment, either surgery or radiation, within a few weeks. Last week, Mr. Giuliani said he had decided on a final treatment but that he did not want to disclose it. Then on Tuesday, Mr. Giuliani told Diane Sawyer on “Good Morning America” that he had not made a final decision and reiterated that Wednesday with David Letterman on Mr. Letterman’s talk show and yesterday to reporters at City Hall. Mr. Giuliani also emphasized that the hormones, which he said had reduced his prostate specific antigen, or P.S.A., level were only a preliminary treatment and that he would definitely have either surgery or radiation within a month or two. Doctors have said that radiation treatments may well be an out-patient procedure, while surgery could require him to take up to three weeks off from work. Mr. Giuliani had earlier indicated that he was leaning toward radiation, but his recent comments seemed to have left the door open to the possibility of surgery. Surgery is the choice of most men of Mr. Giuliani’s age, 56. It has a high cure rate, but it also can cause impotence and incontinence. Doctors say that radiation, particularly in the form of “seeds” inserted into the prostate, may affect sexual function less, but its long-term cure rates are not known. Mr. Giuliani said yesterday that his P.S.A. level, which he said had fallen to below 1, indicated that the growth of his cancer had been arrested but that “it wouldn’t necessarily last.” Doctors say that over time, cancer cells can become resistant to hormone treatments. Dr. Michael J. Droller, the chairman of urology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, said yesterday that a P.S.A. level of 4 was “the traditional threshold” for more evaluation of a patient but that many other factors determined whether someone has cancer. Dr. Droller is not involved in Mr. Giuliani’s case. ® 2000 USTA NYC bike messengers are going to the US Open. Are you? Pete, Andre, Venus, Serena, Lindsay and more. August 28- September 10. For tickets, call 1-888-OPEN-TIX or visit usopen.org. US OPEN 2000 A USTA EVENT American Express® is the Official Card of the US Open.

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B4 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 LONG ISLAND Interim Roosevelt Schools Leader Quits After 2 Months, Citing Board Interference By EDWARD WYATT ROOSEVELT, N.Y., Aug. 31 - The troubled Roosevelt school district, which is facing a state ultimatum to improve its junior high and high school or risk their closure, suffered another blow Wednesday night when its interim superintendent resigned less than two weeks before the opening of school. Fadhilika Atiba-Weza served only two months as Roosevelt’s interim schools leader before becoming the fourth superintendent to quit in the five years since the State Education Department intervened in the district. Roosevelt’s junior and senior high schools have been among the state’s worst performers, and in 1995 the department removed the school board and appointed an oversight panel that advises a reconstituted board on academic and business affairs. The board appointed Horace Williams interim superintendent, effective Friday. Last year, Mr. Williams served as the principal of Lincoln High School in Yonkers, itself on the state’s list of low-performing schools. In an interview after a marathon meeting that stretched past midnight Wednesday, Mr. Atiba-Weza said he was taking a job as an assistant superintendent in the Central Islip district in Suffolk County. But he added that he had sought another job because of “too much interference” from the Roosevelt board, which he said “is not listening to my recommendations.” Mark Davis, president of the board, disagreed, saying that Wednesday night the board approved more than two dozen appointments of teachers and other staff members recommended by Mr. Atiba-Weza. Mr. Davis said he believed the change in superintendents would not affect the district’s attempt to improve the performance of its junior high and high school students this year. Last year, only 5 of Roosevelt’s 100 graduating seniors earned the challenging Regents diplomas, and more than 80 percent of its eighth graders failed to meet state standards on math and English exams. School and board officials also said at the meeting that the district had had a growing number of resignations from teachers and support staff in the six weeks since the state education commissioner, Richard P. Mills, threatened to close the district’s junior and senior high school if student performance did not improve this year. The board has taken some steps ordered by the commissioner, including the appointment of math and English department chairmen in the high school and the hiring of a middle school principal. But some school officials also said they were not getting adequate support from the state, whose five-member oversight panel, appointed to help manage the district, has dwindled to two active members, one of whom is expected to resign in September. Mr. Mills, in an interview, said he planned to make further appointments to the oversight board in the coming weeks. He also said the district had received much help from Education Department officials preparing them for the upcoming school year. In September, Mr. Mills is scheduled to specify performance goals that the junior and senior high school students must meet if the district is to avoid having those schools closed.

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At Wednesday’s meeting, several of the 40 community residents in attendance rebuked board members during the public discussion period for failing to focus on educational issues. “All they want to talk about is money,” said Sandra Macer, who added that she intended to move out of the district. “No one at these meetings likes to discuss education.” During the meeting, which lasted 4 hours and 20 minutes, the school board discussed and voted on more than three dozen items, including individual teacher contracts, whether to grant maternity leave to certain district employees, and even the price of milk for the school cafeteria. But the only item on the agenda dealing with curriculum and instruction, a report on professional development activities for school administrators and teachers, was put off until a future meeting. Mr. Davis, the board president, said the process of reviewing individual contracts and appointments was necessary in a district that is operating on a contingency budget and that has been ordered by the commissioner to fill certain administrative positions by the start of the school year on Sept. 11, a deadline he said the board would meet. NEW JERSEY As Jet Falters, Pilot Steers Toward Ocean And Bails Out By ROBERT D. McFADDEN A jet fighter that conked out on a routine training mission was ditched into the ocean off Atlantic City yesterday afternoon by a pilot who ejected safely. The pilot, whose name was not immediately released, parachuted into rough seas and was picked up by a state police boat as crowds of beach-goers, lifeguards and Boardwalk strollers watched the spectacle. Military authorities said last night that the pilot, realizing that his faltering jet could not reach its base west of Atlantic City and that he would have to bail out, headed back out to sea to avoid a crash on land that might have taken a heavy toll in life and property. The pilot was praised by his superiors at a news conference last night. “He wanted to reduce the risk to people,” said Lt. Col. Mike Cosby, operations group commander of the 177th Fighter Wing of the New Jersey Air National Guard. “To his credit, his decision was based on avoiding collateral damage.” Colonel Cosby and other officials said the jet, an $18 million F-16C falcon interceptor that carried no armaments, had taken off with three other fighters for training exercises over the Atlantic. On the way back to base at Atlantic City International Airport in Pomona, he said, the jet’s oil pressure dropped and the engine began to fail. Four miles from base, he said, the pilot turned around and headed seaward. He barely made it. Passing over the Boardwalk and beaches of Atlantic City, the plane lost power. The plane was about 2,000 feet up and traveling at 140 knots, the colonel Said, when the pilot blew his canopy off and ejected. It was a stunning drama for hundreds of spectators on the beaches, jetties and Boardwalk. They told of lets thundering overhead, of sudden flames from the tail of one aircraft and of a flier bailing out and floating down into Absecon Inlet at the north end of Atlantic City, while his plane plunged into the sea a mile and a half offshore at 3:40 p.m. The pilot, who inflated a raft, was in the water 10 to 15 minutes, bobbing in

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five-foot swells, before a state police patrol boat from Atlantic City drew up and Troopers Thomas Sost, John Schreiner and Dean Rocap pulled him in. “He was sitting there in his raft, smiling from here to here,” Trooper Sost recalled. “It was not what we expected to see.” The pilot, who was said to have 2 years of flying experience in F-16 jets, was not seriously injured, officials said, but was taken to the Atlantic City Medical Center and treated for trauma and bruises. Associated Press F. Mac Buckley, holding hands with his wife, Donna, left Superior Court in Hartford yesterday after pleading no contest in a theft case. Ex-Lawyer Pleads No Contest In Case of Theft From Clients HARTFORD, Aug. 31 (AP) - A former federal prosecutor pleaded no contest today to first-degree larceny in the theft of $145,000 from two of his clients. F. Mac Buckley is scheduled to be sentenced by Judge Patrick Clifford on Nov. 8. The charge carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, although the prosecutor in the case, Herbert C. Carlson, did not say how much prison time he would recommend to the judge. Mr. Buckley, a one-time boxing coach who often volunteered his time for poor children, would not comment as he left Hartford Superior Court with family members. Mr. Buckley entered a written plea of nolo contendere, meaning he will not contest the charge. Judge Clifford then found him guilty. Mr. Carlson said he would recommend “actual incarceration,” but he did not elaborate. Judge Clifford continued Mr. Buckley’s bond at $200,000. Mr. Buckley, 58, has been under house arrest and has been receiving treatment for bipolar disorder since he returned in April 1999 from a still unexplained seven-week disappearance. He vanished March 1, 1999, after leaving his Marlborough home for a client’s sentencing in Federal District Court in New Haven. Mr. Buckley’s family initially was worried that he had been the victim of foul play. But the state police soon learned that some of his clients were missing hundreds of thousands of dollars. Mr. Buckley was spotted during the disappearance at a cemetery in upstate New York where his father is buried. He was also seen at a jewelry shop in Tennessee, where he used a credit card to buy a $1,500 bracelet. The larceny charge was related to the embezzlement of nearly $145,000 from David and Sharon Fracchia of Hebron. An arrest warrant affidavit alleges that Mr. Buckley forged the Charges that a former prosecutor stole $145,000 couple’s signatures on a check and converted the money for his own use. Mr. Buckley represented the Fracchias in a wrongful-death lawsuit in the early 1990’s after their daughter was killed by a drunken driver. The couple won more than $580,000 in the case, which they let Mr. Buckley invest and control. A short time after his arrest, Mr. Buckley repaid the Fracchias more than $300,000, and they dropped a civil suit against him. Mr. Buckley, however, faces several other lawsuits by former clients who accuse him of taking their money and performing little or no legal services in

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return. Mr. Buckley resigned last year from the practice of law and promised never to reapply for admission to the Connecticut Bar Association. The Post to Halve Its Newsstand Price By JAYSON BLAIR The New York Post will reduce its daily newsstand price to 25 cents from 50 cents starting Monday, a move taken two weeks after its main competitor, The Daily News, said it would begin distributing a free afternoon edition. The Post, owned by the News Corporation, is reducing its price to attract more readers, said Ken Chandler, the publisher. The reduction will apply every day except Sunday, Mr. Chandler said in an interview yesterday. Both The Post and The Daily News have experimented with lower newsstand prices in the past. The Post reduced its price to 25 cents on Staten Island for two years in the mid-1990’s and its daily circulation in that borough doubled to 12,000, company officials said. The paper lost only 1,000 subscribers when the price went back to 50 cents, the officials added. “This is a very aggressive market and we basically see this on the eve of our 200th anniversary as a chance to introduce new readers to the paper,” Mr. Chandler said. The Post, which faces tough competition for advertising dollars from The New York Times and The Daily News, hopes that the lower price and improvements related to a new color printing plant opening in the Bronx next year will help it capture a larger share of the city’s newspaper readers. Two weeks ago, The Daily News announced its plan for a free afternoon edition that could cut into The Post’s circulation during the September audits, often used to determine the next year’s ad rates. Holiday on Monday Labor Day NEW YORK GOVERNMENT OFFICES Closed. POST OFFICES Express Mail and special delivery only. BANKS Option to close. PARKING Sunday regulations in effect. SANITATION No pickups, street cleanings or recycling. SCHOOLS Closed in New York City. Option to close elsewhere. FINANCIAL MARKETS Closed. TRANSPORTATION New York City buses and subways will be on a Sunday schedule. Long Island Rail Road will be on a Sunday schedule. Metro North will be on a holiday schedule. NEW JERSEY GOVERNMENT OFFICES Closed. POST OFFICES Express Mail and special delivery only. BANKS Option to close. SCHOOLS Option to close. TRANSPORTATION PATH trains on a weekend schedule. New Jersey Transit rail service and buses on a Sunday schedule. CONNECTICUT GOVERNMENT OFFICES Closed. POST OFFICES Express Mail and special delivery only.

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BANKS Option to close. SCHOOLS Public Schools closed. TRANSPORTATION Metro-North on a holiday schedule. CITY Woman Charged in Beating of Her 18-Month-Old By ELISSA GOOTMAN A young New Jersey mother was charged with assault yesterday after she confessed to severely beating her 18-month-old daughter, the authorities said. The child, Kamouri Grant, who suffered severe head injuries, was in critical condition yesterday at University Hospital in Newark. Hospital officials said she was non-responsive and on life support. A spokesman for the Bronx district attorney said the mother, Tyesha Turnage, 18, of Irvington, N.J., was to be arraigned by this morning in Bronx Criminal Court. She faces charges of first and second degree assault. The police said that doctors had determined that the beatings took place over several days, going back perhaps as far as Saturday. The most severe injuries occurred while Ms. Turnage was visiting her boyfriend at 2885 Valentine Avenue in the Bedford Park section of the Bronx, they said. They said that witnesses told them they saw Ms. Turnage hitting the child with a belt in her boyfriend’s apartment building. The boyfriend has not been charged, and the police did not release his name. Ms. Turnage took the baby to the hospital late Tuesday or early Wednesday, police said, and hospital officials. notified the authorities in New Jersey, who then contacted those in New York. The authorities said that Ms. Turnage admitted to the crimes at 9 p.m. Wednesday. Kamouri was on a ventilator and was suffering from severe head trauma and bruises to her stomach, said a spokesman for University Hospital, Rogers Ramsey. Mr. Ramsey said it was difficult to tell whether the child was not responding because she was in a coma or because she was heavily medicated. A friend of Ms. Turnage, Lashaunda Morgan, said the two met about five years ago as students it Irvington High School. She said she was shocked when she heard of the charges because she knew Ms. Turnage to be a patient mother who seemed content to forfeit social events to spend time with her child. “She always has the baby with her,” said Ms. Morgan, 20. “She’s always taking the baby to the park. She’s always playing with the baby. She’s always talking to the baby. I’ve never seen her lose her cool with the baby.” About two weeks ago, Ms. Morgan said, she and Ms. Turnage spent the evening sitting on the steps outside 36 Bruen Avenue in Irvington, where Ms. Turnage and Kamouri live with Ms. Turnage’s mother, grandmother and sisters. That evening, Ms. Morgan said, Kamouri played on the porch before crawling onto her lap. “She’s always seemed patient with the baby,” Ms. Morgan said of Ms. Turnage. “She seemed happy to me.” Jewelry Store Owner Is Killed in Robbery A 54-year-old jewelry store owner was fatally shot in a holdup in Bayside, Queens, yesterday by a man who fled in a car, the authorities said. The victim, Fausto Rodriguez, was behind the counter at Jilliann’s Jewelry at

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210-17 Horace Harding Expressway around 4 p.m. when a man in his mid-20’s came in, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. The man browsed among the jewelry and handbags until another customer left, then announced a holdup and led Mr. Rodriguez into a back room, Mr. Brown said. It was not clear whether Mr. Rodriguez resisted, but the man shot him about four times, including once in the face, Mr. Brown said. The robber also put a gun to the head of Mr. Rodriguez’s wife as he tried to leave. But the gunman fled after the woman let him out of the locked store, and she was not hurt in the holdup. Metro Briefing NEW YORK BROOKLYN: FUGITIVE CAUGHT IN ISRAEL A Brooklyn businessman has been arrested in Israel after fleeing the United States to avoid a federal indictment that charged him with trying to defraud a bank of $115 million through illegal accounting practices, prosecutors said. The fugitive, Dov Engel, 52, was the president of Kent International Associates, a distributor of electronic devices and small appliances, when he created false invoices and regularly submitted false financial statements to a lender, La Salle National Bank of Chicago, from 1994 to 1997, prosecutors said. Alan Feuer (NYT) MANHATTAN: MAYOR DISMISSES POSSIBLE CANDIDATES With the list of possible mayoral hopefuls growing, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said yesterday that preparations for next year’s election were in the “let’s-see-if-I-can-get-publicity season.” The mayor laughed when asked about Geraldo Rivera, left, the television journalist, who said this week that he may run as an independent, as well as an earlier report that a former police commissioner, William Bratton, may run as a Republican. “It doesn’t sound like I am going to support either of those two,” he said. Thomas J. Lueck (NYT) MANHATTAN: NADER ENDORSES GREEN Ralph Nader, the consumer activist and Green Party presidential candidate, yesterday endorsed Mark Green, New York City public advocate, for mayor in next year’s election. Answering reporters’ questions at a campaign stop in Chinatown, Mr. Nader said, “I think Mark Green is the best mayoral candidate for New York.” Mr. Green, for his part, praised Mr. Nader as “the greatest consumer advocate of the century” but said he regretted that he could not reciprocate the endorsement. He is backing Al Gore for president. (NYT) ALBANY: PRICES PINCH HEATING FUNDS FOR POOR Although more poor families will be eligible for government help with their heating bills this winter, an increase of as much as 20 percent in natural gas prices will mean that federal funds will have to stretch further. Jack Madden, a spokesman for the state office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, which helps poor families with heating bills, said that even during last year’s unusually warm winter, the federal government had to add $70 million after $135 million in federal money was quickly exhausted. More people will be eligible for aid this year, with a family of four qualifying if they have an income of about $33,500 a year. Last winter, 626,000 households statewide received aid, a 9 percent increase from the previous year. Tara Bahrampour (NYT) NEW JERSEY NEWARK: WELFARE BIRTH RULING A Superior Court judge has upheld as constitutional New Jersey’s 1992 law that denies additional welfare benefits to women who give birth while on welfare. The ruling by Judge Anthony J. Iuliani

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late Wednesday echoed a 1995 federal court ruling on the law, the first of its kind in the nation. Similar laws have been adopted by 22 other states as part of welfare reform. Opponents, including the National Organization for Women Legal Defense and Education fund and the New Jersey chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said they would appeal the decision. Ronald Smothers (NYT) WILDWOOD: DRUG ARRESTS AT NIGHT CLUB Ecstasy, Special K, GBL and other so-called club drugs were flowing so freely at the Nile Night Club in Wildwood, prosecutors say, that the state attorney general’s office began an investigation there three months ago. Yesterday, the office announced that it had arrested five people between the ages of 18 and 22 on drug distribution charges during a 1: 45 a.m. raid, and obtained arrest warrants for nine others. Steve Strunsky (NYT) TRENTON: CENSUS ACTION FAVORS STATE A federal committee has backed off a proposed change in how cities are defined that would have seen New Jersey swallowed up, statistically speaking, by New York City and Philadelphia. The Metropolitan Area Standards Review Committee no longer proposes to lump communities into “megapolitan” areas of one million or more people. Under the plan, northern New Jersey would have become part of the New York City area, and southern New Jersey part of the Philadelphia area. (AP) TRENTON: PEPSI BOTTLER ORDERED TO PAY OVERTIME The Pepsi Bottling Group has been ordered to pay more than $270,000 in back wages and interest to 13 delivery drivers who were not paid overtime for working more than 40 hours a week between 1993 and 1998. After a lengthy administrative hearing, the State Department of Labor rejected the company’s assertion that the workers were sales people and were therefore exempt from New Jersey’s overtime law. Mark Boyd, the state labor commissioner, also ordered Pepsi to turn over wage records for other employees at its four outlets in New Jersey. David Kocieniewski (NYT) CONNECTICUT HARTFORD: MORE OVERSIGHT FOR APPRAISERS Connecticut is stepping up monitoring of real estate appraisers in response to a threat by federal regulators to decertify them. The federal government charged that Connecticut had been lax in answering consumer complaints and monitoring appraiser training. James T. Fleming, the commissioner of the state consumer protection department, which oversees appraisers, said his agency had hired two more workers to handle a backlog of complaints and had made other changes. In January, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council had threatened to decertify Connecticut appraisers. nearly all home loans require an appraisal from a federally certified appraiser. David M. Herszenhorn (NVT) STAMFORD: APPEAL IN CELEBRATED DIVORCE CASE Logna Wendt, the former wife of a millionaire executive who was involved in a celebrated divorce case, insists she is worth at least $35 million. She said she planned to appeal an Appellate Court ruling issued Wednesday that upheld a 1997 divorce settlement ordering her ex-husband, a former General Electric executive, to pay her about $20 million. The ruling allows her former husband, Gary Wendt, to hold on to assets estimated at more than $80 million. Mrs. Wendt argued that her role as corporate spouse and mother for 31 years was key to Mr. Wendt’s rise as an executive. Mr. Wendt had offered $11 million. (AP) Compiled by Anthony Ramierz

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THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L+ B5 Metro Business Busy Roads Forecast, Despite Gas Prices With just one summer holiday weekend left, the price of gasoline in New York State seems unlikely to deter travel on highways in the state during the Labor Day weekend. “Gas prices really haven’t had a negative effect,” said Jim Ver Steeg, a spokesman for AAA Western and Central New York. “The talk about people scaling back vacations was short-lived.” The New York State Thruway is expected to be busy this weekend despite a national 20 percent increase in gas prices from last year, according to AAA. Travelers who use the gas stations at rest stops on the Thruway benefit from a state program to save them an average of 5 cents per gallon. The program will run until Sept. 19. In Rochester, consumers pay an average of $1.57 for a gallon of self serve regular unleaded, down 11 cents from the peak of about $1.68 last month, according to AAA’s Fuel gauge Report. The price is about the same in Buffalo, Syracuse and Albany. According to AAA’s daily report, the average price in New York City yesterday was $1.72, down from $1.77 a month ago. The national average is about $1.51. (AP) Blue Cross Building Sale A Miami Beach investment group plans to buy a building in downtown Newark that was used by Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey as its headquarters. The Miami group, Savitar Realty Advisors, plans to close on the property this month with the current owner, Townsend Gateway Limited Partnership, which paid $12 million for it in November 1997. Clifford Stein, the president of Savitar, would not disclose the purchase price, but The Star-Ledger of Newark, quoting six unnamed Newark building owners and brokers, reported yesterday that the price was $22 million. The building is at 33 Washington Street, near the Newark Museum and the Newark Public Library, and it overlooks Washington Park. Blue Cross used the building while Hartz Mountain Enterprises built the insurer a 16-story building near Pennsylvania Station. Townsend Gateway then bought 33 Washington Street from Blue Cross. (AP) Lottery Numbers Aug. 31, 2000 New York Numbers - 387 New York Win 4 - 1682 New York Take 5 -2,35,36, 38,39 New York Pick 10 -4, 9, 12, 13, 14 ,23 ,24 ,28 ,38 ,44 ,55 ,56 ,58 ,59, 62, 65, 68, 72, 73, 78 New Jersey Pick 3 - 792 New Jersey Pick 4-5110 New Jersey Cash 5 - 9, 29, 30, 32, 36 New Jersey Pick-6 Lotto -2, 11, 16, 27, 31, 34; bonus, 06060 Connecticut Mid-Day 3 - 927 Connecticut Mid-Day 4 - 2757

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Connecticut Daily - 867 Connecticut Play 4 - 2705 Connecticut Cash 5 - 11, 19, 27, 33, 34 Aug. 30, 2000 New York Lotto - 11, 14, 20, 25, 31, 33; supplementary, 39 New York Pick 10 - 4, 8 ,9, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 22, 27, 30, 33, 39, 48, 50, 57, 61, 66, 67, 79 Connecticut Daily - 146 Connecticut Play 4 - 3766 Connecticut Cash 5 - 3, 23, 27, 29, 32 Powerball - 4, 25, 29, 36, 46; Powerball, 8 Residential Real Estate House Prices in Queens Exceed One Developer’s Expectations by NADINE BROZAN When the developers of Waterside Estates at Cresthaven in the Whitestone Woods section of Queens began sales two years ago, they deliberately set prices low - $500,000 and up - in hopes of building demand. No less than halfway through the planned 110 houses, they say the strategy has worked so well, with help from the generally rising real estate market, that their prices are running about $100,000 higher than they had originally projected that they would be getting now. The fact that the houses sit near the waterfront did not hurt, either. “We knew we opened below market, but that is a common strategy,” said Philip Megna, a partner in the Mattone Group of College Point who is overseeing the Waterside Estates project. He said that he had assumed the houses would be selling in the mid- to-high $600,000’s by now, but that they were selling in the mid $700,000’s. “There is a lot of demand to live in that area, and we have a very strong economy.” Forty-three houses have been built or are under construction and 67 more are planned. By the time all 25 houses in the first phase were under contract in October, they were selling for up to $675,000. Some buyers in that group have already moved in and the remainder are expected to do so in the fall. Prices for the second phase (27 houses, of which 19 have been sold) began rising about three months ago, starting at $605,000 and going up to $750,000, depending on which of three models was chosen. There will be 58 houses in the last phase, some of them on larger lots and all of them either on the water or with water views. “We anticipate that the waterfront housing will sell in the $1 million area,” Mr. Megna said. The development is on 12 acres of prime real estate between the Whitestone and Throgs Neck Bridges, where Catholic Charities, Diocese of Brooklyn and Queens, once operated a children’s summer camp. Associated Development Corporation of Bayside is collaborating in the development with the Mattone Group. The architect is John Stacom and the financing is being handled by the CFS Bank, based in Westbury, N.Y. The houses are similar, all basically long and narrow, on plots 40 to 45 feet wide by 100 to 120 feet long. The differences are in the details, the slope of a roof, the shape of a window, the style of a kitchen cabinet. Buyers have been individualizing them by choosing everything from the color of the exterior bricks to the shape of the kitchen sink faucets. Besides the basic choices, appliances, decorative touches and amenities can

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be upgraded for additional fees. The first houses were sold strictly on the basis of dollhouse-size models. “People were spending a half a million dollars on houses they hadn’t seen, on land that hadn’t been cleared,” Mr. Megna said. Not surprisingly, the proximity to water has been a draw. There will be a private beach for the use of residents. “There is very little waterfront property in Queens and certainly very little available for development,” said Lawrence Rosano, a member of the development team. “A house in the neighborhood sold for $900,000 last year and the buyer tore it apart and probably put in another $400,000.” The taxes are another attraction. Thanks to the city’s 421b tax abatement program, the taxes for the first two years of ownership are based solely on the assessed value of the raw land. “That means that for the first two years, they would be $400 to $500 a year,” said Marilyn Larsen, owner of Lane Realty in Great Neck, N.Y., and the director of sales. “So a $750,000 home here is $500 a year and will be phased in to a full $4,000 a year at the end of eight years.” A comparable house in Glen Cove in Nassau County would probably be taxed at more than $18,000, she said. None of the houses in Westside Estates are built until they are sold. “They are not being put up an spec,” Mr. Rosano said. “In Queens, more routinely you build and then sell. Buyers are used to seeing something complete.” Once there are contracts and mortgage commitments, the houses go up in clusters. Two of the three models, the Driftwood and the Sandpiper, are high ranches, with the living room, dining room, kitchen and two or three bedrooms upstairs, and a large recreation room downstairs. The center-hall, colonial-style Sandcastle has the more traditional configuration of living room, dining room and kitchen downstairs, and three bedrooms upstairs. The developers say that their project marks a departure from the attached houses and town houses that have dominated new construction in the area in recent years. “We think this may be the largest single-family development in maybe 50 years,” Mr. Megna said. So far, 98 percent of the buyers have been from Queens. “For most of them, this is their second or third home,” Mr. Megna said. When the former day camp was sold, Catholic Charities kept six and a half acres, where it plans to build three low-rise buildings with 200 apartments for elderly people with moderate incomes. 6 Real Estate Companies Submit Bids on 99-Year Lease for the World Trade Center By RONALD SMOTHERS A half-dozen companies had submitted bids to take over the World Trade Center under a 99-year lease by the end of the day yesterday, the deadline for proposals, according to people involved in the bidding process. Officials of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the trade center, would not disclose who had made bids to take the buildings private or the value of the proposals. But others involved in the process said that six firms had bid and that the top bid would give the authority net revenue of about $2.5 billion over the life of the lease. When the privatization proposal was approved in 1998, it was estimated that the agency would realize $1.5 billion, and as recently as three months ago, that estimate had risen to $2 billion. The six companies emerged from a group of 30 large real estate development

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firms that were considered capable of handling a deal of this size and were provided three months ago with the data they needed to make preliminary bids. Those six companies will be further pared by the end of the month to a “short list” of companies that will be given access to more detailed That dispute was resolved in May, unleashing millions of dollars in projects favored by both states and clearing the way for the World Trade Center proposal to go out to a group of undisclosed bidders in June. According to people involved in the process, the companies that were invited to submit proposals last June included Donald J. Trump’s organization, as well as. Tishman Speyer, Gale & Wentworth, Mortimer Zuckerman’s Boston Properties, the Rouse Company and the Canadian firm Brookfield Properties. The deal could potentially be split between a company skilled in leasing and managing the office space and another more experienced in retail. The 430,000square-foot retail component of the trade center includes 74 stores. One critical feature of any deal would be the end of the arrangement under which the Port Authority pays New York City $27.5 million a year in lieu of real estate taxes on the trade center. Mr. Gargano said that any bidders would have to be aware of his position - and that of others on the authority’s board - that the successful bidder would have to pay city taxes, which are estimated at $100 million a year, or negotiate a deal with the city. City officials have said in the past that they would accept nothing short of the full real estate taxes on the property. 500 MINUTES $2999 A MONTH $50 REBATE ON A SELECT SPRINT PCS PHONE™ 2 ONLY AT RADIOSHACK Right now, RadioShack is offering a great deal on clear digital Sprint PCS Service and a Sprint PCS Phone™. Get 500 minutes each month (250 local anytime minutes, 250 Night & Weekend Minutes) for just $29.99 a month. Plus the dual-band, Wireless Internet-ready Sprint PCS Phone™ by Qualcomm (model 2760) is just $49.99 after a $50 mail-in rebate. There’s only one place you’ll find these money-saving offers, and they end soon. So stop by now. The Sprint Store At RadioShack Sprint® Sprint PCS® KEEP BOTH HANDS ON THE WHEEL. ADD A HEADSET FOR SAFER DRIVING. PRICES START AT JUST $39.99. Sprint D SPRINT PCS TALK END 2abc 3def 4ghi 5jkl 6mno 7pqrs 8tuv 9wxyz 0# C 17-2254 Sprint PCS

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Wireless Web. customers who purchase a Sprint PCS Phone at RadioShack stores from September 1, 2000 - September 30, 2000. A promo-tional Night & Weekend Minutes, which include Long Distance when Long Distance is selected as the subscriber’s Free & Clear Option and when a 1-year Sprint PCS Advantage Agreement is taken. Night & Weekend hours are M-Th 7am and, F 8pm - M 7am. Benefits of the offered Plan continue as long as customer remains on the Plan with the options that they originally selected. All plans subject to credit approval. A nonrefundable $29.99 phone activation fee applies. 2 Rebate offer valid for new consumer subscribers who purchase a new Sprint PCS Phone by Qualcomm (model 2760) from Radio Shack during the period September 1, 2000-September 4, 2000. Activate service on a Sprint PCS rate plan of $29.99 or higher, and remain active for 30 days. Allow 8-10 weeks for pro-cessing. See in-store mail-in rebate form for additional details. Restrictions apply, see printed materials in-store for details. LABOR DAY SALE BIGGEST SALE EVER! 30-50% OFF ALL ITEMS ENTIRE INVENTORY OF ORIENTAL RUGS, ANTIQUE & MODERN FURNITURE, CHANDELIERS, LAMPS, BRONZES & DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES (SALE EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 10TH) 9X12 ORIENTAL RUG WAS: $5500 NOW: $3000 MARQUETRY INLAID DINING SET W BRONZE ORMOLU TABLE W/10 CHAIRS WAS: $16,000 NOW: 10,000 614 SHIPPAN AVE. STAMFORD, CT 06902 (203) 975-8400 (203) 327-9997 FAX www.lfservices.com OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK IFI THE ARCADE ANTIQUES FURNITURE OBJECTS D’ART

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B6 L+ THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Certified Teachers, Looking for a Job, Find a Paradox Continued from Page B1 School District 29, which covers a largely middle-class area in southeast Queens. She said she was turned away from a job fair in Queens on Wednesday because she was certified, a reversal of how hiring normally works. She said she would never work in a failing school, because most are in neighborhoods that she considers dangerous and because the demands are overwhelming. “You have to be a combination of a social worker and Mother Teresa to work in those schools,” she said. “Those kids deserve a decent education, but we as teachers deserve a decent work atmosphere. We deserve to be safe. I worked so hard to get my license, I did all this schooling, and the last thing I heard, America was a country of free choice.” At another crowded job fair at the Marriott Hotel in Brooklyn on Wednesday, many applicants said they were frustrated that they would not be able to work in districts that were close to home or to their graduate schools. Many districts in Queens and Manhattan have only a few vacancies in troubled schools, so most teachers who had their hearts set on working in those boroughs were disappointed. A few teachers at the job fair were in tears. But others were glad to be assigned to a challenging school, saying they had gone into the profession to work with children who needed the most help. “I really want to teach disadvantaged kids,” said Waithira Mbuthia Protano of Mamaroneck, N.Y., who accepted a job teaching English at Alfred E. Smith High School in the Bronx, a failing school. “I want to give, I want to sweat, I want to give all my energy to help.” To lure certified teachers into the failing schools, the Board of Education is offering teachers $3,400 in tuition reimbursement over the next four years. The failing schools also have smaller classes, and teachers get extra help from curriculum specialists. This summer, the board recruited about 330 people with little or no teaching experience to work in the failing schools under an alternative certification program. The board has also held several job fairs for the failing schools since Aug. 1, when Mr. Mills, unsatisfied by the city’s pace in hiring certified teachers for those schools, filed his lawsuit. In an interview yesterday, Mr. Aaron Lee Fineman for The New York Times Leonard Cohen, a certified social studies teacher, at a job fair for teachers held at the Marriott Hotel in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Newly hired certified teachers must be assigned to the city’s failing schools at first. Mills said certified teachers who did not want to set foot inside the failing schools should reconsider, because the students at those schools badly needed qualified teachers. “People are going to have to be guided by their better angels,” he said. He added, “This court action has led to profound change in the way the city places teachers, and it’s high time.” The failing schools “were always last in line, and now they are first in line.” But the other parties to the settlement that resulted in the court order were still unhappy with its terms. Schools Chancellor Harold O. Levy said any teacher who agreed to work in an urban school was taking on a major challenge. “People who choose urban education are doing God’s work,” he said, “and where they choose to teach and how they choose to dedicate themselves is a matter of per-

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sonal reflection.” Randi Weingarten, president of the United Federation of Teachers, which represents New York City teachers, said the city was doing the right thing by assigning new certified teachers to the failing schools first. But she said the frustration among new teachers was troubling. “At a time when the city is begging for teachers, you will lose people when you mandate where they work,” Ms. Weingarten said. However, Ms. Weingarten predicted that the number of new teachers who refused to work in New York City as a result of the court order would be relatively small. For one thing, the failing schools are hiring more certified teachers than they expect to need, just to be on the safe side. After the school year starts on Thursday, certified teachers who are not needed at the failing schools will be assigned elsewhere, she said. But Mr. Levy said it was too early to tell whether the court order would have the unfortunate effect of increasing the number of uncertified teachers in schools that are not listed as failing. “My fervent hope is that it’s a momentary aberration,” he said. While the order benefits the failing schools, he said, “it obviously does nothing” for the other city schools. In a report released yesterday, the nonprofit Citizens Budget Commission said one way to find enough certified teachers for all 1,100 of the city’s public schools would be to offer substantially higher salaries - up to 25 percent higher - to teachers who agreed to work in failing and other hard-to-staff schools. The city now gives 15 percent raises to teachers who agree to work in 39 failing schools that are in session an hour longer than regular schools. But the incentive is not enough to draw as many certified teachers as those schools need. By yesterday afternoon, Ms. Walker, the teacher who was turned away from Kennedy High School, was hopeful that she would land a job at George Washington High School, a failing school in Washington Heights. She was relieved because the alternative was to work at Smith High School, which is in the Bronx but is much farther away - about an hour using public transportation - from her new apartment. While the last-minute wrench in her plans upset her, she said it was not enough to make her abandon the city school system. “I would never leave the system,” she said. “I just don’t appreciate the system forcing me to rearrange my life.” Federal Agency Finds Workfare Contractor Violated Wage Law By NINA BERNSTEIN The nation’s largest operator of welfare-to-work programs violated federal law by paying lower wages to women than to men placed in the same jobs in a Milwaukee warehouse, according to a decision made public yesterday by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The company, Maximus Inc., has been under mounting criticism for its business practices in recent months. A state judge in Manhattan has held up the Giuliani administration’s plans to award Maximus more than $100 million in contracts to help welfare recipients find work. And state auditors in Wisconsin recently found that the company had billed the state for $466,000 in improper or questionable expenses. The federal commission’s ruling

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found that a woman placed in warehouse jobs by MaxStaff, the company’s temporary employment agency, was paid $7.01 an hour while five male co-workers got $8.13. “We’re obviously very disappointed with the determination,” said Rachael Rowland, a spokeswoman for Maximus. “We respectfully disagree with it. We remain confident that no discrimination occurred in this case.” She repeated an earlier explanation by Maximus executives that the difference was based on the woman’s being paid “a training wage” in a program for people with little job history. But the commission ruled against the company. “Examination of the evidence indicates that female employees working in warehouse positions had substantially equal qualifications to males working in the same positions, but were paid lower wages even though females were performing the same duties as males,” the ruling said. Tracy Jones, the woman who filed the complaint, said she did have job experience, including work as a machine operator, a warehouse carton packer and a building maintenance worker. “It was my prior experience as a union steward that helped me recognize this was wrong,” she said. Ellen Bravo, the director of 9-to-5, the National Association of Working Women, an advocacy group, told Wisconsin legislators who are auditing the company that the Jones case revealed a fundamental flaw in the state’s welfare-towork program, designed in part by Jason A. Turner, now New York City’s welfare commissioner. “The goal was not to remove women from poverty, but simply from the welfare rolls,” she said. “Consequently, any job was good enough.” Ms. Jones, now 33, said she had asked a MaxStaff supervisor a year ago why she, the only woman, was being paid less than all the men. The supervisor told her that she was mistaken, and later warned workers that they could be fired if they discussed wages. At that point, the commission said in its ruling, the company began hiring males at a lower rate of pay - apparently in an effort to cover up sex discrimination. But Ms. Jones privately challenged male employees to prove their earnings and collected pay stubs that she took to the commission. Eight days later, she was fired. The law requires the commission to now try to eliminate the unlawful employment practices with persuasion and conciliation. If that fails, the commission can go to court. NEW YORK STATE Ammonia Leak Keeps Upstate Residents From Their Homes By The New York Times FORT EDWARD, N.Y., Aug. 31 - For the third night in a row, more than 800 residents of this small factory town on the Hudson River were unable to go home today, evacuated because a tanker train car in a nearby rail yard was leaking ammonia gas. The rail car, bound for a paper mill, began leaking anhydrous ammonia vapor through a faulty gasket Tuesday night. Though emergency crews have transferred most of the gas to another car, the evacuees - more than a quarter of Fort Edward’s 3,000 residents - were told today that it was still not safe to return, Firefighter Mark Brockaway said. And the downtown of Fort Edward, about 43 miles north of Albany, remained

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off limits to the public except for through traffic. “Basically, I’m trying to get my family back in the house,” said Arvid O’Connell, who was also rousted from his home in a low-lying part of town, where the gas accumulated. He was staying with in-laws in a neighborhood on higher ground. “We were more or less at the mercy of the wind,” said Mr. O’Connell, standing near Fort Edward High School, command center for dozens of police officers, firefighters Do you have The Times delivered? and other emergency workers, reporters, and local, state and federal officials. “First they moved us to the firehouse and then up here.” At 11:06 p.m. Tuesday, two men saw and smelled the ammonia leaking from the top of a tanker car just east of downtown, said Max Fruchter, a spokesman for the Fort Edward Fire Department. The leak was in a gasket in a bell-shaped compartment that serves as an emergency valve, akin to that on a pressure cooker. Firefighters arrived five minutes later, followed by Washington County emergency workers, 9 other fire companies, 17 ambulances and more than 100 volunteers to help evacuate people. About 60 people were treated at hospitals, mostly children whose asthma was worsened by stress or older people with medical conditions. Mr. Fruchter said one elderly person was injured by inhaling the ammonia vapor and was likely to be released soon. A section of the Champlain Barge Canal was still closed today, and Amtrak trains to Montreal, which run through here, were being stopped in Albany, where passengers switched to buses. Most evacuees moved in with relatives and friends, and 150 stayed at the high school overnight before finding other quarters. By today, about 25 remained in CANADA NEW YORK Fort Edward Glens Falls Rutland VT. N.H. Hudson R. Albany 90 18 87 90 84 95 GOV. THOMAS E. DEWEY THRUWAY PENNSYLVANIA CONN. 0 Miles 50 N.J.

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New York City The New York Times Residents left Fort Edward after a rail car began leaking ammonia. another shelter at the Hudson Falls High School. At 10 this morning, a team from the Findlay, Ohio, offices of the International Technologies Corporation, hired by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, hooked a hose to the rail car and began transferring the gas to another tanker. The original tanker had a capacity of 30,000 gallons, roughly equivalent to that of three tractor-trailers, Mr. Fruchter said. The tanker car from Canadian Terra International had been in the rail yard, operated a division of Canadian Pacific Despairing Parents See No Option but Foster Care Continued From Page B1 rehabilitate, troubled teenagers. Why would a parent voluntarily turn a child over to foster care? Sometimes, a parent or guardian is ill, homeless or incarcerated. Sometimes, child welfare officials offer voluntary placement as an alternative to filing abuse or neglect charges against the parents. Occasionally, a parent simply wants to be done with a difficult child. Often, for parents under pressure, the child welfare system is the only way out. “For parents who don’t have a support system or the economic means to purchase a support system - like after-school activities, summer camps - the stresses are exacerbated,” said Karen Freedman, executive director of Lawyers for Children, a nonprofit group that provides lawyers and social services for children who are voluntarily placed. “A lot of what these parents are feeling is fear for their children.” In Family Court, where despair competes daily with heartbreak, voluntary placement cases are among the saddest and most confounding. The adolescents are likely to end up in group homes rather than with foster families. If they need psychiatric care, the wait for a state-financed residential treatment center can sometimes be many months. Often, the youngsters simply run away from a group home, or wait until they become adults and leave the system. Occasionally, social workers and advocates for children successfully persuade parents not to relinquish the children. Margaret O’Marra, a Legal Aid social worker, says many of the children have suffered loss and trauma in early childhood. Others live with attention deficit disorder, depression or learning disabilities. “A good percentage of these kids are kids who have not gotten proper treatment in time,” Ms. O’Marra said. Mr. Abdul-Hakam’s daughter was relatively lucky in that she was placed with foster parents, four families in two years. Mr. Abdul-Hakam wants her back home, he says, but not now. He wants first to move out of the one-bedroom Brooklyn apartment he shares with his wife and younger daughter, though for now, that seems out of reach. Mr. Abdul-Hakam, 49, supports his family on public assistance, he says, cleaning a beach in Queens three days a week for his welfare check. And though his relationship with his daughter has improved in the last two years, he remains out of touch with the ordinary details of her life. He is not sure which school she will attend this month. He is not sure of the mental health diagnosis that has been made, nor of the name of the medications she has been taking. When and

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whether she will return home remains a mystery. Lawyers who represent children Me her say they tend to stay in care longer than others. Marta, a 15-year old who had been shuttled among a series of caretakers before she landed in foster care last year, is no exception. When her mother was arrested on drug charges, Marta, who spoke on the condition that only her first name be used, was sent to her grandmother in Puerto Rico. When she started rebelling, she was returned to her father in New York. Father and daughter were virtual strangers, she said. Marta’s grades slid. She did not finish the eighth grade. She ran the streets. That, she said, is when the beatings began. Her father beat her for bad grades and for not cleaning her room. When she reported it to her favorite teacher and the child welfare agency was summoned, her father, who did not return calls requesting comment, was offered the option of voluntarily placing Marta in foster care. Marta did not object. What followed was a foster home in Yonkers, group homes in Brooklyn and Westchester, and finally, a residential treatment center upstate, where she still lives. She now sounds almost sympathetic to her father. She misses him, but knows he is not ready to take her back. “I know why he wanted me here - he wanted the best for me,” she said. “He wasn’t doing it for his best. He was doing it for my best.” Now 15, Marta would prefer remain in foster care until her 18th birthday because, as she puts it, would like to give her father a breaks. He works, goes to school, care three stepchildren. “He got a lot of things to do,” Marta said. “I really want to give him some time. Fear, more than frustration, led Jose Vasquez to sign his daughter over to foster care earlier this year. In fits of rage, his daughter, Tania, would bang her fists on a school desk. She bit classmates, and once even a police officer. Last December, he admitted her to a psychiatric hospital. Then, afraid that the city would take her away after another outburst, Mr. Vasquez said, he agreed to sign her over to foster care. He thought it would be brief, he said, long enough for her to be evaluated. What made that action all the more incongruous was Mr. Vasquez’s record as a father. Five years ago, after neglect charges were filed against the mother of his two children, he fought for custody, taking the children out of foster care. He shuttled them, both mentally retarded, between school, doctor appointments and Medicaid offices almost daily. He lost his job as a carpenter. He held onto them even as they lived in a room in a seedy residential hotel, which was all he could afford. Last week, Mr. Vasquez appeared in court in a desperate bid to get his daughter back. Tania, now 13 and with a mood disorder and borderline intelligence, has spent the last four months in the Kings County Psychiatric Hospital. She has been on Depakote, an anti-convulsant prescribed for epileptics and people with behavioral disorders. And on his recent visits, Mr. Vasquez said, Tania seemed calmer, eager to come home. But his heart broke, he said, when he saw that her hands were shaking uncontrollably. (Depakote is known to cause tremors.) “When I saw her shaking like that, I started crying myself,” he said, as his son, Jose Jr., born with fetal alcohol syndrome, played quietly outside the courtroom. “I thought she was going to come out all right. I thought by this time, she’d be back home again.”

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Taking Tania home will be no easy feat. Yet Mr. Vasquez is determined to do so. To make her more comfortable, he has asked his girlfriend and their 8-monthold baby to move out of their Bronx apartment. But if Tania slips into violent outbursts again, how does he know he will be able to handle her? “Because I’m her father,” Mr. Vasquez said, unable to hold back tears. “I wouldn’t like for her to be away forever. I would like to try. She doesn’t belong over there. She belongs over here.” UPDATE West Nile Spraying Schedule. QUEENS 10 p.m. today to 5 a.m. Saturday Kew Gardens, Glendale, Woodhaven, Righmond Hill, Ozone Park and parts of Forest Hills 10 p.m. tomorrow to 5 a.m. Sunday Hunters Point, Long Island City, Dutch Kills and Queensbridge BROOKLYN 10 p.m. today to 5 a.m. Saturday Trinity Cemetery and Cemetery of the Evergreens, Highland Park and adjacent cemeteries 10 p.m. tomorrow to 5 a.m. Sunday Greenpoint THE BRONX 10 p.m. tomorrow to 5 a.m. Sunday Highbridge, Concourse, Mount Eden, Morris Heights and University Heights WESTCHESTER COUNTY 11:30 p.m. today to 4:30 a.m. Saturday White Plains, Greenburgh (parts), Village of Elmsford, Scarsdale Harrison, Mamaroneck Town (parts), New Rochelle and Eastchester BERGEN COUNTY, N.J. 3 to 6 a.m. today Ridgefield Park, Palisades Park, Hackensack, North Arlington, Lyndhurst and Wyckoff Note: Pesticide spraying schedules are subject to change in the event of rain. Source: Health and mosquito control departments The New York Times

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THE NEW YORK TIMES METRO FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L+ B7 Fire Raises Questions About a Town’s Boom Keith Myers / The New York Times Continued from Page A1 ruins today, arson investigators began trying to determine the cause of the blaze, which started at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday and rapidly consumed the timberframe Avalon River Mews, a 408-unit luxury rental building that was under construction. Sam DeNorchia, Edgewater’s fire chief, said the heat radiating from the blaze was so intense that it ignited the houses across Undercliff Avenue, about 50 feet away. Cars, trees and backyard swing sets were consumed as anxious homeowners stood by helplessly. Fire officials said tonight that at least 100 people were still waiting to return to their homes. Many were staying at a nearby Holiday Inn. Like many of those who live across the street from the Avalon River Mews site, Grethel Rambone had only unflattering words for the seven-story project, which she and others fought to have scaled down. Mrs. Rambone, 57, said that Edgewater’s mayor and City Council were unsympathetic to their concerns. She and others cited the local planning board’s decision to grant the developers a variance on zoning laws that would have required the western edge of the project to be set back at least 30 feet from the sidewalk; the variance allowed the developer a setback of only 6 feet. Had existing zoning been applied, this development would have been at least 24 feet farther from the homes that caught fire across the street. “It seems like the almighty dollar has taken over this town,” said Mrs. Rambone, who has lived in Edgewater all her life. “No one is stopping and thinking about the effect the development is having on the people already here.” Robert Corcoran, the City Council president, said that complaints about overdevelopment were off the mark. Nearly all of new construction in Edgewater, he pointed out, is on land that once held abandoned factories or decaying piers. After decades of post-industrial desolation in Edgewater - and fiscal desperation - the spate of new buildings is finally helping to fill the town’s coffers, Mr. Corcoran said. “I wouldn’t call this development - it’s redevelopment,” he said. “This is a good thing for us.” Development is altering the face of Keith Meyers/The New York Times Heat from a fire at a construction site for a luxury apartment building ignited houses across the street, about 50 feet away. Richard Perry/The New York Times Alice Klein, 70, lives on Oakdene Terrace, behind the site of the fire. Her house had only minor damage. once sleepy towns up and down the Hudson in New Jersey, polarizing communities and straining services. In the last two years, 23 office buildings and thousands of apartments have been built along the 17 miles of waterfront from Bayonne to Fort Lee. In Jersey City, where 20 new high-rises have gone up since 1990, fire officials are trying to cope with a new breed of building: the skyscraper. On July 20, a power surge set off fires in two new high-rises there, injuring four people and prompting complaints that fire alarms had failed to function. In an effort to grapple with the threat of high-rise blazes, the city’s fire direc-

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tor is asking that all new buildings employ round-the-clock employees trained to deal with fires. Some developers, citing annual costs that could run as high as $250,000 a Fighting the Edgewater Fire The huge fire that lighted the sky over the Hudson River on Wednesday was isolated between a cliff and the river. APARTMENT CONSTRUCTION The large block where the Avalon River Mews complex was being built was consumed by flames. Hudson River RIVER RD. MALL Burned area. Cliffside Park PALISADES UNDERCLIFF AVE. Edgewater 1 mile North TANK FARM Oil tanks located nearby were not damaged. HOMES DAMAGES Several homes across Undercliff Avenue were also destroyed. Source: United States Geological Survey The New York Times building, have balked at the proposal. In Edgewater, if all goes according to plan, nearly 100 acres of former industrial wasteland will be converted into residential and commercial use in the coming decade. The former Hills Bros. coffee plant is now an assisted living center, a postal service mailbag repair plant, as given way to a shopping center and the luxury apartment complex that burned yesterday was rising atop the Richard Perry/The New York Times Firefighters, having battled the blaze Wednesday night, continued to douse embers yesterday. site of the former Alcoa factory. For Edgewater officials, Avalon -River Mews was a long-awaited coup. For nearly 30 years, the parcel was a PCB-contaminated eyesore. In 1997, state and Bergen County officials reached an agreement with two local developers to clean up the land. A year later, Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and New Jersey’s environmental commissioner appeared at the site during demolition to showcase the project as a model of the state’s so-called Brownfields Act, which is intended to entice developers to build on-contaminated industrial sites. In the end, however, the developers sold the land to the current owners,

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Avalonbay Communities, for $13.5 million. While most residents initially supported the project, many who live nearby became opponents when they learned that the developers were asking for considerable variances. In the end, Avalonbay received a variance to allow more units than zoning permitted, although an earlier proposal to build three 16-story towers was scuttled by opponents. In recent months, several other projects have been approved despite Librado Romero/The New York Times Homes along Undercliff Avenue were destroyed, along with cars, trucks and backyard swing sets. “We have one main road and three paid firemen,” a town official says. objections from some who said they were too large. Last week, the planning board, whose members are appointed by the mayor, approved a $90 million project that includes 350 hotel rooms, 300 apartments and a shopping center. Ms. Bardinas, who was elected to the City Council last yea I said that many residents thought that the mayor, Bryan Christiansen, and his supporters on the Council were too eager to please developers. “People feel like their voice is not being heard,” she said. “A lot of them are disillusioned.” Mayor Christiansen, who has been in office for 12 years, did not return phone calls seeking comment today. A group of residents led by the Independent Coalition for a Better Edgewater is now fighting a plan to sell off the town’s last stretch of waterfront to developers. The group wants the town to issue bonds to acquire the property, a plan Mr. Christiansen has rejected. In interviews with nearly two dozen residents, many said they had mixed feelings about the good times that have washed over Edgewater. Dolores Lawlor, 62, who grew up here, worked in the factories and then bemoaned their departure, said she was glad the town finally had its own supermarket. But like others, she said she missed the languid pace and small-town familiarity. She recalled when River Road, recently widened to five lanes, was a meandering two-lane street. The mom-and-pop stores she remembers from her childhood have given way to suburban-style shopping plazas. The jaw-dropping views of Manhattan are largely obscured by gated communities, with names like Admiral’s Walk and Mariner’s Landing. And traffic, nearly everyone agrees, has become unbearable during rush hour. “It used to be one big family,” Mrs. Lawlor said. “There are so many strangers now, you don’t even know your next-door neighbor.” NEW YORK STATE Continued From Page A1 Lazio Closes in on Mrs. Clinton in Fund-Raising, Amassing a Total of $19.2 Million only six words: “I’m running against Hillary Rodham Clinton. Sincerely, Rick Lazio.” Despite her financial edge so far, Mr. Lazio has more money on hand, an important indicator. Mr. Lazio began the race with $3.5 million left over from his House campaigns, and then collected $15.7 million. After expenditures, largely for television advertisements and direct mailings, he has $10.2 million in the bank.

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She has $7.1 million. Both campaigns released summaries of their finances yesterday, but not lists of donors and expenditures. They are required to submit those lists to the Federal Election Commission this month. Before exiting the race to focus on his treatment for prostate cancer, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani repeatedly set fund-raising records with a campaign that appeals to the distaste of conservatives and others for Mrs. Clinton. With the same strategy, Mr. Lazio is surpassing even Mr. Giuliani’s records. In the first three months of this year, for example, Mr. Giuliani took in $7 million, less than Mr. Lazio’s total for the recent seven weeks. “It is historic,” said Bill Dal Col, Mr. Lazio’s campaign manager, a longtime political consultant who led Steve Forbes’s presidential campaigns. “I have never seen numbers like this.” These totals would have been unthinkable in previous races. In the sevenweek summer period in the 1998 Senate contest in New York, the eventual winner, Charles E. Schumer, raised $627,000, while the incumbent, Alfonse M. D’Amato, raised $1.7 million, officials said. Mr. Schumer spent $16.7 million on the entire race. Mr. Giuliani, who raised $23.3 million for his aborted run, and Mrs. Clinton have both surpassed the record for fund-raising by a nonincumbent in a Senate race, the $21 A candidate for the Senate harnesses donors’ distaste for the first lady. million taken in by Oliver L. North, a Republican, in his failed race in Virginia in 1994. The record for spending will not be known until November. Jon S. Corzine, a Wall Street multimillionaire, spent $35.5 million, hearty all of it his own money, to win the Democratic Senate primary in New Jersey. He is expected to spend far more in the general election against the Republican, Representative Robert D. Franks. The New York contest is likely to be the most expensive Senate race in the nation’s history, and that is without taking into account so-called soft money: large donations raised and spent by party committees. Mrs. Clinton has raised soft money, and while Mr. Lazio has not, outside groups not connected to his campaign have bought ads to help him. Because of Mrs. Clinton, Mr. Giuliani took in more money from donors outside the state than a typical Senate candidate, and Mr. Lazio is expected to focus more on such contributors this month. He has scheduled fund-raising visits next week to Alabama, Texas and California. The Lazio campaign said it did not know what percentage of its recent donations were from out of state. Mrs. Clinton has raised about 60 percent of her individual donations out of state. Mrs. Clinton’s aides, who long ago resigned themselves to the idea that she is reviled by politically active (and check-writing) conservatives, said they were not daunted by Mr. Lazio’s tally. “We are not surprised that Congressman Lazio outraised us given his ability to tap into a well funded national network of conservative donors,” said Cathie Levine, a Clinton campaign spokeswoman. Mr. Lazio’s aides attribute some of their success to a sense of urgency among Republicans around the country after Mr. Giuliani dropped out. Many Republican

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contributors consider the New York Senate race their second priority after the presidential one, because defeating Mrs. Clinton would end the reign of both Clintons. Mr. Lazio holds several weekly fund-raisers, often weaving them into his schedule as he travels around the state. Campaigning one Monday in mid-August in the Jamestown area, in the southwest corner of the state, he held a breakfast fundraiser, then toured a sprawling furniture factory, and then held a luncheon fund-raiser. Mr. Lazio has benefited from the groundwork laid by Mr. Giuliani’s campaign, especially its direct-mail operation, which compiled a list of more than 200,000 donors nationwide. “Obviously, and there is no secret about this, there is a great deal of resentment towards Mrs. Clinton,” said Bruce J. Teitelbaum, who led the Giuliani campaign. “No matter who is going to run, they are going to raise big money. That said, Rick Lazio and his team are doing a superb job.” For some Democrats, the numbers released yesterday confirmed their fears that Mr. Lazio would quickly catch up to Mrs. Clinton in fundraising and probably surpass her by November. That does not mean that he will win, but it does make him less of an underdog, they said. “They could run a tree against her, and it wouldn’t matter,” said Hank Sheinkopf, a Democratic political consultant not involved in the Senate race. “The Republicans will do anything to stop her.” Everything you need to know for your business day is in Business Day. The New York Times

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Business Day L+ C1 FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 The New York Times BUSINESS Digest France Proposes Tax Cuts Of $16 Billion Over 3 Years Nudged by Germany, and probably providing an example to Italy, France became the sec-ond of Continental Europe’s big three econo-mies to propose a large package of tax cuts. The proposal, totaling $16 billion over three years, is part of a wave of similar measures being enacted across Europe as governments react to increased tax revenue because of ex-panding economies and declining unemploy-ment. The cuts, while differing by country, are intended to give a measure of stability to a ten-uous spurt of economic growth. [Page A12] Main Stock Gauges Post Solid Gains Stocks advanced on new signs that interest rates could remain steady. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 112.09 points, or I percent, to 11,215.10. The Nasdaq composite index soared 102.54 points, or 2.5 percent, to 4,206.35. And the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index rose 15.09 points, or 1 percent, to 1,517.68. [C6] 2 Top Nordstrom Executives Resign After several years of anemic sales growth at Nordstrom, John Whitacre, the company’s chairman and chief executive, and Michael A. Stein, the chief financial officer, resigned. Two members of the Nordstrom family, which controls roughly one-third of The company’s stock, have been named to key executive positions. Blake W. Nordstrom, 39, will be president, while Bruce A. Nordstrom, 66, will be chairman. Shares of Nordstrom fell $1.13, to $17.25. [C2] Clinton Vetoes Repeal of Estate Tax President Clinton vetoed a Republican-sponsored bill to repeal the federal estate tax and stepped up the election-year debate over tax cuts and how best to spend the budget surplus. He accused Republicans of threatening to hamstring the economy by devising tax cuts that he said would leave little money for Medicare, a prescription drug benefit, education and a host of other programs. [A1] F.C.C. Eases Radio Spectrum Limits In a move that may stimulate development of wireless products for the home, the Federal Communications Commission erased restric-tions on part of the radio spectrum. The change affects an area used by companies that enable people to transmit data from say, a laptop computer to a desktop computer - or from either to a printer - without wires. [C2] Plan to Cut European Trading Costs In a move intended to shore up support for the planned merger of the London and Frankfurt stock exchanges, the clearinghouses for the two markets introduced a plan that would cut settlement costs for certain trades. [C4] Volkswagen Raises Pay in Mexico Workers at Volkswagen Mexico negotiated a raise of more than double the inflation rate, ending a two-week battle that included a walkout at the only factory in the world that produces the trendy Beetles. The company agreed to raise

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salaries 13 percent and give workers a 5 percent productivity bonus plus a percent of benefits. The union’s general secretary, Jose Luis Rodriguez, said, “We think that salaries should not be based on inflation, but the performance of the workers and the results of the company.” [A4] Factory Orders Fell 7.5% in July Orders placed with manufacturers fell 7.5 percent in July, the largest drop on record, government figures showed, and private survey data indicated that manufacturing in the Chicago region contracted in August. [C17] YESTERDAY Dow Industrials 11.215.10 112.09 Nasdaq composite 206.35 102.54 30-yr. Treasury yield 5.66% 0.07 The euro $0.8878 0.0046 The dollar 106.72 yen 0.25 TODAY 4.1% 4.0 3.9 FMAMJJ 3.8 Unemployment August figures due at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time. Expected: +4.0% Construction Spending July figures due at 10 a.m. Eastern time. Expected: +0.2% Index Advertising Column C6 American Stock Exch. C15 Company News C4 Currency Markets C4 Dividend News C9 Foreign Exchange C12 Foreign Stocks C12 Futures Markets C6 Highs and Lows C9 International News C4 Key Rates C6 Media Business C6 Mutual Funds C14 Nasdaq National Mkt C10 New York Stock Exch C7 Preferred Stocks C9 Stock Exch. Bonds C13 Stock Options C9 Technology C2 Treasury Issues C13 Suspect Is Arrested in Fake News Case by ALEX BERENSON

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Mark S. Jakob made a big bet in mid-August that shares in Emulex, a maker of communications equipment, would decline, federal prosecutors say. Instead, Emulex soared, leaving him with a paper loss of almost $100,000 in just a week. So Mr. Jakob, a 23-year-old former student at El Camino Community College in Torrance, Calif., took matters into his own hands, according to the government. On the evening of Aug. 24, he sent a fake press release by e-mail to Internet Wire, a Los Angeles service where he had previously worked, warning that Emulex’s chief executive had resigned and its earnings were overstated. The next morning, just as financial markets opened, Internet Wire distributed the damaging release to news organizations and Web sites. An hour later, shareholders in Emulex were $2.5 billion poorer. And Mr. Jakob would soon be $240,000 richer, said Alejandro N. Mayorkas, United States attorney for the central district of California, which includes Los Angeles. Agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested Mr. Jakob yesterday morning at the home he shares with his parents in a quiet neighborhood in El Segundo, Calif., a suburb of Los Angeles. Prosecutors charged him with one count of securities fraud and one count of wire fraud. If convicted, he faces 15 years in prison and a $500,000 fine. The Securities and Exchange Commission simultaneously filed a civil complaint against Mr. Jakob, seeking to freeze his assets and recoup Continued on Page 2 If It’s Not One Thing, It’s Another As Tires Are Recalled, Bridgestone Faces Possible Strike Jay Couch, a warehouse specialist at Concord Tire in Concord, N.H., tosses a recalled Firestone model on to a pile. As the recall effort continues, Bridgestone/ Firestone is faced with a threatened walkout by workers at nine of its U.S. plants. Dan Habib/Concord Monitor/Saba By STEVEN GREENHOUSE Reeling from a crisis over defective tires, Bridgestone/ Firestone Inc. faces the possibility of a strike tomorrow by 8,000 workers at nine American factories - a move that could set back the company’s efforts to replace 6.5 million recalled tires. Officials with the United Steelworkers of America, which represents the Bridgestone workers, said they had scheduled a strike for a minute after midnight, barring a settlement, because of the failure to reach a new contract after months of talks. Wayne Ramick, a steelworkers’ spokesman, said the union and the company were engaged in intensive nearly round-the-clock talks. He declined to predict the likelihood of a settlement before the strike deadline. “At this point, it’s going to be a nail biter,” he said. The strike threat is the latest crisis for Bridgestone/ Firestone, and its Japanese parent, the Bridgestone Corporation, which faces Congressional investigations and a raft of lawsuits over tires that federal regulators say might have been involved in 88 deaths and 250 injuries. Two weeks ago, the company recalled more than six million 15-inch tires after Federal officials disclosed complaints that the tread can separate from the rest of the tire, with such failures blamed for dozens of rollover accidents. John Lampe, Bridgestone/Firestone’s executive vice president, was somewhat upbeat about the progress made in talks and the prospects of avoiding a strike.

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“We think they’re going well; we’re optimistic we can come to an agreement,” he said in an interview yesterday morning in Nashville, where the company is based. A strike now would hit Bridgestone at an especially vulnerable time in its efforts to restore its badly shaken Continued on Page 5 Officials in Caracas rolling out Firestone tires yesterday that were part of evidence in a report from the Venezuelan consumer protection agency to the prosecutor’s office. Firestone said It was working with Ford to find the causes of the tire problems. Reuters Hitting a Pothole Between 1996 and 1999, Bridgestone/Firestone gained ground on both of its main rivals, overtaking one of them. But the recent disclosures of problems with its tires have unsettled investors and could threaten the long-term health of the company. MARKET SHARE United States and Canada Bridgestone/ Firestone 19.6% 21.1% 29.2% 30.1% Goodyear Michelin 1996 Total sales = $19.9 bil. Other 1999 Total sales = $22.5 bil. Sources: Tire Business magazine; Bloomberg Financial Markets STOCK PRICES DAILY CLOSES Venezuela Asks Criminal Case Against Bridgestone and Ford By ANTHONY DePALMA Accusing both the Ford Motor Company and Bridgestone/ Firestone of conspiring to hide tire defects that caused dozens of deaths, Venezuela’s consumer protection agency asked the nation’s prosecutor yesterday to bring criminal charges against both companies. The companies “had concealed vital information from Venezuelan consumers,” said Samuel Ruh Rios, chairman of the Venezuelan consumer agency. He said the companies were well aware that “a macabre combination of a soft suspension and an inadequate tire” was to blame for at least 80 accidents in which

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47 people died. The tires involved in Venezuela are similar to those being recalled in the United States in that they are suspected of tearing apart at highway speeds and causing Ford Explorers to roll over. In Washington, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration yesterday increased by 26 the number of deaths in the United States that been linked to the recalled Firestone tires that brings to 88 the number of deaths being investigated by the agency, along with more an 250 injuries in 1,400 complaints it has received concerning tire separations on the popular Ford sport utility vehicles. In Dearborn, Mich., Jacques A. Nasser, Ford’s president, defended the company’s actions in Venezuela and denied any attempt to mislead authorities. “The accusation from the Venezuelan government that Ford Venezuela lied is also Continued on Page 5 Europeans Raise Rates, Yet Euro Falls Emphasis on Inflation Is Ill-Timed, Some Fear By EDMUND L. ANDREWS FRANKFURT, Aug. 31 - It was supposed to be a show of toughness, an antidote to the weakness that has plagued Europe’s single currency, the euro, over much of the time since its introduction in January 1999. But when the European Central Bank raised interest rates today for the sixth time in less than a year, the euro foundered near its all-time low, amid widespread fear that it will sink even lower. Indeed, more than any other time in the short history of the euro, many financial analysts view the central bank as weak and off balance in response to changes in the region’s economic climate. “They are behind the curve,” said Thomas Mayer, a senior economist with Goldman, Sachs in Frankfurt, who argues that the bank is becoming tougher just as European economic growth shows signs of becoming weaker. “In April 1999, they reduced interest rates even though the economy already seemed to be taking off. We could very well be in a similar situation right now.” Alarmed in large part by what it called the “protracted depreciation” of the euro, the central bank increased its baseline interest rate by a quarter-point today, to 4.5 percent. In a brief statement, the bank said that the euro’s weakness threatened to push up the cost of imported goods at a time when high oil prices - compounded by the commodity pricing of crude oil in dollars - were threatening to ripple through Europe’s economies. But if the move was supposed to build confidence in the euro, it did not. Within minutes after the announcement, the euro slipped slightly, to roughly 89 cents against the dollar. It fell further later in the day, sliding as low as 88.45 before settling at 88.78 cents in New York trading, down from 89.24 cents on Wednesday. By any measure, the European Central Bank faces a devilish problem. The euro has lost nearly a quarter of its value Continued on Page 4 Retailers Post Weak August, Hoping It Is Not Holiday Omen By LESLIE KAUFMAN After watching business slow for six months, the nation’s merchants reported only slight gains yesterday in sales of back-to-school merchandise - news that may not bode well for the rest of the year and the coming holiday season. Retail sales for August in stores open at least a year, a crucial industry meas-

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urement, rose just 3 percent, according to the Goldman Sachs retail composite index. The numbers were hardly disastrous, but they were lower than analysts had expected and the weakest August results in three years. After experiencing nearly two years of banner growth, retail sales have been slowing since early this year. But consumer enthusiasm for back-to-school shopping is watched particularly closely because it is seen as the first window to the all-important holiday season. “Usually what happens in August is a very significant harbinger of the rest of the year,” said Richard Baum, an analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston. “Retailers learn in the third quarter what works. But if you don’t have a lot working for you, it is hard to plan for the holidays.” There was clearly plenty of bad news from the August sales numbers. The biggest stunner came Wednesday night from the normally efficient Gap Inc., which announced that its same-store sales would be down 14 percent for the month. And Wall Street analysts began lowering their earnings forecasts for major players as they missed sales growth estimates. For example, Jeffrey Feiner, an analyst with Lehman Brothers, lowered his third-quarter earnings estimates for Dillard’s, May Department Stores, J. C. Penney and even the previously invincible Target. But as disappointing as sales at those chains were, there were still some bright spots. The merchants that did best were mostly those that sold goods besides clothing. Sears, Roebuck & Company, for example, had a strong sales increase of 5.6 percent, largely on the strength of its home appliance and gardening businesses. It is also true that in a fiercely competiContinued on Page 17

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C2 L K+ THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY F.C.C. Widens Radio Spectrum for Wireless Networks By LISA GUERNSEY In a move that may stimulate development of wireless products for the home, the Federal Communications Commission announced yesterday that it had eased restrictions on part of the radio spectrum. The rule change affects the 2.4-gigahertz band, an area used by companies that produce wireless local area networks, or LAN’s. Such networks enable people to transmit data from, say, a laptop computer to a desktop computer - or from either to a printer - without wires. They have been adopted by office complexes, college campuses and, to a lesser extent, consumers at home. Proponents have argued that opening the spectrum will give rise to consumer products that wirelessly transmit large amounts of data, like streaming video and digital music. For example, it may enable someone to send music from a desktop computer to a laptop, or to use a cordless phone to pick up a call that has come in over the Internet. A rule change intended to ease transmission of data. “The rule change has given us everything we need to develop these next-generation wireless devices,” said Ben Manny, chairman of the Home RF Working Group, a coalition of technology companies that asked the F.C.C. two years ago to relax its restrictions. Among the members of the HomeRF group are Compaq; Intel; Proxim, a wireless LAN company in Sunnyvale, Calif.; and Siemens, which has developed cordless phones that use the 2.4-gigahertz band. From a technical standpoint, the ruling gives new muscle to a radio signal technique called frequency hopping. For years, proponents of frequency hopping - who include members of the HomeRF group - have squared off with engineers who favor a different technique, called direct sequence. Wireless LAN products with direct-sequence systems offer data speeds of up to 10 megabits a second, a rate equal to that on most high-speed networks. But until yesterday, products using frequency hopping could reach speeds of only 1.6 megabits a second. The rule change widens the terrain for frequency hopping by allowing signals to be sent across channels that each span 5 megahertz - up from the I megahertz a channel allowed previously. With the added space, engineers say, HomeRF systems will be able to offer data speeds equal to those of systems based on directsequence technology. “It levels the playing field,” Mr. Manny said. But some companies have already been developing wireless products for consumers based on the direct sequence technique, which is so far associated with systems that cost more than consumers are willing to pay. Apple Computer, for example, sells a wireless system called Air Port for transferring data between home computers. That several products are already in development has led Jeff Abramowitz, president of the Wireless LAN Association, a trade group, to caution that the change could lead to a plethora of consumer products that run under different systems. “This does create the potential for confusion in the marketplace,” said Mr.

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Abramowitz, who is also the vice president for marketing for NoWires Needed, a product that uses the direct-sequence system and is. sold by Intersil, a company in Irvine, Calif. “But in the long term it will not affect what is happening over all.” The F.C.C. ruling did not give the HomeRF advocates everything they wanted. They had asked permission to use 75 channels across the 2.4 gigahertz band. But several engineers protested that hopping frequencies over 75 channels of 5 megahertz in width would lead to interference with other devices, because the channels would have to overlap. The F.C.C. limited the rule change to only 15 permissible channels instead. TECHNOLOGY BRIEFING E-COMMERCE HOW AMAZON USES INFORMATION Amazon.com, the No. 1 Internet retailer, has revised its privacy policy, and in doing so has provided a window into how much it uses the customer data it collects to help it and other companies sell more. In the new policy, Amazon disclosed that it has started sending e-mail marketing messages on behalf of other companies. It also added a long list of data it collects about users, including financial information, Social Security numbers, product searches and the telephone number from which a user calls Amazon’s customer service line. And for the first time, Amazon disclosed it can buy information about customers from outside databases. And if the new initiatives do not help stem Amazon’s huge losses and the company is put up for sale, the new policy says, anyone who buys Amazon will get its customer data. Saul Hansell (NYT) CALIFORNIA BILL ON WEB SALES TAX The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require businesses with stores in California to collect state sales tax on purchases made over the Internet. The bill, approved earlier by the State Senate, passed by a vote of 42-to-31 and was sent to the governor. It focuses on companies like Barnes & Noble, whose affiliated Internet units do not charge or collect the state’s 7.25 percent sales tax. While Gov. Gray Davis has not said whether he will sign the bill, he has indicated that he opposes Internet taxes. State officials estimate the measure could add $14 million in tax revenues to the $22 billion the state already collects each year. Lawrence M. Fisher (NYT) DEALS JAPANESE COMPANY COMPLETES VERIO PURCHASE The NTT Communications unit of Nippon Telegraph and Telephone of Japan has completed its $5.5 billion acquisition of Verio, an Internet service provider based in Englewood, Colo., a week after the White House determined the transaction was not a risk to national security. Concern had emerged that Japan could gain access to delicate government information with the deal. NTT hopes to broaden its corporate Internet services with the purchase of Verio, which operates more World Wide Web sites than any other company. Masanobu Suzuki, president and chief executive of NTT Communications, said the merger “will position us even more strongly to serve our customers throughout the globe.” Simon Romero (NYT) AT HOME BUYS POGO ONLINE GAME SITE At Home of Redwood City, Calif., which sells residential and commercial broadbrand services, said yesterday that it had acquired Pogo.com of San Francisco, which offers online games. The stock transaction was estimated at $125 million to $150 million. According to Nielsen Net Ratings, Pogo.com is the “stickiest” service on the Web - with each user spend-

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ing an average of 84 minutes a week playing games like chess, solitaire and Buckaroo Blackjack. Allison Fass (NYT) CISCO ACQUIRING PIXSTREAM Cisco Systems, continuing its torrid pace of acquisitions, said it would buy PixStream, a maker of hardware and software for the delivery of digital video over high-speed networks, for $369 million in stock. Cisco said it would take a charge of about 2 cents a share for the purchase of privately held PixStream, of Waterloo, Ontario. (Reuters) HARDWARE SEGA CUTTING DREAMCAST PRICE Sega Enterprises, the maker of video game consoles, said it would drop the price of its Dreamcast game system 25 percent, to $150, in a bid to spur sales before Sony introduces its Playstation 2 in the United States this fall. The price cut, from $200, comes about a year after the game machine was first sold in the United States. (Bloomberg News) PROFIT REPORT LIFTS HUTCHINSON SHARES Hutchinson Technology $25 Yesterday $23.75 20 15 10 Stock closes since Aug. 10 A surprise mid-quarter report of profitability lifted shares of Hutchinson Technology nearly 30 percent Thursday and may have helped other disk drive stocks as well. Hutchinson, which makes disk drive components, said it earned a penny a share in the first nine weeks of the fourth quarter, but stopped short of issuing a profit forecast for the rest of the quarter. Analysts, however, had estimated Hutchinson would lose 22 cents for the quarter ending Sept. 31, and the stock rose $5.31, to close at $23.75. The AWV company credited the news to an increase in demand and productivity and lower expenses. (Dow Jones News) Compiled by F. Duayne Draffen UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT DISTRICT OF DELAWARE In re: PRIME SUCCESSION, INC., et al., Debtors. Chapter 11 Case No. 00-2969 (PJW) (Jointly Administered) NOTICE OF HEARING TO CONSIDER CONFIRMATION OF DEBTORS’ JOINT PLAN OF REORGANIZATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: On July 12, 2000 (the “Petition Date”), Prime Succession Holdings, Inc., Prime Succession, Inc. (“Prime”) and certain of Prime’s wholly-owned subsidiaries, the above-captioned debtors in possession, each with a mailing address of 3940 Olympic Boulevard, Suite 500, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 (each a “Debtor” and collectively, the “Debtors”), filed petitions for relief under chapter 11 of title 11 of the United States Code, 11 U.S.C. §§ 101 est. seq. (the Bankruptcy Code”), and

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contemporaneously with such chapter 11 filings, filed a motion (the “Motion”) requesting entry of (A) an initial order in advance of the hearing (the “Disclosure Statement Hearing”) to consider the adequacy of the Debtors’ amended disclosure statement (the “Disclosure Statement”) dated August 21, 2000 in connection with the plan of reorganization dated July 12, 2000 (the “Plan”) (i) scheduling the Disclosure Statement Hearing, (ii) establishing deadlines and procedures for filing objections to the adequacy of the Disclosure Statement, and (iii) approving the form and manner of notice of the Disclosure Statement hearing and (B) and order (i) approving the Disclosure Statement , (ii) scheduling a hearing to consider confirmation of the Plan, (iii), establishing deadlines and procedures for filing objections to confirm of the Plan, (iv) approving the form and manner of notice of the confirmation hearing and (v) establishing solicitation, voting and tabulation procedures and deadlines. Hearing On Confirmation of the Plan 1 A hearing to consider confirmation of the Plan and a objections thereto (the “Confirmation Hearing”), has been set by the United States Court for the District of Delaware for 2:00 p.m., Wilmington, Delaware on September 28, 2000 at the United States Bankruptcy Court. Midland Plaza, 824 North Market Street Wilmington, Delaware 1980119801 (the “Court”). before the Honorable Peter J. Walsh, at which notice shall be provided to creditors or interest holders of any adjournment of the Confirmation Hearing announced in open court at the Confirmation Hearing or at any subsequent Confirmation Hearing. 2 Any objection to confirmation of the Plan must (a) be in writing, (b) comply with the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure and General Orders of the Courts, (c) set forth the name or the objector, and the nature and amount of any claim or interest asserted by the objector against the estates or properties of the Debtors, (d) date with particularity the legal and factual basis for such objection, and (e) to be filed with the Clerk of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (including a copy for Chambers of the Honorable Peter J. Walsh), together with proof of service thereof, and served upon (1) Young Conaway Stargatt and Taylor, LLP, 11th Floor, Rodney Square North, P.O. Box 391, Wilmington, Delaware 18999-0391, Attn: Pauline K. Morgan, Esq., and Paul Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York 10019-6064, Attn: Jeffrey D. Saferstein, counsel for the Debtors; (2) Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP, 355 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90071, Attn: Thomas B. Walper, Esq., counsel for the Unofficial Committee; (3) Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, 333 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60606, Attn. Eric Ivester and Mayer, Brown & Platt, 1675 Broadway, New York, New York, 10019, Attn: Raniero D’Aversa, Jr. counsel to the Agents for the perpetuation and proposed postpetition lenders, and (4) the Office of the United States Trustee, 601 Walnut Street, Room 950W, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106, and (5) counsel for any statutory committees appointed in these cases so as to be actually filed and received no later than September 21, 2000 at 4:00 p.m., Wilmington, Delaware time. UNLESS AN OBJECTION IS TIMELY SERVED AND FILED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THIS NOTICE IT WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED BY THE COURT Dated: August 21, 2000 YOUNG CONAWAY STARGATT & TAYLOR, LLP -andPauline K. Morgan (No. 3650) Michael R. Nestor (No. 3526)

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11th Floor, Rodney Square North P.O. Box 391 Wilmington, Delaware 19899-0391 (302) 571-6600 PAUL, WEISS, RIFKIND, WHARTON & GARRISON Alan W. Kornberg Jeffrey D. Saferstein Dana S. Safran Nikurka T. Nwokoye 1285 Avenue of the Americas New York, New York 10019-6064 (212) 373-3000 Man Is Charged In Fraud Case Involving Fake News Release Continued From First Business Page what it calls illegal profits. The hoax, which temporarily roiled financial markets, was revealed within an hour of the news report and Emulex stock recovered the same day. Still, investors who panicked and sold their shares or had sell orders automatically executed at preset prices are unlikely to recover their losses. Mr. Jakob did not have a lawyer at the time of his arrest and was represented by a public defender at his initial court appearance yesterday, according to a spokesman for the United States attorney’s office. He was being held in custody in Los Angeles. A woman who answered the door and phone at his parents’ house declined to comment. Mr. Jakob’s arrest is the third time in 18 months that law enforcement agencies have made a quick arrest in an Internet fraud aimed at a big company’s stock, illustrating yet again that the promise of anonymity on the Internet is largely an illusion. Because Web sites and servers that deliver e-mail carefully track the location of every visitor and message they get, police and prosecutors can usually track Internet users with relative ease. “Anyone who would use the internet to commit a crime should understand one thing - do not count on the anonymity of the Internet to serve as a shield for your illegal conduct,” Mr. Mayorkas said. “As technology advances, so do our investigative techniques and our abilities to protect the public.” While the fake Emulex release was the most damaging instance, Lucent Technologies and PairGain also have had their stocks manipulated by fake releases. In both cases, prosecutors quickly found and charged suspects. Law enforcement officials said they were continuing to investigate the Emulex hoax and did not rule out the possibility of more arrests. Mr. Jakob, who had worked for Internet Wire for about a year, resigned on Aug. 18, and had been an employee in good standing, according to the company. But on Aug. 17 and 18, prosecutors say, Mr. Jakob sold 3,000 shares of Emulex short, betting that he would be able to buy the stock later at a lower price and pocket the difference as profit. Like a short sale, buying a put option is another way to profit from a stock price decline, and many Emulex puts were bought just before and just after the fake release was issued. Prosecutors did not assert that Mr. Jakob bought put options, leaving open the question of who did. Mr. Jakob’s arrest comes after an intense six-day investigation that began

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with the electronic trail left by the e-mail message he sent Internet Wire, Mr. Mayorkas said. Within a few hours, F.B.I. agents had tracked the message mail to a computer library at El Camino Community College. The fact that the message appeared to have been written by someone familiar with Internet Wire’s procedures offered another clue, and agents quickly-made the Associated Press Mark Jakob is accused of sending a fake press release about Emulex that depressed its share price. connection between Mr. Jakob’s employment at Internet Wire and his enrollment at El Camino, where he was a student until early August. By Monday, investigators had tightened their focus on Mr. Jakob and begun to examine records of his stock trading. They discovered his short sales, which took place at prices ranging from $72 to $92 on Aug. 17 and 18 through Datek Inc., the online brokerage firm. As Emulex stock soared, Mr. Jakob’s losses mounted, prosecutors said. But after Internet Wire distributed the press release, which was picked up by other news organizations, Emulex stock fell from $113 to $45, and Mr. Jakob “covered” his short by buying the 3,000 shares he had previously sold, for a profit of $55,000. Minutes later, with Emulex stock still reeling, he bought 3,500 more shares for just over $50 each, from a computer at the Manually Bay Hotel in Las Vegas, prosecutors say. Late Monday, after the fraud had been discovered and Emulex stock had recovered, he sold those shares, pocketing $186,000 more, prosecutors said. Mr. Jakob had actively traded Emulex for five months before his mid-August short sales, prosecutors said. “This is an example of the downside of day-trading,” said Pamela Johnston, one of two assistant United States attorneys who investigated the case. “Someone can get themselves in a position where they are financially strapped.” Kirk Roller, senior vice president of Emulex, said he hoped Mr. Jakob would face substantial penalties if convicted. “When you look at this kind of crime, it’s electronic terrorism,” Mr. Roller said. “You’ve got to make an example of this person.” Nancy Wernick, a neighbor, said Mr. Jakob had a business refurbishing and selling used cars. In his personal profile for his America Online account, prosecutors say, Mr. Jakob lists Las Vegas, snowboarding, dancing and playing the stock market among his hobbies, and lists “let it ride” as his personal quote. TRIP TO THE FRONTIER Science Times Every Tuesday The New York Times 2 at Top of Nordstrom Quit; Family Members Take Over By LESLIE KAUFMAN After several years of anemic sales growth at Nordstrom Inc., the chairman and chief executive and the chief financial officer have resigned, the company said yesterday. Two members of the Nordstrom family, which controls roughly onethird of the company’s stock, have been named to top executive positions. Blake Nordstrom, 39, will be president, while Bruce Nordstrom, 66, will be chairman of the board.

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In a statement released after the stock market closed yesterday, Enrique Hernandez Jr., a new board member who analysts say is the catalyst for the move, said the board had been disappointed in the company’s performance for the last few years. “We are now at the point where we believe the company would benefit from a different style of leadership,” he said. For some time, there had been rumors of discord between the Nordstrom family, on one hand, and John Whitacre, the departing chairman and chief executive, and Michael A. Stein, the chief financial officer. Mr. Whitacre, who took the helm of the company in 1997, was the first non-family chief executive in the company’s 100-year history, it said. Although Mr. Whitacre’s tenure did not produce dynamic sales increases at the department store chain, which is based in Seattle, many stock analysts were not happy to see the company return to family management. “I am disappointed,” said Michael Exstein, a retail analyst with Credit Suisse First Boston. “I think Nordstrom had a problem, and John Whitacre and the team he had assembled had started a process to bring the store toward the realities of retail today. They took steps that were utterly necessary, like pooling purchases, reducing costs, not resorting to selling on price.” Mr. Whitacre and his team were also widely credited by analysts with bringing Nordstrom’s notorious inventory overstocking problems under control. Mr. Exstein raised concern that the family would not make the hard decisions needed to right the stalled retailer. He pointed to Dillards, another company where the founding family has a similar stake; it, too, has been struggling in the current difficult retail climate. Nordstrom’s stock has been in decline for almost a year and a half. Until the announcement last night, it had been trading at about $17.50 a share, almost 50 percent below its 52-week high of $34.50 a share. At the end of July, Nordstrom warned that earnings would fall short of forecasts and the stock plunged. Nordstrom stock closed yesterday at $17.25, down $1.13. Dorothy Lakner, a retail analyst with CIBC World Markets, was more equivocal about the management The retailer’s board acts after months of weak results. changes. “It was under Bruce Nordstrom and his generation that Nordstrom saw its greatest years, in the 1980’s,” she said. Still, Ms. Lakner is not recommending the stock. “Nordstrom is still a company in search of an identity.” Nordstrom said it hired a national search firm before settling on Blake Nordstrom to take the role of president. Mr. Nordstrom started working for the company in 1974. He has been a stock clerk, salesman, buyer, merchandise manager and store manager. In 1995, Mr. Nordstrom and his five brothers and cousins were named co-presidents. In February 2000, the company eliminated the office of the co-presidency after John Whitacre reorganized the company into five units. He named Blake Nordstrom president of the Nordstrom Rack Group. EXECUTIVE CHANGES CD WAREHOUSE, Oklahoma City, named Christopher Salyer to succeed Jerry Grizzle, chairman, chief executive and president. Mr. Salyer had been chairman and chief executive at Medical Arts Laboratory. DIAL CORP., Scottsdale, Ariz., named Conrad A. Conrad senior vice president and chief financial officer, succeeding Susan Riley. Mr. Conrad had been a finan-

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cial consultant. EDDIE BAUER, Redmond, Wash., named Steve Newman to the new post of president at its apparel business. He had been president at Brooks Brothers. KEMET CORP., Greenville, S.C., named D. Ray Cash, treasurer, to the post of chief financial officer. He succeeds James Jerozal, who retired in 1997. Michael Boone was named treasurer. COMPANY INDEX This index lists businesses mentioned in The New York Times today, It omits companies mentioned in passing and it does not cover statistical tables. Page numbers refer to the beginnings of articles, A dagger (t) denotes a parent company not directly mentioned in an article about a subsidiary. A A&E E23 Advanced Micro Devices C6 AES C4 Aliani C 17 Amazon.com C2 American Legend C6 Apple Computer C2 Asher/Gal C6 Ashland C4 AtHome C2 Autowraps F1 Avaya C4 B B Com3 Group C6 Bayer C6 Bertelsmann E36 Blackboard C6 Bonifacio Logistics C4 Boston Properties B5 Bridgestone A1, C1 British Telecommunications C17 Brookfield Properties B5 C Carrefour C4 CD Warehouse C2 CH Energy C4 Chubb C4 Cisco Systems C2 ClearChannel Communications C6 Coca-Cola C4 Compaq C2 Continental C5 Costco C1 Credit Suisse C C6 D Dell Computer C6 Destination Films E14 Deutsche Telekom C4

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Dial C9 Dillard’s C1, C2 DM News C6 Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette C4, C6 E Earthgrains C4 El Salvador Energy Holdings C4 Electronics for Imaging C4 Emulex C1 Epiegel C2 F Federated C1 Fifth Third Bancorp C4 Firestone C1 Ford Motor A1, C1, C4, C6, F1 Freddie Mac C18 FreeCarMedia F1 Fries Film Group E21 G Gale & Wentworth 05 Gap C1 GATX C4 General Dynamics A18, C4 General Electric A23 General Motors C6 Gerber Scientific C17 GlaxoWellcome C4 Goodyear Tire and Rubber A1 Griffith Consumers C4 H Heitner Weiss C6 Hertz: Hutchinson Technology C2 Hyundai Group C4 Hyundai Motor C4 I Image Entertainment E23 Insurance AutoAuctions C6 Intel C2 International Finance C4 Interpublic Group C6 Intersil C2 K Kemet C2 Kia Motors C4 Kino E23 Kohlberg Kravis Roberts C17 Kohl’s C1 L Laspata/DeCaro C6 Lear C5 Limited C1

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London Stock Exchange C4 Lowestpremium.com F1 Lucent Technologies C1, C4 M May C1 Mazda Motor C4 Meiji Life Insurance C4 Mezzina Brown C6 Michelin A1, C5 Micro Systems C6 MicroClean C4 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing F1 MobileEngines.com F1 Morgan (J. P.) C6 N Neiman Marcus C1 New China Life Insurance C4 News Corporation E23 Nippon Telegraph and Telephone C2 Nordstrom C2 Novartis C4 O OM Gruppen C4 Ottawa Financial C4 P PairGain C1 Penney (J. C.) C1, C6 Pioneer E23 PixStreann C2 Pogo.com C2 Posnick & Kolker C6 Procter & Gamble F1 Proxim C2 R Reliant Energy C4 Roche Holding C4 Rouse Company B5 Runyon Saltzman & Einhorn C6 S Seagram E23 Sears, Roebuck C1 Saga Enterprises C2 SFX Entertainment C6 Siemens C2 SmithKline Beecham C4 Sony C2 Sony E23 Splash Technology Holdings C4 Stratos Global C17 Sybron Chemicals C6

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T T-Online International C4 Target C1, C6 Telephone and Data Systems C4 TimeWarner E23 Tishman Speyer B5 TowerAutomotive C5 True North Communications C6 U UAL C18 UBS C4 USA Education C4 V Verio C2 Viacom E23 Visteon C5 Vivendi Environment C4 Volkswagen A4 W Wal-Mart C1 Waste Management C4 Y Young & Rubicam C6 Z Zurich Insurance C4 You can quote us. The quotation of the day: noteworthy remarks daily on page 2 of The New York Times If you aren’t already enjoying the convenience of home delivery, call 1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637). The New York Times Expect the World® | homedelivery.nytimes.com

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L C3 JOIN THE HERD! TO BETTER TV ENTERTAINMENT SWITCH TO DISH NETWORK DISH Network DIGITAL DYNAMITE NEW! 100% DIGITAL TV ENTERTAINMENT -WITH NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY! DIGITAL DYNAMITE 100 PLAN Only $3499/month Premium satellite TV system with interactive Program Guide -No equipment to buyAmerica’s Top 100 CD - our most popular programming package Hassle-Free In-Home Service Plan 30-day Satisfaction Guarantee Model 382 Add DISH Network to 2 rooms in your home with this multi-room-ready satellite TV package. DIGITAL DYNAMITE 100 HOME PLAN 2 Premium multi-room-ready satellite TV receivers with interactive Program Guides -No equipment to buyAmerica’s Top 100 CD - our most popular programming package Hassle-Free In-Home Service Plan 30-day Satisfaction Guarantee Model 2700 Model 3822 NOW, OVER 10 MILLION SATISFIED VIEWERS. SIGN UP TODAY. ONE-TIME-SET-UP FEE OF $99. Includes 1st month’s Plan payment and standard Professional Installation. OTHER GREAT DIGITAL DYNAMITE PLANS AVAILABLE. ASK FOR DETAILS! Valid major credit card required. Plus, GET YOUR LOCAL CHANNELS NOW ON DISH NETWORK Only $400/month abc FOX Local networks available by subscription in select areas. Availability restrictions apply. CALL TODAY: 1-800-333-DISH PROMOTION CODE 1DD0100 3474

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24-Hours-A-Day, 7-Days-A-Week www.dishnetwork.com NOW, SUBSCRIBE TO ANY OF OUR PREMIUM MOVIE PACKAGES AND RECEIVE THE FIRST 3 MONTHS FREE. OVER $100 VALUE! SHOWTIME UNLIMITED, HBO THE WORKS, STARZ ENCORE SUPER PAK AND MULTIMAX Up to 28 commercial-free movie channels, over 2000 movie choices every month. dish™ NETWORK Disney Channel (East & West Network The Learning Channel CNBC Sci-Fi Channel QVC Cou Shopping Network TV Food Networ Classics BET Independent Film Channel Movies TVG CNNfn CNN1 MTV Boomera Regi Nichelodeon / Nick at Nite C-SPA USA time America’s Voice VH1 Home el Home & Garden American Movie N Turner Classic AX TV Noggin NASA nels of CD-quality music Offer ends 10/31/00. All prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Local and state sales taxes may apply. Programming is available for single-family dwellings located in the continental United States. A DISH Network programming, and any other services that are provided, are subject to the terms and conditions of the Residential Customer Agreement, which is available upon request. Local TV channels are offered only in specified areas and may be provided through an outdoor antenna or a local dish antenna. Off-air broadcast picture quality may vary based upon location. Local Broadcast Networks by satellite are only available to customers who reside in the specified local Designated Market Area (DMA). Distant Broadcast Networks packages by satellite are only available for private home viewing and in limited areas, to homes that are located outside a Grade A or B designated area. Additional receivers must be activated in conjunction with a primary receiver, and are subject to a $4.99 per month programming fee per receiver. All receivers must be connected to a phone line. Digital Dynamite Am (Digital Dynamite 100 Plan, Digital Dynamite 100 Home Plan) are available from 7/1/00 through 10/31/00, require a valid major credit card with a programming commitment of 12 consecutive months. The DOI Dynamite 100 Plan ($34.99 per month) and Digital Dynamite 100 Home Plan ($39.99 per month) include 1 Model 3822 (or equivalent) satellite TV system, 1 additional receiver (Dynamite 100 Home Plan only), America’s Top 100 CD programming and In-Home Service Plan. Customer must pay a $99 Set-up Fee that

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C4 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 COMPANY NEWS AFTER ACQUISITION, SALLIE MAE TO CUT 1,700 JOBS Sallie Mae, which provides funds for federally guaranteed student loans, said yesterday that it would cut 1,700 jobs, or about a quarter of its work force, and take a $50 million charge in a move to consolidate operations after a recent acquisition. Last month, Sallie Mae, based in Reston, Va., closed on its acquisition of the USA Group’s student loan operations, and Sallie Mae’s parent company, SLM Holding, renamed itself USA Education. As part of Sallie Mae’s reconfiguration, a loan servicing center in Lawrence, Kan., will be closed, and loan servicing operations in Indianapolis; Killeen, Tex.; Marlton, N.J.; Panama City, Fla.; Surnmerlin, Nev.; and Wilkes-Barre, Pa., will be consolidated. A Chandler, Ariz., operation will focus solely on client relations, and most information technology functions will move to Indianapolis from Reston. (Reuters) LUCENT TO DISTRIBUTE AVAYA STOCK AS SPECIAL DIVIDEND Stockholders of Lucent Technologies will receive a special dividend of all the common stock of Avaya, a new company that Lucent will spin off by the end of September. Avaya comprises the three businesses under Lucent’s Enterprise Networks Group, which sells business telephone networks, voice and data switches for those networks, voice messaging systems, and some other equipment and services to government agencies and businesses. Avaya will be based in Basking Ridge, N.J. Lu-cent said the spinoff would be complete on Sept. 30, to shareholders of record as of Sept. 20. Lucent shareholders will receive one share of Avaya common stock for every 12 Lucent shares they hold. (AP) WASTE MANAGEMENT AGREES TO SELL 2 FOREIGN OPERATIONS Waste Management, the nation’s largest trash hauling company, has agreed to the $250 million sale of waste service operations in Hong Kong and Mexico and other foreign assets to Onyx, a unit of Vivendi Environment. The sale is part of Waste Management’s effort to refocus on its North American operations. As part of the sale, the company’s Waste Management Environmental unit completed the sale of its 49 percent interest in Advanced Environmental Services to Onyx, which already owned the rest of the domestic hazardous waste treatment venture. The shares of Waste Management, which is based in Houston, fell 13 cents, to $18.94. (AP) ELECTRONICS FOR IMAGING IS BUYING SPLASH TECHNOLOGY Electronics for Imaging Inc., a maker of networked publishing equipment and software, said yesterday that it had agreed to buy Splash Technology Holdings for $146 million to enhance its position in color imaging. Electronics for Imaging, based in Foster City, Calif., will pay Splash shareholders $10 a share, 11 percent higher than yesterday’s closing price. Splash, based in Sunnyvale, Calif., makes computer color printing products. The acquisition is expected to be complete in 10 business days. Shares of Electronics for Imaging fell $3.06, to $26, while Splash Technology rose $1.97, to $9.03. (Bloomberg News) FIFTH THIRD IN $160 MILLION DEAL FOR OTTAWA FINANCIAL Fifth Third Bancorp said yesterday that it had agreed to buy the Ottawa Financial Corporation for about $160.2 million in stock. Fifth Third, based in Cincinnati, has 644 branches in Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and other states. Ottawa Financial, based in Holland, Mich., has 27 offices in Michigan. Fifth Third said

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each Ottawa share would be worth 0.54 share of Fifth Third stock in the deal. AmeriBank, a unit of Ottawa, will be merged with Fifth Third Bank to create a combined entity with $2.7 billion in assets, Fifth Third said. Shares of Fifth Third rose $1.81, to $46.19, while Ottawa Financial rose 50 cents, to $21. (Reuters) MACHINISTS REACH AN AGREEMENT WITH GENERAL DYNAMICS About 1,500 striking machinists at the Bath Ironworks shipyard in Maine, where Navy destroyers are built, reached a tentative settlement with the General Dynamics Corporation yesterday after a 20-hour negotiating session, union and company officials said. The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Local 6 agreed to allow General Dynamics to cross-train workers building complex ships like the $900 million Aegis destroyer, said Susan Pierter, a spokeswoman for the ironworks, in Bath, Me. In return, General Dynamics, based in Falls Church, Va., agreed not to use the cross-training provision when layoffs are in effect, she said. (Reuters) MAZDA NAMES CHIEF FOR ITS NORTH AMERICAN SALES UNIT The Mazda Motor Corporation, an affiliate of Ford Motor, named Charles R. Hughes as chief executive and president of its North American sales unit, replacing Richard Beattie, a Mazda spokesman said. Mazda said last month that Mr. Beattie, 45, would leave to become Ford’s head of investor relations. Mr. Hughes, 55, resigned in May 1999 as the top North American executive for Land Rover, a sport utility vehicle unit now owned by Ford. The change is the latest executive shuffle since Ford increased its stake in Mazda to 33.4 percent from 24.5 percent in 1996 and took a bigger role in helping turn around the company, which was losing money. (Bloomberg News) TELEPHONE AND DATA PLANS $230 MILLION STOCK BUYBACK Telephone and Data Systems, a provider of cellular and local telephone service, said yesterday that it would buy back up to two million shares of common stock worth about $230 million. The buyback represents about 3.8 percent of the company’s 53 million outstanding common shares. Companies use buybacks to increase earnings per share by reducing shares outstanding. In 1999, Telephone and Data, based in Chicago, earned $314.2 million, or $5.10 a share, on revenue of $1.96 billion. Its shares were up 6 cents, to $116. (Dow Jones) EARTHGRAINS SAYS STRIKE HAS SPREAD TO NASHVILLE PLANT The Earthgrains Company said yesterday that workers had walked off the job at the company’s bakery in Nashville, making it the seventh plant affected by a labor strike that began Saturday in Alabama. About 60 of the bakery’s 225 workers stopped work after their contract expired at midnight Wednesday, a company spokesman said. They join 1,565 other members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers union who have taken up picket lines against Earthgrains, the maker of IronKids and Heiner’s breads. Production at the Nashville plant is continuing. Earthgrains has about 22,000 employees and runs 64 bakeries and 2 refrigerated-dough plants. (Bloomberg News) COKE IS BUYING REMAINING STAKE IN LITHUANIAN FACTORY The Coca-Cola Company’s Lithuanian subsidiary said yesterday that it had bought the government’s remaining 22.96 percent stake in the Lithuanian factory that makes its soft drinks, turning it into a wholly owned subsidiary. A spokesman for Coca-Cola Bottlers Lietuva, Coca-Cola’s distribution subsidiary in Lithuania, said it would pay 3.5 million liras ($875,000) for the

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stake. Coke bought a 77.04 percent stake in the Alytus bottling plant in 1994, setting up Coca-Cola Bottlers Lietuva at the same time. (Bloomberg News) CENTRAL HUDSON ENERGY SERVICES, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., a subsidiary of CH Energy Group, has acquired Griffith Consumers Co., a Maryland-based heating oil vendor. The price was not disclosed. GATX CORP., Chicago, which leases railroad cars and aircraft, said that it bought a 35 percent stake in Bonifacio Logistics, a Brazilian railroad-car leasing company, for undisclosed terms. AES CORP., Arlington, Va., the largest United States power-plant developer, has agreed to buy Reliant Energy’s 50 percent interest in the utility owner El Salvador Energy Holdings for an undisclosed price. ASHLAND SPECIALTY CHEMICAL, Covington, Ky., a subsidiary of Ashland Inc., has acquired the assets of MicroClean, which has operations in Austin, Tex., and Tempe, Ariz., and provides cleaning products for semiconductor makers, for undisclosed terms. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Plan to Cut Trading Costs at 2 Key European Exchanges By SUZANNE KAPNER LONDON, Aug. 31 - In a move intended to shore up support for the planned merger of the London and Frankfurt stock exchanges, the clearinghouses for the two markets introduced a plan today that would cut settlement costs by 90 percent for certain trades. Brokers have expressed concern about the potential for escalating costs should the London and Frankfurt exchanges combine to form a pan-European bourse called M Winning the support of brokers is crucial for the London Stock Exchange in its attempts to ward off a hostile bid from OM Gruppen A.B., the Swedish company that runs the Stockholm stock exchange. “It’s a good workable blueprint,” said Brian Mairs, a spokesman for London and Frankfurt seek brokers’ support. the Association of Private Client Investment Managers and Stockbrokers. While today’s proposal went a long way toward addressing shareholder concerns, questions about how the savings would be achieved and who would benefit the most underscore the difficulty that European stock exchanges were facing as they tried folding dissimilar technologies and regulations into one entity. A certain amount of overlap in terms of how trades are settled has led some shareholders of the London Stock Exchange to call the proposal a political Band-Aid, rather than the most economically viable solution. Furthermore, since the plan laid out by the London settlement firm, CrestCo, and its Frankfurt counterpart, Clearstream, is not contingent upon the formation of iX, it remains unclear how effective the measures will be in warding off the Swedish bid. CrestCo has said that it will work with whichever partner London exchange shareholders choose. “This can go ahead without iX,” Don Cruickshank, the chairman of the London Stock Exchange, said today at a news conference. Under the plan, which could be introduced by next summer, the cost of domestic trades will remain constant, while the price of cross-border trades could fall by as much as 90 percent. Transaction costs for trading pan-European stocks are more than 10 times those for trading, stocks in the United States, according to an

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estimate by Merrill Lynch. only trades made through a so-called central counterparty, a kind of clearinghouse system intended to al-low institutional investors to remain anonymous in trades, will be subject to the savings. Since most retail brokers do not use such a system, it is unclear how much they will benefit. Institutional investors accounted for most international trades last year on the London exchange, which amounted to E 2.4 trillion, or $3.48 trillion, compared with ff 1.4 trillion, or $2.03 trillion, for domestic trades;; “In essence this is good news,” said Michael Clark, a director of the British brokerage house Charles &, Stanley & Company, which owns 100,000 shares of the London Stock, Exchange. “What bearing it has on a decision regarding iX, I’m not sure.” Europeans Increase Interest Rates, Yet the Euro Falls Further Continued From First Business Page against the dollar since its introduction, and the biggest cause of that decline has been the United States’ magnetic pull on investment capital. If a weak euro should fuel inflation, the currency’s credibility and value in world markets can be expected to slip further. But if the central bankers slow economic growth in an effort to prevent inflation, the euro could lose value as investors and corporations tilt more heavily away from Europe and toward the United States. “European corporations are voting with their pocketbooks,” said As U.S. draws global capital, central bank attracts criticism. Paul Mortimer-Lee, markets economist with BNP Paribas in London. “If you raise interest rates too far, there is a danger you will squeeze growth.” Though European inflation remains extremely low, at an annual rate of 2.4 percent a year, it has been gathering strength and is now above the central bank’s limit of 2 percent. Many analysts argue that the bank and its president, Wim Duisenberg, are clamping down on the money supply at a time European economic growth may already be tapering off. Though economists predict that the overall growth of countries in the this year and next, recent surveys show that business confidence declined in Germany, France and Belgium in the last month. The inflationary signals have been ambiguous as well. Stripping out the effects of one-time increases and of crude oil prices - $33.12 a barrel in New York today - the underlying rate of inflation is very modest, at 1.3 percent. And though higher oil prices can ripple through the rest of the economy, especially in wage demands, the European Central Bank’s most recent assessment is that those effects have not shown UP in goods unrelated to energy costs. Partly as a result, the move to raise interest rates has so far had the opposite effect on the euro than the central bankers wanted. In the two weeks since they began sending out hints of their intentions, the euro has significantly weakened. Indeed, after staging a modest rebound in June, the currency is now just a smidgen above a record low in European trading of 88.25 cents against the dollar. The E.C.B. has trapped itself, Mr. Mortimer-Lee of BNP Paribas said, by setting an inflation target that is too rigid. The Bank of England and the Swedish

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central bank - neither country is part of the euro-zone - have set targets around 2 percent but allowed for flexibility by allowing the rate to vary by one percentage point above or below the target. The European Central Bank, by contrast, has fixed 2 percent as the upper limit and never really set a lower limit. To be sure, economists and analysts generally agree that the euro’s woes reflect the persistently faster growth of the United States in comparison with Europe. “There is a massive flow of money into the United States,” said Ian Gunner, a currency analyst in London with ABN Amro, “and that has become a major new influence in the past two years.” But the United States’ investment allure ties back to its higher growth rate. “Why do companies want to take over other companies?” Mr. Gunner asked. “It has to do with the general well-being of the economy. The euro zone is one year into its recovery, and the E.C.B. is already worried CURRENCIES $1.20 Euro in Dollars 1.10 1.00 0.90 0.80 1999 Weekly 2000 MKAMJJASONDJFMAMJJA Last 10 days 92 cents 91 90 89 88 FMTWTFMTWT The New York Times Source: Bloomberg Financial Markets 52-WEEK YESTERDAY YEAR 52 HIGH LOW INDEX CLOSE CHANGE TO DATE WEEKS 244.71 175.81 Gldmn Schs Overall 244.40 -0.31 -0.13% +25.63%+34.84% 121.94 74.39 Energy 121.53 -0.41 -0.34 +40.81 +56.23 183.82 158.37 Agriculture 176.32 +0.77 +0.44 + 8.28 + 2.98 199.72 161.66 Livestock 170.53 +0.41 +0.24 - 3.51 + 4.28 428.48 344.06 Prec. Metal 389.04 +4.42 + 1.15 + 0.05 +13.02 178.04 151.09 Indus. Metal 168.18 -0.29 -0.17 - 1.99 + 7.13 227.08 195.88 CmdtyRschBur/Bridge 227.41 +2.15 + 0.95 +1046 +13.64 about inflation. That is just not very impressive.” Since the euro was introduced, the region has experienced a net investment outflow of about 200 billion euros - both direct investment in companies and property, and portfolio investments in stocks and bonds. Much of that reflects a sharp increase in trans-Atlantic mergers, most recently the Credit Suisse Group’s $12.8 billion deal announced this week to acquire the investment bank Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. But a number of analysts complain that the European Central Bank has been inherently slow to recognize changing economic conditions. Such critics think that the bank erred when it reduced its core interest rate to 2.5 percent from 3 percent in April 1999. At the time, central bankers were afraid that lingering effects of the Asian financial crisis and the severe economic problems in Russia

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would lead to a slowdown in Western Europe. The fears were correct, but late: by the time interest rates were decreased, Europe was already exhibiting many signs of renewed economic growth. The current problems are complicated by the widening divergence of growth rates within the euro zone. Germany, with the largest economy, lagged far behind the pack, growing by less than 2 percent in 1999. But Ireland has grown at well above 5 percent. Consumer prices there are increasing at an annual rate of 6.2 percent, with housing prices surging, about 21 percent. “With the E.C.B., the president is, more of a moderator and consensus builder than a strong leader.” Mr. Mayer of Goldman, Sachs said. The process of building a consensus is more time-consuming and difficult than at the Federal Reserve, he said, and that may have made the European Central Bank slower in its response. WORLD BUSINESS BRIEFING EUROPE LOSS AT INTERNET SERVICE The European Internet service provider TOnline International posted a $161 million (179 million euro) net loss for the first half after one-time charges related to its initial public offering in April and acquisitions. But the number of subscribers to T-Online more than doubled to 6 million from 2.7 million in the first half of last year. And the company, a Deutsche Telekom spinoff, said it expected to be profitable in two to three years. (AP) CARREFOUR’S PROFIT UP Carrefour S.A., the French-based global retailer, said its first-half profit rose 11 percent. Profit from operations rose to 302 million euros ($270 million) from 273 million euros in the first half of 1999. Including costs for closing shops in Hong Kong, net income rose to 277 million euros from 266 million euros. In the first half, Carrefour paid off two-thirds of the 122 million euros in expenses related to its January takeover of Promodes, said Daniel Bernard, the chairman of the company. (Bloomberg News) SMITHKLINE SELLS PRODUCT LINES In an effort to win regulatory approval for its merger with Glaxo Wellcome P.L.C., SmithKline Beecham P.L.C. said it would sell product lines to Novartis A.G. and Roche Holding A.G. for almost $2.9 billion. Novartis will buy SmithKline’s herpes treatments Famvir and Vectavir/Denavir for $1.63 billion, while Roche will pay $1.23 billion for Kytril, an anti-nausea drug for cancer patients. SmithKline, based in Britain, must sell some of its drugs to gain approval for its merger with Glaxo Wellcome, also of Britain, because Glaxo makes similar products. The sales are contingent on the completion of the $75 billion merger, which is expected to close next month. Suzanne Kapner (NYT) CREDIT SUISSE PROFIT UP The Swiss financial services group Credit Suisse said income in the first half rose 36 percent, to 3.6 billion Swiss francs, or $2.1 billion, buoyed by securities trading and asset management fees. But shares in Credit Suisse, which agreed this week to acquire Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, tumbled for the second consecutive day, apparently reflecting investor concern over mounting personnel costs, which were driven up 33 percent by soaring bonuses, increasing operating expenses by 28 percent, to 11.7 billion Swiss francs. Income at the company’s private banking unit, which invests money for wealthy clients, rose 61 percent, to 1.4 billion Swiss francs. Income from fees and commissions rose 51 percent, to 7.5 billion francs. And income from securities trading rose 49 percent, to 5.4 billion francs. Unlike its bigger

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Swiss rival, UBS A.G., which reported that its assets under management declined 3 percent in the first half, Credit Suisse said its assets changed little in the second quarter, and rose almost 5 percent in the first three months. John Tagliabue (NYT) AMERICAS CANADA’S ECONOMY GROWS With a surge in business investment, Canada’s economy continued to grow at a strong annual pace, 4.7 percent, in the second quarter, slightly below the 5.1 percent gross domestic product advances of the two previous quarters. Spending on machinery and equipment, main y computers and related high-tech compo-nents, grew by 19.5 percent annually. Exports advanced at an 8.5 percent yearly rate, led also by high-tech sales, and imports were 10.2 percent higher. Considering that much of Canada has endured a cool, wet summer, consumer spending was stronger than expected, rising at a 3.6 percent annual rate. Timothy Pritchard (NYT) BRAZIL LIABLE IN LOSSES Brazil’s Supreme Federal Tribunal ruled that the government is liable for about $21 billion in losses employees suffered to their Guarantee Fund for Length of Service - a type of individual unemployment insurance fund - during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, when a series of unsuccessful economic plans threw the Brazilian economy into chaos. About 600,000 workers are affected by the court’s decision to hold the government responsible for losses under two of the five economic plans. The exact amount will be decided later. Jennifer L. Rich (NYT) ASIA KOREAN AUTO SPINOFF The South Korean government permitted the Hyundai Motor Company to be spun off from its parent, the Hyundai Group, the nation’s largest business conglomerate, in a move investors welcomed as a step toward increased openness from management. The approval by the Fair Trade Commission came just one day after a key executive in the Hyundai Group resigned, bolstering optimism that highranking employees loyal to the founding family would no longer be able to funnel cash from healthy units to prop up money-losing affiliates. The spinoff of Hyundai Motor is expected to include its sister automaker, the Kia Motors Corporation, and several component makers. Samuel Len (NYT) KOREAN INFLATION INCREASES South Korea’s consumer prices rose in August at their fastest rate in a year, led by higher medical fees and crude oil prices, stepping up pressure on the central bank to raise interest rates after keeping them unchanged for six months. The consumer price index rose 0.8 percent from a month ago, the Finance and Economy Ministry said, topping July’s 0.3 percent gain and the 0.4 percent increase economists had expected. From a year ago, prices rose 2.7 percent, faster than the 2.4 percent economists had forecast. (Bloomberg News) CHINA LOOSENS INSURANCE RULES China is allowing foreign insurance companies to buy up to 25 percent of domestic insurers, opening a fast track for foreign companies eager to get into the growing market. In the first of what is expected to be several such deals, five foreign companies, including the Zurich Insurance Company, the International Finance Corporation and the Meiji Life Insurance Company, based in Japan, have agreed to buy 24.9 percent of the New China Life Insurance Company, according to yesterday’s China Daily. Foreign insurers have complained about waiting years for licenses to operate in the coun-

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try. Only a handful of foreign licenses have been issued, most recently to the Chubb Corporation, which filed its application seven years ago. The share sale will increase New China’s net assets to $193 million from about $76 million. Craig Smith (NYT) JAPANESE AUTO EXPORTS RISE Japan’s auto exports rose 6.3 percent in July from a year ago, helped by continued brisk sales in the United States and Asia. A total of 395,370 cars, trucks and buses were exported from Japan last month, the fourth consecutive month of year-to-year gains, the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association said. The data was in line with expectations, coming after the release earlier this week of strong automobile export figures from Japan’s top five automakers. (AP) Beyond Business: World Briefing, Page A8.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L+ C5 Firestone Struggles in the Center of an Ever-Widening Storm Over the Safety of Its Tires Continued From Page A1 onstrate in front of his company’s American headquarters here. Close to 8,000 workers could go on strike Saturday morning at nine Firestone plants in the United States. Marketing experts are gloomy about Firestone’s prospects. Tylenol survived a poisoning scare a decade ago. Ford survived the problem of Pintos that caught fire during collisions two decades ago. And Firestone itself survived a much larger recall of its Firestone 500 car tires in 1978. But now, under the unblinking glare of 24-hour news channels and the Internet, Firestone - pilloried again as insufficiently concerned about safety - is especially vulnerable because consumer loyalty to tire brands is weak, said Jack F. Trout, the president of a market research company that bears his name in Greenwich, Conn. “I think their chance of survival is certainly in question,” Mr. Trout said. “There might be irreparable damage to the brand.” Mr. Lampe said “business was normal” for tires not subject to the recall, but also noted that the recall was taking up mechanics’ time and filling service bays, which would affect sales. General Motors repeated today that it had not found problems with Firestone tires and would keep buying them. But the costs of the recall and expectations of lower sales have knocked 45 percent off Bridgestone’s stock price in Tokyo trading during August. Firestone had slowly gained market share over the last three years at the expense of its two global archrivals - Goodyear and Michelin - by heavily marketing the success of Firestone tires on the racetrack. Now its rivals are having their revenge. Goodyear, still the market leader in the United States, has just stepped up its advertising, particularly of tires for sport utility vehicles. “We have responded, we believe appropriately and effectively, to the market opportunities out there,” said Chuck Sinclair, a Goodyear spokesman. The crashes involving the recalled tires - 15-inch ATX and ATX 11 tires made anywhere in North America and 15-inch Wilderness models made only in Decatur, Ill, have occurred mainly in Sun Belt states. Tire dealers and customers in the region said today that consumer confidence in the Firestone brand had been shaken. “I want to get a different brand of tires,” said Allison Leader, a University of Texas student leaving a Firestone service center in Austin, explaining she had been waiting two weeks for replacement tires for her 1998 Explorer. “It’s been horrible. I canceled a trip to Houston to see my parents a few days ago because I’m scared to drive on the highway.” Understanding the tumult in the United States poses a special challenge for Bridgestone in Japan. People who follow the industry in Tokyo describe the parent company as lacking in public relations skill. “Bridgestone has a tradition that ‘no news is good news,’ even when it’s good news,” said Roger Schreffler, a long-time auto journalist there. Bridgestone has no Americans on its board, even though half the company’s sales are in the United States. Here in Nashville, 5 of the 10 corporate officers of

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Bridgestone/ Firestone are Japanese. They handle communications with Japan, said Mr. Lampe - who, like most of the Analysts worry about irreparable damage to a well-known brand. American executives, does not speak Japanese. Though analysts have viewed the tire maker’s response to the recall as tineared and defensive - especially in comparison with that of Ford, which has often released information as quickly as it obtains it from Firestone - Mr. Lampe said that he did not believe that the company’s foreign ownership had interfered at all with its handling of the crisis. Still, the timing of the recall could not be worse for Firestone’s management. Since the early 1990’s, the American operations have been led by two Japanese executives in close partnership. Kenji Shibata, the president, has overseen sales and marketing issues, while Masatoshi Ono, the chief executive, is an engineer who has handled manufacturing and technical issues. But Mr. Shibata, who speaks fluent English and sometimes served as an interpreter for fellow Japanese executives, retired in early July. Mr. Lampe described the retirement as unrelated to the recall, which began on Aug. 9, although federal regulators opened an investigation in May. Mr. Shibata’s retirement has left the many issues facing the company in the hands of Mr. Ono, who conducts meetings in English but is sometimes uncertain whether he understands all the nuances when asked questions in English, said Trevor Hoskins, a retired senior vice president of Bridgestone/ Firestone. Mr. Ono, who declined repeated requests this week for an interview, is scheduled to testify before the House Commerce Committee next week. Mr. Nasser, who earlier in the week turned down an invitation to testify, said today he had changed his mind - but Congressional aides said he pointedly refused to appear on the same panel as Mr. Ono. Bridgestone has a reputation in Japan for an unyielding management style, especially, compared with the more compromising approach of other Japanese multinationals. A former executive told a Japanese newspaper that the first Japanese word that the company’s American employees learned was “dam,” or no. In Japan, an employee committed hara-kiri, or ritual suicide, in the office of Bridgestone’s president last year, to draw attention to the cause of workers asked to leave the company. But Mr. Lampe said Firestone under Japanese ownership had moved much faster this summer than it did in 1978, when it was still an American company and when the eventual recall was linked to 41 deaths. Then, Firestone fought regulators for a year and a half to prevent a recall and the release of documents which, when finally handed over, showed that the company had known of problems with Firestone 500 tires for several years and covered them up. One big difference between then and now is that the 1978 recall involved many models, not just Ford vehicles, and automakers had little to say at the time. By contrast, the current recall involves only vehicles made by Ford and its affiliates, and most of the deaths have involved Explorers that rolled over. Leery of letting the reputation of one of its most profitable models be harmed, Ford has been increasingly outspoken in blaming Firestone and has released extensive Firestone data showing problems dating back to at least 1997. “This is a tire issue without question; it is not a vehicle issue,” Mr. Nasser said today, later adding, “I’m sorry that these defective tires are on our vehicles.”

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Yet American regulators are examining Ford’s role, notably its recommendation that the tires on Explorers be inflated to just 26 pounds a square inch - lower than what is called for on many rival models. For their part, Firestone officials have been loath to direct blame at their largest customer. But as Ford’s comments have grown more pointed they are beginning to point out that Firestone’s very similar tires for other automakers’ sport utility vehicles have not encountered similar problems. “This situation is somewhat unprecedented in itself, because the incidents that we’ve seen and the problems that we’ve seen have been primarily on one size tire on one’ application,” Mr. Lampe said. “We’ve got the same size tire on a, number of other applications, and we’re not seeing the same sort of circumstances.” Mr. Hoskins, who retired from Firestone nearly two years ago, was more blunt. “It has nothing to do with the tires,” he said. “It has to do with S.U.V.’s, and with one kind of S.U.V. in particular.” Ford officials have repeatedly pointed out that Explorers roll over less often than other midsize sport utility vehicles and that Explorers equipped with Goodyear tires have fared much better than those with Firestone tires. With the tallies of deaths, and the lawsuits and government investigations mounting, life is only growing more difficult for Firestone officials. Since it became apparent on Aug. 6 that a recall would be necessary, Mr. Lampe said, “I have literally not been home except to sleep.” As Tires Are Recalled, Bridgestone Faces Strike Continued From First Business Page reputation. It expects to need six months to replace all of the recalled tires, most of them from Ford sport utility vehicles. Some labor experts suggested that the union had threatened a walkout at this point because it believed it might be able now to wrest the most out of Bridgestone. Company officials said a strike this week would have a minimal effect on production and on working down the backlog of recall orders. Noting that the company was airlifting in tires produced at its factories in Japan, Christine Karbowiak, Bridgestone/Firestone’s vice president for public affairs, said, “We’re working very hard to identify and secure tires from as many different sources as possible.” Union officials said that they were not trying to pressure Bridgestone at a time of trouble. Rather, they said, workers at the nine plants, who have been working under temporary extensions since their contracts expired, have grown frustrated about not having reached a new agreement after months of talks. “It seems that it’s high time,” Mr. Ramick said. “Negotiations have been going on a long time, and the company has been stalling for a long time in the talks.” Union officials said the two sides were focusing on numerous issues, including pensions, wages, seniority rights, grievance and arbitration procedures and the company’s policy over absences. Pay for the unionized workers ranges from $9 an hour for new workers to $19 an hour for experienced workers, who receive various production incentives. “The company is certainly vulnerable right now,” said David Cole, director of the Office for the Study of Automotive Transportation at University of Michigan. “At the same time, the labor force has an agenda to put forward, and they don’t want to be left out of the game.”

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But Professor Cole suggested that it would be unwise for the union to squeeze the company too hard. “In the best of conditions, they’re going to lose market share,” he said. “The real concern is they could end up in a position where they can’t support the labor force.” The union is threatening strikes at six factories covered by a master Organizing Chart Saturday Associated Press John Lewis, a worker at the Bridgestone / Firestone factory in Decatur, Ill., reviews a strike organization chart. After months of negotiations, a walkout by 8,000 employees in nine plants may be near. contract that expired April 23. They are in Akron, Ohio; Decatur, Ill., Des Moines; Noblesville, Ind.; Oklahoma City, and Russellville, Ark. The strike would involve three other factories - in Bloomington, Ill., LaVergne, Tenn. and Warren County, Tenn. - covered by separate contracts that have also expired. A factory in Wilson, N.C., is not threatened with a walkout because it is not covered by a union contract. The Wilson plant is one of those producing replacement tires for sport utility vehicles. “Our top priority, along with serving customers, is achieving fair and reasonable agreements here,” said Mr. Sharp, the company spokesman. “A strike will benefit no one. We’re working very hard to avoid any sort of disruption.” Many steelworkers are still bitter toward Bridgestone over its extensive use of replacement workers in a 27-month period from 1994 to 1996. During that strike, Bridgestone said it would permanently replace 2,300 of the 4,200 strikers. The dispute began with a 10-month strike in July 1994. The union agreed to end the strike in May 1995, but because of the company’s use of replacement workers, all the union members were still not taken back to work by November 1996, when a new contract was reached. Ford officials said many of the defective tires were made in the Decatur plant when it was using replacement workers. “Sure, there’s bitterness about that strike, and I’ve seen T-shirts that say, ‘Never forget,’ ” said Larry Odum, the steelworkers’ regional coordinator for the Southeast. “Anytime some people are out of work for two and a half years there’s going to be some bitterness. But there are also a lot people willing to work with the company and help it through the situation now.” The 1994 strike was begun by the United Rubber Workers, but that union, its funds depleted by the strike, merged with the steelworkers’ union in 1995. Visteon Hurt by Ford Motor’s Cutbacks DEARBORN, Mich., Aug. 31 (Bloomberg News) - Shares in the Visteon Corporation fell after the company said that third-quarter earnings would be reduced by production cuts at Ford Motor because of Firestone tire recalls. Visteon, which is based in Dearborn and was spun off from Ford on June 28, fell 50 cents, to $15.69. The company said after the close of New York Stock Exchange trading on Wednesday that third-quarter earnings could be cut by 12 to 14 cents a share as a result of Ford’s idling of truck assembly plants in Minnesota, Missouri and New Jersey for two weeks as it replaces the Bridgestone Corporation’s Firestone tires that were recalled because of safety concerns. Visteon had been expected to earn 49 cents a share in the third quarter, according to the average forecast of 10 analysts surveyed by First

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Call/Thomson Financial. Ford canceled production of about 10,000 Explorer sport utility vehicles and 15,000 Ranger pickup trucks so it could shift tires that were to have been fitted in assembly plants to dealers. At the dealerships, the tires are being used as replacements on trucks that have already been sold. Visteon makes air-conditioning systems, instrument panels, radios, axles and other parts for the Ranger and the Explorer. Tower Automotive, the world’s largest maker of stamped vehicle-frame parts, and the Lear Corporation, the largest maker of auto seats and interiors, also have said in recent days that Ford’s move will hurt third-quarter profit. More Tire Output Planned PARIS, Aug. 31 (Bloomberg News) - Michelin of France and Continental A.G. of Germany said today that they would increase North American output of sports utility tires several times over to help replace defective Bridgestone/ Firestone tires. Production of Michelin LTX, BF Goodrich Radial Long Trail T/A and Uniroyal Laredo tires will rise more than 400 percent during the next three months at the company’s plants in Ardmore, Okla.; Opelika, Ala., and Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Michelin said. Continental said its United States subsidiary, General Tire, would raise production of 15-inch sport utility tires from 50,000 to 200,000 a month. Company News: Tuesday through Saturday, Business Day Venezuela Asks Criminal Case Against Bridgestone and Ford Continued From First Business Page lutely unfounded,” he told reporters during a conference call. He added, however, that Ford would cooperate with any Venezuelan investigation. Mr. Nasser also promised to testify next week before Congressional committees investigating the tire failures and Explorer accidents. Earlier this week he had said he would not appear, leading to criticism that Ford was not being sufficiently open with the public. Mr. Nasser insisted that the problem “was a tire issue, not a vehicle issue,” and said that 1.5 million tires had already been replaced, representing 22 percent of the 6.5 million Firestone tires being recalled. Bridgestone/ Firestone officials, speaking in a conference call held yesterday at almost the same time as Ford’s, said they had not yet had time to translate the report from Venezuela but did not believe that they had done anything wrong. “We do not believe there was a conspiracy,” said Christine Karbowiak, a Firestone vice president. “We are working closely with Ford, however, to identify the cause or causes of the problems that have been evident.” The continuous stream of accusations and bad news hurt both companies on Wall Street. Shares of Ford dropped nearly 7 percent yesterday, or $1.75, to $24.25, a 52-week closing low. Shares of Bridgestone closed down 98 yen in Japan, at 1,380 yen. Early today, the tiremaker traded lower still, down 60 yen to 1,320 yen, or $12.37. Venezuelan consumer authorities contended that after the first reports there in 1998 of Firestone blowouts causing Ford’s Explorers to roll over, the two companies held a series of secret meetings to determine what was wrong. Evidence led them to suspect that the original-equipment Wilderness model tires were failing, investigators said, and instead of starting a costly recall, Ford asked

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Bridgestone to redesign the tire by adding a new, fifth ply. Firestone officials confirmed yesterday that they had discussed redesigns with Ford Venezuela starting in January 1999, but said that such discussions were normal. After the meetings, new tires produced at Firestone’s plant in the Venezuelan city of Valencia were. marked to indicate that they con-tained five plies, but most contained no more than four, investigators said. Firestone acknowledged that all but a few of the tires had been mistakenly stamped as having five, plies, but that they always met Ford’s specifications. Yet Ford engineers who examined some of the Venezuelan tires made at that time found that their treads separated at a rate 500 times that of Firestone’s ATX tires made in the United States. The Venezuelan investigators also said that Ford’s door-jamb decals, recommended lower tire pressures than those set by Firestone. And they said that original-equipment shock, absorbers were not strong enough to handle fully loaded Explorers, making them dangerous to operate. Instead of recalling the vehicles and replacing the shock absorbers, the investigators asserted that Ford told dealers to change them without notifying regulators or buyers. The Venezuelan agency, the Institute for Consumer Protection and Education, does not have the power to file criminal charges, so it recommended that the federal prosecutor do so. It also asked that Bridgestone/ Firestone recall all the defective tires and that Ford replace inadequate shock absorbers on Explorers. For lawyers in the United States, representing victims of Explorer rollovers and their families, the Venezuelan report may help build a case that the manufacturers withheld information about the tire problem. For Venezuela, the action yesterday by the consumer agency, created in 1995, is apparently an attempt to carve out a more influential role in international business matters. However, the poorly financed and understaffed agency has never undertaken a case like this before. The evidence presented in the report includes examinations of Explorers parked in public lots, as well as American newspaper articles taken from the Internet. The consumer agency’s chief investigator, Jorge Dominguez, is an agronomist, and the technical expert heading the tire inquiry, Carlos Salanova, is a former Goodyear tire salesman and rally-car driver without engineering qualifications. HE NEW YORK TIMES FASHION TUESDAY, JUE nav dress gown the tin dress e. The who was a Wang, v ed in the Fashionably Tuesday The Fashion page, every Tuesday in The New York Times.

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If you aren’t already enjoying the convenience of home delivery, call 1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637). New subscribers get 50% off the first eight weeks. The New York Times Expect the World®

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C6 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 Advertising | Courtney Kane How do you sell a skimpy mink bikini? Call Frankie Avalon THE “ladies who lunch” seem to have had their fill of fur coats, so American Legend, the maker of the finest mink coat available, is turning to their daughters to try to convince them that mink is the ultimate luxury item and an absolute fashion must. To do that, Legend is introducing a print campaign that drops the stodgy studio glamour shots of a sophisticated model clad in a full length mommy-looking mink coat in favor of a sexy young model on the beach posing in versatile mink items including a skimpy mink bikini. “We’re not trying to sell grandmom’s fur coat any longer,” said Edward Brennan, the chief executive of American Legend, which is based in Seattle. “When we decided to relaunch our new vision, we said, ‘Now we want to position it from a fashion perspective, keep it totally unexpected and young.’” After a considerable amount of consumer research, Mr. Brennan said, it is clear that the positioning of the company’s fur coats in North America was “not really effective in terms of bringing back young potential consumers.” Therefore, he added, “our strategy was all about bringing something to a fashion-forward girl that’s modern, exciting, fun and useful.” Instead of focusing on the traditional mink coat, the campaign is focusing on nontraditional mink clothing and accessories with casual chic attitudes, like cropped bolero jackets in various colors, vests, knitted sweaters, fur-trimmed jeans, blankets, headbands, bikinis, hats and purses. “Our objective is not only to draw consumers’ attention to the high fashionability of mink, but also creFrankie Rayder, a model, is featured in a print campaign for the fur maker American Legend. ate awareness for Legend the brand,” Mr. Brennan said. “It is important that consumers recognize that mink is not a commodity. If they want the very best quality, they need to look for the Legend label.” Legend is designed and sold by J. Mendel on Madison Avenue and through his salon in Bergdorf Goodman. Legend will also be available this month through the company’s Web site at www.legendmink.com. A decade or so ago, furs had fallen out of fashion as the economy dipped and they became associated with spray-paint assaults by animal rights protesters. It was also all the rage for celebrities to lend their faces to ads that stated that they’d rather be naked than wear fur. In the last couple of years, however, the taboo has lifted somewhat and fur has quietly crept back into the American fashion world, first by showing up in the lines of many top designers on collar trims and accessories. Now it has boldly asserted itself in full-page fashion layouts. American Legend has had a history of memorable ads that also featured celebrities, taking pro-fur stances, of course. In the 1960’s, the company along with the adman Peter Rogers created the long-running campaign “What Becomes a Legend Most” for one of its other trademarks, Blackgama. Those ads featured stars like Lauren Bacall, Bette Davis, Marlene Dietrich, Judy Garland, Rita

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Hayworth, Lena Horn, Barbra Streisand and many others swathed in fur. The latest campaign, created by Laspata/DeCaro in New York with billings estimated at $2 million, also features an “it” girl. This time, though, she comes from the fashion world, not Hollywood. The supermodel Frankie Rayder is featured posing on a beach in Malibu, Calif., in a retro satire of 1960’s surf movies like “Beach Blanket Bingo” and “How to Stuff a Wild Bikini.” And who better to join her for a cameo appearance? The king of those surf movies himself, Frankie Avalon. “We looked to showcase the brand in the most unexpected light,” said Charles DeCaro, creative director at Laspata/DeCaro. “And what could be more unexpected than mink on the beach? “Obviously with a ‘Beach Blanket Bingo’ subtext to the campaign, it was sort of a no-brainer to contact someone that was part of that genre, and Frankie Avalon seemed the perfect addition,” Mr. DeCaro added. “He was the remaining ingredient that this whole equation needed.” In the ad featuring the two Frankies, they are shown posing in a bit of an awkward embrace. She looks secure and sultry in her $5,500 mink-and-leather bikini and sarong. He is clad in all white, yet not quite sure what to do with himself. As a wink to both Mr. Avalon’s film career as well as the famous ad campaign that inspired the Legend brand, Mr. Avalon’s white shirt says “What Becomes a Legend Most?” “We did not want to set out to recreate the Legend campaigns of the past,” Mr. DeCaro said. “They were phenomenal and iconic in their genre.” But for the new campaign, he continued, “it was much more important to capture the fashion pulse in a very sort of tonguein-check way.” The subtle way that they reintroduced the famous line on Mr. Avalon’s T-shirt was “definitely a segue to possible future campaigns,” Mr. DeCaro added. Thirteen other ads feature Ms. Rayder wearing a variety of mink items. One ad shows her wearing a white mink sweater over a daisy bathing suit as she joins four tanned, clean-cut surfers in carrying a surfboard. Another ad features her dancing on the beach with the same models, this time wearing a creamy gold mink bolero over a gold lamé bikini top and pants. All the ads have the tagline: “J. Mendel for Legend. American Legend Mink.” “We really wanted to show the diversity of the brand,” Mr. DeCaro said. The technology is so much more advanced than it was in the past that mink can now be used in many different ways, including being cut to look like corduroy or even resemble velvet, Mr. DeCaro added. “It was more important to get that across and definitely reach toward a younger, more hip consumer,” he said. The campaign begins running in the September issues of magazines including Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue, In Style, Nylon, Town & Country, Vanity Fair and Wallpaper. This is the second effort from Laspata/ DeCaro since it was awarded the account in August 1999. “We intend to position Legend as the very best of the best, so would the average girl be able to go in and buy a beautiful Legend bikini?” Mr. Brennan asked. “I would say no. But, in fact would it interest her to go look at other products that could be affordable and really could be useful today that she is not aware of at the moment? Absolutely yes. And that’s the point.” ADDENDA

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Family Panel Seeks Agency of Record The California Children and Families Commission is beginning a review to find its first agency of record to handle its educational advertising campaign focused on early childhood development and the effects of tobacco use by pregnant women and parents of young children. Billings were estimated at $90 million for a three-year contract. Kristina Parham, a spokeswoman at the commission in Sacramento, Calif., confirmed a report of the review that was carried in the online edition of Adweek. The account had been handled on a project basis by Asher/Gal & Partners in Los Angeles and Runyon Saltzman & Einhorn in Sacramento. A decision is expected in December; the contract will begin on Jan. 1, 2001. The commission was created as a result of a 1998 initiative started by the actor Rob Reiner that imposed a 50-cent tax on every pack of cigarettes sold in California; the tax generates about $700 million a year. People Mary Carpenter, vice president and media director at Starcom, Chicago, part of the Starcom MediaVest Group unit of the B COM3 Group, working on the Oldsmobile account, was named director for operations at G.M. Planworks, Detroit, a new unit of Starcom MediaVest. Also, Jana O’Brien, executive vice president and executive planning director for clients like Coca-Cola and Pillsbury at Leo Burnett USA, Chicago, part of B COM3, was named executive director for strategic research an insights at G.M. Planworks. Both executives report to Dennis Donlin, president at G.M. Planworks, a unit formed to handle all United States media planning for General Motors. Peter Siegel, creative director at Torre Lazur Chicago, was named to the new post of senior vice president and executive creative director overseeing all United States creative operations at Torre Lazur, based in Parsippany, N.J. Torre Lazur is part of Torre Lazur McCann Healthcare Worldwide, part of the McCannErickson World Group unit of the Interpublic Group of Cos. Daniel J. Reid, senior national managing partner at FRB/BSMG Worldwide, Chicago, part of the BSMG Worldwide unit of True North Communications, was named president at a new Financial and Professional Services Marketing practice unit of BSMG. He continues as partner at BSMG. Liz Schroeder was named executive director at the Advertising Women of New York, succeeding Terry Player, who is retiring. Ms. Schroeder had been promotion director at DM News, New York, and its affiliated properties, Steve Ratti was named to the new-post of director for business development at Mezzina Brown & Partners, New York. He had been director for new business at Posnick & Kolker, New York. Zander Riese was named media director at Heitner Weiss, New York, succeeding Crissy Wade, who left. He was a marketing consultant at Im-priic, New York, part of Young & Rubicam Advertising. Jay Branson was named director for corporate communications A Draft Worldwide, Chicago, part of the Interpublic Group of Companies. He succeeds Howard Schacter, who became vice president for public relations at SFX Entertainment, New York, which is being acquired by Clear Channel Communications. Mr. Branson had been senior managing director at the business-to-business and medical and health communications groups of BSMG Worldwide, Chicago, part of True North Communications.

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Miscellany Houston Helm Fattal & Collins, Los Angeles, was renamed Blackboard. DJIA 11,215.10 112.09 NASDAQ 4,206.35 102.54 DOLLAR 106.72 yen 0.2S 30-YR. TREASURY 5.66% 0.07 GOLD (N.Y.) $277.70 4.00 CRUDE OIL $33.12 A 0.20 NIKKEI 225 16,861.26 40.41 FTSE 100 6,672.70 57.60 STOCKS & BONDS Main Gauges Advance Smartly as Inflation Fears Ebb By ROBERT D. HERSHEY Jr. Responding to fresh signs that the Federal Reserve may be able to avoid further interest rate increases, investors pushed stock prices up briskly yesterday, with the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index approaching a record. The government reported that factory orders declined 7.5 percent in July, the biggest decline on record, and another report showed that industry in the Chicago area contracted in August to the lowest point since 1996. The nation’s merchants also reported that sales in August rose only 3 percent, below analysts’ expectations. The data suggests that six interest rate increases by Fed policy makers since June 1999 may be taking hold and slowing the economy, possibly easing the central bank’s concern about inflation. Shares of brokerage firms and other financial companies were standouts, continuing to benefit from this week’s bid by Credit Suisse for Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. J. P. Morgan leaped $16.13, to $167.19, accounting for most of a 112.09-point gain in the Dow Jones industrial average that reversed Wednesday’s decline. The Dow closed up 1 percent, to 11,215.10. It is now down 2.5 percent for the year. But the better general performance was in the Nasdaq composite index, which has made gains in 13 of the last 15 sessions. It soared 102.54 points, or 2.5 percent, to 4,206.35. “The market is more pleased about what steady interest rates mean for valuations than worried about what a slower economy will do to earnings,” said Byron R. Wien, chief United States strategist at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter. The S.& P. 500 advanced 15.09 points, or 1 percent, to 1,517.68, giving it a 3.3 percent gain for the year. Of its components, 306 rose while 167 fell and 27 were unchanged. It is now just 10 points shy of its record. “I’m not excited by the performance of the Dow, but I am excited by the S.& P. and Nasdaq creeping up” out of established trading ranges, said Michael Strauss, managing director of Commonfund, which invests college endowments. 12,000 Dow Jones Industrial Average Daily closes 11,000 10,0000 9,000 8,000 1999 Latest week

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Trading ranges 11,400 11,300 11,200 11,100 11,000 FMTWT 2000 ASONDJFMAMJJA Sources: Associated Press; Bloomberg Financial Markets The New York Times The Favorites Stocks held by largest number of accounts at Merrill Lynch. YESTERDAY YEAR STOCK CLOSE CHANGE TO DATE AT&T 31.63-0.06 - 0.2% -37.8% AOL 58.50 -1.08 -1.8 -22.9 Cisco 68.75 +2.19 +3.3 +28.2 Disney 38.94 +0.56 +1.5 +33.1 EMC s 97.88 +1.56 +1.6 +79.2 ExxonMob 81.63 +0.27 +0.3 + 1.3 GenElec 58.69 +0.88 +11.5 +13.7 Home Dep 48.31 unc. unc. -29.7 Intel 74.88 +1.38 + 1.9 +82.1 IBM 132.06 +1.75 +11.3 +22.4 YESTERDAY YEAR STOCK CLOSE CHANGE TO DATE JohnJn 91.94 -0.56 -0.6%- 1.4% Lucent 41.88 -0.94 -2.2 -44.2 Merck 69.88 -1.25 -1.8 + 4.0 Microsft 69.81 -0.19 -0.3 -40.2 Oracle 90.94 +2.69 +3.0 +62.4 Pfizer 43.25 +11.13 +2.7 +33.3 SBCCrn 41.75 +0.38 +0.9 -14.4 Sun Micro 126.94 -0.19 -0.1 +63.9 VerizonCm 43.63 -0.56 -1.3-29.1 WalMart 48.00 -0.19 -0.4-30.6 He said he thought the markets were encouraged by the post-convention bounce in the polls by Al Gore, the Democratic presidential nominee, because it suggested maintenance of the political status quo in Washington assuming Republicans maintain their majority in Congress. “Divided government is better for financial markets,” Mr. Strauss said. Others, including Andrew Brooks of T. Rowe Price, were reluctant to seek trends in a pre-holiday summer period. “It’s easy to push stocks around this week because a lot of people are out,” he said. Some investors were no doubt engaged in month-end transactions, while others remained on the sidelines awaiting today’s report on the August labor market. Volume did perk up, with 1.07 billion changing hands on the New York Stock Exchange, compared with 818.4 million on Wednesday. Advancing issues there outnumbered declining ones by 1,727 to 1,156, while 137 stocks

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made new 52-week highs and 29 slumped to new lows. Ford Motor, which has lost about one-fifth of its value over the last three weeks, was among the day’s most prominent casualties. The automaker, caught up in a huge tire recall and found by a court in California to have knowingly installed faulty ignitions, dropped as low as $23.81 before closing at $24.25, down $1.75. Retail stocks continued to sag, with Target skidding $2.88, to $23.19, after warning of a profit shortfall in the third quarter. J. C. Penney, which said it might trim its forecast, also slumped. Clear Channel Communications, Key Rates Percent Day Year Yesterday Ago Ago Prime rate 9.50 9.50 7.75 Discount rate 6.00 6.00 4.50 Federal funds 6.63 6.51 5.26 3-month T-bills 6.10 6.12 4.76 6-month T-bills 6.07 6.09 4.96 10-yr. T-note 3.99 4.00 4.05 30-yr. T-bond 5.6 5.73 6.13 Telephone bd. 7.98 8.14 7.84 Municipal bds. 5.72 5.73 5.79 Sources: Salomon Smith Barney; Telerate; The Bond Buyer down $5.38, to $72, and Ford were the most heavily traded Big Board issues, with 28.5 million shares traded for Ford, the most for the company in a single day in at least 20 years. Dell Computer, the subject of a prominent article in The Wall Street Journal, climbed $3.69, to $43.63, on Nasdaq as 64.2 million of its shares changed hands, the most of any issue. Treasury Prices Rise By The Associated Press Bond prices rose yesterday after reports suggested the economy was slowing, a situation that greatly eases inflation fears. The price of the 10-year Treasury note rose 17/32, to 100 8/32. Its yield, which moves in the opposite direction from the price, fell to 5.72 percent from 5.79 percent on Wednesday. The 30-year bond rose 30/32, to 1081 12/32. its yield fell to 5.66 percent from 5.73 percent. Treasuries were lifted by a Commerce Department report that showed factory orders dropped a record 7.5 percent in July, while orders excluding transportation dipped a smaller 2.6 percent. The Purchasing Management Association of Chicago said business activity fell to 46.5 in August from 52.0 in July. The figures indicate Chicago-area manufacturing activity is contracting - something that is probably happening nationwide, analysts said. The New York Times For home delivery call 1-800-NYTIMES Hot & Cold A look at stocks with large price percentage gains and losses. STOCK YESTERDAY YEAR EX: SYMBOL CLOSE CHANGE TO DATE COMMENT

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Insurance Auto $16.50 -$6.50 -28.3% Seller of salvaged cars for the insurance industry predicts third-quarter earnings of 20 to 22 cents; analysts had expected 32 cents. Auctions NNM: IAAI MicroSystems $17.56 -$5.44-23.6% -76.3% Supplier of computer systems to hotels and restaurants re-ports a loss from operations 30 cents a share for the fourth quarter; analysts had expected a loss of 17 cents. NNM: MCRS Sybron $34.44+$3.69+12.0% +193% Germany’s Bayer agrees to buy the specialty chemical maker for $211 million in cash and to assume $116 million in debt. Chemicals A: SYC J.C.Penney $14.00-$1.19 -7.8% -29.78% Retailer reports August same store sales fell 4.5 percent and says that could hurt third-quarter earnings. N: JCP AdvancedMicro $37.75 +$2.38+6.73% +161% Larry Hollatz, head of the PC processor group, resigns to pursue other interests. The company’s president, Hector de J. Ruiz, will assume his duties temporarily, Devices N: AMD Compiled from staff reports, The Associated Press, Bloomberg News, Bridge News, Dow Jones, Reuters. Monetary Aggregates M1 M2 M3 Monetary base (St. Louis) Averages Week ended Aug. 21 1,105.0 4,830.2 6,856.2 590.4 in billions Week ended Aug. 14 1,090.7* 4,809.3* 6,834.8* 588.5* Annual Latest 3 months -2.9 +3.9 +7.6 +.9 growth rate Latest 6 months -2.4 +5.3 +8.3 -0.4 in percent Latest 12 months +0.3 +5.4 +9.2 +5.7 Reserve Data Total Borrwd. Extnd. Reqd. Excess reserves reserves credits reserves reserves Averages Week ended Aug. 30 640 0 in millions Week ended Aug. 23 579 0 2 weeks ended Aug. 23 39,490* 564 0 38,512* 978* 2 weeks ended Aug. 9 41,074* 581 0 40,026* 1,047* July 40,521 470 0 39,49 1,022 Aggregates are seasonally adjusted. *Revised. Source: Federal Reserve COMMODITIES UNLEADED GASOLINE RISES. Gasoline rose on signs that demand from motorists before the Labor Day holiday is eroding inventories. In New York, gasoline for September delivery rose 1.15 cents, to $1.0114 a gallon. Unleaded Gas: Near-Month Contract $1.25 1.00 0.75 0.50 0.25 1999 Weekly 20000 MAMJJASOND JFMAMJJA Last 10 days $1.05

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1.00 0.95 0.90 FMTWTFMTWT Source: Bloomberg Financial Markets The New York Times YESTERDAY YEAR 52 CURRENCY CLOSE CHANGE TO DATE WEEKS British pound (in U.S. dollars) 1.4503 - .0079 - 10.24% - 9.72 Canadian dollar (per U.S. dollar) 1.4716 - .0051 + 1.72 - 1.40 German mark (per U.S. dollar) 2.2034 + .0120 + 13.22 + 19.06 Japanese yen (per U.S. dollar) 106.72 + .25 + 4.35 - 2.62 Mexican peso (per U.S. dollar) 9.1960 + .0040 - 2.79 - 1.62 South Korean won (per U.S. dollar) 1108.70 + .20 - 2.06 - 6.33 U.S. DOLLAR INDEX 112.55 + .47 + 10.78 + 13.86

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THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 L C7 MARKET INDICATORS CONSOLIDATED TRADING/THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 THE DOW MINUTE-BY-MINUTE Position of the Dow Jones industrial average at 1-minute intervals yesterday. 11,350 11,300 11,250 11,200 11,150 11,110 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Source: Bridge Information Systems The New York Times +112.09 +102.54 +15.09 DOW JONES NASDAQ S.&P. 500 Close 11,216.10 High 11,310.55 Low 11,104.86 % Chg +1.01 Close 4,206.35 High 4,208.73 Low 4,127.19 % Chg +2.50 Close 1,517.68 High 1,525.30 Low 1,502.59 % Chg +1.00 The tables above, including the one for the Dow Jones industrial average, reflect the indexes’ actual highs and laws for the day. The theoretical highs and lows of the various Dow Jones averages, calculated from the intraday high and low of each stock in each average, appear in the table below. STOCK MARKET INDEXES 12/8 52 WK YTD 1994* High Low Close Chg %Chg % Chg % Chg %Chg DOW JONES Industrials 11416.03 11040.51 11215.10 +112.09 + 1.01 + 3.43 - 2.45 +204.28 Transportation 2762.60 2691.28 2723.63 - 2.54 - 0.09 -11.51 - 8.52 +97.73 1 Utilities 367.44 359.31 363.74 + 3.62 + 1.01 +15.62 +28.37 +102.52 Composite 3300.49 3203.78 3249.83 + 26.03 + 0.81 + 2.55 + 1.10 +165.47 STANDARD & POOR’S Industrial 1854.16 1830.291844.92 + 14.63 + 0.80 +13.97 + 0.16 +249.12 Transportation 603.81 594.70 598.74 + 1.41 + 0.24 - 5.13 + 0.18 +77.72 Utilities 311.49 306.84 310.24 + 2.89 + 0.94 +22.12 +36.54 +106.52 Financial 158.61 154.31 157.73 + 3.42 + 2.22 +22.27 +18.58 +289.94 Mid-Cap 400 543.97 535.80 542.90 + 7.10 + 1.33 +37.53 +22.09 +233.21 Small-Cap 600 223.92 221.37 223.49 + 2.12 + 0.96 +26.65 +12.99 +152.22 100 Stocks 832.18 820.93 827.41 + 6.48 + 0.79 +19.27 + 4.36 +298.60 500 Stocks 1525.30 1502.591517.68 + 15.09 + 100 +15.05 + 3.30 +240.71 NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Composite 678.22 670.40 674.53 + 4.07 + 0.61 +10.34 + 3.73 +176.67 Industrial 848.79 842.02 943.87 + 1.61 + 0.19 + 8.99 + 1.89 +174.84 Transportation 406.99 402.49 404.89 + 1.46 + 0.36 -13.51 -13.24 +88.22 Utility 470.22 462.78 467.53 + 4.75 + 1.03 + 0.09 - 8.53 +134.80 Finance 617.50 603.41 614.43 + 11.02 + 1.83 +22.32 +18.93 +221.2 NASDAQ Composite 4208.73 4127.194206.35 +102.54 + 2.50 +53.84 + 3.37 +484.93

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Industrials 2266.27 2221.25 2265.16 + 53.49 + 2.42 +45.11 + 1.17 +213.96 Financial 2904.74 2876.47 2901.49 + 15.20 + 0.53 - 2.29 -14.17 +247.35 Banks 1680.67 1651.28 1673.94 + 23.09 + 1.40 - 2.44 - 1.03 +146.47 Insurance 1900.84 1868.88 1898.47 + 25.31 + 1.35 -12.03 + 0.12 +117.11 NMS Composite 1916.36 1879.18 1915.25 + 46.75 + 2.50 +54.09 + 3.44 +498.52 NMS Industrial 935.49 916.80 935.00 + 22.13 + 2.42 +45.53 + 1.19 +220.19 OTHER INDEXES Russell 2000 539.14 532.36 53739 + 5.56 + 1.04 +25.85 + 6.57 +127.83 American Exch 946.13 934.22 943.48 + 9.26 + 0.99 +21.08 + 7.58 +123.14 Value Line Arith 1163.51 1151.75 1160.44 + 8.69 + 0.75 +17.44 +13.13 +16735 Wilshire 5000 14280.04 +154.46 + 1.09 +18.81 + 3.38 +225.47 MARKET DIARY NYSE NASDAQ AMEX Yesterday Previous Yesterday Previous Advanced 1,727 1,395 2,420 2,099 404 297 Declined 1,156 1,446 1,583 1,845 226 297 Unchanged 509 522 998 1,017 193 200 Total issues 3,392 3,363 5,001 4,961 823 794 New Highs 137 95 174 95 48 23 New Lows 29 38 81 81 9 6 Block Trades 22,420 17,692 n-a 17.986 n-a 629 Block Trades are transactions of 10,000 or more shares. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE REGULAR TRADING 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg A 26.50 10.06 AAR .34 3.0 94372 11.26 10.38 11.26+0.94 2800 1925 ABM .62 2.3 16 170 27.69 26.94 27.00-0.81 260 1 138 ABN Arnro .83 a 3.3 806 25.06 24.56 25.00-0.06 26.25 20.25 ACE Cap n 2.22 8.8 37 25.44 25.06 25.13-0.31 37.2514 06 ACE Ltd. 52 f 1.5 166187 36.50 33.56 35.13 +1.38 8:56 6 31 ACMIn .78 10.1 q 771 7.75 7.63 7.75 +0.8.00 6.25 ACM Op .72 q 9.9 q 89 7.38 7.25 7.25 7.98 6 78 10.3 q 1164 7.56 750 756 6.25 5.193 AACCMISSpc .60 9.8 q 286 6.25 6.13 6.13 10.50 8.00 ACMMD 1.20 13.0 q 293 9.31 9.1 9 9.25-04 8.75 5.50 ACM MI .84 13.3 q 292 6.31 6.19 6.31+0.06 12.88 10.13 ACMMu .87 7.3 q 48 12.00 11.94 12.00 29.44 16.31 ACNiels 22 3037 24.63 24.06 24.06 -0.13 63.00 25.25 AAES Cp s 60 23472 63.94 61.00 63.75+2.13 58.94 33.56 AFLAC .34 0.6 25 5625 55.88 53.56 54.00-0.19 1 4.50 9.50 AGCO .04 0.4 dd 1847 10.69 10.50 10.50 0.13 19.56 15.50 AGL Res 1.013 5.7 13 595 19-19 18.94 1824 -0.06 21.44 7.88 AK Steel 50 4 6 1 9 2196 11.00 10.81 10.88+0.06 2444 18.00 AMB Pr 1.48 f 6.1 13 2978 24.38 24.13 24.19 -0.19 500 0 19 AMF BOW + dd 1423 0.50 0.56 2531 1944 AMU Rs 1.88 f 7.6 6 562 25.00 24.75 24.75 -0.06 39.00 20.75 AMR s 5 6489 33.44 32.63 32.81 -0.56 24.63 19.56 AMR Cp 39 1.97 8.6 113 23.13 22.88 23.00 +0.06 925 3.63 APT Sat .36 a 8.0 221 4.63 4.50 4.50 -0.13 42.00 34 WNW LW n 2540 44.60 42.00 44.00+2.25 24.00 14.94 ASA Ltd. Eib 16 q 538 16.94 16.38 16.94 +0.69 61.00 29.63 AT&T .88 2.8 16219145 32.50 31.50 31.63-0.06 36.00 23.56 ATT Wds n 41856 26.38 25.63 26.19+0.19 25.31 21.69 ATT N2B 2.06 8.3 243 25.19 24.94 24.94 -0.13 25.00 21.56 ATT D28 2.03 8.2 701 24.88 24.63 24.64 -0.11 50.00 13.88 AVX Cp s.14 0.5 20 6836 30.00 29.31 30.00 81.5058.25 AXA 2.10e3.0 10275 71.75 69.88 70.31 -2.63 55.0025.50 AXA Fn a .10 0.2 21 A19W 53.19 51.75 51.75-0.50 22.94 9.00 AZZ 16f 1.0 11 179 16.75 16.13 16.38 8.13 0.44 Aarnes a 75 0.75 0.69 0.69 20.00 11.47 AaronRnt 04 0.3 10 144 13.75 13.31 13.63+0.25 45.811 29.38 AbtLab .76 1.7 27 54447 45.00

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43.38 43.75 +0.44 4121 8.00 Abetflic 16 46496 23.69 21.06 23.19-2.06 13.75 7.75 Abitibi g .40 - 418 11.38 11.13 11.19 +0.06 6.13 4.38 AcachaRR .48 7.9 16 54 6.06 6.06 6.06 15.13 2.75 AcptIns dd 664 6.44 5 +63 5.88-0.50 19.56 10.88 AckGrp .02 0.2 cc 147 11.38 11.19 11.31 +0.25 16.69 9.81 Acuson dd 574 14.88 14.06 14.38 -0.44 39.8828.06 AdaEx 2.45 e 1.1 q 186 39.75 39.38 39.63+0.38 112.00 65.50 AdecoDSA .61 a 0.6 13 96.75 96.38 96.38+0.50 80.44 14.31 Adminsff cc 818 81.50 79.88 81.50 +1.50 22.25 16.88 AFPProv ZOOS 73 20.88 20.69 20.88 +0.13 46.50 8.25 AMD a 36 U378 38.26 36.06 37.75 +2.36 33.00 15.63 Advest .24 0.8 14 1222 31.19 30.13 30.56 +0.38 45.19 17.06 Advolric 19 1807 41.88 40.94 40.94 -1.06 49.13 31.50 Aegon 9 .580.5 27 809 39.38 39.00 39.25-0.63 80.44 38.50 Aetna Inc SO 1.4 12 5463 56.75 55.94 55.94 49.88 31.00 AffCmpSv 22 1501 46.81 45.63 46.56+0.88 58.19 22.00 AfWgrs 16 2215 55.94 54.38 55.63 +0.88 31.56 13.88 AgSvca 13 16 17.81 17.63 17.75 162.00 38.19 Agilent n 43 24708 62.13 59.75 60.25 1.13 9.69 5.25 Agnico g 02 a 0.3 1079 5.94 5.69 5.81 +0.19 17.75 12.88 AgreaRlt 1.84 12.1 10 187 15.19 14.63 15.19+0.13 53.56 35.00 Agfibrd 9 234 40.00 3975 39.75 -0.06 11.56 6.75 Agrium g.11 1.1 622 9.88 9 56 9.75 +0.25 37.31 20.63 Ahold .48 a 1.7 624 28.50 28.13 28.50+0.63 39.06 23.00 AjrProd .76 12.1 cc 6482 36.88 36.25 36.31-0.63 10.50 3.38 AjrNetS 9 138 4.75 4.63 4.63 26.88 14.31 AirbFrt 16 1.1 10 1772 15.13 14.75 14.94 +0.19 13.25 4.63 Airgas 10 1520 6.63 6.44 6.63 +0.13 12.38 10.56 Akiew 1.80 18.0 13 x43 12.00 11.94 12.00+0.13 2313 19.88 AiaPw 39 1.69 7.5 84 22.81 22.50 22.63 +0.13 23.88 19.75 AiaPw 47 1.78 8.0 39 22.38 22.25 22.38 23.00 19.25 Ww 47B 135 8.0 46 21.88 21.63 21.81 -0.06 23.25 19.13 AIaPw48 1.75 8A 48 21.94 21.50 21.56 -0.19 13.44 8.25 AlamoGp .24 1.8 16 19 13.25 13.13 13.13 -0.25 45.63 25.25 Alsr 9 962 26.19 25.63 26.00 +0.38 17.88 12.75 Albnyin 14 169 14.00 13.94 13.94 -0.06 26.13 14.56 Athernar .44 1.8 11 717 25.19 24.75 24.81-0.06 42.38 26.06 AlbrtE g 266 37.19 36.88 36.88 31.81 19.38 Alberto .30 1.1 16 386 28.56 28.19 28.31 -0.25 26.63 18.25 AlbCulA .30 1.3 14 299 24.13 23.75 24.00-0.13 5t.31 20.88 Albertan .76 3.5 2624614 21.75 21.06 21.50 +0.38 45 06 Alcan .601.8 11 12342 33.13 32 -44 32.81 -0.06 29.26.06 Alcatel .39 a 0.5 27 170 82.88 81.38 82.88+2.00 27.25 Alcoa a .50 1.5 1924183 33.81 32.81 33.25 +0.56 63.50 Alexdr cc 3 80.75 80.75 80.75 +0.25 27.75 AWAKE 1.72 4.9 25 511 35.00 34.38 35.00 +0.31 12.25 11.13 AllAmTar .72 6.1 q 129 11.88 11.75 1175 202.63 161.00 AjlegCp 15 39 174.69 172.00 .44 + 1.3-8 35.94 23.631 AJIgEngy 1.72 4.8 22 3427 36.06 35.44 35.00 BB +0.31 26.81 16.13 AllegTch 1.80 3.7 11 1383 22.19 21.56 21.75 +0.19 21.94 8.00 AllenTel cc 488 20.25 19.75 19.94 -0.25 81M 40.66 Allergan a .32 0.4 50 8360 76.00 71.26 73.19 +2.94 45.19 37 AWIHAMU 7.48 00.3 q 112 45.75 44.56 45.63 +0.81 5.25 24.25 AllCap 2.90 a 5.6 20 1570 52.75 51.66 51.75 -0.81 13.75 9.56 AllFrst g 7 12.13 12.00 12.13 +0.19 11.31 8.69 AIANdd 1.32 11.9 q 184 11.13 11.06 11.06 -0.06 9.81 8.13 PJfWdd 2 1.02 11.0 q 1216 9.38 9.19 9.25 37.76 25.19 ARWEgy 2.00 6.8 13 1090 29.56 29.13 29.25 +0 .06 76.00 61.0 G AlliantTch 10 458 77.06 75.19 77.06 +1.31 9.75 5.00 AlldHldg 724 6.38 6.1 9 6.25 +0.19 ON THE WEB The latest stock and mutual fund quotations, along with news updates, are available at The New York Times on the Web: www.nytimes.com/business 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % PIE 100s High Low Last Chg 28.88 15.13 Aldirish 69e4A 13 393 16.8B 16.63 16.75 -0.19 4.94 1.13 AlliedPd dd 777 1.63 1.25 1.56-0.06 14M 531 AldWaste dd 3021 9.31 9.19 9.19 63.44 35.06

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AlimrFn 25 a 0.4 22 2098 63.00 60.81 60.88-2.25 9.88 875 A] mrST 10 8.4 q 57 9.69 9.56 9.56 37.69 17.19 Allstate .68 2.3 1221587 29.94 28.69 29.06+0.38 24 13 19 .81 Allst 2D97 1.78 8.0 - 149 22.50 22.25 22.31-0.06 91 81 4931 Alftel 1.28 2.5 17 18024 51 .44 5031 5056-0 .25 28 94 20 .00 1 22 2181 21 .69 21 .81 71.94 26.38 15.1 410 6726 56.63 54.69 56.63 +1.44 17.25 5.25 AlpineGr 2 144 6.00 5.75 5.81-0.06 35.56 21.63 Alstorn 7 22.75 22.50 22.50+0.38 73.25 26.0 DAAlza 63 12322 75.75 72.94 75.63 +2.88 68.69 38.88 ArnbacF .44 0.7 13 3282 65.25 63.75 64.63 +0.69 23.94 19.38 ArnbacF 98 1.77 7.9 71 22.38 22.00 22.27 +0.08 17.00 8.00 Ameast .56 4.7 21 249 12.00 11.63 12.00 4.44 1.75 AMCOL 14.22c 5 130 3.44 3.25 3.31 -0.13 96.00 19.81 Amdocs .cc 5693 72.13 68.50 71.44+2.69 78.6920.19 AmdocsTr 1.51 2.5 529 60.94 59.88 60.94+2.69 25.25 18.56 AnyUs 01 2.21 9.1 2 24.19 24.19 24.19 73.0647.81 AmHes .60 0.9 9 4822 69.38 68.38 68.44-0.25 40.50 27.56 AAmeren 2.54 6.3 13 5116 40.63 39.69 40.44 +0.69 5.81 4.25 ArnrFMl .56 10.5 7 82 5.44 5.31 5.31 +0.13 95.81 40.25 AmOnInc s cc 97587 59.50 58.25 58.50 -1.08 21.75 12.50 AmWest 5 840 14.63 14.00 14.50+0.50 1713 11.38 AmAxle 5 91 15.00 14.38 14.38 -0.50 38.50 25.94 AEP 2.40 6.8 16 8141 36.44 34.75 . +063 60.44 39.88 AmExp s.32 0.5 31 34521 60.38 59.00 5125 +31 30.25 18.38 AFnclGp 1.00 4.0 14 555 25.25 24.50 24.81 82.1945.63 AGenCp 1.76 2.4 20 9722 73.69 71.38 72.81 +0.81 28.50 15.31 AGreet .84 f 4.5 10 3939 18.69 17.94 18.63 +0.69 61.63 36.50 AHorneP .92 1.7 dd 32216 55.56 54.19 54.38-0.19 14.00 10.06 AindPrp .80 5.9 15 51 13.63 13.31 13.56-0.06 89.94 52.38 AAmIntGp s.15 0.2 33 31904 90.19 87.75 88.13 +0.63 31.63 15.00 AIPC 12 921 16.94 16.63 16.94 +0.25 13.75 10.69 AmLandLs 1.00 8.5 32 117 11.81 11.69 11.81 +0.06 9.56 4.00 AMedSec dd 252 8.44 8.00 8.25 10.75 10.13 AmMuTr .65 6.2 q 28 10.44 10.44 10.44 10.63 10.06 AmMuT2 .62 5.9 q21 10.56 10.44 10.56 +0.13 10.66 9.75 AmMuT3 .57 5.6 q 26 10.44 10.44 10.44 +0.06 1U.19 8.50 ArnrRlty n .22 9.69 9.38 9.69+0.31 8.75 3.94 AResrT .80 20.0 dd 85 4.00 4.00 4.00 12.31 4.00 ARetire dd143 5.38 5.25 5.25 7.75 3.75 ASaftyins 8148 4.06 4.00 4.06 + 0.06 11.94 10.81 ASelPort .96 8.3 q 64 11.56 11.50 11.50 5.06 1.63 ASkiing dd50 2.19 2.00 2.13 49.75 33.38 ArnStd 20 2801 46.69 45.81 46.31 +0.19 39.75 25.00 AmStWatr 1.28 4.9 15 273 26.06 25.63 26.06 +0.38 11.75 10.25 AnnSIP .87 7.9 q 15 11.00 11.00 11.00 11.94 10.44 AmSIP2 1.02 9.0 q 176 11.50 11.38 1138 11.44 10.00 AmSIP3 1.02 9.3 q 194 11.00 10.94 55.50 .7.13 AmTower dd 65M 38.13 34.00 36.38-1.94 30.31 18.94 AmWtr .90 3.7 15 865 25.38 24.50 24.50-0.13 25.31 10.63 AAmeriedt 1912071 28.13 26.13 27.63 +2.44 20.00 12.75 Arnerigas 2.20 12.2 42 335 18.19 17.88 18.00-0.25 38.50 11.00 Arnerift 22 4415 35.63 34.13 35.13 +0 .94 47.943 .63 Ameron 1.28 3.8 6 379 33.81 33.50 33.75 +0.13 26.06 16.50 AmerUs .40 1.6 11 279 24.69 24.25 24.69 +0.19 22.13 15.50 Ametek .24 1.1 11 2990 21.75 20.50 21.38 70.38 22.88 Arnphenl a 36 2013 67.38 64.00 64.00-1.50 7.38 3.63 Amrap 31 7 5.00 5.00 5.00 26.44 12.75 AmSouth .80 4.4 21 4775 18.50 17.88 18.25 +0.38 109.00 36.00 Arnvescep .81 a 0.8 cc 245 107.50 106.00 107.00 +6.94 7.25 4.31 AmwayJ .24e5.3 12 90 4.56 4.56 4.56-0.06 65.30 26.25 Anadrk .20 0.3 63 17554 65.95 64.70 65.77 +1.59 100.00 23.38 Aanai 9 -.79 34122 102.12 96.63 100.60 +4.13 12.75 6.31 Angelic .32 3.9 15 132 8.25 8.00 8.19 +0.13 37.00 18.00 Anglogld 1.60 a 8.1 12 2510 20.19 19.31 19.81 +0.50 87.50 54.63 Anheus 1.32f 1.7 25 133.64 80.13 78.25 78.81 +0.81 43.2527.38 Anheus 20 40.00 40.00 40.00 +0.50 37.38 18.13 Anixter 31 1780 36.44 34.94 35.00 -1 .44 48.25 15.00 AnnTay 18 7863 36.00 33.38 36.00 +0.06 9.88 7.19 Annaly 1.20 m 14.2 6 303 8.56 8.44 8.44-0.06 7.88 6.00 AnthCap 1.16 15.5 6 909 7.50 7.38 7.50 +0.13 42.75 20.69

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Aon Corp .88 2.4 24 4756 38.25 36.81 37.31 +0.31 64.0030.00 Apache .28 0.4 18 7433 63.06 61.75 63.00 49.38 34.06 Apdnv 2.80 6.2 oc 1908 45.03 44.88 44.88 +0.13 13.31 7.00 ApexMrt 1.40m 1.95 17.79 7.19 7.13 7.19 +0.06 9.94 8.00 Apex .60 6.8 q 182 8.88 8.81 8.88 +0.06 25.5021.44 ApPw26 2.06 8.4 24 24.50 24.50 24.50 +0.02 26.00 21.00 ApPw27 2.00 8.3 19 24.25 24.00 24.00 22.75 19.00 ApPw38 1.80 8.2 2 22.00 22.00 22.00 23.D6 19.13 ApPwB38 1.83 8.4 22 21.69 21.63 21.69-0.19 19.44 9.75 Applica 8703 10.50 10.19 10.38 +0.19 18.31 14.31 ApdIndl .48 2.8 11 357 16.94 16.75 16.94 +0.13 4.94 1.63 AApldPw s .06 1.2 2 3309 5.00 4.50 4.94 +0.38 22.00 10.50 Apda 4 1226 15.06 14.88 14.88-0.19 30.00 20.13 Aptargp .20 0.9 14 2281 23.69 23.00 23.31-0.06 27.50 16.06 Aracruz .59 a 3.0 1372 20.00 18.94 19.38 +0.38 22.19 13.94 ArchCh .80 4.4 10 940 19.00 17.88 18.19-0.81 15.56 4.75 ArchCoal .23 3.1 dd 244 7.63 7.38 7.50 +0 -.9 13.50 8.38 ArchDan .20 b 2.2 19 16678 8.94 8.56 8.94 +0.38 26.44 18.94 ArchstnC 1.64 6.3 16 1706 24.88 24.63 24.63-0.13 27.13 17.63 ArdenRlt 1.86 7.3 17 1191 25.94 25.50 25.50-0.06 13.13 8.94 ArgentFd. 70.68 q 193 10.38 10.31 10.31 +0.06 1838 9.75 Argosy 8 867 16.19 15.75 16.00 +0.25 1813 8.63 Armorl -1 24 548 17.00 16.75 17.00 49.75 1525 ArmstHld 1.92 12.0 dd 2140 16.06 15.44 15.94 +0.1 24.00 18 .13 ArmAR 38 1.86 8.9 81 21.00 20.75 21.00 +0.13 46.00 14.75 ArrowEl 16 1366 37.00 36.06 36.38 +0.25 18.63 14.38 ANMerit n .88 5.3 2073 16.88 16.50 16.50 -0.38 10.13 1.38 Ashanti dd 372 2.75 2.56 2.63 +0.13 39.06 28.63 Ashland 1.10b 3.1 28 2294 35.69 35.19 35.25 -0.06 11.50 8.25 AsiaPc .14e 1.4 q 913 9.94 9.81 9.88 +0.06 1.81 0.63 AsiaPR 66 823 1.38 1.31 1.31 +0.06 8.8 1 3.56 AsiaPlp 5 3553 4.00 3.69 3.81 -0.13 45.94 23.00 AsiaSat .26e 0.9 60 30.50 29.75 30.13 +0.63 11.19 7.56 AsiaTigr .01 0.1 q 1293 9.06 8.88 9.00 +0.06 9.56 6.38 AsdEstat 1.00 m 12.9 dd 138 7.75 7.63 7.75 0.06 39.81 15.75 AscFCap .26 0.9 14 25651 28.31 27.69 28.06 +0.44 48.56 31.00 AstraZen .78 a 1.7 1583 45.69 44.81 45.56 +0.50 050 7.13 AtaJSos .25 2.6 5 31 9.88 9.75 9.75 -0.25 1.13 5.38 AtchCst 3 90 5.88 5.56 5.56 -0.31 46.13 18.88 AlasAir 22767 43.25 42.63 43.25 +0.69 MARKET GAUGE: WINNERS AND LOSERS Best and worst Generic drugs +7.9 performers Home construction +6.2 among the Telephone +4.9 industry groups in the Standard Independent power producers +4.2 & Poor’s 500 Biotechnology +4.1 The week ended -5.8 Trucking Wednesday; -6.2 Household furnishings, appliances percent change from the -6.5 Non-alcoholic beverages previous week -7.2 Defense electronics -8.0 Specialty apparel retailers Source: Standard & Poor’s The New York Times NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE MOST ACTIVE CHANGES UP CHANGES DOWN Vol (100) Last Ch.Vol (100) Last Chg % Chg Vol (100) Last Chg % Chg ClearChan 377649 72.00 -5.38 DotHill

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3976 8.88 +1.56 +21 +4 BestBuy 79254 61.88 -9.13 -12.9 FordM n 283424 24.25 -1.75 Omnova n 862 6.00 +1.00 +20.0 Gap 259316 22.38 -3.19 -12.5 Gap 259316 22.38 -3.19 BnlChA s 1267 34.00 +4.88 +16.7 Target a 220977 23.19 2.88 -11.0 Target a 220977 23A9 -2.88 Dave&B 2273 8.00 +1.13 +16.4 Consc. pfV 702 11.64 -1.36 -10.5 AT&T 219145 31.63 -0.06 GC Cos 571 14.88 +1.88 +14.4 PrecOr g 4333 34.00 -3.56 - 9.5 Lucent 207845 4 1 .88 - 0.94 Entrade 1405 5.00 +0.63 +14.3 BritSky 45 95.50 -9.50 - 9.0 Compaq 171562 34.06 +0.81 Telemig 745 65.00 +8.00 +1 4.0 Neff Cp 1262 4.88 -0.44 - 8.2 Nokia s 160929 44S8 +2.94 TB Woods 199 11.25 +1.38 +13.9 AberFitc 46496 23.19 -2.06 - 8.2 Mattel 1336.46 10.00 -0.44 Lexmark 26229 67.50 +8.00 +13.4 Heico 311 15.50 -1.38 - B.1 Motorola s 128649 36.13 +1.06 C1yHlt n 4160 23.75 +2.69 +12.8 AcptIns 664 5.88 -0.50 - 7.8 WalMart 121599 48.00 -0.19 WalICS 3980 11.63 +1.31 +12.7 Penney 48101 14.00 -1.19 - 7.8 GenElec s 1 17095 58.69 +0.88 THilfgr 55082 10.88 +1.19 +12.3 EAndinB 426 10.31 -0.81 - 7.3 Pfizer 11 0263 43.25 +1.13 Oceaner 2926 17.44 +1.88 +12.0 KingPh s 17113 33.50 -2.63 - 7.3 AmOnlne a 97587 58.50 -1.08 ChmpE 802 6.63 +0.69 +11.6 ClearChan 377649 72.00 -5.38 - 6.9 NortelNw 91629 81.63 +1.19 SwftEng 4319 28.94 +2.88 +11.0 Heico A 134 12.69 -0.94 -6.9 NASDAQ MOST ACTIVE CHANCES UP CHANCES DOWN Vol (100) Last Chg Vol (100) Last Chg % Chg Vol (100) Last chg % Chg DellCptr 626144 43.63 +3.69 OiaoXing n 61207 20.50 +8.56 +71.7 SuperGn n 45446 19.69 - 8.50 -28.9 Cisco a 439058 68.75 +2.19 WebEx n 8223 55.38 +15.44 +38.7 InsAut 3836 16.50 -6.50 -28.3 Microsft 342149 69.81 -0.1 9 Talk.com 56423 7.19 +2.00 +38.6 SupGwt 0l 31 10.63 -3.63 -25.4 Intel a 262339 74.88 +1.38 Marex n 2134 19.00 +4.88 +34.5 Micros 19556 17.56 -5.44 -23.6 Atmel a 243389 20.00 +1.38 ChinaBrdb 7458 5.06 +1.25 +32.8 EndoPh n 1111 5.13 -1.38 -21.2 InfoSpce a 216205 39.00 +2.38 SmrtSrv vvt 1193 16.25 +4.00 +32.7 IntmetC 1089 7.75 -1.66 -17.6 Qualcom a 186399 69.88 +1.56 BrukDaIt n 2591 50.25 +12.13 +31.8 Casella n 1465 9.81 1.88 -16.0 Oracle 185983 90.94 +2.69 ArenaPh n 1988 46.25 +10.75 +30.3 Oilgear 29 8.00 -1.44 -15.2 JDS Uni a 180618 124.48 +6.48 SignlSoft n 5081 49.56 +11.50 +30.2 XATA n 1028 4.50 -0.75 -14.3 BroadVis s 175226 34.50 BlueMart n 15750 69.50 +16.00 +29.9 IntegInf n 433 6.02-0.98 -14.1 AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE MOST ACTIVE CHANGES UP CHANGES DOWN Vol (100) Last Chg Vol (100) Last Chg % Chg Vol (100) Last Chg % Chg Nasd100 s 155799 101.63 +2.63 Boundis 637 5.56 +0.94 +20.3 Hallwood s 18 5.00 -0.63 -11.1 SPDR 48491 152.34 +2.00 Avanir n 32949 6.06 +0.94 +18.3 HeartIdT 78 4.75 -0.56 -10.6 Avanir n 32949 6.06 +0.94 InSiteVis 2860 6.69 +0.88 +15.1 eMagin n 1019 9.69 -1.01 -9.4 1vaxCp s 23680 34.63 +2.25 Matec Cp 210 12.13 +1.56 +14.8 DixnTic 110 4.63 -0.38 - 7.5 Sybron 12992 34.44 +3.69 JWGenes s 3259 14.88 +1.81 +13.9 UGrdn 28 4.63 -0.38 - 7.5 Xcelera s 11840 18.88 +1.00 Myers1nd 609 14.00 +1.56 +12.6 GlcWatr pf 62 16.75 -1.25 -6.9 DevonE 9081 58.56 -1.56 Sybron 12992 34.44 +3.69 +12.0 Foodrm 20 20.75 -1.38 - 6.2 DJIA Diam 8896 112.47 +1.31 3Dshopg 634 8.13 +0.81 +11.1 GrahamCp 103 11.75 -0.75 - 6.0 BiotechT n 8237 201.94 +6.38 Selas 314 5.63 +0.56 +11.1 Careside 65 4.94 -0.31 - 5.9 Nabors 7174 47.56 +0.13 StrgCmp 1213 13.44 +1.31 +10.8 ATechC s 662 22.88 -1.38 -5.7 NYSE VOLUME Regular Session 1,056,573,210 Fixed Price Session 2,255,600 Basket Session

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13,083,260 NASD 133 296 720 Chicago 57 432 300 Boston 22,707,600 Cincinnati 17,582,500 Pacific 173,900 Philadelphia 11,09,600 NYSE NASDAQ AMEX Advances 548,037,220 1,272,218,200 34,692,280 Declines 461,987,680 470,425,200 4,550,400 Total 1,072,030,000 1,803,787,500 41,344,000 Composite Total 1,325,314,620 61,112,720 Year to Date 169,847,061,000 272,944,121,000 8,316,506,000 1999 to Date 130,704,270,000 161,877,659,000 5,180,621,000 *Percentage change since Dec. 8 1994, a recent market low. Changes exclude stocks under $5 (today’s or previous close). Active stocks exclude stocks under $1. LATE STOCK TRADING MOST ACTIVE, 6:31 P.M. NEW YORK CLOSE Regular 6:35 P.M. Early/Late Daily LateVol Regular 6:35 P.M. Early/Late Daily LateVol Stock Exch.Last Last Chg High Low (100) Stock Exch. Last Last Chg High Low (100) JOS Uni a 0 124.48 124.00 -0.48 125.25 118.25 36878 BroadVis a Q 34.50 34.81 +0.3136.75 33.69 11289 Cisco a 0 68.75 68.44 -0.31 68.94 67.00 29295 Amgen a Q 75.81 75.50 -0.31 76.63 72.69 10651 NextelC a 0 55.44 54.75 -0.69 56.00 51.69 25501 WrldCom a Q 36.50 36.69 +0.19 37.19 36.00 10621 Intel a Q 74.88 74.75 -0.13 75.63 73.63 22968 InfoSpce a 0 39.00 39.00 41.00 37.00 10017 SEI Inv a Q 63.50 64.50 +1.00 66.94 56.81 22323 Verisign s Q 198.88 198.25 -0.63 199.63 195.00 9052 Microsft Q 69.81 70.00 +0.19 71.31 69.63 20728 TdZetto n Q 10.25 10.25 10.31 10.00 8892 Palm n Q 44.00 43.94 0.06 44.88 42.50 18923 Vignette s Q 38.13 37.50 -0.63 38.63 34.638633 LXMUSC S 0 68.44 67.25 -1.19 69.00 64.56 18598 Aribs Q 157.38 156.75 0.63 159.00 147.38 8407 MtrmdF a 0 39.94 39.83 -0.11 40.00 37.50 17947 Brdcom a 0 250.00 248.63 -1.38 250.50 230.00 8147 JonesPh s 0 35.75 35.75 41.88 35.38 16088 SiebelSys a 0 197.81 196.00 -1.81 198.50 185.56 7507 DeLLCptr Q 43.63 43.38 -0.25 44.06 40.00 15982 Gemstar a Q 90.25 89.50 -0.75 91.63 81.38 7401 BEA Sys s 0 68.06 67.25 -0.81 68.63 62.75 14409 SpmtPCS a N 49.81 50.19 +0.38 50.63 49 25 6615 PajnWeb N 71.50 71.50 71.52 70.25 14081 Intuit a 0 59.88 59.77 -0.11 60.00 56 06 6513 Oracle Q 90.94 90.88 -0.06 91.06 88 13217 SympDv Q 5.16 6.94 +1.78 7.31 4.38 61.11 Level 3 Q 87.23 87.38 +0.14 87.75 84.13 12892 Sicor Q 9.69 9.69 10.509.56 6055 CHANGES UP Vol 6:35 P.M.Early/Late Stock Exch.(100) Last Ch9 %Chg Maysj Q 4 13.88 +4.88 +54.2 Syrnplv 0 6111 6.94 + 1.78 +34.6 Quentra Q 133 5.63 +1.19 +26.7 EndoPh r. a 234 5.75 +0.63 +12.2 IntactCrn n Q 38 11.50 +1.13 +10.8 EnPointe 0 82 8.25 +0.75 +10.0 GenMcr Q 15 19.56 +1.63 + 9.1 BackWb Q 42 19.94 +1.56 + 8.5 FmtTch a 337 17.00 +1.20 + 7.6 Extensty n 0 351 23.94 +1.44 + 6.4 Matav n a 4 45.00 +2.38 + 5.6 ImunRsp Q 93 9.50 +0.50 + 5.6 SterriCells 0 535 9.50 +0.50 + 5.6 P&F Q 4 7.75 +0.38 + 5.1 Atmel a 0 5621 21.00 +1.00 + 5.0 CmwlT B Q 3 44.00 + 2.00 + 4.8 GigaMed n Q 60 11.00 + 0.50 + 4.8 Lminant n 0 510 8.75 +0.38 + 4.5 Nordstr N 31 18.00 +0.75 + 4.3 180 met 0 65 18.25 +0.75 + 4.3 Tanrech n Q 54 17.00 +0.69 + 4.2 CyberCare Q 98 6.19 +0.25 + 4.2 Audvox Q 142 18.88 +0.75 +4.1 AjrNet n 0 27 34.50 +1.31 +4.0 AJIRiser n Q 107 8.44 +0.31 +3.9 CHANGES DOWN Vol 6:35 P.M.Early/Late Stock Exch.(100) Last Chg %Chg Viant a Q 3998 9.88 -4.00 -28.8 AcaciaR Q 5 22.50 -4.94 -18.0 CybrSme 0 454 10.19 -2.19 -17.7

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AksysL Q 30 9.00 -1.88 -17.2 ArenaPh n Q 494 40.00 -6.25 -13.5 Versata n Q 293 22.00 -2.94 -11.8 CtrSpan Q 21 14.13 -1.81 -11.4 UnvAcc n 0 70 14.25 -1.56 9.9 IntmetC 0 405 7.00 -0.75 - 9.7 Maxtor a 413 7.13 -0.72 - 9.2 Mainsprg n Q 1106 9Z2 -0.86 - 8.3 Sohucm n 0 2 7.00 -0.63 - 8.2 TaroPh 0 17 17.25 -1.50 8.0 Sapient a Q 4857 49.00 -3.50 - 6.7 CasinoD Q 33 7.00 -0.50 - 6.7 NCRIC Q 10 7.50 -0.50 - 6.3 BenihnA a 5 12.06 -0.81 - 6.3 SoundA a 4 7.78 -0.47 - 5.7 Aspenrc 0 1467 43.38 -2.56 - 5.6 ScientCp a 0 1665 25.75 -1.31 - 4.9 BlueMart n Q 1650 66.13 -3.38 - 4.9 eBenX n a 122 20.00 - 1.00 - 4.8 SynQuestn Q 286 7.50 -0.34 - 4.4 Barra a 237 55.06 -2.56 - 4.4 ConvGrp n Q 1437 5.75 -0.25 - 4.2 In late trading, until 6:35 p.m., these were the 30 most active stocks yesterday. The percent change reflects the activity during the extended session only, not during the regular day. The highs and the lows reflect activity during the regular day and late trading. The volume represents late trading only. The exchange symbol N refers to the New York Stock Exchange, Q represents the Nasdaq national market system and A represents the American Stock Exchange. 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 1008 High Low Last Chg 25 50 14.25 ATMOS 1.14 5.5 36 543 20.94 20.44 20.75-0.06 6988 27.81 AtwdOcn 30 367 45.50 44.88 45.38+0.13 8.25 0.31 AudioVis dd 1900 0.75 0.41 0.75+0.31 16.94 2.69 AuroraF dd 1039 4.19 3.88 3.88-0.25 38.56 30.06 AustINZ 1.8Oe4.8 231 37.56 37.44 37.56 -0.19 17.50 8.44 Austria 1.4000.2 q 554 11.06 10.88 10.94 -0.19 14.06 5.75 AutoNatn .68 t dd 21158 6.56 6.25 6.50 +0.13 38.25 22.69.Autoliv .44 1.9 11 1584 2325 22.50 23.06 +0.13 60.44 38.56 AutoData .35 f 0.6 46 12782 60.69 59.06 59.63 +0.56 22.63 21.00 AutoZone 14 4966 22.63 22.00 22.50 +0.19 48.06 30.88 AvalonBay 2.24 5.0 21 3448 45.06 44.38 44.69 0.50 78.63 45.50 Aventis .43 a 0.6 90 1152 75.75 74.56 74.75 +2.44 12.31 2.88 Aventis wt 203 11.75 11.00 11.31 +0.56 78.50 51.00 Averyl 1.08 2.0 21 3211 54.81 53.50 54.06-0.25 12.25 4.38 Aviall 16 780 6.38 6.00 6.00 -0.25 35.88 3.50 Aviation dd 149 5.00 4.69 5.00 +0.25 3188 13.25 Avis A 11 2060 30.75 30.38 30.75 +0.25 68.00 14.63 Avista .48 2.6 dd 1132 18.75 18.25 18.44 +0.13 8113 37.31 Avnet .60 1.0 16 2478 62.25 59.88 59.88 -1.38 46.50 23.31 Avon .74 1.9 22 8575 39.50 38.50 39.19+0.44 16.69 8.50 Aztar 15 995 15.06 14.56 14.56 0.06 19.50 4.56 Azurix 24 2042 4.81 4.56 4.75+0.13 B 43.94 BASF n 249 38.00 37.13 37.44-0.44 37.1321.69 BUT Cp .92 3.4 15 6184 27.44 26.38 27.06 +0.38 19.00 13.06 BEIV BHIF .59 a 4.0 -48 14.75 14.63 14.63 +0.13 32.50 10.63 BOE gs 1.20b 3370 22.56 22.31 22.50 -0.06 34.00 2011 BG Grp .82 a 2.5 89 32.88 31.50 32.44+0.6 76.75 26.69 BJS 69 5950 68.44 66.38 67.00 -0.50 41.38 25.75 BJs Whls 21 9995 34.25 32.75 33.88+0.19 23.38 9.94 BKF Cap n j q 232 19.94 19.50 19.56 -0.31 13.00 3.69 BMC .06 1.22 723 5.63 5.50 5.63 45.13 26.50 BOC ADS 1.20 a 4.2 112 2931 28.56 28.63 0 6 62.63 43.13 BPAnm s 1.33 2.4 18060 55.69 54.94 55.25 -0 88 12.94 8.06 BP Pru 2.47 a 19.7 8 834 12.63 12.44 12.564.0 06 33.6920.50 BR 1.70 b 5.8 18 1299 29.38 29.00 29.19 +0 13 9.00 6.63 BIRT 6 4 8.13 8.13 8.13 -0.06 11.00 3.81 BWAY dd 72 5.94 5.75 5.94 +0.19 25.63 14.50 BacouUSA 15 19 25.25 25.13 25.13 8.00 5.88 Baimm .20 2.5 7 x19 8.00 7.94 T94 +13.00 39.31 15.00 BakrHu .46 1.3 cc 15979 37.13 36.31 36.56 -0.17 20.50 14.88 Baldor .48 2.4 15 304 19.63 19.13 19.63 +0.13 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 47.38 26.00 Ball .60 1.7 19 734 34.88 34.31 34.63 +0.31 7.81 0.94 BalInty

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6 3030 1.25 1.00 1.19 +0.13 34.38 20.56 BallyTotF 12 234 24.69 23.88 24.69 +0.81 513 1.75 BanColum 520 4.00 3.75 3.75 -0.13 15.75 12.31 BcBiIVArg .39 a 2.4 44 507 14.94 14.63 14.94 2638 17.25 BncoFrn .60 a 2.8 9 495 21.88 21.44 21.81 +0.56 17.88 3.38 BGwadro.46 e 12.7 567 3.69 3.60 3.63 +0.13 28.63 21.00 BcLatn 1.25f4.6 5 71 27.50 27.38 27.38 -0.13 15.31 8.00 BcoRioP .21 a 2.5 102 8.69 8.06 8.56 -0.19 12.31 8.88 BcoSnCH .23 a 2.1 28 1273 10.94 10.63 10.94+0.13 18.19 12.31 BcSwtCh .68 a 4.5 323 15.25 14.88 15.13 -0.13 25.63 16.63 BcoSanti 1.04 a 5.3 99 19.81 19.44 19.63 -0.19 1.94 0.75 BcoWiese 110 1.13 1.00 1.13 +0.13 21.19 11.75 BcoAEdw 316 13.25 13.06 13.19 +0.06 17.50 13.81 BcpSmth .52 3.6 12 533 14.69 14.50 14.63 22.75 13.88 Bancwst s.62 3.5 12 3014 17.98 16.88 17.69 +0.81 36.25 21.88 Bandag 1.18 3.6 13 310 33.44 32.44 32.56 -1.00 29.56 19.75 Sandi 1.18 4.2 9 146 29.31 28 00 28 00 -1.44 24.50 14.13 BangH .80 3.3 12 225 24.31 24 13 24.13 +0.13 42.50 23.19 BankOns 1.68 4.8 55 59429 35.50 33.81 35.00+1.06 53.50 35.00 ABUtd PIES 4.00 7.3 40 54.75 53.50 54.75 +1.25 67.50 42.31 Bit of Am 2.00 3.7 1156120 53.75 50.96 63.56 +2.69 38.63 22.13 BkIrelnd .89 3.7 15 97 24.69 24.00 24.31 -0.13 16.81 9.88 BkTokyoObe 0.7 5346 12.44 12.19 12.25 -0.25 45.94 29.13 BkMwt g 2.00 113 41.44 41.06 41.19 52.94 29.75 BkNY 64 1.2 22 18789 53.88 51.25 52.44 +1.38 6.69 3.00 BkAtlA 10 2.5 7 522 4.00 3.94 3.94 -0.06 24 +56 17.19 Banta .56 2.5 11 1140 22.13 21.63 22.06 +0.31 130.00 89.25 Barclay 3.59 a 3.5 20 90 103.00 100.00 3.00 -1.50 58.38 35.00 Bard .84f 1.7 20 1653 49.94 48.81 48.81 -0.06 27.50 16.31 BamNbl 13 2145 17.63 17.25 17.31 -0.13 23.69 12.00 BamesGp 80 4.1 13 261 19.88 19.31 19 .44 -0 .31 BarrLab s 60 3572 73.63 71.00 71.00 -0.69 41.63 19.19 BaffettRs 89 1666 34.94 33.69 34.63 +0.94 26.00 15.50 BarrickG .22f 1.4 21 32280 16.50 15.94 15.94-0.06 6.75 2.75 BarryRG dd 700 3.44 3.00 3.19+0.06 14+06 9.56 Bass .56 a 5.6 12 335 10.06 9.81 10.06-0.06 4.19 1.63 BatlMt dd 5892 1.94 1.81 1.88 80.88 33.75 BaumhL 1.04 2.9 15 9107 35.16 34.19 35.75+1.66 85.25 51.75 Baxter 1.16 1.4 35 15587 85.63 82.13 83.25-1.50 16.94 6.56 BayView .40 4.1 14 4W 9.94 9.38 9.75+0.25 Continued on Next Page The same way my father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. The same way his father made it. BELVEDERE VODKA IMPORTED The time-honored traditions haven’t changed in over 5 centuries. Belevedere is handcrafted from 100% Polish rye and distilled 4 times. IMPORTED BY MILLENNIUM® IMPORT CO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA U.S.A. 100% neutral spirits distilled from rye grain 40X ALC. VOL. 180 Proof ©1997 Millennium® Import Co. NOTICE OF COURT MEETINGS OF SHAREHOLDERS IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BERMUDA

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CIVIL JURISDICTION IN THE MATTER OF LASALLE RE HOLDINGS LIMITED AND IN THE MATTER OF LASALLE RE LIMITED AND IN THE MATTER OF SECTION 99 OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1981 NOTICE OF COURT MEETINGS By Orders dated the 17th day of August, 2000, made in the above matters, the Supreme Court of Bermuda has directed separate meetings to be convened of the holders of LaSalle Re Holdings Limited (“LaSalle”) Scheme Shares as defined in the Scheme of Arrangement, and LaSalle Re Limited (“LaSalle Re”) Scheme Shares, as defined in the Scheme of Arrangement (“the Court Meetings”), for the purpose of considering and, if thought fit, approving, with or without modification, a Scheme of Arrangement proposed to be made between LaSalle and the holders of its Scheme Shares, and a Scheme of Arrangement proposed to be made between LaSalle Re and the holders of its Scheme Shares. The Court Meetings will be held at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel, Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Toronto, Ontario, Canada UP 1C4 on the 25th day of September, 2000 at 2:00 p.m., local time, for LaSalle Scheme Shares and 2:30 p.m., local time, or as soon thereafter as the meeting convened for the same day and place shall have been concluded and adjourned, for LaSalle Re Scheme Shares, at which place and time the holders of LaSalle Scheme Shares and LaSalle Re Scheme Shares are requested to attend. Copies of the Schemes of Arrangement and the explanatory statements required b Section 100 of the Companies Act 1981 may be obtained from the offices of LaSalle and LaSalle Re at Continental Building, 25 Church Street, Hamilton, Bermuda. Holders of LaSalle Scheme Shares or LaSalle Re Scheme Shares may vote in Person at the relevant Court Meetings or they may appoint another person, whether a member of LaSalle or LaSalle Re or not, as their proxy to attend and vote in their stead. Forms of proxy for use at the Court Meetings are available at the above addresses. Shareholders may attend and vote at the Court Meetings if they wish, even if they have completed and returned a proxy. In the case of joint holders, the vote of the senior holder who tenders a vote whether in person or by proxy will be accepted to the exclusion of the vote(s) of the other joint holder(s), and for this purpose seniority will be determined by the order in which the names stand in the Register of Members of LaSalle or LaSalle Re, as the case may be, in respect of the relevant joint holding. Forms of proxy should be signed, dated and returned before the time appointed for the meetings, but if the form is not so lodged it may be handed to the Chairman at the relevant meetings. Forms of proxy may be obtained from the offices of LaSalle and LaSalle Re at the addresses above. By its Orders, the Court has appointed Victor H. Blake, OBE or failing him, Clement S. Dwyer, Jr., to act as Chairman of each of the Court Meetings and has directed the Chairman to report the result of the court meetings to the Court. The Schemes of Arrangement will be subject to the subsequent approval of the Court. The Schedule

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Particulars of Court Meetings Time appointed for Meetings on the ordered to be convened: 25th day of September, 2000: (1) Holders of LaSalle Scheme 2:00 p.m. Shares (2) Holders of LaSalle Re Scheme 2:30 p.m. or so soon thereafter as the Shares preceding meeting convened for the same day and place shall have been concluded or adjourned Dated the 23rd day of August, 2000 Conyers Dill & Pearman Attorneys for LaSalle Re Holdings Limited and LaSalle Re Limited By Order of the Supreme Court of Bermuda NOTICE OF PROPOSED BRANCH PURCHASE AND CONSOLIDATION Notice is hereby given that Emigrant Savings Bank, New York, New York will make application to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for approval of the purchase and assumption of the deposits and related loans, as well as safe deposit box facilities at the branch of Carver Federal Savings Bank located at 261 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York 10019 (the “Carver Branch”) and to move said deposits and related loans and safe deposit box facilities located at the Carver Branch to an existing branch of Emigrant Savings Bank located at 250-252 West 23rd Street, New York, New York 10011 -2301, approximately 425 feet east of the present site of the Carver Branch. This notice is published pursuant to Section 18(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and Section 303.7 of the Rules and Regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file his or her comments in writing with the Regional Director of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation at its regional office, 20 Exchange Place, Now York, New York 10005, before processing of the application has been completed. The closing date of the public comment period is September 6, 2000. This period may be extended by the Regional Director for good cause. The non-confidential portion of the application file is available for inspection within one day following the request for such file. It may be inspected in the Corporation’s regional office during regular business hours. Photocopies of information in the nonconfidential portion of the application will be made available upon request. A schedule of charges for such copies can be obtained from the regional office. Emigrant Savings Bank 5 East 42nd Street New York, New York 10017

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C8 THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Yld sales High Low Stock DIV % P/E 1009 High Low Last Chg 68.50 31.88 BearSt .60 b 0.9 13 20452 69.75 65.31 67.06+1.81 25.25 15.63 BeazHm 5 56 24.75 23.88 24.75+0.69 78.26 39.50 BeckGouft .64 0.8 20 1119 77.56 76.06 76.13-1.38 34.44 22.38 BectDck .37 1.2 21 15M 30.94 28.94 30.13+1.13 19.63 15.63 BedfrdP 1.68 8.6 8 308 19.44 19.31 19.44 11.88 3.81 BeijYan .36 a 5.0 97 7.25 7.25 7.25 11.25 4.94 Belco dd 1206 9.25 9.06 9.13 30.38 17.06 Belden .20 OS 14 x688 26.13 25.06 26.13+1.00 39.13 19.50 Bell&Hwl dd 794 22.63 22.25 22.25-0.25 63.6034.94 Beffiouth .76 2.0 17 407SB 38.75 35.81 37.311+11.44 26.00 21.56 BellSttM 1.94 7.6 214 24.44 24.19 24.25+0.06 20.75 12.31 Belo .28 1.5 17 3114 19.44 19.06 19.13-0.19 39.6927.06 Bemis .96 2.9 14 1283 33.75 33.13 33.50+0.31 55.25 12.00 BenchEl cc 3106 52.44 51.06 51.25-0.13 4.50 1.44 BentonOG dd 389 2.19 2.00 2.13 16.13 4.50 BergBr .04 0.4 94 4891 9.38 8.81 9.38 +6 408W BerkK.A 28 26OO 58M 56700 577 -22.19 1351 BerkH B 168 1919 1881 1913+ 3 21.13 7.81 Berfitz dd 9 10.31 10.13 10.13-0.19 19.25 12.13 BerryP 2 l .13 .0 19-00.1 19 00 + 0.3 1118 42.00 BeStBuy 7954 67.00 61.50 61.88-9.13 71.44 35.75 Bestfds 1.06 1.5 28 19152 70.88 70.50 70.63-0.25 9.31 3.25 BethStl dd 1T728 3.56 3.44 3.50-0.06 5.19 2.50 Beverly dd 1732 5.25 6.13 5.19 29.38 11.75 BindlyW .08 f 0.3 24 1251 28.81 27.75 28.81+1.00 38.50 17.00 Biomtrx 33 684 21.25 20.63 21.25+0.23 71.50 23.63 Biovail a 65 2034 65.38 63.75 64.06 8.19 2.44 BirStl dd 1587 2.81 2.75 2.81+0.06 55.63 29.75 Blackl .48 1.2 10 5056 40.38 39.06 40.06+0.56 26.00 20.31 BlkFCp 1.08 4.2 14 211 25.56 25.38 25.50 9.25 8.75 Blk2001 .30 a 3.3 q 1183 9.25 9.19 9.19-0.06 9.50 8.56 BlkAdv .60 6.4 q 52 9.50 9.44 9.44 15.31 13.50 BlkCA08 .77 5.1 q 127 15.13 15.06 15.13+0.06 15.00 13.50 BlkFLD8 .75 5.4 q 62 13.88 13.81 13.88-0.06 15.00 11.19 BlkHY-Tr 1.61 12.4 q 71 13.06 13.00 13.00-0.06 39.00 12.50 Warck n .33 457 41.00 38.00 41.00+3.00 6.69 5.63 BlkIT .56 8.7 q 605 6.44 6.38 6.44 15.13 13.38 Blk20G8 .80 5.4 q 199 14.75 14.63 14.69 +0 10.31 9.00 BlklMT .62 6.4 q 278 9.69 9.63 9.63 13.81 11.50 BIMOM .78 6.1 q 139 12.69 12.63 12.69+0.06 8.25 7.56 BlkIQT .45 5.5 q 307 8.25 8.19 8.19 10.25 9.25 BlkMTar M 5.9 q 224 9.88 9.81 9.88+0.06 15.06 14.00 BlkNY 08 .75 5.2 q 85 14.56 14.50 14.56+0.06 10.13 9.00 BlkNA .84 8.7 q 137 9.75 9.69 9.69 15.06 11.94 BlkStMT .94 7.3 q 96 13.00 12.88 12.88+0.13 9.06 8.56 BIkStrTT .47 5.2 q 378 9.06 9.00 9.00-0.06 9.81 9.38 BlkTr .30 3.1 q 1090 9.81 9.75 9.75 70.75 16.56 Blanch .48 2.2 9 1685 21.94 21.00 21.94+0.31 55.94 26.94 BlckHR 1.20 f 3.3 15 6617 36.19 35.00 .35.88+1.13 17.13 8.63 Blockbstr .02 e 0.2 dd 1379 9.44 8.81 9.38+0.38 17.69 7.44 Blount dd 20 8.38 8.38 8.38 9.94 7.56 BlueChp 1.60 a 7.9 q 918 8.69 8.44 8.56+0.13 15.06 9.25 BluSq .25 a 2.2 7 395 11.38 11.13 11.38+0.13 5.94 2.50 BlueScreen 9 15 3.63 3.44 3.63+0.25 33.88 21.13 Blyth 12 7068 24.25 21.63 23.44-0.38 11.00 7.50 BocaResrt 34 456 11.25 10.63 11.13+0.44 54.50 32.00 Boeing .56 1.0 22 37582 54.88 52.25 53.63+1.13 43.94 25.00 BoiseC .60 2.0 10 2753 3000 29.00 29.88+0.81 6.44 2.50 Bombay 15 464 2.75 2.63 2.69-0.06 6.25 3.25 BordCh dd 574 3.81 3.75 3.81-0.06 18.50 11.06 Borders 11 3949 13.81 13.25 13.31-0.13 48.88 29.75 BorgWarn .60 1.7 6 2037 35.06 34.19 34.38+0.19 9.50 6.94 BostBeer 16 197 9.31 9.06 9.25-0.13 43.19 27.25 BostFlrDp 2.12 f 5.2 22 717 40.69 40.31 40.44+0.13 36.38 15.50 BostSci 20 22380 19.88 18.88 18.94+0.13 11.50 8.31 BoulderTR .20 1.8 q 43 10.81 10.69 10.81+0.06 29.31 17.50 Bouygs

Day C8 / 250

.61 a 2.3 17 61 27.00 26.19 26.31-0.69 59.56 41.88 Bowatr .80 1.6 cc 5127 51.81 50.69 51.38+0.63 14.50 8.63 Bowne .22 2.1 13 883 10.63 10.31 10.38-0.06 7.25 4.25 BoydGm 3 576 4.75 4.63 4.63-0.06 14.06 5.63 BoydsC 93 9.19 8.88 8.880.25 14.88 9.56 BoykinL 1+88 1 B.9 10 386 10.00 9.88 9.94-0.06 21.81 15.63 BradRE 1.52 6.9 16 3347 21 .94 21.75 21.88+0.06 34.56 24.50 BradyCp .68 2.3 15 178 29.38 28.56 28.94-0.31 21.38 10.19 Brahma 20e 1.0 8021 20.88 20.13 20.75+0 50 16.00 8.19 BrahmaC. 18 1.2 1 15.00 15.00 15.00-0 25 21.94 14.75 Brandyw 1.60 7.8 23 1075 20.75 20.38 20.50-0 31 98.00 47.88 BrasilTel 1.28 a 1.8 1079 70.81 67.50 70.44+2.69 19.31 12.19 Brazil .30el.6 q 173 18.44 18.19 18.38+0.13 6.63 3.63 BrazilEF q 78 6.19 6.13 6.19+0.06 63.63 31.00 BrigStrat 1.24 f 2.9 7 740 43.50 43.25 43.25 37.75 10.25 BrNiChA s.03 9 0.1 12 1267 34.00 32.66 34.00+4.88 36.00 19.88 Brinker 18 5377 33.00 31.63 32.00-0.69 79.25 42.44 BrMySq .98f 1.8 24 36401 53.63 52.63 53.00-0.13 68.38 42.25 BritAir 3.00 e 6.4 9 548 49.44 47.00 47.13-1.63 25.88 7.25 BritEngy n .15 p 35 13.25 13.06 13.13-0.50 201.94 66.00 BritSky 84 45 96.25 95.50 95.50-9.50 245.00 118.75 BritTel 3.69 a 2.9 22 1029 129.75 127.63 127.75+2.63 41.06 16.31 Broadwing old 5633 28.31 27.63 27.94+0.81 28.50 18.75 BHP .60 a 2.7 421 22.31 22.00 22.00-0.38 17.19 9.44 BrkficIP g .40 2.5 17 222 16.00 15.69 16.00+0.38 27.50 15.38 BrwnBm s.26 1.0 25 246 26.94 26.69 26.69-0.31 4.06 1.56 BwnSh dd118 2.25 2.13 2.13-0.13 64.1341.50 BrwnFA 1.24 2.4 16 37 52.75 51.56 52.75+1.31 69.1941.88 BrwnFB 1.24 2.3 16 744 53.13 51.56 53.00+1.44 20.00 .50 BrwnShoe .40 3.7 6 811 10.75 9.88 10.75+0.69 27.31 14.75 Brunswick .50 2.7 dd 2550 19A 18.44 18.75-0.38 24+31 12.94 BrshEMat .48 2.1 71 661 23.75 23.13 23.38-0.63 28.38 25.00 Buckeye 2.40 8.5 11 207 28.13 27.94 28.13 25.00 14.25 BuckTch 15 529 24.94 24.00 24.94+0.75 19.75 10.81 Buckle 9 560 13.75 12.63 13.06-0.69 10+44 3.19 BLjdgetGp old 1089 4.63 4.50 4.50-0.13 22.26 14.00 Buenavnt .15 a 0.9 1040 16.50 16.25 16.50 30.00 21.00 Bunzl .71 a 2.4 26 29.44 28.00 29.44+0.94 20.75 9.69 BurlCoat .02 0.2 9 186 12.63 12.13 12.19+0.06 6.25 1.50 Budinds cc 2067 1.75 1.69 1.75 32.75 19.06 BurlNSF .48 2.19 12448 22.75 22.00 22.38 +0.13 46.25 25.75 BdRsc .55 1.4 62 7969 40.00 39.13 39.31+0.02 11.88 4.88 BumPP 1.05 17.5 33 894 6.13 5.81 6.00+0.13 21.50 2.06 Burns Intl 19 401 21.50 21.38 21.50 44.50 22.13 BushBA 32229 43.94 43.50 43.88+0.38 18.19 12.06 Bushind .20 1.5 11 38 13.06 12.75 13.00+0.13 28.31 17.00 ButlerMfg .60 2.7 5 186 22.38 22.06 22.19-0.06 C 61.381525 CO Tch s .06 0.1 35 2605 S5.25 51.60 55.25+3 74.1363.19 C-Mac an 1126 72.50 71.63 71.69-0.19 23.63 13.813 CABJCP 71.91 11.6 22 16.44 16.38 16.44+0.06 39.00 19.50 CANTV 1.72 7.0 18 2113 24.75 24.50 24.63+0.06 16.25 9.06 CB REllis 8 109 10.88 10.50 10.50-0.31 26.00 19.25 CBL Asc 2.04 8.5 11 286 24.13 23.88 23.88-0.19 32.50 18.25 CDI 7 876 18.50 18.38 18.50+0.13 36.56 19.50 CEC Ent 16 463 29.19 28.81 28.88-0.19 27.25 5.94 CGI gs 448 8.31 7.88 8.25-0.13 43.00 26.13 CH Engy 2.16 5.7 13 444 37.94 37.25 37.94+0.69 10594 60.75 CIGNA 1.24 1.3 27 7604 98.13 97.25 97.25-0.81 7.13 5.00 CIGNA Hi .69 12.5 q 1474 5.56 5.44 5.50-0.06 15.50 14.00 CIGNA Inv 1.12 7.3 q 46 15.31 15.25 15.26+0.06 25.75 10.81 CIT Gp .40 2.3 8 8106 17.56 16.81 17.50+0.69 9.13 2.56 CKE Rat .08 b 2.0 dd 5139 4.63 3.88 4.00-0.50 41.81 30.13 ACLECO 1.70 14.1 16 416 41.88 40.56 41.75+1.00 8.88 1.75 CMI Cp .06 2.7 dd 311 2.38 2.19 2.25-0.13 29.38 26.00 ACMPGrp .90 3.1 13 829 29.44 29.31 29.38+0.06 40.13 16.06 CMS Eng 1.46 5.6 12 4581 26.50 25.75 26.130.06 41.13 24.25 CMS Tr 3.63 11.1 308 33.00 32.56 32.63 42.13 24.56 CNA Fn

251 / C8 Day

39 750 39.88 39.31 39.69+0.56 9.31 6.88 CNAI 96 11.2 q 29 8.63 8.56 8.56-0.06 14.94 9.75 CNA Sure .32 2.8 9 397 11.75 11.38 11.56+0.25 43.94 22.00 CNFTran .40 1.6 9 2103 25.31 24.50 24.50-0.31 16.69 7.50 CNHGlbl .55 5.6 dd 4288 10.19 9.25 9.75+0.56 38.0028.25 CP&L Egy 2.06 5.6 14 4524 37.25 36.13 37.00+0.50 25.50 23.00 CarP 8.55 2.14 8.6 38 24.94 24.88 24.94+0.06 34.56 17.69 CPI .56 2.3 15 131 24.44 24.25 24.38+0.13 25.00 4.69 CSK Ato 6 1520 5.56 5.38 5.44 23.00 18.50 CSS Inds 12 13 20.50 20.44 20.50-0.13 46.00 19.50 CSX 1.20 5.0 cc 4032 24.25 23.88 23.88-0.38 40.25 34.00 ACTG Res 1.04 2.6 22 518 40.88 40.25 40.50+0.50 86.25 38.75 CTS .12 0.2 24 1725 51.63 49.94 51.63+0.69 46.81 27.75 CVS Cp .23 0.6 22 27441 38.44 36.63 37.19-1.81 93.00 57.13 CVS Tr 4.23 6.4 203 68.25 66.44 66.50-3.00 75.25 32.00 Cabl&Wrls .77 a 1.4 4441 55.94 55.06 55.25+1.75 29.75 11.38 CablDsg a 23 1506 27.25 26.13 27.00 86.98 55.00 Cablvsn dd 1660 67.88 67.25 67.25-0.13 52.75 5.75 Cabttm 16 20M 37.60 34.31 37 +3 .13 38.44 17.94 Cabot .44 1.2 20 3396 37.19 36.63 37.00+0.06 20.63 17.00 CabotlTr 1.42 7.2 15 1140 20.13 19.00 19.63-0.50 25.06 13.19 CbtOG .16 0.8 57 4387 20.25 19.19 20.00+0.38 29.25 20.75 CadbyS .67 a 2.9 23 171 23.11 23.44 231-1.1 24.63 12.06 Cadence dd 34795 21. 38 2081 21.2.+ 9.44 5.44 Calgon .20 2.4 dd 987 8.94 8.50 8.50-0.38 32.00 21.50 ColifWtr 1.10 4.2 20 149 26.50 28.56 26.25+0.63 20M 9.69 CallGolf .28 1.9 13 1701 14.50 14.19 14.50+0.25 18.50 9.63 CallonP 44 420 15.38 14.81 15.31+0.50 95.00 19.88 A Calpine s 89 17966 99.00 94.31 99.00+4.25 51.75 24.25 Cambrex .12 0.3 28 454 47.06 45.44 46.94+1.13 32.00 25.19 CamdnP 2.25 7.5 25 350 30.00 29.81 29.94 18.94 10.19 Carneco g .50 452 13.13 12.50 13.00+0.63 9.38 0.63 CmpRs gs 109 0.69 0.63 0.69 47.0024.88 CampSp .90 3.5 17 4692 25.88 25.25 25.38+0.31 31.00 19.06 CIBC g 1.32 142 30.69 30.19 30.56+0.44 34.50 22.56 CdnRy gs .70 624 29.63 29.31 29.44+0.19 33.81 27.44 CdnNRs gn 19 32.75 32.44 32.50+0.31 28.63 18.25 CdnPc g .56 6205 27.50 26.94 27.31+0.50 62-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100 High Low Last Chg 60.75 42.50 CandgBrB 19 6 54.50 53.94 53.94-0.31 61.19 40.38 CandgBrA 12 536 53.94 53.56 53.88+0.25 16.06 10.25 Canwat g .25 2.0 2 12.56 12.50 12.56+0.13 60.63 32 CapOne .11 0.2 31 8549 61.63 59.69 60.31+0.63 8.31 2.13 CapSenl- dd 130 3.19 3.13 3.19+0.06 5.00 3.25 CapitalTr 12 182 4.38 4.38 4.38 -9 6.00 Capstd a 1. 14 e 13.3 dd 138 8.63 8.56 8.56-0.13 38.25 19.00 CarboGera 30 0.8 53 2663 36.31 36.00 3631+0.31 80.38 37.00 CardniH .1210.1 34 18131 85.00 80.31 81.81+1.56 9.63 3.75 A CaremkRx dd 49581 10.63 9.69 9.81+0.25 51.00 30.63 Carlisle .80f 17 14 892 46.13 45.31 45.81+0.44 24.50 18.69 CadtCm 2.00 87 50 23.00 22.25 23.00+069 13.69 0.41 Carmike dd 1507 0.75 0.69 - 51.88 18.31 Carnival .42 2.1 1232017 20.13 19.69 19.94-0.06 33.19 18.75 CarpTech 1.32 4.1 14 625 33.25 32.38 32.50-0.31 30.38 17.75 CarrAmR 185 6.4 18 1846 29.19 28.88 29.06+0.13 11.44 1.56 Carr 9 45 2.94 2.75 2.88+0.13 25.25 16.38 A CwtWal .32 1.2 24 3416 26.94 25.63 26.63+11.50 14.25 7.44 CasodeCp .40 3.0 47 221 13.75 13.50 13.50-0.19 1 8.69 13.38 CascNG .96 5.6 12 91 17.31 16.94 17.00-0.19 13.00 6.19 CashArn .05 0.7 dd 468 7.56 7.19 7.50+0.13 19.94 11.75 CastCk 22 112 19.31 19.25 19.25 6.19 3.56 Catallt 9 180 3.94 3.75 3.94-0.06 44.6324.50 CatalMkt a 45 5450 43.69 41.63 42.69-1.00 19.06 10.76 Catelus 20 2463 18.00 17.81 17.88 61.56 33.50 Caterpillr 1.36 3.7 1323832 37.88 36.50 36.75-0.81 5.44 1.31 CavaW .16 10.7 dd 266 1.50 1.44 1.50+0.06 22.56 17.44 Cedarl 1.50 8.3 12 493 18.13 17.81 18.00+0.13 24.56 14.75 Celanese 10p 49 16.88 16.69 16.75-0.19 82.13 21.25 Celestic gs ID942 79.31 76.13 78.13+1.50 60.25 24.38 Celltech n 49 43.13 42.00 43.00+0.81 4.75 2.13 Cemex wl 1 2.31

Day C8 / 252

2.31 2.31-0.06 2B.75 19.25 Comex n .79 a 3.4 2708 23.69 23.31 23.44+0.19 26.94 11.84 Cendant dd 543133 13.31 13.00 13.06 12.31 6.88 Cendant rt 155 7.88 7.63 63-0.1311.63 4.88 CenterTrst .84 14.6 7 388 5.94 5.75 5.75-0.06 44.50 31.25 CentrpPr 2.01 4.6 21 262 44.00 43.31 43.81+0.31 39.63 21.75 CentxCn .20 0.8 5 209 26.00 25-59 2581+031 30.81 17.50 Centex .16 0.6 7 x7359 29.25 28.19 28.88+0.75 17.75 11.811 CentEur q 54 14.00 13.88 13.94006 32.75 14.38 ContPrkg .06 fi 22 441 19.50 19.25 19.38-0.06 14.44 9.81 CVtPS .88 7.3 14 523 12.25 11.31 12.00+0.38 54.5030.63 CentBk 1.36 3.9 13 422 35.44 34.81 35.31+0.44 48.75 24.44 CntryTel .18 0.6 18 6005 29.81 28.13 28.81+0.38 29.13 14.75 Cerldian 29 3068 24.63 23.88 24.19-0.25 34.2520.31 Cervecer .68 e 2.9 366 23.56 23.00 23.13-0.38 10.25 4.00 ChmpE 74 802 6.63 5.94 6.63+0.69 33.63 18.13 ChAutoR 20 1163 23.38 22.50 23.31+0.75 33.50 18.50 ChRvLab n 182 27.44 27-31 27.44-0.06 6.38 2.63 Chart dd 105 5.50 5.38 5.50+0.13 27.00 15.25 ChartOne F .72 3.0 14 6496 24.13 23.06 23.75+0.31 13.00 9.81 ChtwlDiv 1.24 10.6 q 283 11.69 11.50 11.69+0.13 23.94 19.88 Cha 1.75 7.9 60 22.19 22.00 22.19+0.06 25.25 25.00 Cha n 2.06 8.2 740 25.25 25.13 25.20-0.05 10.81 7.75 Chaseind - 7 19 8.75 8.75 8.75+0.25 67.1343.96 ChuM s 128 2.3 1384496 56.56 53.50 56.98+2.63 29.31 23.25 ChateauC 2.06 7.9 20 284 26.56 26.00 26.00-0.38 3.06 0.50 Chaus 75 73 0.75 0.69 0.75 12.50 6.81 Checkpnt .01 0.1 cc 2556 8.00 750 8.00+0.50 36.8825.81 ChelGCA 3.00 8.9 20 1585 33.69 32.69 33.56+0.88 31.44 24.63 Cherned .40 1.3 17 243 30.63 30.13 30.50+0.06 28.00 17.63 ChemFst .40 1.7 12 121 23.06 22.75 23.06+0.19 35.75 20.19 Chapk .88 3.7 2 132 24.06 23.75 23.88+0.06 8.25 1.94 ChesEng 16 12022 7.69 7.38 7.63+0.19 19.63 16.25 ChesUtl 1.08 6.3 11 117 17.50 17.06 17.060.31 98.13 69.94 Chavron 2.60 3.1 16 12875 85.94 84.38 84.44-0.67 17.00 11.63 ChicB&I .24 1.7 11 144 14.38 14.00 14.38+0.13 12.75 9.00 ChileFd .67e 1.2 q 587 9.56 9.50 9.50-0-06 24.00 14.63 ChileTel 02 a 0.1 5205 1775 16.94 17.63+0.69 20.25 8.50 ChinaEA 76 16.38 16.13 16.38+0.50 12.13 8.38 Chinaid .11 a 1.0 q 217 10.69 10.50 10.50-0.06 51.75 15.00 ChinaMbl s 7503 38.75 38.06 38.56 + 1 .06 18.38 6.06 ChinSAir 211 14.98 14.56 114.88+11.06 11.63 4.50 ChinTire .08 1.5 25 5.38 5.38 5.38 28.75 20.00 ChinaUni n 22945 23.31 22.94 23.25+0.13 4.25 0.63 ChiYuc 2 232 1.50 1.44 1.44 7.19 3.13 Chiquta dd 1008 3.31 3.19 3.31+0.06 33.2522.56 Chiflet .96 3.5 13 489 27.38 26.06 27.38+11.26 17.38 8.25 ChoioeH 9 148 9.25 8.88 9.00+0.06 46.56 30.25 A ChoicePt a 51 794 47.19 46.38 46.88+0.94 80.44 48.25 ChrisCr 1.82 t 60 1415 80.19 78.25 78.25-1.69 13.50 7.50 Chrmcft .1Oe0.9 8 2 11.13 11.13 11.13+0.13 79.56 43.25 Chubb 1.32 1.7 24 6264 77.75 75.19 76.56+1.25 30.19 14.69 ChurDwt .28 1.6 16 196 18.06 17.88 17.94-0.06 13.50 0.66 Chyron dd 413 2.00 1.88 1.88 31.13 29.00 CibaSpC n 32 29.50 29.50 29.50-0.56 29.81 9.50 CIBER 23 3529 10.63 1000 10-31+038 24 94 21.38 CinG25 2.07 8.3 16 24.94 24.69 24.94+0.19 31.1920.00 CiNergy 1.80 6.1 11 5471 29.50 28.81 29.38+0.31 15.25 7.00 Ciroor n .15 1.6 12 x472 9.25 9.13 9.19+0.06 66.1921.00 CirCtVCC .07 0.3 15 62064 26.81 25.63 25.94-1136 4.88 1.31 CirOCar 43 836 4.88 4.69 4.69-0.06 59.13 31.38 Citigrp a .56 1.0 23 75962 58.75 57.25 57.25-0.75 19.00 10.88 Citzcomm 47 2557 16.69 16.31 16.31-0.25 41.50 25.50 CityNC .70 1.8 15 2906 39.44 37.88 39.06+1.13 24.44 14.75 ClaireaStr .16 0.8 13 2455 20.06 19.50 19.69-0.19 21.38 14.25 Clamor .46 2.2 13 429 20.63 20.06 20.63+0.50 8.00 4.00 Clarion .80 13.8 6 2 5.81 5.81 5.81-0.06 11.94 7.69 ClaytnH .06 0.6 9 3035 9.88 9.56 9.75+0.13 95.50 57.88 ClearChan dd 377649 76.94 70.50 72.00-5.38 15.13 1025 GlemStrt s 3.93 a q 28 13.06 13.06 13.06-0.06 33.44 21.94 ClvClf 130 dd

253 / C8 Day

434 25.25 24.50 25.13+0.94 56.38 29.06 Clorox .84 f 2.3 23 9595 37.00 36.19 36.19-0.81 17.63 9.50 Coachmen.20 1.8 9 330 11.13 10.81 11.13+0.19 72.75 31.25 Coastal .25 0.4 26 32320 70.63 66.00 69.34-0.51 20.50 10.50 Coastcat .68 f 4.4 11 100 15.56 15.44 15.56+0.19 69.0042.88 CocaCl .68 1.3 8180218 54.19 51.50 52.63-1.88 30.25 14.00 CocaCE .16 0.9 45 8796 19.00 18.50 18.63-0.31 21.00 12.50ACCFemea .15 a 0.7 60 605 21.13 20.50 20.50-0.13 569 125 Coeur dd 1859 1.75 1.56 1.63 l1.50 10.00 CohenST .96 a 7.9 q 67 12.19 12.00 12.13 8.63 3.88 ColeNatl .01 a 0.1 dd 3 7.00 7.00 7.00 46.6327.63 ColeMyr 1.28 a 3.9 21 33.13 32.75 33.13+0.13 66.7540.50 Colal .63 1.2 32 11557 52.19 50.75 50.94-0.44 7.06 4.50 Coll.43k 20 98 5.25 5.13 5.19 13.13 8.50 ColBgp .44 4.5 9 1408 10.00 9.76 9.75-0.13 71 .19 6.00 Coll-lin .48 7.1 q 211 6.75 6.69 6.75 9. 25 7.81 ColIntln .89 9.8 q 223 9.13 9.00 9.13+0.19 6.25 4.94 Colll-ll .70s q 160 6.75 5.69 5.75+0.06 9.56 8.38 CollnvG .61 6.4 q 212 9.56 9.50 9.50 6.50 5.25 ColMu .43 7.3 q 389 5.94 5.88 5 - 88 28.81 21.75 ColonlPT 2.40 9.0 16 39327.13 26.76 26 75-0.26 70.19 54.19 ColumEn .90 1.3 21 264970.44 70.00 70 19+0.13 24.94 21.38 ColSP25 2.09 8.6 21 24.50 24.44 24 44+0.13 24.69 20.44 ColSP27 1.98 8.4 5 23-63 23.63 23.63 126.38 86.13 ComostN n 1.43 1.5 1 95.50 95.50 95.50 57.25 17.44 Comdisco.10 0.4 29 5153 24.50 23.50 24.00-0.13 61.38 32.94 Comeric 1.60 2.8 13 4870 57.38 55.56 56.31+100 15.69 3.38 ComfrtS 8 386 5.50 5.44 5.50-0 06 54.69 30.88 CmcBNJ .98 b 1.9 22 872 51.94 51.00 51.69+0 50 31.0020.75 CmceGpl.16 4.5 8 291 26.38 26.00 26.00-0.25 23.81 12.13 CmcFdl .26 1.4 10 1410 18.44 17.63 18.06+0.44 33.94 22.13 CmclMtl .52 1.9 8 267 27.94 27.50 27.94+0.44 11.88 9.44 CmcINL 1.24 11.9 9 437 10.56 10.44 10.44 50.1322.63 ComScop. 17 6838 25.38 24.50 24.94+0.13 27.3820.00 CmtyBS 1.08 f 4.9 8 46 22.44 22.06 22.06+0.06 21.75 13 VACmtyHR n 4160 25.26 21.88 23.75+2.69 15.25 9.25 CoGnGeo 12 14.88 14.69 14.69-0.31 38.06 18.63 CBDPao .10 a 0.3 534 37.44 37.25 37.31-0.06 35.00 18.25 Compaq .10 0.3 50 171562 3431 33.38 34.06+0.81 79.44 23.69 CompAs .07 0.2 15 33997 33.06 31.50 32.13-0.38 99.88 57.94 CompSci -32 10320 79.31 77.19 79.06+2.88 20.00 3.38 CmpTsk .05 1.4 6 614 3.63 3.44 3.50 23.75 17.00 Compx .50 2.2 14 10 22.69 22.50 22.69+0.19 10.88 2.44 ComstkRs 83 1732 10.00 9.75 9.94-0.13 26.44 15.06 ConAgra .81 4.4 21 17898 18.56 18.19 18.31+0.13 7.63 3.19 CweMl dd 1050 4.44 4.19 4.38+0.13 22.00 13.44 Conectiv 88 5.0 dd 775 17.94 1750 17.75+0.13 41.00 19.38 ConecW A 3.20 13.7 dd 50 23.50 23.00 23.31+0.31 29.25 18.81 ConocoA .76 3.0 11 8070 25.44 25.06 25.19+0.06 29.38 19.00 ConocoB .76 2.9 12 5089 26.38 26.00 26.13+0.14 26.81 4.50 Conseco .20 2.4 453609 9.19 8.31 8.44-0.38 13.38 9.50 ConsecSI 1.37 12.5 q 73 11.06 11.00 11.00 20.25 9.0 CornEgy 1.12 5.4 19 973 21.00 20.00 20.81+0.94 45.00 26.19 CwEd 2.18 7.0 10 5819 31.75 31.25 31 31-0.19 24.81 21.56 ConEd31 1.94 8.1 160 24.00 23.81 24.00+0.13 24.44 20.38 ConEd39 1.84 8.0 110 23.19 23.00 23.13+0.13 48.00 8.50 ConsGph 6 256 14.75 14.44 14.75 + 0. 1. 41.13 24.44 ConsPap. .88 2.2 3631166 39.56 39.13 39.34+0.22 13.38 7.63 ConsPdts 1.03t 13 448 9.19 9.00 9.19+0.13 23.00 10.81 ConStor 57 3320 14.19 1.144 13 6-3-0 M 12.50 1.25 CGDjrwa a dd 62 1.50 1.38 1.50 1.68 4.4 20 2856 38.69 38.06 38.25+0.06 54.75 29.06 CtlAir A 8 20 48.75 47.88 48.75+0.50 54.81 29.00 CtlAir B 9 3747 49.00 47.56 48.13+0.13 27.25 15.31 ConCMx Age 0.7 35 25.75 24.38 25.50+1.50 55.44 17.25 Cnvrgys 40 7612 39.88 38.75 39.13+0.38 83.56 33.56 CoopCam 82 4586 80.81 77.81 77.81-2.19 38.81 22.75 CoopCo .08 0.2 17 1296 32.88 32.13 32.88+0.31 53.25 29.38 Cooper 1.40 4.0 10 3063 35.50 34.38 35.31+0.69 20.19 9.50 CooprTr .42 3.5 7 3673 12.19 12.00 12 .06+0 .06 67.63

Day C8 / 254

37.38 Coors B .74 1.2 23 2093 60.44 59.19 59.56+0.63 10.25 6.19 Copel .24 a 2.5 3175 9.69 9.50 9.69+0.13 22.25 T38 CopeneP 1.69 e 8.3 123 20.31 20.19 20.31 3225 13.25 Cordant .16 0.7 38 37 24.50 24.13 24 .25+0 .81 31.38 15.69 CoreLab 42 1232 19.44 18.88 19.25-0.06 22.50 10.00 Corimon s 720 17.69 17.44 17.44-0.19 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 35.2522.44 ComPdts .32 1.3 15 630 25.38 25.00 2513-0.31 17.25 5.88 ComellCos 9 313 8.31 8.13 831 +0.06 17.56 10.00 ComPpn 2.16 15.9 dd 145 13.69 13.38 13.63+0.06 11.63 9.00 ComerRlt 1. 11 10.6 12 286 10.69 10.44 10.50-0.06 13.56 9.00 CmstStrR q30 10.44 10.44 10.44+0.06 340.00 62.63 Comingin .72 0.2 cc x25857 330.00 324.50 328.00+3.94 11.56 9.00 CorpHY 1.37 13.1 q 497 10.50 10.38 10.44+0.06 10.56 8.31 CpHYII 26 12.9 q 346 9.75 9.56 9.75+0.13 12.19 19.50 CpHYIII i.48 13.8 q 1373 10.88 10.69 10.69+0.06 10.13 7.00 CorpOffP 76 8.4 16 65 9.19 9.00 9.00-0.06 14.81 9.63 CorrPrT 1.46 14.6 8 164 10.06 9.94 10.00+0.06 14.94 3.06 Corrpro do289 3.69 3.56 3.63-0.13 23.25 20.00 CoftsBLS 95 1.75 7.9 27 22.25 21.75 22.25+0.75 23.00 13.25 CortsJCP 9 71.91 11.9 115 16.38 16.00 16.00-0.44 25.00 18.25 CortXRX27 2 00 8.7 11 22.88 22.81 22.88-0.13 32.19 25.44 CorusE gn 135 30.26 30.00 30.00-0.50 29.69 9.63 CorusGr a 2 1170 10.50 10.25 10.31+0.31 7.25 2.88 Cotellignt dd 406 4.13 4.00 4.00 39.75 22.31 CntwCrd .40 1.1 11 5607 38.44 37.63 37.88-0.06 45.63 30.63 CousPr 1.80 4.4 12 769 41.25 40.50 41.13+0.50 17.50 6.50 Covance 22 663 10.69 10.25 10.38-0.31 58.38 35.13 CoxCorn 17 9588 36.75 35.56 35.630.50 76.00 49.00 CoxCmco 3.50 7.1 931 50.50 49.50 49.63-0.25 67.25 43.63 CoxCmGth .13 0.3 15 44.25 43.63 44.25-0.06 121.00 85.00 CoxCm29 n 6.86 7.2 340 95.50 93.75 95.50+2.13 35.63 17.38 CoxRadio s 28 2711 21.56 20.81 20.810.63 29.50 16.06 Crane .40 b 1.6 14 1295 25.25 24.7 12.38 10.25 CrwtdA .55 5.1 14 11 10.94 10.8 14.81 11.00 CrwfdB .55 4.4 16 46 12.50 12.3 13.00 7.00 Cred1cp .10 a 1.2 1045 8.38 8.19 7.25 5.56 CrSuisinco .72 10.9 q 789 6.75 6.56 6.63-0.06 9.00 6.50 CrSuisStrt .87 a 11.8 q x242 7.38 7.31 7.38+0.13 23.19 15.13 CresRE 2.20 9.9 do 1331 22.63 22.13 22.13-0.31 24.13 15.88 Crestime 9 76 19.88 19.63 19.69-0.13 2.94 CrllmiM dd 3905 1.69 1.56 1.69+0.06 22.88 12.44 CriatChle .72 a 4.6 32 15.75 15.75 15.75 18.00 7.25 Crompton.20 2.2 c1d 2238 9.19 9.00 9.00-0.06 26.94 7.56 ACrosThr .04 0.2 25 3068 27.00 26.06 26.44+0.19 15.50 9.25 CrosTirn 1.60e 40.4 13 40 15.50 15.25 15.44 T38 4.81 CrwnAm 83 14.0 dd 743 6.00 5.88 5.94-0.06 28.13 12.94 CwnCork 1.00 7.7 27 5032 13.94 12.94 12.94-0.31 3.25 0.34 CwnCr .12 24.0 dd 999 0.56 0.50 0.50 23.13 17.00 CmPac 2.26 12.0 18 600 19.19 18.69 18.88-0.13 27.50 10.81 Cryolife 67 158 26.88 26.06 26.88+0.38 33.06 19.63 CullenFr .78 2.5 16 5349 31.00 30.38 31.00+0.50 9.88 4.19 Culp Inc .14 3.3 8 214 4.25 4.00 4.25+0.06 6088 27.06 CumEng 1.20 3.4 8 1409 35.88 34.44 35.50+0.19 18.81 9.69 CurInc .83 7+8 q 10 10.63 10.63 10.63-0.06 4838 3038 CurtWr .52 1.1 11 174 47.00 45.25 45.44-1.56 5100 K31 CypSem 33 20055 49.50 47.69 49.44+1.69 34.25 21.25 Cytec 10 872 33.63 32.94 33.38+0.13 D 23.50 18.00 DECS T2 1.81 8.4 1500 21.56 21.56 21.56+0.44 8.63 6.69 DU HiY .99 132 q 234 7.56 7.50 7.50 27.38 16.38 ADPL .94 3.4 25 3046 27.44 26.31 27.31+0.81 53.00 33.63 00E 1.60 4.0 17 2453 40.63 40.13 40.19-0.06 25.25 21.50 00E 39 n 2.09 8.5 25 24.81 24.50 24.63-0.19 1956 10.00 DADR Horton 16 0.8 7 4996 20.25 19.50 19.63+0.25 100.25 51.19 DST Sya 35 655 94.63 93.06 94.00+1.00 41 .31 28.44 DTE 2.06 5.9 10 2585 35.00 34.50 34.75+0.25 19.75

255 / C8 Day

11.25 DVl Inc 12 139 18.56 18.13 18.38+0.38 78.69 51.31 DajmlrC 2.22 a 4.3 10 6833 52.38 51.56 52.06-0.31 76.94 52.00 Daimlr 02 3.73 a 7.1 6 52.50 52.50 52.50 80.94 41.75 DainRaus .98 1.1 13 1283 80.81 78.69 80.44 + 0 .11+75 6.13 Dal-Tile 8 551 11.31 11.06 11.25 49.00 24.75 DWMl s .13 0.3 31 3660 41.38 39.00 41.38+2.63 7.25 3.81 DanRivr 5 408 4.50 4.44 4.44-0.06 43.75 20.31 DanaCp 1.24 5.0 7 4276 25.06 24.00 24.69+0.50 60.25 36.44 Danaher .06 0.1 28 3390 56.31 55.06 56.19+0.69 30.63 17.50 Danone a .31 a 1.1 225 28.06 27.31 27.44-0.44 20.63 12.44 Darden .08 0.5 13 3889 17.75 17.38 17.69+0.19 14.13 5.06 DavB 11 2273 8.00 7.00 8.00+11.13 36.25 15.63 ADeVry 55 2756 37.81 36.06 37.38+1.44 46.56 22.38 DeanFd .90 f 2.9 11 828 31.56 31.19 31.250.25 719 5 . 63 DebtStrt .80 12.7 q 485 6.38 6.25 6.31 8.19 6.75 DebtStr .95 2.8 q 971 7.44 7.31 7.44+0.1 913 7.81 DebtStr3 .99 . 1.7 q 202 8.44 8.38 8.44 .40 30.31 Deere .88 2.7 20 15897 33.50 32.31 32.94+0.56 1550 656 DelMnte 3 689 6.75 8.56 6.56-0.19 d 94 9.69 DelaGp 1.50 11+9 q 296 12.69 12.44 12.56-0 06 13.75 10.25 DEGpGlb 1.50 2.0 q 156 12.50 12.31 12.50+006 10.13 6.63 DelcoR 16 104 7.94 7.63 7.88-0.06 26.88 14M DelhaizeA .58 3.9 8 1167 15.19 15.00 15.00-0.13 2794 14.75 DelhaizeB .57 3.8 8 283 15.44 15.06 15.06-0.31 21.13 14.00 DelphiA .28 1.7 818766 16.50 15.63 16.44+0.50 41.38 22.94 DelphFn 12 425 41.38 39.94 41.38+0.88 34.00 14.13 DeltPne .12 0.5 13 1031 24.50 24.00 24.44+0.17 58.31 43.56 DeltaAir .10 0.2 5 6682 49.88 48.75 49.50-0.25 25.38 20.00 Delta39 2.03 8.4 442 24.25 23.88 24.13+0.25 6.13 0.75 DeltaFn do 68 0.88 0.75 0.81 2.13 0.63 DeltaW 2 40 1.75 1.63 1.63+0.13 27.19 19.50 DeltTim .25 1.3 41 288 20.75 20.00 20 .00-0 . 13 36.69 21.19 Deluxe 1.48 6.7 8 2994 22.25 21.50 22.00+0.13 7.25 3.63 Danbury 9 1003 6.94 6.75 6 94+0.13 28.19 7 Dept56 9 257 13.56 13.31 13.56+0.13 7.88 4.94 ADeRigo 220 7.94 7.88 788 20.00 10.50 DescSA .56 a 4.7 255 12.00 23.00 12.88 DetDiesl .50 2.2 13 26 22.81 22.81 22.81 24.50 19.81 DetE26 1.91 8.5 15 23.00 22.50 22.56-0.19 24.06 18.50 DetE6 -28 1.89 8.5 15 22.56 22.31 22.31-0.19 23.44 18.00 DetE12 -28 1.84 8.4 177 22-06 21.88 21.94+0.06 100.25 37.06 DeutTel .56 a 1.4 22693 38.94 38.44 38.94-0.19 16.25 11.00 DevDv 1.44 9.9 12 3050 14.63 14.38 14.50-0.19 59.56 32.3 Dexter 1.04 1.8 25 9330 62.38 59.13 59.13-0.13 43.56 24.38 Diageo 1.44 a 4.2 1596 34.63 34.06 34.44-0.19 45.00 21.69 DiagPd .48 1.1 24 169 43.38 42.38 42.38-0.38 31.00 9.88 Dial .32 3.1 9 4442 10.31 10.06 10.25+0.19 46.25 26.50 DiaOffs .50 1.1 T3 7522 45.00 44.44 44.81+0.19 32.88 19.69 Diebold .62 2.2 15 2492 28.81 28.25 28.25-0.13 24.00 12.23 Dillards .16 1.2 11 4494 13.38 12.75 12.81-0.63 22.50 13.50 Dillard38 1.88 12.6 93 15.13 14.63 14.88 19.69 11.31 DimeBcp .32 1.7 9 4816 18.69 18.00 18.38+0.25 4.56 1.94 Dimon .36 11.5 8 1607 3.19 3.00 3.13-0.06 20.81 7.88 DiscAut 6 918 8.94 8.44 8.88+0.38 43.8823.38 Disney .21 0.5 78 436 88 39.81 38.31 38.94+0.56 37.69 9.26 Dwnt n 4962 16.63 14.88 10.311+11.31 23.75 15.00 Dist&Srv .22 a 1.3 2097 17.25 16.94 17.25-0.13 25.63 13.50 Dole .40 2.8 17 1312 14.19 13.94 14.13+0.13 26.13 14.38 DollarG a .10 0.5 30 7107 21.31 20.50 20.56-0.81 43.88 28.25 DIrGnST 3.36 9.4 181 36.75 35.50 35.63-1.38 2425 11.38 DollarTh 8 1419 23.00 21.81 22.63+0.94 5294 34 81 DomRes n 2.58 4.9 32 15450 53.94 51.31 53.00+1.63 16.75 10.25 DmRsBW 2.63 e 17.2 q 278 15.38 15.00 15.25 -1481 8.25 Domtar g .14 86 9.00 8.75 8.94+0 . 19 2513 18 . 81 Donldson .28 1.3 14 859 21.31 20.63 21.13+0.19 88.63 36.50 DonLufJen .25 0.3 17 12152 88.63 88.38 88.50+0.13 19.94 6.25 DU Dir cc 4335 8.56 8.06 8.13-0.44 21.25 6.38 Doncstrs 9 1775 19.25 19.00 19.25 9.75 5.75 Maran 11 293 6.25 6.06 6.06-0.19 32.00 19.00 DonlleyRR .92 f 3.6 10 5878 25.81 25.13 25.75+0.50 16.44 11.75

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Donmily .40 2.9 5 21 13.88 13.69 13.88+0.19 17.19 4.63 DotHill dd 3976 9. 38 731 8.98+1.56 54.38 36.06 Dover .50f 1.0 20 4446 49.50 48.81 48.88-0.50 20.00 9.94 DoverD .18 1.8 12 91 10.19 10.06 10.06+0.06 47.13 26.00 DowChm s 1.16 4.4 1230261 26.75 26.06 26.20+0.01 77.31 49.31 DowJns 1.00 1.6 19 1596 63.50 62.56 62.56-1.19 36.00 18.50 DowneyFn .36 1.1 11 255 33.50 32.38 33.50+0.69 25.63 21.00 Downey29 2.50 9.8 413 25.50 25.00 25.50+0.50 6.69 5.56 DresGlob .72 10.8 q x5l 6.69 6.56 6.69+0.06 11.81 8.44 DryHYSt 1.40 15.6 q 2660 9.00 8.94 9.00 9.44 7.50ADryStG .75 7.9 q 244 9.50 9.44 9.44 8.63 7.38 DryStrt .55 6.4 q 624 8.63 8.50 8.63+0.06 8.56 7.13 DrySM .56 6.7 q 405 8.44 8.38 8.38 49.25 21.13 DrilQuip 72 126 45.88 45.38 45.44-0.19 74.0042.88 DuPmt 1.40 3.1 18 24658 46.13 44.88 44.88 -0 32.94 19.00 DuaneR 10 6482 22.13 20.63 22.13+1.19 32.75 23.63 DucatiM cc 1 25.75 25.75 25.75+0.25 14.63 8.50 Ducomun 11 508 14.50 13.81 14.50+0.63 10.75 8.25 DufPUtil .78 a 8.1 q 1403 9.75 9.69 9.69 16.06 11.94 DufPTF .75 5.7 q 62 13.13 13.06 13.13+0.06 14.00 .56 DufPUC 1.02 8.3 q 248 12.38 12.19 12.25 73.63 45.75 ADukeEngy 2.20 2.9 2920610 75.81 73.50 74.81+1.31 22.88 19.38 DukeE38 1.65 7.5 86 22.25 21.88 22.00 25.75 16.63 DukeWks 1.72 f 7.2 17 4174 24.19 23.75 23.750.11 34.25 23.56 DunBrad .74 2.2 20 5308 33.50 32.19 33.00+0.75 23.63 19.94 Duq38 1.84 8.0 10 23.06 22.94 23.06+0.13 59.25 20.00 Dycom s 64 3568 55.38 53.00 53.00-0.50 49.00 19.25 Dynegy 5 .11 e 0.2 7012046 45.44 44.38 45.00+1.13 13.25 0.44 DynexCap dd 875 1.44 1.31 1.44+0.25 E 65.9440.44 EON AG V 4 e 2.4 354 49.75 47.63 48.31-1.81 4.75 0.34 Ek dd 3498 0.44 0.34 0.34-0.09 4.13 2.88 ECC Int 10 29 4.00 3.94 3.94 6.25 2.13 EEX Cp dd 787 5.88 5.50 5.88+0.13 4.94 1.88 EK Chor .50 e 19.5 13 100 2.56 2.50 2.56+0.06 98.63 29.13 EMC s cc 60733 99.19 95.81 97.88+1.56 63.44 46.13 ENI 1.61 e 2.8 486 59.38 57.81 58.44-0.31 39.50 13.69 EOG Res. 14 f 0.4 8 5396 38.75 38.06 38.25+0.38 68.00 43.19 ETown 2.04 3.0 40 167 67.38 67.19 67.190.06 25.19 13.31 Earthgr .24f 1.4 14 2662 17.88 17.50 17.63-0.31 15.19 9.75 EstANG 1.39 e 9.6 9 35 14.44 14.25 14.44 63.69 43.38 EastEnt 1.72 2.7 27 x 10265 63.50 63.19 63.25+0.19 24.00 16.26 Eastgrp 1.52 6.9 11 202 21.98 21.00 21.88+0.88 STOCK TABLES EXPLAINED P/E 52-Week Dividend ratio High Last based on most recent declaration, unless indicated otherwise by Lo Stock Yield Sales Low footnote. High % 100 Change a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. Annual rate plus stock. 11.50 7.13 A CorkyC .48 4.2 M7 11.75 10.88 11.00 +.13 c Liquidating dividend. 26.25 7.60 LwMeCo 1904 10.63 9.75 9.75 -.75 e Sum of dividends paid in last year. 26.75 10.75 17 1562 23.76 23.13 23.75 +.50 11 Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement, Bold type marks stocks that rose or fell at least 4 percent, but only if I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. the change was at least 75 cents a share. J Sum of dividends paid this year, Most recent dividend was Underlining (on New York or American Stock Exchange) means stock omitted or deferred. traded more than 1 percent of its total shares outstanding. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent Underlining (on Nasdaq) means stock traded more than 2 percent of dividend announcement. its total shares outstanding. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. 52-Week High and Low Highest and lowest prices reached by a r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. stock over the last year, but not including yesterday. t Paid in

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stock, approximate cash value when stock was distributed. Arrows * Yesterday’s high was greater than 52-week high. Yield is the ratio of the annual dividend to the closing price, * Yesterday’s low was less than 52-week low. expressed as a percentage. Both new high and new low were reached. Price/Earnings Ratio is the price of the stock, divided by earnings Stock Name per share reported over the last four quarters. cid Preferred stock that has been called for redemption. q Stock is a closed-end fund. No P/E ratio shown. ec Company listed on the American Exchange’s Emerging cc P/E exceeds 99. Company Marketplace. dd Loss in last 12 months. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and Sales refers to the volume of shares, in hundreds. low figures date only from the beginning of trading. x Ex dividend, meaning this was the first day that the stock s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. traded without the right to receive a dividend. The price change pf Preferred stock issue. is adjusted to reflect that fact. pp Partly paid share, for which owner will need to make one or more y Ex dividend and sales in total shares. additional payments, z Sales are in total shares. pr Preferences. Prices Regular trading for the New York Stock Exchange and the un Unit, including more than one security. American Stock Exchange runs from 9:30 a.m., Eastern time, through rt Right to buy security at a specified price. the close of the Pacific Exchange, at 4:30 p.m. For the Nasdaq stock wd Trades will be settled when the stock is distributed. market, it is through 4 p.m. wl Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. High Highest price at which the stock traded in regular trading. vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized Low Lowest price at which the stock traded in regular trading. under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. Last Last trade of the day in regular trading. Dividend refers to the current annual rate of dividend payment, Change Difference between last trade and previous day’s price. Source: Associated Press STANDARD & POOR’S 500 STOCK INDEX 1,550 1,525 1,500 High Close Low 1,475 1,450 1,425 1,400 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 June July Aug. N.Y.S.E. Volume 1,500 1,250 1,000 750 500 250 0 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26

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June July Aug. 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 1100s, High Low Last Chip 54.75 33.63 EastChm 1.76 4.1 25 13012 44M 42.88 43.13-0.69 78.28 53.19 EKodak 1.76 2.8 13 8923 63.25 61.63 6250+006 98.38 60.13 Eaton 1.76 2.7 7 3932 67.31 65.00 6638+031 55.00 27.31 EatnVan .38 0.8 16 1203 50.31 48.44 4844-150 13.44 10.13 EV MulT .75 6.3 q 418 12.06 11.88 12 . 00+025 10.00 8.31 EV Sdnc .92 9.5 q 756 9.81 9.69 969-0.13 41.25 28.00 Ecolab .48 1.2 28 1662 N 19 38.19 38.94+0.75 30.00 15.25 Edisonint 1.12 5.4 11 6576 20.88 20.50 20.69+0.25 7.25 5.13 E00 .12 1.8 33 177 6.88 6.50 6.69+0.31 25.60 12.38AEdwLSd n -66.94 26.38 25.75 26.25+1.88 57.0024.25 Edwards .64 1.2 12 x6880 66.75 52.00 62.00-2.25 18.25 16.00 19386dF 1.45 8.1 q 39 17.81 17.75 17.81+0.06 19.88 8.50 Eircom .21 e 2.4 2390 8.88 8.50 8.69-0.06 62.00 30.31 ElPasEn .82 1.4 27 40067 60.50 57.63 58.25+0.27 28.00 16.75 ElPa&EPt 2.15 9.0 66 861 24M 23.81 23.88-0 .06 59.88 21.25 Elan cc 6129 59.00 57.75 58.31+019 84.25 20.13 Elan wtA 10 82.00 81.31 81.31+0 . 06 65.25 16.00AElan wt B 5 65.50 65.38 65.38+013 39.63 13.75 Elcor .20 1.2 11 1232 16.56 16.25 16.44-0. 1 3 8.25 0.56 ElclerTrst 1.20 147.6 dd 115 0.81 0.75 0.81 76.69 38.38 EDS .60 1.2 33 19404 50.50 49.50 49.81-0.38 107.94 67.00 ElfAquil 1.34 a 1.3 52 250 101.94 99.50 99.69-3.63 10.38 5.06 Becht 3 550 6.75 6.25 6.75+0.63 29+94 17.75 ElseLier .45 a 1.8 120 24.63 24.38 24 63-0 . 25 19.50 10.94 EAndinABBe 6.5 680 13.19 13.00 13 06-044 16.00 9.13 EAndlnB .9499.1 426 11.13 10.31 10 31-0 . 81 27.50 19.06 EBrAero n 3054 28.75 27.00 27 31-006 31.00 10.13 Embrab .27 a 1.2 5007 22.13 21.63 2188 13.13 10.13 EmMkFlt 1.59 12.3 q 62 13.06 12.88 14.94 10.81 EMInco1.65 11+8 q 46 14.00 13.75 13 . 94+0 . 19 12.44 EMInco2 1.65 130 q 478 12.75 12.38 12.69+0.31 13.88 8.00 EmgMkt .25e2.3 q 228 11.00 10.88 10.94 20.63 10.00 EMTel q87 14.06 13.94 13.94 70.38 40.50 EmmnEl 1.43 2.2 21 13116 67.06 66.19 66.19-0.13 26.19 18.94 EmpDist 1.28 4.9 21 182 26.00 25.75 25.94+0.13 14.38 10.31 EEIChile 602 10.69 10.63 10.69 4.13 1.31 Empica 2 483 1.75 1.69 1.75-0.06 8.50 3.56 Encal g 13 66 6.38 6.13 6.31+0.06 12.94 4.63 Encompss 6 1046 5.50 5.31 5.50+0.06 23.75 17.94 Endesa .58e30 16 840 19.81 19.56 19.63-0.31 46.19 38.38 Enel n 1.12e2.8 9 40.19 39.75 39.75-0.75 26.50 14.69 Energen 68 f 2.6 17 1403 26.13 25.50 25.94 24.19 14.81 Energur n 1533 19.94 19.75 19.75-0.19 25.88 17.94 EgyEast .88 3.9 11 3142 22.81 22.38 22.69+0.25 60.94 41.00 Engynth 1.40 2.3 59 103 60.00 59.63 59.88+0.06 25.06 17.00 Enersis 130 17.44 17.25 1725+0.06 17 .81 3.81 Enesco 1.12 17.2 6 348 6.69 6.38 6.50-0.06 20.88 12.56 EnglCp .40 2.1 11 1606 19.00 18.69 18.75+0.19 21+25 8.63 Enhance .24 1.5 29 707 15.75 15.50 15.75+0.31 9.63 6.69 EnisBu .62 7.9 8 102 8.00 7.88 7.88-0.13 90.75 34.88 Enron .50 0.6 66 22409 85.94 84.81 84.88 34.75 15.31 Enron02 1.56 4.5 421 34.44 34.06 34.38+0.56 41.25 14.88 ENSCO .10 0.3 cc A003 40.00 39.44 39.88+0.38 68.69 34.94 Entercm 1972 41.88 41.06 41.31+0.19 32.19 15.94 Entergy 1.20 3.9 12 7042 31.00 30.44 30.44-0.25 25.25 13.69 EntOil .38 a 1.6 32 20 23.63 23.63 23.63-0.25 25.50 17.00 EntPrPt 2.1 Of 8.2 10 295 25.63 24.88 25.56+0.44 16.25 10.00 EnterPT 1.76 16.2 7 1566 10.88 10.63 10.88+0.06 55.75 3.06 Entrade dd 1405 5.75 4.31 5.00+0.63 20.56 15.19 Entra n n 8737 19.88 19.31 19.81+0.25 139.01120.26 EnzoBlo cc 1997 60.81 56.63 60.00+3.36 19.25 11.13 EottEng 1+90 12.7 177 15.06 14.81 15.00+0.06 177.88 34.00 Epcos n 84 103.50 100.69 102.38+5.38 132.00 33.31 Equant dd 2544 38.88 37.69 38.44+0.75 31+00 19.88 Equifax .37 1.5 16 2901 25.88 25.00 25.44+0.25 59.75 32.25 EqtResc 1.18 2.1 21 864 56.50 56.13 56.31+0.25 2325 18.50 EqResCT

259 / C8 Day

1.84 8.2 393 22.38 22.06 22.38+0.25 9.25 6.13 EqtyInn 1.00 m 15.7 dd 610 6.50 6.38 6.38-0.13 31.44 20.81 Eq0ffPT 1.68 5.8 17 8128 29.25 28.88 28.88-0.44 1100 9.00 EqtyOne 1.04 10.3 8 29 10.25 10.06 10.13 51 19 38.13 EqtyRsd 3.24 f 6.8 18 3756 48.75 48.00 48.00 12.25 9.75 Equusll 5.65 e 6.2 q 95 10.56 10.50 10.50-0.06 20.13 HO Esco 4 86 18.44 18.06 18.44+0.13 19.50 15.06 EspirSan .64e3.3 380 19.50 19.31 19.50+0.13 52.00 29.06 EssexPT 2.20 4.5 18 402 49.31 49.13 49.19-0.06 55.88 37.25 EsteeLclr .20 0.5 34 3232 41.88 40.81 40.94-0.63 96.25 68.50 ELaudTrst 3.80 5.4 26 71.13 70.63 70.88+0.31 101.31 74 . 50 ELaucIT2 5.40 6.9 5 78.00 77.88 77.88-0.63 19.13 9.25 Esterline 10 2584 21.00 18.50 19.38+0.63 37.06 20.50 EthanAl .11 0.4 12 1632 27.44 26.81 26.94+0.19 5.50 1.88 Ethyl .19j 3 885 2.13 2.06 2.06 19.00 13.88 EuroFd 2.72e0.8 q 138 17.38 17.25 17.38+0.06 19.25 11.50 EurWtFd 3.35 a q 181 14.75 14.50 14.69+0.19 44.00 20.50 EverestRe .24 0.6 11 4812 42.75 40.25 40.25-1.31 15.56 13.88 Excelsr 1.01e6.6 q 6 15.25 15.25 15.25 17.50 6.31 ExideCp .08 0.9 dd 0908 9.38 UO 9.00-0.06 14.88 6.00 ExtStayA 24 9471 14.88 14.19 14.81+0.63 5.00 1.19 Extend g 4 1.88 1.75 1.88+0.19 86.56 69.88 ExxonMGb 1.76 2.2 23 37958 82.25 81.38 81.63+0.27 F 31.13 21.00 F&M Nat 1.00f 4.1 14 229 24.88 23.63 24.38+0.56 20.75 12.13 FBL Fn 36 2.4 9 100 14.81 14.75 14.75-0.06 54.63 29.13 FEMSA .54 a 1.2 2726 45.94 44.81 45.56+0.94 68.81 39.25AFMC 13 612 69.00 67.19 67.81+0.19 55.31 36.38 FPL Gp 2.16 4.0 12 6297 54.13 53.06 5338-0.13 4175 18.00 FactsetA s .12 0.4 47 304 34.50 33.56 34.19+0.50 21.38 14.31AFahnVin .32 1.5 6 31 21.44 21 25 21.25-0.13 55.63 26.25 Faidsc .04 0.1 23 343 46.19 45.75 45.94 8.38 3.63 FairchCp s dd 478 7.00 6.63 6.88 49.50 19.50 FairchldS 30 4828 41.06 38.75 39.75-0.88 14.25 6.88 FairfCmts 6 2417 8.00 7.81 8.00+0.19 13.44 8.19 FalconPd .16 1.6 70 12 9.75 9.75 9.75-0.06 23.44 14.00 FamDlr .22 1.2 18 12858 18.75 17.69 18.00+0.44 73.25 47.88 FanniMae 1.12 2.1 14 24033 54.38 53.75 53.75-0.25 6.13 3.13 Fanstel 6 105 4.25 4.06 4.06 43.75 26.00 FarmFH 6 4 30.13 30.13 30.13-0.13 47.94 30.56 FedExCp 17 6526 40.80 39.15 40.35+0.72 6.81 4.75 Fedders .12 2.3 9 401 5.19 5.00 5.19+0.13 6.00 4.44 Fedder&A .12 2.5 9 131 4.81 4.81 4.81 18.63 14.75 FdAgficA 24 9 17.88 17.88 17.88+0.25 23.63 13.13 FedAgric 22 61 17.19 16.88 16.88+0.13 46.19 8.94 FedMog .01 0.1 4 3233 10.69 10.19 10.31-0.06 24.00 16.38 FedRIty 1.80 9.0 15 319 20.63 20.00 20.00-0.44 22A 14.75 FedSigni 76 3.5 16 878 21.69 21.38 2156 + 0.19 53.88 21M FedrDS 8 12386 28.19 2T.00 27.63+0.50 27.13 2.50 FdDS MID 204 5.38 4.94 5.19+0.19 27.44 1025 Fedinvat a .15 0.6 21 3631 23.94 23.19 23.44+0.25 23.25 6.25 FelCor 2 .20 9.9 cc 1608 22.81 22.25 22.25-0.38 17.50 11.38 Ferrellgs 2.00 13.3 22 424 15.25 14.75 15.00-0.50 25.13 1731 Ferro .58 2.8 11 522 20.88 20.50 20.63 37.38 24.13 Fiat .58 a 2.3 31 24.88 24.69 24.69-0.50 13.81 10.38 FibrMrk 9 39 10.94 10.81 10.88+0.13 20.06 11.63 FidelFin .40 2.0 14 2521 20.06 19.19 19.94+0.50 14.38 6.19 FilaHold 83 9.69 9.50 9.50-0.19 23.88 16.13 RnFedl 14 200 21.31 21.00 21.25+0.25 24.19 19.75 FSA2097 1.84 7.9 118 23.25 23.00 23.22+0.22 23.30 19.38 FSA2098 1.74 8.0 28 22.00 21.813 21.88-0.13 44.63 6.31 Finova .72 10.4 3 6582 7.25 6.94 6.94-0.25 17.75 10.25 FstAmCp 24 1.5 24 1191 16.88 16.25 16.50 22.81 16.25 FtBcpPR .44 2.3 10 524 19.50 19.19 19.50+0.25 19.25 16.63 FBksAm 9 1 19.00 19.00 19.00-0.06 14.88 8 . 63 FstCwlth s .56 5.9 11 181 9.81 9.44 9.56-0.13 10.38 8.56 FCmwF .93 10.1 q 144 9.19 9.13 9.19 57.69 38.94 FstData .08 0.2 16 13867 48.25 47.06 47.06-0.25 9.50 7.00 FFinFd MeH q 221 9.19 9.13 9.19+0.06 32.13 23.25 FstlnRT 2.48 8.4 12 1176 30.13 29.63 29.690.38 19.13 12.13 FtIsH 1.87e2.6 q 33 19-06 19-00 19-06-0-06 7.00 3.56 FtPhil .

Day C8 / 260

1213 3.81 3.63 3.81+0.19 26.63 13.63 FstRepBk 11 311 24.94 24.63 24.81+0.31 36.31 15.94 FstTenn .88 4.0 12 3343 22.25 21.13 22.00+0.75 44.31 24.44 FstUC 1.92 6.7 824014 29.75 28.56 28.81+0.13 3.88 2.25 FUnRE a .62b23.1 dd 731 2.81 2.63 2.69-0.06 49.75 29.00 FtVaBk 1.48 3.5 15 653 43.69 41.88 42.75+0.81 22.63 17.76 FWART 1.95 9.7 14 27221.38 19.94 20.13-0.94 19.38 11.56 FstFed 9 285 18.00 17.44 18.00+0.25 29.50 16.38 Firstar .65 2.7 26 13431 24.25 23.19 23.88+0.56 29.13 18.00 FirstEngy 1.50 6.1 10 13730 24.75 23.88 24.75+0.81 51.00 17.56 FishrSci 30 356 22.25 21.88 21.94-0.31 44.06 26.13 Fleelftst 1.20 f 2.8 1628014 42.69 40 42.69+2.63 44 00 13.06 FItBost wt 418 40.50 37.81 40.25+2.63 25.94 24.81.FltCa pfK 2.20 8.6 367 25.63 24.58 25.50 23.13 12.13 FleetEn .76 5.6 13 2013 13.75 13.44 13.69+0.13 17.63 8.69 Flernng OB OS dd 717 15.50 15.31 15.44-0.06 4.94 2.50 FletFD 412 3.63 3.50 3.50 14.63 8.81 FletBld 1.06 e 11.2 4025 9.63 9.44 9.50-0.25 37.38 18.BBAFletEgy 1.14e3.0 7079 38.44 37.56 37.94+0.69 51.00 29.63 FlaEC .10 0.2 42 66 44.00 43.00 43.63-0.25 52.63 40.06 FlaProg 2.22 4.3 14 x9581 52.25 51.75 51.88-0.19 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Lost Chip 43.25 28.00 FlaRck .50f 1.3 12 159 38.69 37.69 38.44+0.81 23.25 1 1.69 Flowers .53 2.4 66 6866 22.06 21.50 21.75+0.25 18.88 10.56 Flowsem .56 3.0 40 1312 18.75 18.38 18.50 48.50 23.94 Fluor l.00 3.3 11 2230 29.94 29.44 29.94+0.63 39.38 20.75 Footstw 11 1689 30.63 29.00 29.75-1.13 30.00 25.WFordM n 7 211341125.63 23.81 2425-1.75 36.81 21.88 ForstCA 2007 18 44 35.32 35.00 35.00-0.20 38.31 25.00 ForstCB .2410.6 19 18 37.80 37.40 37.40-0.39 119.44 41.75 ForestLab 75 4441 99.25 97.00 97.88-0.13 19.00 7.19 Forest01 25 1506 15.69 15.25 15.31-0.19 1413 FtDear 1.04a7.8 q 122 13.38 13.25 13.31+0.06 36+50 16.44 Names .60 1.9 22 14954 32.25 31.50 32.06+0.03 7.94 6.75 Fortis50 .70 9.2 q 80 7.69 7.56 7.63 38.06 19.19 FortuneBr .92 3.6 13 2383 25.88 25.13 25.50+6+ 13.19 5.19 FostWh .24 3.4 26 1337 7.19 6.98 7.06 + 0.19 17+56 6.25FoundHS 15 4222 17.63 17.00 17.56 + 0 76.98 34.06 FourSH g .11 0.1 1576 75.75 72.50 75.75+325 34.75 19.50 Fox Ent cc 2791 29.31 28.94 28.94+0.13 17.63 1 1.88 France 4.53e q 119 13.88 13.56 13.81+0.06 209.94 76.25 FranceTel .94 a 0.8 244 115.31 112.00 11531-1.44 25.25 20.81 FranFin 2.12 9.4 8 1276 22.69 22. 22.50-0.06 11.19 6.38 FrankGov dd 385 6.81 6.63 6.69-0.19 12.38 2.69 FrkEPb 7 220 11.00 10.19 10.75-0.25 8.56 6.75 FrkMul .67 8.0 q 15 8.38 8.31 8.38-0.06 39.19 24M FrankRes.24 0.6 18 5587 38.44 37.25 38.00+0.81 8.81 6.31 FrkUnv .80 a 10.4 q 464 7.75 7.56 7.69+0.19 55.81 36.88 FredMac .68 1.6 13 20479 42.25 41.69 42.13+0.56 23.25 20.38 FredM13 1.67 7.5 39 22.50 22.31 22.31-0.25 18.7S 8.06 FMCG A - 29 589 9.56 8.63 9.50+0.88 21.44 8.19 FMCG - 1710360 9.94 8. 88 .811+0.94 11.13 2.69 Fremont .16m 5.0 dd 8258 3.19 I00 3.19+0.25 30.38 21.63 FresenM .21 a 0.7 387 29.19 M 81 2919+025 13.38 5.63 FDelMnt 10 288 5.94 5 .88 5.88-0.06 13.19 4.88 FGoldmn dd 2288 5.75 5.44 5.63+0.13 19.94 4.38 FriedBA dd 259 7.88 7.44 7.44-044 12.38 0.31 Fmtrine dd 2105 0.41 0.31 0.31 -0.06 9.13 4.88 FrontrOil 23 538 7.25 7.00 7.13+0 13 22+44 13.94 FumBrds 7 2543 16.25 15+94 16.13+0.19 G 11.06 6.50 G&L Rty .50 6.6 dd 4 7.56 7.56 7.56 42.31 28.38 GATX 1.20 2.9 13 912 40.75 39.56 40.69+1.00 35.75 12.50 OC Gos did 571 15.31 12.88 14.88+1.98 12.50 3.06 Glo Strait dd 201 4.50 4.31 4.31 -0.06 35.50 23.44 GPU 2.18 7.19 15462 31.25 30.63 30.63-0.31 28.81 14.19-GabolliA 11 965 30.38 28.00 30.13+2.06 11.06 8.94 GabCv .80 8.1 q 134 9.94 9.88 9.88-0.06 1 2.94 10.81 GabelliET 1.08 q 567 12.63 12.44 12.50+0.06 19.75 1 1.50 GabGloM 3.0 e

261 / C8 Day

0.2 q 138 14.50 14.06 14.31+0.19 8.69 7.31 GabUtil .60 7A 12 167 8.19 8.06 8.13+0.06 29.31 20.25 GablRsd 2.2718.2 252 27.75 27.50 27.75+0.D6 6.94 3.75 Gainsco .07 1.8 65 366 3.88 3.75 3.88+0.06 4.63 1.25 Galeyl- dd 76 4.44 4.25 4.44+0.13 48.50 16.50 Galileo Int .36 1.9 10 2216 19.13 18.56 18.63+0.63 50.00 23.13 Gallaghr 9 .92 1.9 27 625 49.63 47.94 49.00+0.88 29.25 12.75 Gallaher 1.52 a 7.1 325 21.50 21.13 21.38+0.25 83.63 52.25 Gannett .84 1.5 16 5941 57.38 56.06 56.50-0.38 53.7521. 19 20.75 11.00 GardDen 13 1358 15.38 14.44 14.75-0. 22.31 9.56 Gartner 50 2173 13.56 12.69 13.38+0.69 22.63 9.19 GartnrB 11 3389 11.50 10.94 11.25+0.25 84.00 41.63 Gateway a 45 13793 69.88 65.60 68.10+2.25 33.06 19.50 GaylrdEnt cc 2267 26.50 26.00 26.13-0.38 17.06 7.19 GenTek .20 1.3 7 111 15.38 16.13 15.25+0.13 12.38 6.63 GenCorp a .48 r 6.6 6 2485 7.38 7.13 7.31+0.25 245.00 66.88 Genentc old 6818 194.50 188.38 190.50 +3.13 18.81 12.63 GenerSA .15e 1.2 380 13.13 12.75 12.75+0.13 40.88 32.13 GAInv q 464 40.75 40.19 40.75+0.31 17.44 5.75 GnCable .20 2 .4 dd 2412 8.38 7.88 8.38+0.50 3.56 0.44 GnChem 35 322 1.06 1.00 1.06+0.06 15.44 2.25 GnData dd 8028 6.31 6.00 6.00+0.25 64.81 36.25 GenDyn 1.04 1.7 17 5120 64.25 62.88 62.94-0.88 60+50 37.13 GenElec a .55 0.9 50 117095 59.31 67.19 58.69+0.88 34.50 25.00 GnGrth 2.04 6.4 17 2372 32.56 32.13 32.13-0.38 44.00 29.38 GenMills s 1.10 3.4 16 6929 32.31 31.56 32.13+0.06 94.63 56.94 GnMotr 2.00 2.8 8 32783 73.94 71.94 72.63+0.25 47.00 16.25 GM H a 8.78e 29033 33.56 32.50 33.13+0.38 21.63 825 GenSerni 14 2450 15.25 14.56 14.56-0.25 18.00 8.25 Gensco 17 1054 16.25 15.75 16.19+0.50 13.81 08 GensisE 2.00 30.2 dd 470 6.63 6.31 6.63+0.31 20.00 6.88 GnRad 6 676 9.00 8.56 8.81-0.25 29.38 19.94 GenuPrt 1.10 5.3 9 4169 20.75 20.50 20.56 34.50 15.38 Gaon Co .50 2.9 4 2272 17.75 17.31 17.44+0.38 31 13 12.94 GaGulf .32 2.5 7 2976 13.38 13.00 13.000.19 51.94 24.50 GaPcGP .50 1.9 7 11007 26.94 26.00 26.75+0.75 32.00 20.75 GaPTimb 1.00 3.4 14 2044 29.50 29.19 29.31 52 .38 30.38 GaPac un 3.75 11.6 678 32.75 32.06 32.44+0.6 23.00 19.38 GaPw 39 1.66 7.6 15 22.25 21.81 21.810.25 22+75 19.56 Ga .38 1.65 7.5 268 22.13 21.75 22.00+0.06 23.00 18.88 GaPw47 1.72 7.9 44 21.75 21.63 21.75-0.13 6.00 3.75 GerbChw 8135 575 5.50 5.75+0.19 23.25 8.75 GerbSc .32 3.3 15 954 9.81 9.50 9.75+0.50 15.63 7.25 Gerdau a .53e3.9 1117 13.88 13.69 13+69-0.06 17.00 12.75 GerFd 1.50 e 3.5 q 177 14.44 14.13 14.38-0.06 16.50 11.06 GerNew 1.49 e 0.9 q 435 13.56 13.38 13.38 14.19 9.81 GettyRity .60 5.1 2434 11.75 11.56 11.75+0.19 12.25 6.63 Giantin 15 49 6.88 6.75 6.75-0.19 44.81 14.50 Gildan 377 43.94 42.94 42.941.00 48.38 28.19 Gillette .65 2.2 26 29908 31.00 29.94 30.06-1.25 3.31 1.38 Glamis dd 4516 1.69 1.56 1.63+0.06 16.50 9.81 Glaffelter .70 6.7 10 476 10.63 10.25 10.50+0.19 64.44 45.25 GlaxoWel 1.27e2.2 34 3079 57.94 57.31 57.56+0.44 19.98 11.66 GlenRT 1.68 9.0 43 709 18.63 17.69 18.63+0.75 16.13 11.94 GlirnchRt 1.92 12.5 17 234 15.56 15.25 16.38+0.13 13.56 9.63 GlobHi 1.66 12.5 q 430 13.38 13.25 13.25-0.06 33.25 13.38 GlobM 87 7998 32.56 31.88 32.31+0-50 12.00 9.63 GlobPart 1.42 12.2 q 71 11.69 11.63 11.63 5.56 3.38 GblbTAp s 1.35 a 24.8 8 2 5.44 5.31 5.44 36.50 7.69 GiblTele dd 23601 9.19 8.56 8.63 6.00 2.44 GlobVac dd 1 -5 325 325-006 8.19 4.25 GoldcpA g 43 7.06 6.88 7.00 10.25 5.13 GoldepB g 17 8.00 7.88 7.88 22.25 12.25 GoldStBc .10p 8 3037 20.38 19.81 20.13+0.25 49.94 26.98 GoldWF s.21 0.4 16 6114 48.13 47.31 47.63+0.44 12HO 57.44-GoldmanS .48 0.4 21 13836 12925 123.88 128.06 +4.38 6.50 1.00 GoodrPet dd 14 5.i5 5.69 5.69+0.06 43.13 21.00 Goodrch 1.10 2.7 27 x7450 41.25 40.00 40.81+1.06 58.25 19.56 Goodyear 1.20 5.1 14 14626 23.94 22.38 23.38+044 9.25 4.25 Gotchk 12 598 6.81 6.38 6.63+0.25 19.81 7.75 Grace

Day C8 / 262

4 8167 8.19 7.81 7.94 36.19 28.44 Greco .56 1.6 12 191 35.44 34.69 35.44+0.69 56.U 28.60 Graingir .68 2.4 16 6230 30.44 28.63 28.88-1.88 28.50 16.75 GraniteC .40 1.8 11 652 23.50 22.75 22.75-0.63 26.25 13.13 Grantor n 2345 23.69 23.19 23.50-0.13 8.76 1.25 GraphPk 9 dd 388 2.00 1.88 2.00+0.06 1 8.75 9.75 GrayCom .08 0.7 dd 37 1 1 25 11.25 11.25 1 5.25 9.50 GrayCmB .08 0.8 3 16 10.19 10.00 10.19+0.06 22.63 14.94 GrAmFncl .10 0.6 20 27 17.94 17.94 17.94 3T44 13.38 GtAtloc .40 2.9 14 2524 14.25 13.94 14.00+0.06 25.75 20.00 GtAPc39 2.34 10.0 36 23.50 2319 23.38+0.06 42.00 26.50 GtLkCh .32 0.9 14 2467 33.94 32.31 33.75+1.06 1925 13.63 GtLkRE 1.44 7.5 13 517 19.19 18.69 19.19+0.31 61.88 49.38 GNIron 5.80 a 11.5 8 5 50.50 50.50 50.50-0.13 10.50 6.63 GtChina q228 9.88 9.50 9.63 0.25 13.00 6.56 GMP .55 6.9 dd 60 8.00 7.88 8.00 1138 7 00 Greentor .36 4.4 846 8.63 8.25 8.25-0.38 k69 15.00 GreenptFn 100 3.8 10 2297 26.63 26.13 26.13-0.06 863 5.13 Griffon 9 1846 8.00 7.69 7.75+0.13 22.38 9.50 Groupl 6 217 10.69 11.00+0.06 14.94 1.75 Groups 605 14.88 14.25 14.88+0.63 7.00 4.56 GrubbEl 8 147 6.13 6.06 6.13+0.06 11.00 3.25 GCSaba 5 10.25 10.25 10.25 14.50 4.38 GEIektra .11 a 1.1 14 1625 10.38 9.75 10.06+0.38 17.75 9.88 Gpolmsa .32 a 3.1 655 10.50 10.25 10 +0.13 13.56 6.63 GDurang 35 8.63 8.50 8.50-0.25 10.06 5.13 GlAaseca .19 a 3.6 89 5.25 5.13 5.25+0.13 26.50 9.00 Gpolusaell 2651 13.13 12.25 12.75+.63 14.118 3.69 GpoRadio .23 a 2.5 18 180 9.06 8.81 9.06+0.25 87.00 33.56 GTelevsa 07 0.1 3793 65.94 64.69 64.75+0.06 8.13 GTHbasa 9 66 1.00 0.94 0.94-0.13 26.00 17.06 Gtach 7 4512 18.13 17.75 17.88+0.06 769 3.88 GuangRy 72 a 10.9 410 6.63 6.50 6.63+0.38 121.50 72.94 Gucci .45 0.4 32 337 104.38 102.81 102.810.69 33.00 10.38 Guess 15 4142 23.13 21.63 22.69+0.69 20.25 13.06 GuestSply 14 86 18.63 17.75 18.63 75.38 41.00 Guidant 48 151125 67.66 65.00 67.19+1.94 9.75 2.56 Guilford .22j 13 1496 3.50 2.88 3.50+0.19 5.69 3.06 GlfCda g 5136 5.63 5.44 5.56 11.25 6.60 GulfIncloR 13 1247 10.06 8.8 10.00 +0.19 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last VN H 41.00 15.13 H&Q Hit 4.47 a 5.9 q 430 36.25 35.00 36.00+1.00 45.60 13.31 H&O Lie 2.90 9 5.6 q 408 31.94 30.56 31.94-M.44 12.69 4.38 HA-LO dd 2845 5.19 4.94 5.00 35.81 18.75 HCA HIth .08 0.2 73 15727 34.75 33.50 34.50+0M 22.94 8.00 HCC In .20 0.9 41 756 21.19 20.94 21.13-0.06 11.88 6.11 HRPT Prp .80 m 117 11 4124 6.88 6.81 6.81 - 34.50 12.38 HIS Rsc 18 313 31.94 31.19 31.69+0.31 40.63 21.50 HSB Gp 1.76 4.4 17 2300 40.00 39.81 39.94+0.06 74.25 63.13 HSBC 1.98 a 2.7 767 72.44 71.75 72.44+0.44 29.25 17.38 Hasmon 35 234 25.25 24.63 25.19 0.50 54.75 32.31 HaJlibtn .500.9 5019924 53.81 51.94 53.000.04 4.94 2.00AHancFab .10 2.0 10 604 5.00 4.75 5.00+0.19 11.75 9.13 HanPtGIb .97 8.4 q 105 11.56 11.50 11.50 11.69 9.50 HanPtPfd .86 8.0 q 11 10.69 10.69 10.69 9.25 7.06 HanPO-65 7.8 q 56 8.38 8.25 8.38+0.13 11.06 8.38 HanPtDv2 .78 7.8 q 161 10.13 10.00 10.00 13.88 11.25 HanPtSel 1.08 8.5 q 45 12.75 12.69 12.75+0.06 9.75 6.00 HancBT .70 9.5 q 3385 7.44 7.25 7.38+0.13 14.00 12.31 HanJS 1.06 7.6 q 95 13.94 13.81 13.88+0.06 18.25 16.13 Hardl 1.40 7.7 q 112 18.25 18.13 18.19+0.06 17.00 8.50 HandIm 9 1006 12.38 12.00 12.38+0.13 15.50 3.25 HangrOrth 88 691 3.50 3.44 3.50 -13.94 7.69 Hanna .50 6.0 dd 18275 8.88 8.31 8.31-0.31 40.69 14.00 HanovC a 42 1136 32.19 31.13 31.75+0.69 44.25 26.63 Hanson 1. 19 a 4.0 7 263 29.63 29.13 29.44-0.63 62+50 32.63 HarcGn .84b 1.4 24 1763 60.13 5B.88 59.31+0.31 2038 11.88 Hadnd .30 2.1 9 264 14.63 14.19 14.63+0.38 49.50 22.50AHwleyD s.10 f 0.2 50 8449 50.50

263 / C8 Day

48.44 49.88+1.00 78.25 36.75 Harman .20 0.3 19 2114 77.19 76.50 76.75 -0.38 30.75 17.00 HaffahE 17 4252 28.63 28.13 28.38+0.13 39.38 17.88 Harris .20 b 0.7 cc 2738 30.88 29.94 30.06+0.13 31.88 24.00 Harsco .94 3.4 11 650 28.25 27.25 27.81+0.19 26.75 19.06 HarteHnk.08 03 23 540 25.63 25.13 25.13-0.19 69.50 29.38 HartfdFn .96 1.4 17 8723 6775 65.69 66.63+0.69 4.50 2.13 Hartmx 11 518 3.06 2.88 3.00+0.13 26.38 10.19 Hasbro .24 1.9 158886 12.38 11.69 12.31+0.31 13.31 11.63 HattSe q 70 13.25 13.13 13.25+0.13 16.88 7.75 Haverty s .20 1.7 9 100 11.56 11.31 11.56+0.25 37.69 27.69 HawEl 2.48 7.6 10 816 32.94 32.19 a2.75+0.50 00 3.81 HavkCp 12 28 7.94 7.75 7.94+0.19 28.75 11.69 HayeaL 6 220 13.56 12.88 12.88-0.56 29.75 21.69 HlthCP 2.96 fl 1.2 12 652 26.75 26.13 26.50+0.13 20.88 13.81 HlthCr 2.34 13.0 9 555 18.19 17.88 18.06+0.06 25 16660 16.44 15.63 16.38+0.63 20.38 14.50 HltcRTY 2.24 111.3 10 870 20.06 19.56 19.75+0.06 8.00 1.63 HlthpIn5v dd 2396 4.00 3.19 3.63+0.38 9.00 4.56 Hltheth 68 9206 6.25 6.00 6.13-0.06 29.25 18.69 HrstArT 51 430 21.63 21.13 21.63+0.50 3.38 075 HeclaM dd 4363 0.94 0.81 0.88 20.98 11.19 Helco .05 b 0.3 16 311 16.44 15.44 15.50-1.38 20.00 9.88 Helco A .05 b 0.4 13 134 13.56 12.50 12.69-0.94 48.25 30.81 Heinz 1.47 3.9 16 6123 38.63 37.75 38.13-0+38 1538 8.81 HelInTel .28e3.0 5782 9.38 9.13 9.25+0+19 26.50 16.50 HellrFn .40 1.6 8 1838 25.81 24.88 24.88-0.38 38.50 1838 HelmPayn .30 t 0.8 33 1931 37.44 36.13 36.94+0.13 34.19 11.75 Hercule .32 rn 2.4 11 6915 13.88 13.25 13.25-0.13 23.00 16.50 HeritPpne 2.25 10.8 27 28 21.00 20.56 20.81 55.81 37.75 Hershey 1.12 f 2.6 20 3461 43.13 42.25 42.69-0.44 51.75 26.63 Hertz .20 0.7 9 600 31.00 30.63 30.63-0.25 136.19 52.25 HewlettP s .64 b 0.5 35 30650 121.50 119.56 121.00+1.06 14.75 4.75 Hexcel 43 969 13.94 13.63 13.81+0.06 14.31 8.75 Hibern .48 3.8 10 2496 12.81 12.56 12.56-0.19 9.63 8.25 HiIncoOp q 1463 9.25 9.13 9.19 .1. 6.94 5.00 HiYld .60 10.5 q 180 5.69 5.63 5.69-10.06 7.63 5.88 HiYdPl .87 a 13.1 q 113 6.63 6.56 6.63 10.63 6.75 Highins dd 5 9.00 8.94 8.94-0.06 27.19 20.13 HighwdP 2.28 f 9.5 16 3338 24.38 24.06 24.06-0.31 42.13 23.75 HilbRog .68 1.7 27 296 40+06 39.94 40.00 38.38 26.13 Hillenbd .80 2.3 19 499 35.56 34.75 34.81-0.06 12.50 6.38 Hilton .08 0.8 14 9305 10.13 9.88 10.00+0.06 67.50 24.88 HispBrd a 72 2641 26.38 24.75 25.690.69 164.50 95.00 Hitachi .57e0.5 31 358 121.44 118+50 120.44 - 1.56 17.06 9.69 Hollinger .55 3.4 56 1030 16.63 16.38 16.38-0.13 70.00 39.38 HomeLp 5.16 0.3 43 85152 49.38 48.00 48.31 31.75 24.81 HmePrp 2.12 7.1 22 465 29.69 29.00 29.69+U9 4.63 1.44 Homebase 39 1434 2.63 2.31 2.31-0.13 11.00 5.25 Hmstke .05 U dd 218M 5.75 5.50 5.56+0.13 27.88 15.56 Hon Ind .38 1.4 16 625 27.50 26.94 26.94 90.75 64.50 Honda .44 a 0.6 244 72.81 72.D6 72.50+2.25 65.81 32.13 HonwlIntnl .75 1.9 19 W9 39.94 38.56 39.00-0.50 31.94 12.00 HorMan .60 13.9 16 x512 15.38 15.13 15.25-0.13 23.13 13.63 Hormel a .35 2.3 13 1198 15.63 15.38 15.44 -26 17.94 HospPT 2.76 11.9 11 1075 23.50 23.13 23.25-0.38 11.75 7.38 HostMarr .84 7.9 14 1746 10.75 10.69 10.69-0+06 51.81 34.88 HoughtM .52 f 1.1 291552 49 . 31 48.63 49.19-0.13 50.44 29.50 Hoshint .76 .6 14 3110 48.19 47.75 48.00 26.00 14.50 HoustEx 16 450 25.88 25.00 25.88+0.38 11.88 5.31 HowlCp .16 1.4 16 130 A.69 11.50 11.69+0.06 17.63 6.56 HuanPw .43 a 2+7 13 2588 16.50 16.06 16.19+0.38 40.00 21.75 HubbelA 1.32 15.3 11 35 28 19 24.88 25.06+0.06 39.19 21.63 HubbelB 1.32 f 5.1 12 770 26.00 25.50 25.88+0.38 32.88 18.00 Hucl&mUtd 1.00 b 4.0 50 1594 25.75 24.94 25.19 13.69 3.60 Huffy dd 2775 11.63 10.81 11.06+0.19 24.38 14.88 HughSup .34 1.6 7 1336 21.45 20.85 21.30+0.40 13.38 7.50 HugotnR 1.10 e 8.6 - 591 13.00 12.63 12.81 -.0.38 10.00 4.75 Humana dd 8654 9.06 8.56 8.56 11.13 6.63 HuntCorp

Day C8 / 264

.41 4.6 18 32 9.00 8.88 9.0070+13 6.00 1.38 Huntco dd 44 2.13 2.00 2.00 1475 206 HtgLfSci a dd 307 2.81 2.50 2.81+0.25 200 075 Huntway 6 187 0.94 0.88 0.94 5.13 3.44 Huttig n 7 584 4.56 4.44 4.56+0.6 18 . 63 731 Hyprcm cc 394 11.81 11.31 11.31-0.50 8.63 7.94 HypT02 .32 3.8 q 103 8.44 8.44 8.44 B. 7. Hyp2005 .43 5.2 q 53 8.38 8.25 8.25-0.06 B. 7.13 HypmTR .87 10.2 q 518 8.50 8.44 8.50+0.06 I 25.56 11.00 IBP .10 0.6 6 5814 16.31 15.81 16.06-0.13 18.75 10.63 ICICI Bk n 988 11.75 11.00 11.50-0.38 46.00 10.63 ICICI n .63 a 4.4 3513 14.25 14.13 14.19-0.06 35.81 16.56 ICN Phrm .29 1.0 18 1390 28.94 28.25 28.31+0.06 24.81 21.00 IES Ut25 1.97 8.3 5 23.88 23.88 23.811+0.25 23.75 13.63 IHOP Cp 12 900 19.63 18.94 19.63+0.69 19.38 12.63 IMC Glo .32 2.2 dd 1497 15.00 14.69 14.690.19 1-1 1-1 .24 3.0 9 244 8.00 7.25 8.00+0.63 29.88 14.25 IMS Filth .08 b 0.4 2031178 19.63 18.81 18.88+0.13 69.94 46.81 ING 1.65 a 2.4 20 x 1181 67.50 66.75 67.44+0.13 35.44 22.00 IRSA .76 r 3.1 175 24.50 24.31 24.50+0.19 9.81 7.19 RT .94 10.7 10 381 8.94 8.81 8.81 +11.06 36.25 16.00 IStar 2.40 11.5 30 366 21.38 20.75 20.94 0.31 12.25 4.13 IT Gp 4 1430 4.88 4.38 4.38 -0.38 24.00 10.75 ITT Ed 24 1395 23.50 22.50 23.004056 36.25 22.38 ITT Inds .60 1.8 12 5133 33.88 32.38 33.63+0.81 53.00 25.94 Idacorp 1.86 4.7 13 880 39.81 38.94 39.44+0.63 3475 22.75 IDEX .56 1.8 15 415 30.38 30.00 3038+0.06 1244 3.86 IkonOffSol .16 3.2 25 7824 5.13 4.50 5.00+0.38 80.63 51.06 ITW .80f 1.4 19 3198 56.94 56.06 56.06-0.44 34.25 20.69 Imation - 14 450 22.94 22.25 22.250.44 31.60 13.50 IhmprBc. 2.12 It 11 IM 21.75 20.60 21.75+1.19 46.63 27.13.10 8 555 27.31 27.00 27.31+0.06 24.69 11.75 ImpTob 1.00 a 5.6 59 17.88 17.75 17.81-0.38 25.13 14.13 INCO - 14 4323 17.94 17.56 17.88+0.38 9.94 9.50 IncOp2000 .50 5.1 q 221 9.88 9.88 9.88 21.44 10.60 IndiaFd q 2033 13.94 13.63 13.88+0.31 21.00 9.00 IndiaG q 479 12.06 11.94 11.94 24.69 20.38 IndiM26 2.00 8.3 12 24.26 23.88 24.00-0.13 24.00 18.88 IndiM38 1.90 8.3 35 23.00 22.63 22.88-0.13 6.31 3.00. Indones q 63 3.13 2.88 3.13+0.06 24.88 9.0 IndoSats .38 a 4.2 8% 9.13 8.94 9.00-0.06 12.13 6.06 IndoTel As 1.8 914 7.19 7.00 7.13 4.94 2.25 IndlDist dd 71 2.8B 2.75 2.88+0.13 11.25 6.50 IndBach .32 e 3.7 7 8.75 8.69 8.69-0.44 17.88 8.38 IndNatuz 26 a 2.6 9 1830 9.94 9.75 9.94+0.06 18.25 10.w Indymac 9 1880 17.25 16.69 16.88-0.13 88.25 48.50 Infineon n 2323 66.63 65.25 65.94-1.00 41.50 26.00 Infinitylill 100 2M 39.31 37.66 37.88-1.63 33.69 9.56 Infonet n 3435 13.56 12.75 13.06+0.31 46.00 17.13 InfoHold 85 380 32.13 31.63 32.13+0.25 64.88 34.13 IngerRd .68 1.5 12 11880 46.38 44.56 45.56+1.00 27.06 10.00 IngrmM 10 5557 15.69 15.00 15.00-0.50 10.88 7.63 Innkeepr 1.12 10.8 69 351 10.38 10.25 10.38 -10.00 4.25 InputOut dd 981 9.19 8.56 9.00-0.19 16.63 7.25 InsigFn 21 60 9.56 9.31 9.44-0.13 9.63 3.94 Insteel .24 4.9 7 37 4.94 4.81 4.94 12.88 11.31 InsMuni .77 6.1 q 220 12.56 12.44 12.56+0.19 15.88 4.25 IntegES 11 427 775 7.56 7.69+0.06 9.63 3.81 IntlCer 40 7.75 7.56 7.75+0.25 27.81 14.00 IntAlu 1.20 6.6 63 1 18.31 18.31 18.31 137.69 89.75 IBM .52 0.4 34 53NO 134.19 131.63 132.06+1.75 42.56 25.38 IntFlav 1.52 5.9 15 6350 26.31 25.75 25.75-0.25 30.31 16.19 IntGame 16 1842 29.13 28.50 29.00+0.25 23.38 9.81 IntMult .80 4.9 23 222 16.69 16.19 16.31-0.38 60.00 29.56 IntPap 1.00 3.1 15 23965 32.31 31.50 32.13+0.63 24.69 20.50 IntPap38 1.97 8.4 374 23.50 23.31 23.44 65.50 14.69 IntRect 51 27611 63.44 61.50 62.94+0.50 13.50 7.00 IntShip .25 3.5 7 11 7.25 7.13 7.19+0.19 10.25 5.19 IntSpcIty 6 235 5.81 5.75 5.75 13.63 5.25 Interpool .15 1.2 12 149 12.25 11.81 12.06+0.06 58.38 35.25 IntpubGp .38 f 1.0 36 6325 39.19 37.81 38.25+0.13 24.50 11.31 IntstBak .28 a

265 / C8 Day

1.6 1 1 2354 17.94 17.56 17.94+0.31 19.50 8.56 Intertan 17 374 1 3.88 13.63 13.8B+0.25 31.38 10.25 IntPoly .16 1.0 135 16.38 16.06 16.06-0.25 23.98 14.00 Intimate s 28 1.7 17 9229 16.69 16.06 16.13-0.98 21.06 12.50 Intrawt g .16 32 19.50 19.44 19.44 29.63 17.44 Invacare .05 0.2 18 603 26.94 26.31 26.94+0.56 20+69 13.31 InvesGHS 2.41 e 12.2 q 728 19.88 19.31 19.81+0.38 14.56 12.63 InvGrMu .90 6.3 21 251 14.38 14.19 14.19 52.69 17.81 IrwTech 919 50.38 47.06 48.00-2.44 6.38 2.88 Iomega 32 49400 4.44 4.00 4.13+0.25 37.6920.63 Ionics 28 407 29.81 28.75 29.81+0.44 23.56 15.63 Ipalco .65 2.8 11 940 23.47 23.19 23.31+0.06 22+88 9.50 Ipsco g .50 4.4 26 11.38 10.98 11.38+0.38 16.00 13.19 Irishin 1.73e 0.9 q 64 14.63 14.56 14.56-0.06 36.81 27.75 IronMtn n dd 789 34.31 33.75 34.13+0.31 18.38 6.38 IsptInt .15 e 2.3 5 938 6.63 6.44 6.56+0.06 21.75 11.88 Italy 4.20 el.4 q4 18.50 18.50 18.50. 16.88 5.13 IvexPkq 5142 11.06 10.19 11.00+0.7 5.25 1.94 Alexandr cc 4 3.44 3.44 3.44-0.13 J 21.00 8.00 JDN Rty 1.20 11.8 7 837 10.50 10.19 10.19-0.06 18.38 6.63 JLG .04 0.3 9 1755 11.88 11.50 11.56-0+44 11.69 4.50 JLK Dir 10 52 7.00 6.88 7.00+0+13 19.50 15.31 JP Rity 1.92 10.8 12 145 17.94 17.75 17.75-0.19 63.94 a 93 1202 64.00 58.98 63.76+4.60 27.63 18.19 JackInBox 11 2033 22.44 22.00 22.06-0.38 21.60 7.75 Jackpot 13 664 10.44 9.63 10.44+0.76 3856 26 . 19 Jacobs 21 619 38.38 37.31 38.00+1.19 11 19 6.75 JapnEq q 375 7.63 7.25 7.63+0.25 14.94 8.00 JpOTC q 472 9.44 9.31 9.44+0.13 9.13 6.00 JardFlCh .04 a 0.5 q 218 8.50 8.38 8.38-0.13 17.50 8.06 JF India q425 12.06 11.88 11.88-0.13 31.00 18.50 Jefferies .20 0.7 14 3805 30.94 30.06 30.44-0.56 79.63 49.88 JetfPilot 1.48 2.2 14 2850 66.50 64.00 66.19+1.06 3426 16.69 JSmrfG .64 a 3.1 76 20.50 19.38 20.50+1.26 13.38 5.38 JilinCh .120.7 4 12 7.25 7.19 7.26+0.25 14.88 6.63vJoAnnSt A 6 52 6.56 6.56 6.560.06 13.00 6.00 JoAnnSt B 6 51 7.13 7.13 7.13 24.75 13.WJHFnSrv n 2V39 25.38 23.81 25.25+11.38 45.38 33.50-JNuvean 1.2B f 2.8 15 214 46.63 45.31 45.38+0.06 14.81 7.44 JohnsMnv.24 1.9 8 1177 12.63 12.50 12.50+0.06 106.88 66.13 JohnJn 1.28 1.4 34 23254 93.88 91.63 91.94-0.56 71.44 46.88 JohnsnGtrl 1.12 2.1 11 3310 54.19 52.06 53.44+0.69 33 . 00 20 . 13 JonesApp 13 3064 24.88 24.38 24.50+0.44 16.69 9.19 JonesLL dd 23 14.56 14.44 14.56+0.13 19+38 11.44 JmlReg 16 107 16.75 16.50 16.50-0.44 K 11 94 6.19 K2Inc 23 221 11.19 11.00 11.06-0.06 2.38 0.50 AKCS 3 3300 1.81 1.44 1.81+0.44 30.19 16.75 KLM n ... 423 25.75 25.38 25.38-0.63 13.69 6.56 Kmart dd 23243 7.13 7.00 7.13+0.06 52.50 27.00 KN En0l 3.55 7.0 290 50.63 50.13 50.56+0.19 71.75 21.63 KPN a .50 a 1.8 920 27.06 26.27.06+0.94 41.75 15.69 KV Ph B 33 197 40.50 38.00 40.38+2.31 27.83 10.46 KVPh B 8 27.38 27.38 27.38 41.75 15.13 KY Ph A 32 1605 40.75 37.7S 39.75+11.81 27.83 10.08 KVPh A wi 82 27.50 26.75 27.50 9.00 2.94 KaisAl 20 656 5.69 5.50 5.69+0.06 30.50 22.00 KanPipLP 2.80 10.3 10 174 27.25 26.63 27.06-0.13 6.94 3.81 Kaneb 3 852 4.56 4.44 4.50 29.00 20.81 KtyPL 1.66 6.2 17 1541 27.06 26.88 26.88-0.06 9.13 5.13AKC Sou n 4057 9.25 8.94 9.25+0.31 14.31 7.63 KatyInd .30 3.0 11 4 9.94 9.88 9.88+0.06 25.56 16.76 KaufBH .30 1.2 8 4263 25.00 23.50 24.81 +1.31 31.81 19.94 Kaydon .44 2.0 15 554 22.50 22.06 22.06-0.06 45.44 21.75AKeebler .45 1.0 2512463 46.00 45.38 45.81+0.56 107.50 6.38 s Al 0.1 68 4661 76.94 70.63 76.94+2.94 Continued on Next Page

Day C9 / 266

THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 C9 NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE CONSOLIDATED TRADING/THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Ytd Sales High LOW Stock DIV % P/E 1009 High Low Last Chg 409420.75 Kellogg 1.01 f 4.4 25 4098 2363 2306 2319+0.06 24.56 13.75 Kellwood .64 4. 0 6 x1285 16.31 15.94 16.00 VA X 32S Kemal 9 18 21497 32.00 29.7S 30.00-1.5O 900 725 KmpHi .97 11.8 q 589 8.44 825 825-0.19 16.94 6.13 KmpIGv .54 8.4 q 306 6.50 E44 8.44 A 25 7.69 KmpMl .93 a 10.8 q 216 8.69 8.56 8.63 12.25 9.44 KmpMu .82 6.9 q 245 11.94 11.75 11.81 0.6 1688 12.13 KmpSInc 1.56 m 10.7 q 29 14.69 14.44 14.56+0.13 11 44 9.38 KmpStr .75a6.8 q 70 11.13 11.00 11.06 33.88 19.13 Kennmtl .68 2.7 15 943 25.63 24.75 25.63+0.88 148.69 21.75 Kole a 31 841 46.13 44.06 44.06-1.94 .42.00 15 .75 KentEl 34 4539 29. 25 28.19 29.25+0.31 5.50 22.63 KyPwr25 2.18 8.7 18 25.00 24.88 25.00+0.13 67.94 39.88 KwrMc 1.80 2.8 12 4941 63.69 62.25 63.19+1.00 1 81 3081 KerrM04 .83 3.4 291 54.44 53.75 53.75-0.56 113 5 56 Key3 Md n 5644 7.75 7.13 7.56+0.44 12.25 3 88 KeyEng dd 3201 10.50 10.06 10.38+0.31 .94 6.75 Keyprd 15 1168 1 8.44 17.94 18.00-0.25 .50 15.56 Keycorp 1.12 5.5 8 13736 20.56 19.69 20.19+0.56 00 20.19 Keyspan 1.78 5.2 16 4690 34.63 34.13 34.44-0.25 769 2.63 KeyCon dd 34 3.63 3.63 3.63 27.25 18.00 KilroyR 1.80 7.2 16 649 2438 24 . 63 24.88-0.06 056 42.00 KimbClk 1.08 1.8 18 10901 59.44 58.00 58.50+0.63 2.88 30.88 Kimco 2.72 f 6.7 15 1631 41.00 40.25 40.63+0.25 45.63 36.38 KindME 3.40 f 8.1 16 1288 42.75 42.00 42.19+0 . 06 9.13 17.13 KindMorg .20 0.5 16 7079 37.00 36.69 36.81-0.13 7.25 13.36 KngPh 9 76 17113 37.50 32.00 33.50-2.63 1.75 0.56 Kinross g 4710 0.69 0.63 0.63-0.06 4.63 16.50 Kirby 20 141 23.56 23.19 23.56+0.06 65.00 44.19 KnightR .92 1.7 11 3480 55.69 54.50 54.63-0.75 19.19 14.25 KogerEq 1.40 8.2 15 234 17.31 17.00 17.13-0.25 6650 30.75 KoWs a 6524556 58.38 55.38 56.19-1.38 6.69 4.00 Konover .50 11.9 dd 120 4.25 4.06 4.19+0.06 22.50 16.00 Koor .70 a 3.3 dd 80 21.13 20.88 21.13+0.25 75 11.75 KoreaElc .27 a 1.6 1021 16.94 16.56 16.98+0.13 .38 3.00 KoreaEqt q 24 3.63 3.56 3.56-0.06 17.81 11.13 Korea q 1341 12.94 12.63 12.94 179.88 30.69 KoreaTel A a 0.5 3491 38.81 37.63 37.88-0.88 9.00 5.56 Korealw q 267 6.31 6.19 6.25-0.19 44.13 16.25 KornFer 37 249 30.69 30.25 30.44+0.19 10.75 9.25 Kramont n 1.30 13.1 127 10.00 9.81 9.94+0.06 26.94 14.06 Kroger 43 36873 23.00 22.00 22.69+0.44 .86.50 57.00 Kubota 1.13e 1.7 27 1 66.50 66.50 66.50-1.50 -28094 66.13 Kyocera .57 a 0.3 304 182.94 179.75 181.88 +3.50 L 65.13 34.25 L-3 Com 30 3163 60.00 58.38 59.13+0.19 10.38 6.44 LANChil As 2.2 10 19 7.25 7.13 7.25-0.06 24.63 15.25 LG&E 1.27 5.2 19 1084 24.63 24.50 24.56+0.06 3.88 0.75 LLE Ry .42eI12 8 x230 3.75 3.56 3.75+0.13 21.81 16.50 LNR Rr.05 0.2 8 357 21.50 21.25 21.25-0.13 90.38 21.63 LSI Log a 3956166 37.63 35.75 35.75-0 . 56 12.06 3.50 LTC Prp 1.16 28.6 9 1398 4.25 4.00 4.06-0. 13 6.19 1.69 LTV .12 6.6 dd 4947 1.88 1.75 1.81-0.06 23.63 13.50 LaZBoy .36 f 2.2 10 516 16.38 15.63 16.06 17.13 3.75 LabrRdy 14 1139 3.88 3.75 8.88+0.13 116.00 22.50ALabCp a 58 2774 121.75 11513 118.31 +3.00 34.38 9.06 L&Bmch 21 5903 33.50 30.06 30.13-2.13 23.44 17.50 LaclGas 1.34 6.2 16 117 21.56 21.50 21.56-0.13 V.69 18.81 Lafarge .60 2.5 6 1702 24.88 24.25 24.38+0.06 775 0.31 Laidla .07j dd 2713 0.38 0.31 0.34+0.03 45.38 32.00 LakehdP 3.50 8.9 18 368 39.88 38.75 39.25-0.50 26.25 4.31 LamSes 10 1866

267 / C9 Day

21.00 19.50 19.76-1.00 26.56 15.56 LandAmer .20 0.8 14 264 25.81 24.56 25.44+0.81 10.19 6.06 Landrys .10 1.3 dd 434 8.00 7.88 7.88-0.06 83.50 24.56 LandsE 11 3040 24.75 23.75 24.44-0.50 6.50 0.44 LanierW n cc 5289 1.06 0.94 1.00 15.13 10.81 LaSalleH 1.54 f 10.7 20 110 14.38 14.19 14.38+0.06 19.38 10.88 LaSalle% dd 111 18.38 18.00 18.13-0.31 4.06 3.00 LaserMtg did 3 3.13 3.13 3.13 8.00 4.13 Lasmo As 93 365 6.50 6.25 6.50 14.31 8.25 LatAEqt q86 13.00 12.81 13.00+0.19 13.44 7.13 WAD& q 246 11.06 10.94 10.94+0.06 161 152. f6.06 9.56 LatAInv .50e q 63 15.44 15.56+ 42.94 19.25 LearCorp 5 6882 22 5 21.56 21.56 32.25 19.69 A4 2.3 15 280 28.50 28.00 28.00-0.56 57.31 30.63 LeggMas .36 f 0.7 22 3696 53.69 52.38 52.75+0.63 24.19 15.06 LeggPiat .40 2.3 12 5670 18.06 17.63 9 63 1 00 +0 144.63 52.00 LehmBr .44 f 0.3 16 15589 149.25 39 4 1 25.00 21.63 2.08 8.4 14 24.81 24.81 24.81 29.44 13.06 Lennar .05 0.2 10 5571 28.38 27.38 27.63+0.25 19.25 7.88 Lennox .38 2.8 8 1806 13.94 13.38 13.81+0.19 28.113 20.50 LaucNal 1.68 a 6.0 19 487 26.38 25.00 26.13+1.13 12.25 8.81 LexCrpP 1.20 10.5 10 76 11.44 11.31 11.38 135.11 11.43 .16 Lexmark .27 26.22 9 69.88 63.88 67.50+8.00 33.50 24.63 Libbey .30 0.9 11 72 32.81 31.75 32.81+1.66 3.69 2.81 Liberte .09 a 2.9 52 32 3.13 3.06 3.13 13.25 9.75 LbtyASE 1.40008 q 1508 13.13 12.88 13.00+0.13 12.50 9.31 LbtyASG 1.32 e 10.7 q 331 12.50 12.38 12.38+0.31 50.00 30.75 LibtyCp .88 2.3 13 84 38.69 38.44 38.50 26.69 17.88 LibbFin .40 1.7 11 524 23.94 23.25 23.63+0.38 30.75 15.50 LibyMA a 43268 22.75 21.38 21.38-0.25 3663 16.00 LibtyMB a cc 293 28.75 27.13 28.13-0.13 29.13 20.88 LibtProp 2.08 8.0 14 2489 26.63 26.13 26.13-0.38 109.00 54.00 LillyEli 1.04 1.4 26 26045 74.00 73.00 73.00-1.25 30.75 10.50 Lillyind .32 1.0 22 940 30.63 30.31 30.63+0.19 25.88 14.50 Limited a .30 1.5 18 22700 20.56 19.63 20.00 21.00 12.70 .80 4.2 q 17 19.13 18.88 18.88-0.13 52.31 22.63.1. 1.16 2.1 24 16295 54.50 51.25 54.00+1.88 12.50 9.56 LincNIF .92 a 8.3 q 73 11.13 11.06 11.06+0.06 21.26 13.63 Lindsay .14 0.8 16 269 18.25 18.06 18.25+0.13 4144 17.94 Linens 20 5304 27.56 26.44 27.00+0.50 23.44 11.63 LithiaMot 7 129 12.38 12.13 12.25-0.19 64.94 26.81 Litton 19 2555 56.56 55.25 5U1 -0.25 48.31 30.94 LizClab .45 1.0 13 2662 44-44 43.25 44.00+0.19 37.81 16.38 LockhdM .44 1.6 18 12754 28.94 27.69 28.38+0.56 6.13 1.81 Lodgian dd 2053 2.75 2.25 2.63+0.25 8.63 1.75 LoewsCin dd 475 1.88 1.81 1.81-0.06 86.75 38.25 Loews 1.00 1.2 11 2970 81.88 80.56 80.94+0.31 32.75 4.38 LondnPc s .23e 1.1 1872 20.25 19.63 20.19+0.63 54.25 17.31 LoneStTch 57 497 51.38 49.81 50.25 31.75 15.94 LongDrg .56 3.0 11 737 19.44 18.75 18.880.50 17.75 0.63 LongvF .32 a 2.8 14 762 11.63 11.38 11.38-0.13 25.75 5.00 LffalSp dd 20528 8.06 7.63 7.69 35.38 5.75 LDryNG 35 1063 35.25 34.25 34.75+0.50 DIVIDENDS DECLARED pe- Stk of Payriod rate record able STOCK Lucent Tech x 9-20 9-30 x- 1 shr of Avaya common stock for every 12 shrs of Lucent common. INCREASED Gannett Co Q .22 915 10-2 RESUMED MdvistGmPrdcts .10 10-12 11-8 SPECIAL Public Storage .60 9-15 9-29

Day C9 / 268

pe- Stk of Payriod rate record able REGULAR AMCON Distributing Q .03 9-8 9-22 Cato Corp clA. Q .10 9-11 9-25 DiMON Inc Q .05 9-7 9-18 Hancock PatGIDrv M .081 9-11 9-29 McRae Indus clA. 0 .09 9-15 9-29 Medford Bncp Inc Q .12 9-15 10-13 Minntech Corp A .10 9-15 9-29 Public Storage 0 .22 9-15 9-29 (No Pittsburgh Syst) 0 .17 10-210-13 pe- Stk of Payriod rate record able REGULAR Quanex Corp Q .16 9-15 9-29 (Omega Financial) Q .26 9-15 10-2 Suffolk Bancorp Q .23 9-15 10-2 Robinson C.H. Wrld 0 .08 9-8 10-2 Sandy Spring Bcp Q .20 9-11 9-22 Telephone & Data 0 .125 9-15 9-29 VanE/ChbTax-Exem A. M .045 8-29 B-31 VanE/ChubGlblInc A. M .04 8298-31 g- payable in Canadian funds. 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chip 19.63 9.25 LaPac .56 5.3 6 23134 10.75 10.50 10.56+0.13 67.25 40.38 Lawes .14 0.3 2229578 46.60 44.00 44.81-2.13 33.88 20.63 Lubrizol 1 1.04 150 22342 21.94 21.25 21.69+0.56 Lubys .1 5.755.50 5.50-0.19 14.13 5.63 3 964 84.19 39.63 Lucent .08 0.2 46 207M 43.63 41.25 41.98-0.94 17.06 7.75 Luxottica s .08 e 0.5 42 6850 15.25 15.00 15.25+0.13 12.88 5.13 Lydall 15 321 12.38 12.00 12.06-0.06 19.50 8.44 Lyondell .90 6.9 5 9186 13.56 12.98 13.06+0.44 M 8.88 4.13 M&F Wd .6 260 5.63 5.44 5.44-0.19 512.00 357.00 M&T Bank 5.00 1.0 15 z9790 494.81 480.25 48475+2.50 66.88 36.31 MBIA .82 1.2 13 2571 66.50 64.75 65.75+1.50 23.56 19.38 MBIA38 1.74 7.9 - 28 22.50 22.13 22.130.50 35.94 19.50 MBNA .32 0.9 2623255 35.44 34.25 35.31+094 26.94 17.00 MCN Engy 1.02 4.3 43 2217 24.31 23.50 24.00+025 14.25 5.00 MSC Sft 14 389 9.87 9.55 9.55-0 10 25.00 13.38AMDC .24 1.0 6 983 25.19 22.94 25.06+213 43.00 25.50 MIDS gn .07 e 7 42.25 41.50 42.25+125 25.94 17.63 MDU .84 3.4 16 626 25.00 24.31 25.00+050 24.25 9.94 MEMC dd359 18.13 17.81 18.00 .81 7.75 MCR .79 9.2 q 850 8.69 8.56 8.56 6.25 5.63 MGF .49 7.9 q 2790 6.25 6.19 6.19 6.50 5.94 MIN .53 8.2 q 1932 6.44 6.31 6.44+0.13 6.75 5.50 MMT .59 9.3 q 813 6.31 6.25 6.31+0.06 7.88 6.38AMFM .53 6.6 q 620 8.00 7.75 8.00+0.19 16.88 13.00 MFV 1.65a 110 q 50 15.06 14.94 15.00-0.06 9.94 2.25 MGI Prp 9.35 c -2 386 2.38 2.31 2.31 62.75 31.94 MGIC .10 0.2 12 3906 58.94 56.81 58.81+2.00 36.63 18.44 MGM Mr s 47 3204 34.44 33.56 34.38+0.94 19.81 12.75 MlSchoft .20 1.0 4 176 19.88 18.75 19.69+0.75 17.94 7.31 MllX .20 2.5 dd 153 8.13 8.00 8.06+0.06 5.25 3.50 ML Macad.50 10.7 851 4.75 4.69 4.69 23.25 7.50 MSC Ind 22 556 16.25 15.63 1625+0 . 13 23.19 19.19 MSDW38 1.78 7.9 86 22.56 22.38 22.50+0 .06 41. 1 18.75 McDrmd .08 0.3 18 461 25.25 25.00 25.00 -0.25 2506 17.31 Macerich 2.04 9.7 19 1853 21.38 20.88 20.94-0.31 7 .38 2.75 MacGry dd 21 3.25 3.19 3.25+0.06 2863 22.75 MackCali 2.32 8.9 8 1618 26.38 26.19 26.19-0.19 15.94 5.25 Madeco 4 581 6.00 5.69 5.75-0.38 9.31 1.19 Magellan dd 1211 3.44 3.06 3.25+0.25 52.8838.19 Magnal g 1.20 2.5 1268 49.38 4T88 47.94-U3 .00 6.13-Magntk 34 2887 11.13 10.00 10.63+0.63 1450 6.50 MailWell 6 532 7.44 7.00 7.25+0.31 1613 11.98 MalanR 1.70 1.5 23 65 12.63 12.25 12.56+0.3 7.44 4.56 Malaysa .1le2.3 q 114 4.81 4.69 4.75 46.44 22.19

269 / C9 Day

Malinckr .66 1.5 15 3214 45.38 44.75 45.06 -0.06 9.44 8.00 MgdHi .97 10.9q 1257 9.00 8.88 8.94 11.75 9.00 MgHlYP 132 13.6 q 684 9.75 9.63 9.69 10.13 9.00 MgdMun .60 6.0 q 249 10.06 10.00 10.06+0.06 10.06 8.94 MgdMun2.60 6.0 q 104 10.00 9.94 9.94-0.06 27.94 12.88 Mandalay 18 2234 27.88 27.31 27.81 0.56 38.56 21.69 Manitow .30 1.3 8 4973 23.06 22.69 22.94 + 01 3 21.25 6.44 ManorCare dd 8988 13.56 12.75 13.38+0.56 40.25 25.50 Manpwi 20 0.6 17 1521 37.19 35.81 36.19-0.69 25.75 22.25 ManufHm 1.66 6.8 16 386 23.75 23.63 23.63-0.13 28.13 18.94 MfrsSvcs n 3331 26.50 23.98 25.50+11.75 1.1 10.25Manulif gn 2887 22.00 21.38 21.50+0.69 14.63 8.19 Marcus .21 1.7 16 292 12.31 11.75 12.31+0.56 31 .31 12.63 MarineDri 91 3677 28.63 27.19 27.19 1.38 11.06 6.88 MwineMx 6 16 7.94 7.81 7.88 .75 Maritm .40 7.0 7 80 5.88 5.63 5.750.13 23.88 16.50 MarkIV .25 1.1 13 3040 22.69 22.38 22.38-0.19 185.50 111.50 Markel 55 72 146.00 14475 145.88+0.25 42.38 26.13 MarIntA .24 0.6 25 2936 40.13 38.94 39.50+0.63 12738 61.75 MarshMeL 2.00 f 1.7 38 6916 119.94 11838 118.75 +0.25 69.50 41.00 Mwshils 1.06 2.2 15 1069 49.00 48.25 48.75+0.38 47.50 13.06 MStewrt n cc 847 33.88 33.25 33.75+0.75 55.25 35.25 MartMM .56 11.4 15 1920 40.31 39.06 40.00.0.63 7.88 4.06 MarvelEnt dd 599 4.88 4.69 4.75+0.06 33.69 16.81 Masco .48 2.5 14 11083 19.75 19.13 19.50+0.31 17.50 10.50 MascoTch .32 1.9 9 615 16.56 16.50 16.56+0.06 1725 9.50 Masisa .32 e 2.5 15 20 12.75 12.75 12.75-0.25 23.88 17.63 MassCp q 126 24.25 23.88 24.13+0.25 11.00 .96 a 8.8 q 29 11.06 10.94 10.94-0.06 60.13 18.38 Mastec s 24 3510 37.63 35.13 36.00+0.56 49.94 25.81 Matev 649 28.25 27.63 28.25+0.38 15.25 9.38 MatSci 10 186 10.75 10.31 10.50-0.31 5.50 1.44 Matlack dd 160 2.25 2.13. 2.13-0.25 303.00 191.00 Matsu 1.17 e 0.4 90 36 276.00 272.00 274.63+2.63 24.19 8.94 Mattel .36 3.6 dd 13M 10.44 9.88 10.00-0.44 4.38 2.31 Mavesa .09 e 2.3 9 2223 4.00 3.88 3.94-0.06 38.94 20.00 Maximus 14 389 22.50 22.13 22.13+0.06 40.44 22.50 MayDS .93 4.1 9 16070 23.31 22.13 22.94-0.63 66.94 25.94 Maytag .72 1.9 11 4289 39.25 38.13 38.13-0.38 45.13 28.75 McClatchy .40 1.1 18 199 36.00 35.81 35.81-0.19 36.56 23.75 McCorm .76 2.6 16 986 29.19 28.56 29.19+0.44 23.69 7.19 McDerl .15 2.7 7.75 7.50 7.69+0.13 49.56 29.8l McDnlds .20 0.7 20 67670 3038 29.63 29.88-0.50 25.44 21.63 McDn36 1.88 7.8 66 24.31 24.13 24.25+0.25 25.63 21.75 McDn37 1.87 7.7 139 24.38 24.19 24.20-0.11 63.50 41.88 McGrH .94 1.5 26 4100 63.06 61.94 61.94-1.31 34.94 16.00 McKHBOC .24 1.0 10 7552 25.63 24.75 24.94-0.13 25.00 9.88vMcMoRn dd 568 10.44 9.81 10.25+0.38 20.00 14.25 MeVCDFJ n 933 14.88 14.50 14.88+0.25 45.13 24.38 Mead .68 2.5 16 5787 27.19 26.75 26.81+0.06 13.00 4.0 MdbkIns .12 3.0 dd 131 4.00 3.94 4.00 9.25 3.06 MediaArl 3269 4.00 3.75 4.00+0.13 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 135.00 78.50 Media01 1.56 1.8 26 89.00 86.50 89.00+3.38 59.50 36.75 Media02 n 3.04 7.5 2153 40.50 39.00 40.50+1.50 26.25 10.00 MedAsr 7 643 12.06 11.63 11.630.44 66.50 22.75 Medicis 45 3168 64.63 62.63 64.25+1.94 9.06 1.81 Meditrust dd 2866 2.56 2.31 2.31-0.19 57.88 29.94 Medtmic s .20 0.4 55 2M 53.00 51.06 51.44-1.69 44.75 26.81 MellonFric .88 1.9 2417718 45.63 43.63 45.25+2.00 8.13 6.94 Mentinc .72 89 56 8.13 8.00 8.13+0.06 81.13 52.00 Merck 1.36f 1.9 A 52175 72.13 69.88 69.88-1.25 31.25 20.94 MercGn .96 3.5 13 754 27.63 26.81 27.44+069 42.00 22.38 Meredith .32 1+2 20 1455 27.94 27.25 27.31-0 38 9.19 4.75 MeridGld .05 0.8 39 927 6.94 6.63 6.63-0 06 6.50 Z56 MeridRes 8 4425 6.44 6.31 6.31+0 06 22.88 14.44 MefiStHsp 2.02 9.1 12 1819 22.25 21.88 22.13 3.63 2.13 MeriStHR 9 1177 2.56 2.44 2.50-0.1 16.31 8.75 MeritagCp 4 77 15.69 15.44

Day C9 / 270

15.63+0+19 14594 MerrLyn 1.28 0.9 19 23823 146.63 141.31 145+25 +3.13 54.50 19.00 MLCBROI 4.26 19.0 38 22.56 22.00 22.44+0.25 13.19 11.44 ML DJO3 12 12.75 12.75 12.75 20.50 1 4.25 MLIGLOI 2.39 15.3 109 15.69 15.50 15.63+0.06 10.63 8.75 ML Nil.02 208 9.19 9.13 9.19+0.06 24.94 19.88 MLSP01 138 24.75 24.63 24.75+0.19 18.63 15.00 MLSP02 18 18.25 18.06 18.25+0.25 12.25 10.25 MLSP905 51 12.19 12.13 12.13 11.00 9Z3 MLSP07 5 10.81 10.81 10.81+0.06 49.25 37.00 MesaR 3.63 e 9.4 11 1 38.50 38.50 38.50+0.25 4.00 2.19 Mesab .40 e 10.8 47 3.69 3.63 3.69+0.06 21.38 14.19 Mestel. 1.31 t 9 4 16.94 1681 16.9 + 12.13 8.38 MetPro .32. 3.1 9 32 10.25 10.06 10.25+04 11.00 4.00 Metals .12 2.5 5462 5.00 4.81 4.81-0.13 25 13 14.31 MetLife n 11760 24.94 24.19 24.31 - 0.50 79. 00 50.00AMetLife un 1.42 p 324 79.50 77 .50 79. + 0.50 34.411 113.WilletrisCo s .04 If 0.1 1914771 36.69 34.25 35.94+11.811 31.06 15.38 MGM cc 1835 26.50 25.50 25.63 10.13 8.38 Metrogas 700.9 18 8.88 8.76 8.88-0.06 16.25 9.31 Metso .38 p 79 12.31 11.63 11.88-0.13 47.50 24.50 MeftlerT 35 1927 48.81 45.63 47.31+1.69 1 2.31 6.25 MexEqt .12el.1q 285 10.75 10.56 10.75+0.25 19.25 12.25 MexFd .29 e l.7 q 1233 7.25 6.81 7.13+0.38 13.63 8.25 Microfnc .16 1.6 10 111 9.81 9.63 9.81+0.06 97.50 29.13 MicronT s 6267491 82.94 80.00 81.81-1.88 24.88 21.31 MidAApt 2.32 9.6 20 73 24.19 23.88 24.19+0.19 15.38 5.13AMidAtten .20 1774 16.13 14.75 16.13+11.38 26.56 14.13 Midas .08 0.5 7 470 17.00 16.88 17.00+0.06 11 0.00 1.08 9.5 13 55 11.31 11.19 11.31+0.06 24.88 6.06 MidwGm dd 2407 8.63 8.06 8.63+0.25 33.00 18.50 MdwExp 12 1094 22.69 22.63+0.38 12.38 7.44 Mikasa .20 2.1 8 5 9.69 9.69 9.69-0.06 19.13 12.06 Milacron .48 3.1 8 787 15.69 15.38 15.44 -0.25 23.56 12.69 MillenChm .60 3.6 dd 1291 16.94 16.31 16.50+0.19 5.13 0.94 Milledn dd 716 1.50 1.44 1.44 77.38 30.00 Millipore .44 0.7 29 4664 62.63 59.75 60.88+1.25 19.50 15.31 MillsCp 2.07 11.4 16 1833 18.50 18.00 18.13 51.25 36.63AMinTch.10 0.2 17 786 51.94 50.38 51.88 + 1.00 103 1 78.19 2.32 2.5 20 10294 95.56 93.00 93.00-0.38 2.31 14 75 MinnPwr 1.07 4.8 11 1385 22.44 22.13 22.19+0.13 4.69 2.50 MinoltOMS dd 299 3.06 2.88 3.00 1075 294 MissChm .12 2.9 dd 517 4.13 3.94 4.13+0.13 3900 19.63 MitchlEn .53 1.3 55 1822 40.00 39.19 40.00+1.00 34.25 6.63 Mitel g 4099 25.25 24.25 24.50-0.25 a 2.00 21.88 MobileT n 812 29.63 28.63 29.13-1.06 18.69 6.75 ModisProf 10 2014 7.00 6.88 6.88 27.81 18.38 Mohawk 8 1055 24.25 23.75 23.75-0.13 30.94 10.81 MonacoC 7 690 17.63 16.81 17.50-0.19 25.13 22.44 MononP25 2.60 8.2 6 24.50 24.25 24.25-0.13 51.88 31.00 Monsn03 2.60 52 31 50.25 50.00 50.00 65.75 26.81 MonPw .80 2.2 25 5153 36.31 35.56 36.06-0.06 21.00 14.25 Montedisn .41 e 2.0 98 1 20.75 20.75 20.75 16.63 15.00 Monst el 2 142 1 6.113 16.75 16.75+0.251 19 .8 38.44 25.13 MONYG. 40 1.1 37 1 36.69 37.81+3.00 10.13 2.19 Moore .20 6.5 5 928 3.19 3.06 3.06-0.06 14.88 8.50 MorgGr 1.66 e q 234 13.38 13.13 13.31+0.25 22.25 11.94 MorgKe .36f 1.8 13 537 20.75 20.06 20.06-0.19 106.31 42.00 AMSDWit s .80 0.7 22 27930 108.50 104.56 10756+169 11.69 10.00 MS 13.104 5 11.38 11.38 1 1J8+613 11.94 8.63 MSHTa5 05 55 11.13 11.06 11 13006 13.25 11.25 MSS&P03 12 13.25 13.25 425+8.13 24.63 21.25 MSDW29 1.81 7.5 8 24.00 24.00 24 00-006 12.00 7.56 MSAfrira .25 e 2.9 q 37 8.63 8.56 8 63+013 12.31 9.06 MS Asia .07 e 0.7 q 1615 10.38 10.31 1038+006 20.75 10.75 MS ElEur q 29 19.75 19.75 19.75+0.25 18.19 10.63 MorSEm q 2193 14.69 14.44 14.56+0.06 7.94 6.56 MS EMD .98 e 123 q 292 7.94 7.81 7.94+0.06 9.69 8.13 MS Globl .05 11.7 q 15 9.00 9.00 9.00-0.13 13.44 10.81 MrgSHY 1.26 a 10.7 q 155 11.75 11.63 11.75+0.13 18.88 9.50 MIS India q 954 11.94 11.75 11.94+0.19 13.81 11.50 MSDW iic .78 5.7 q 178 13.75 13.63 13.63-0.13 13.56 10.94 MSDW

271 / C9 Day

iqc .78 5.9 q 32 13.31 13.31 13.31 8.38 7.81 MSDW .54 6.5 q 250 8.31 8.25 8.25 5.13 3.06 MSDW yld .54 13.5 q 393 4.00 3.94 4.00 5.38 3.13 MSDW yld .57 14.0 q 757 4.13 4.06 4.06-0.06 6.06 3.69 MSDW yld .66 13.9 q 180 4.75 4.69 4.75 17.13 14.25 MSDW icb 1.32 8.2 q 116 16.13 16.00 16.06-0.06 14.25 12.44 MSDW ics .75 5.3 q 24 14.13 14.06 14.13 14.63 11.69 MSDWimb .87 6.2 q 37 14.06 14.00 14.00 14.00 12.00 MSOW 1m .87 6.3 q 125 13.75 13.69 13.75 13.88 11.88 MSDW ims .78 5.7 q 77 13.69 13.63 13.63-0.06 14.88 12.44 MSOW imt .93 6.6 q 71 14.25 14.19 14.19-0.06 9.19 7.56 MSOW oia .63 7.1 q 90 8.88 8.88 8.88 7.94 6.88 MSDW db.51 6.8 q 102 7.63 7.50 7.50-04 PREFERRED STOCKS CONSOLIDATED TRADING/THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2001 Stock Div & Ytd Last Chg NYSE ABN PfA 1.88 8.1 23.19+0.06 ABN pfO 1.78 8.022.19 ACE pft 4.13 5.6 74.25 + 2.25 AES ptC 3.38 3.5 96.00 + 1.00 ACI pff 2.25 14.6 15.38+0.19 AMB PfA 2.13 9.5 22.38 - 0.13 ANZ Ex pf 2.00 8.2 24.25 +013 ANZEx2 pf 2.02 8.4 24.19 -0-06 AbbyN pfA 2.19 9.0 24.38 +0.13 AbbeyN pf 1.75 8.0 21.88 Abbey perp 1.88 8.4 22.31 + 0.6 Agrium pf 2.00 9.920.13 +0.38 AlaPw pfN 1.30 6.6 19.66 +0-66 &aPC pfQ 1.84 8.022.88 AjaPC pfR 1.90 8.1 23.50 - 0 AjbrtE gpf 2.38 25.50 -025 AlexRE pf 2.38 10.3 23.00 -0.25 Ahst pfA 1.99 8.2 24.38 - 0.06 Amerc pt 2.13 8.724.50 AAnnu pfT 2.31 9.524.25 +0.31 AExp pfA 1.75 7.7 22.63 - 0.06 AFncl pfr 2.28 9.723.56 -0-06 AGC pfA 1.97 7.9 24.94 + 0.02 AGC pfM 2.11 8.5 24.75 + 0.06 AGC pfN 2.03 8.324.31 +0-19 AmReC pf 2.13 8.624.71 AWat pra 1.25 6.6 24.71 Aptinv pfC 2.25 10.8 20.88 +0.13 Aptnv pfD 2.19 10.7 20.50 +0.25 AptInv ptG 2.34 10.9 21.50 +0.25 Aptim ptH 2.38 10.9 21.88 +0.25 Aptinv pfK 2.80 10.3 27.25 Archst pfA 1.83 5.4 33.63 +0.13 Archst pfB 2.25 9.2 24.50 -0.13 Archst pfD 2.19 9.1 24.00 +0.25 ArgPC prA 1.96 8.6 22.75 -0.06 AsdEst pf 2.44 1Z8 19.00 +0.25 AtlCap pf 2.04 8.3 24.44 - 0.13 AusNZ pf 2.28 8.9 25.63 +0.01 AvBay pfD 2.00 9.1 21.M + Q.2b ABay pfF 2.25 9.5 23.73 +0.11 AvBay pfG 2.24 9.5 23.65 +0.15 AvBay pfH 2.18 9.2 23.59 + 0.01 Avista pf 1.97 9.2 21.50 +0.38 BCH pr 2.62 9.9 26.50 + 0.19 BCH prB 2.36 8.9 26.50 + 0.38 BGE pfA 1.79 8.0 22.50 + 0.19 SNY ptC 1.95 8.024.31 wIw BNY pfD 1.76 8.0 21.88 - 0.31 ONY pfE 1.72 7.9 21.88 + 0.06 BRE pfA 2.13 8.924.00 +0.50 MCH prC 2.03 8.5 23.94 - 0.06 BSCH prD 2.19 8.8 2415 + 0.13 OWH prE 2.14 8.7 24.50 - 0.13 OSCH prF 2.03 8w5 23.75 BSCH prG 2.03 8.5 23.75 - 0.13 SSCH prH 1.95 8.622.56 -0.44 BSCH prJ 1.84 8.521.75 OT PC pfA 2.03 8.3 24.50 BmBil pt 2.44 9.5 25w77 - 0 D6 BncBl pfC NO 8.2 24.31 BwBl prE 2.00 8.3 24.19 + 0.06 BcoSPR pf 1.75 7.9 22.25 -0.25 Skone pfT 2.00 8.1 24.69 +044 BkOm pfLJ 2.13 8.425.25 BkUtd pf 2.53 9.7 26.19 - 0.31 BkUtd pfB 2.40 9.026.63 -0.06 Wm pfZ 1.94 8.0 24.25 + 0.06 BMm pfY 1.75 7.7 22.81 +0.06 OkUtd pfC 2.25 11.020.38 -0.13 ST pfScld 1.94 25.00 aarB pf 2.00 8.423.88 BwB pfD 2.87 11.2 25.69 +0.06 SatlMt pf 3+25 10.2 31.88 +0.13 OayVw pt 2.44 12.5 19.50 3.08 7.3 42.15 +0.77 pfG 2.75 7.2 38.00 + 025 SearS pfY 1.88 8.2 22.81 -0.31 Belco pf 1.63 10.8 15.13+0.38 aergCa pf 1.95 12.8 15.25 -0.13 5thSt pf 5.00 13.2 38 pfB 2.50 13.0 19.19+0.06 Bimail pf 3.38 5.4 62.38 + 1.13 BradRE pf 2.10 9.5 22.19 -0-06 ardw pfB 3.38 6.8 49.75 + 2.56 CBL piA 2.25 10.1 22.38 - Owl3 CFC PT pf 2.34 10.622.13 -0.31 CL&P pf 2.32 9.3 25.00 - 0 13 CMS pfM 25.06 -0.13 CNB pfA 1.50 4.4 34.25+1.25 CNF Tr pf 2.50 6.4 39.00 +038 OPLCap pf 2.00 8.5 23.44 - 0.06 CadScD pf 2.16 8.6 25.19 CaFPC pt 2.28 9.9 22.94 + 0 CallonP pf 2.13 6.1 35.00+1 13 CamdnP pf 2 25 9.2 24.50 CameCo pf 2 19 9.7 2256 -0.31 CdnRy pf 2.63 45.38 Cdn0c pfA 2 .34 24.56 +0.19

Day C9 / 272

CapRe pf 1 91 8.5 22.38 - 0.13 CapM pfB 1.26 11.5 11.00+0.13 CaaA pfB 2.14 9.921.63 +0.06 CarrA pfC 2.14 10.0 21144 - 0 13 CarrA pfD 2.11 9.8 21 50 - 0.06 Cendnt pfl 3.75 1819 19.88+0.19 CentP pfA 1.91 8.5 22.50 + 0.31 CentP pfB 3.75 7.2 52.00 +1-25 ChaseCap4 1.84 8.0 23.13 ChaseCap5 1.76 7.8 22.63 + 025 Chse pfC 2.71 9w6 28.19 Chse pfN 1.3 le 5.9 22.13 Stock Div %Yld Lost Chg ChsePC pf 2.03 8.1 25.00+0.13 ChasEn pf 63.00+1.00 ChevyC pt 5.19 10.2 51.0U - U25 Chiq ptA 2.88 20.8 13.88-0.13 Chiq pfB 3.75 19.7 19.00+0.25 CitCpIII pf 1.78 7.922.50 Citigp PfF 3.18 6.847.00 +0.85 Citigp pfK 2.10 8.2 25.75 Crtigp pfE 2.00 8.1 24.75 Citigp pfN 1.71 7.8 21.88 Citigp pfW 1.75 7.6 23.00 + 0.19 Cifigp pfX 1.72 7.7 22.25 +0.25 CivEl pff 2.12 8.5 24.88 + 0.13 Csti pfG .06 0.2 36.00 - 0.50 Cstl pfI 1.66 4.338.31 -0.88 Cstl pfT 2.09 8.823.88 ColgP pf 4.25 4.9 86.75 - 0.13 ColnP pfA 2.19 10.2 21.56 -0.06 Corned PIT 2.12 0.824.06 -0.06 CmcCa pff 2.19 9.0 24.38 + 0.31 CsatCap pf Z03 9.521.38 +0.38 CnCap pfA 2.25 9.0 24.88 CnCap pfB 1.25 7.0 17.75 -0.25 CnCap ptC 2.34 9.5 24B3 -0.19 Consc PfF 3.50 32.0 10.94 -0.31 Consc pIT 2.29 16.8 13.63 -0.44 Consc pfG 2.26 18.1 12.44-0.81 Consc pfV 2.18 18.7 11.64 -1 -36 Cow ptH 236 17.6 13.38 0.25 ConE pfA 5.00 7.7 64.63 - 0.38 CnE pfA 4.16 8.4 49.50 - 0.44 CnE pfB 4.50 8.7 52.130 - 1.38 CnEF pfJ 2.09 9.1 23.00 CnEF pfK 2.05 8.9 23.13 + 0.06 CnEF pit. 2.31 9.4 24.63 + 0.13 CpOfP pfB 2.50 10.823.25 -0.25 Craig pr 3.75+0.13 CresRE pt 1.69 10.4 16.25 +0.13 vjCriim pfF 7.13-0.06 CrosT pfA 1.66 2.7 57.13 +0.13 DU Ca pf 2.11 8.5 24.75 - 0.06 Delm. pf 2.03 8.324.31 +0.06 1.nF of 3.1 17.01 - 1.21 DD PA 2 37 11 0.1 3 23 0 +025 DevD pfB 2.36 10.2 23.06 -0.13 DevDv pfC 2.09 9.921.06 +0.25 DevD pfD 2.17 10 2 21.38 + 0.19 DonLJ pf9 2.65 5.647.63 DuPnt pfA 3.50 6.7 52.50 DuPnt pfB 4.50 6.668.50 -01.50 Duke pfA 1.59 6.923.00 Duke pfQ 1.80 8.0 22.63 +0.13 Duke pff 1.84 8.0 23.00 + 0.06 Duke pfU 1.84 8.0 23.00 +0.06 Duke PfV 1.80 7.9 22.88 - 0.06 Duke pfW 2.09 8.3 25.25 + 0.06 DukeW pfA 2.28 9.424.31 +0.13 DukeW pfD 1.84 7.9 23.38 - 0.13 DukeR pfE 2.06 8.3 24.88 + 0.88 DukeW prF 2.00 9.1 21.88-0.25 DuqCap pf 2.09 8.624.31 -0.19 Duq pfB 1.87 7.0 26.63 + 0.07 Duq pfG 2.10 7.0 30.00 + 0.50 EDF pfA 2.16 8.8 24.63 + 0.06 EIX pfA 1.97 8.4 23.50 + 0.06 EIX pfB 2.15 8.724.81 +0.19 Est9p pfA 2.25 10.1 22.25 Eksnrt pf 2.18 8.9 24.50 -0.56 ElPasE pf 2.38 3.2 73.75 + 1.00 ElPasT pf 4.13 8.2 50.50-1.00 EnmC pfr 2.08 8.5 24.56 +0.13 EnmC pfR 2.03 8.5 23.94 -0.31 EnrU-C pf 2.00 8.1 24.63 +0.06 EnrCR pf 2.25 8.725.81 -0.06 E tArk p1A 2.13 9.0 23.63 -006 EnjGCa pf 2.19 9.024.31 -0.06 En LA PIS 2.25 9.2 24.50 0.06 EntCT pfS 1.86 8.7 21.44 + 0.19 EntCT pfR 1.81 8.6 21.13 + 0. 3 EntOil prS 2.46 9.9 24.88 +0.44 EqtInn pA 2.38 14.5 16.44 -019 EqOff pfA 2.24 93 24.13 0.13 EqOff pfB 2.63 6.043.63 EqOff pfC 2.16 9.2 23.38 - U.51.1 EqtR pfA 2.34 9.5 24.63 - 0.19 EqtR pfB 2.28 9.1 25.13+0.06 EqtR pfD 2.15 9.0 23.84 - OA6 EqtR pfE 1.75 6.526.88 +0.25 EqtR pfF 2.41 9.7 24.75+0.13 EqtR pfG 1.81 7.9 22.94+0.31 EqtR pfL 1.91 8.9 21.45 -0.23 EspSn prA 2.13 8.824.31 EspSn prB 2.13 8.9 24.00 - 038 FPCCap pf 1.78 8.3 21.50 - 0.06 FW PCa pf 2.25 11.8 19.00 -0.06 FMae pfF .88p 50.88-0.13 FrmG pfA 2.11 8.524.69 F1mG pfB 2.06 83 24.75 FdRIt pfA 1.99 9.820.25 +0.25 FelCor pfA 1.95 U.4 18.75.U.13 FelCo. pfB 2.25 11.7 19.25 - 0.06 Finova pf 2.75 15.6 17.63 - 0.25 FtACT PIT 2.13 9.522.38 +0.25 FtBcp pfA 1.78 8.3 21.50 +0.25 FlinRT pf 2.37 9.6 24.75 +0.25 FInRT pfB 2.19 9.6 22.81 RnRT pfD 1.99 9.6 20.75 FInRT pfE 2.26 11.020.63 AtBos pfF 1.81 7.424.38 -0.06 FftCa pfH 2.00 8.2 24.38 FItCa pfl 1.76 8.1 21.81 +0.13 FItCa pfJ 1.79 8.1 22.06 -0.13 Ford pfB 2. 7.9 25.94 - 0.13 FordC pfr 2.25 8.7 25.81 -0.19 FredM pfK 2.90 6.1 47.50 +118 FMCG p1A 1.75 132 13.25 + 0.75

273 / C9 Day

FMCG pfB .99a 5.4 18.25+0.25 Stock Div %Yld Last Chq FMCG pfC .92e 6.4 14.44 +0.19 FMCG pfD 3.24e 39.9 8.13 - Fremnt pf2.25 18.8 12.00 +0.06 FresM pr .23e 1.5 15.25+0.56 G&L pfA 2.56 17.1 15.00 G&L pfB 2.45 174 14.06-0.19 GabCv pf 2.00 8.1 24.69 GalbellE pf 1.81 7.9 23.00 + 0.19 GabGlo pf 1.98 8.1 24.50 GablR PfA 2.08 101 20.50-0.25 GAJnv pf 1.80 7.6 23.75 + 0.06 GGrth pfA 1.81 8.2 22.06 - 0.25 GMot pfG 2.28 8.925.63 GMot ply 2.47 9.3 26.44 + 0.19 GaPC pfr 1.94 8.1 23.88-0.19 GaPC pfU 1.90 8.1 23.380.13 GaPC pfV 1.94 8.1 23.88-0.06 GaPC pfA 1.71 7.8 21.88 + 0.06 GlenRT pf 1.94 10.8 18.00 +0.38 G1ImR ptB 2.31 12.5 18.50+0.56 GdrcCa pf 2.08 8.7 24.00 GmdM pf 2.35 9.0 25.98 + 0.05 GtUkR pfA 2.44 10.4 23.50 +0.06 GtWLfe pf 1.81 8.4 21.50 - 0.13 GtWF pff 2.06 8.424.44 +0.13 GifCcla pr .28 2.38+0.13 GulfF pfA 1.91 8.023.81 +0.19 GulfP pfB 1.75 8.0 21.75 - 0.19 HECO pfQ 2.01 8.5 23.69 + 0.06 HECO PIT 1.83 8.2 22.19 - 0.19 HL&P PfA 2.03 8.7 23.38 HSBC pfA 2.22 9.3 23.88 - 0.06 HSBC pfB 2.56 10.0 25.63 HSBC pfC 2.28 9.5 24.13 + 0.13 HSBC pfD 2.39 9.525.13 +0.13 Harris pfA 1.84 8.2 22.56 HartC pfQ 1.93 8.1 23.81 + 04 HartC pfB 2.09 8.5 24.56 - O 13 Hrtfrdl pf 1.80 8.1 22.25 -0.25 HawEl PIS 2.09 8.6 24.19 - 0.19 HltCP pfA 1.97 10.2 19.38-0.13 HltCP pfB 2.18 10.5 20.75 +0.13 HltCP pfC 2.15 10.9 19.75+0.19 A 2.22 12.0 18.50 +0.06 HltorR pfA 2.22 11.8 18.88 HecIM pf 3.50 29.2 12.00 + 0.8 HellrFn of 2.03 8.2 24.63 HerculT pf 2.36 10.8 21.81 +0.44 Highw pfB 2.00 9.6 20.75 + 0.38 Highw pfD 2.00 9.8 20.50 + 0.13 HospPT pf 2.38 10.3 23.19 -0.19 HostMr pf 2.50 10.3 24.19 + 0.13 HostM pfEl 2.50 105 23.81 +0.02 HoCT pfT 2.06 8.5 24.25 + 0.13 HoCT pfY 2.18 8.824.81 -0.06 HoCT pfP 1.81 8.222.00 +0.50 HoCT pfX 2.60 9.2 27.06 + OZ6 HoInt pfM 240 6.8 37.00 +11.50 HoInt pfZ 2.06 7.8 26.38 + 0.38 LAC Ca pfa 2.D6 9.1 22.75 ING pfB 25.94+0.08 ING pfA 1.93 8.2 23.50 - Star pfB 18.50-0.25 iStar pfD 15.75 IT Gp pf 1.75 10.5 16.69+0.19 IPm pfB 2.10 7.1 29.50 IlPow ptC 2.13 7.1 30.00+0.25 IllPF pff 2.00 8.4 23.75 + 0.25 INCO PfE 2.75 7.1 39.00 IngRd pfl 1.69 7.4 22.69 + 0.94 IngRd PIG .20 0.9 21.50 + 0.75 Inkeep pf 2.16 12.2 17.69 +0.06 IBM pf 1.88 7.3 25.75 + 0 19 JCPCap pf 2.14 8.7 24.56 +0 . 13 JON pfA 2.34 11.7 20.00 - 0.25 KCP1- PIT 2.08 8.524.50 KmartF pf 3.88 10.7 36.25 KCPL pfD 4.35 7.0 62.50 + 0.47 KCSo pf 1.00 5.2 19.25+0.25 KaufB pfG .08 1.2 6.94 +0.25 KaufB pfl .83 10.7 7.75+0.19 Kimc p1 1.94 11 12 50 + 0.63 Kim. P. 2 13 8 9 23.88 + 0.25 Kimc PfC 2.09 9.0 23.13 - 0.13 Kimc pfD 1.88 7.4 25 +0.31 Kinam pfB 1.88j 9.13 +0.50 Kramnt pf 2.44 132 18.44 +0.19 Kramt pfD 2.38 13.0 18.25 LTC pfA 2.37 205 11.56 LTC pfB 2.25 207 10.88+0.25 LaSalle pf 2.19 104 21.00 LehB pfD 2.84 7.2 39.25 + 0.L3 LehBH pfl 2.00 8.3 24.13 -0.19 LehBH pfJ 1.97 8.3 23.88 +0.25 LibtPr pfA 2.20 9.9 22.31 UncN pf 1.94 7.8 25.00-0.38 LincN pfX 2.19 8.7 25.13 +0.19 LincN ply 2 11 11 224:631 - 00.13 LincN PfZ 822 9+ 06 MBNA pfC 2.06 8.5 24.25 - 0.38 MCN F PfA 2.16 9.024.00 MCN F PIS 2.16 9.0 24.00 + 0.13 MCNMI pf 2.34 9.424.94 + 0.06 MEPC pf 2.28 105 21.63 - 0.38 MP&L pf Z01 8.6 23.50 - 0.13 Magna PIS 2.22 8.9 24.88 +0.13 Made pfc1d 2.33 25.43+0.05 Media pfB 2.38 9.3 26.64 +0.02 Media ptC 2.26 8.925.38 Media pfy 2.06 8.6 24.00 -0.38 Media pfX 1.99 8.523.38 Meditst pf 2.25 16A 13.31 +0.25 Merl- pfA 2.25 7.8 2HO + 0.63 Merl. pfB 1.94 7.9 24.44 - 0.06 Mart- PC 2.00 7.9 25.25 - 0.25 Mart- ptD 1.75 7.9 22.06 + 0.06 Merl- pfE 1.78 7.9 22.39 - 0.17 Stock Dtv %Yld Last Chg Mart pfF 1.82 8.022.88 -0.12 MetEC pfX 1.84 8.2 22.38 +0.38 MidAp pfA 2.37 11.9 19.94 -0.31 MidAp pfB 2.22 11.8 18.81 -0.13 MidAE pfA 1.99 8.2 24.25 MisCa pf 2.47 9.925.00 MisCa pfB 2.13 8.5 25.00 - 0.06 MissP pfD 1.94 8.024.13

Day C9 / 274

.4-0.19 MorPw pfA 2.11 8.524.75 MSDW pfE 188 7.7 50.44 +0.19 Morgn pf 5.00 6.8 73.50 - 0.50 Motorla pf 1.67 7.7 21.81 +0.19 NAB Ex pt 2.00 8.2 24.25 + 0.19 NB Cap pf 2.09 8.823.81 NBCap pfA 1.96 8.0 24.38 + 0.38 NSP F pfT 1.97 8.2 24.00 + 0.06 NVP Ca pf 2.05 8.8 23.25 - 0.06 NVPCa pfB 1.94 8.5 22.75 -0.25 NWPS pf 2.03 8.324.31 -0.19 Nabis pfU 2.38 9.524.94 NtHlth pf 2.13 15.0 14.19 -0.31 NtWst pfB 2.19 9.1 23.94 +0.19 NtWst pfC 2.16 8.9 24.25 +0.19 NatwF pfA 1.78 8.2 21.63 -0.21 NPInE pfB 2.16 9.822.00 NewOv pf 2.15 9.023.81 - NewOv PrB 1.67e 9.2 18.25 -0.13 NiaM pfB 3.60 8.741.25 -0.50 NiaM pfC 3.90 9.0 43.50 -2.50 NiaM pfD 4.10 7.8 52.50 + 0.56 NiaM pfE 4.85 7.8 62.00 + 0.75 NiSrce pfB 3.88 8.346.63 -0.25 NSRy pf 2.60 7.3 35.44 -0.06 NwCap pfB 1.80 8.1 22.13 NovaCh pf 2.38 10.1 23.63 +0.06 NovaC pfA 2.26 9.9 22.94 +0.13 NvoFn pfT 2.88 10.5 27.50 OGE En pf 2.09 8.4 25.00 - 0.19 ONB pfA 2.38 8.7 27.50 + 0.06 OhEd pfM 1.94 8.423.00 OhEd pfT 2.25 9.2 24.50 - 038 OmgH pfA 2.31 16.6 13.94 OmgH pfI3 2.16 16.3 13.25 Orient pfA 1.78 8.4 21.25 + 0.25 OwenIll pf 2.38 11.3 21.13 + 0.25 OqCT pfB 2.04 9.1 22.31 +0.06 PECO pfA 3.80 7.1 53.75-0.25 PECO pfC 4.40 8.0 55.00 - 0.50 PECO pfX 2.00 8.0 25.00 +0.44 PGSTr pfA 2.41 106 22.75 -0.13 PLC pfr 2.06 8.524.13 +0.19 PPL pfD 2.03 8.224.63 +0.25 PPL pfC 2.05 8.424.50 PSCO pfC 1.90 8.422.70 + 0.61 PSEG pfr 2.03 8.524.00 +0.13 PSO Cap pf 2 00 8.4 23.94 -0.13 PWG C pf 2.08 8.524.56 +0.19 PWGC PfI3 2.02 8.324.38 PacT pfT 1.89 7.923.81 + 0.06 PacT PfU 2.13 8A 25.25 PcCap pf 2.06 8.424.50 0.6 PcCap pfI3 1.93 8.3 23.38 + 0.13 Parkw PfA 2.19 10.0 21.94 + 0.13 PartRe pf 2.00 8.523.56 -0.17 Penelc pfX 1.84 8.0 22.88 +0.25 PhILD pf 4.12 11.635.50 Phil66 PC 2.06 8 . 6 23.88 - v.PIcrD ptA 2.16 11.1 19.50+0.06 PogoT ptQ 3.25 5.3 61.00 -0.75 PostP. pfA 4.25 9.0 47.00 +0.25 PostPr pfB 1.91 8.7 22.00 - 0.44 PostPr pfC 1.91 8.8 21.75 - 0.13 PotE pfT 1.84 8.1 22.81 +0.13 PrmrCa pf 2.25 9.3 24.13 - 0.38 PrmFar pr 1.50 7.021.50 + 0.50 Prime pfB 2.25 120 18.75 - 0.25 Pr.Ret pf 7.75 -0.31 PrmRtl pf 4.25 -0.25 PrisnR pfA 7.25 + 0.56 Prolog pfA 2.35 9 7 24.25 Prolog pfB 1.75 5.9 29.63 - 0 3i Prolog pfD 1.98 9.2 21.56 +019 Prolog pfE 2.19 9.2 23.75 ProtLf pfP 3.25e 6.6 49.00 PSEG pfB 4.18 7.060.00 + 1.66 PSEG pfC 4.30 7.1 60.75 -1.25 PSEG pfX 2.00 8.523.63 -0.19 PSEG pfZ 2.34 9.2 25.31 + 0.06 PSEG pfU 2.16 8.7 24.75 PubSt pfA 2.50 92 25.63 -0.31 PubSt pfB 2.30 9.3 24.69 PubSt pfD 2.38 9.4 25.44 -0.25 PubSt pfE 2.50 9.3 26.81 + 0.56 PubSt pfF 2.44 9.3 26.19 - 0.56 PubSt pfG 2.22 9.3 23.88 +0.06 PubSt pfH 2.11 91 23.25 + 0.50 PubSt pfl 2.16 9.2 23.56-0.06 PubSt pfJ 2.00 8.6 23.25 -0.50 PubSt pfK 206 8.8 23.38 +0.19 PubSt pfL 2.06 9.1 2V5 -0.19 PubSt pfM 2.19 8.8 28.00 +0.31 REI Tr pf 1.80 8.421.31 -0.06 RitInc pfB 2.34 10.5 22.31 +0.19 RitInc pfC 2.38 10.6 22.50 Reckson pt 1.91 8.322.94 Reclwd pf 3.02 11.8 25.63 - 0.13 ReliaS pfA 2.05 8.5 24.25 + 0.19 ReliaS pfB 2.03 8.3 24.31 +0.31 Repsol prA 1.86 8.6 21.56 - 0.19 RhPOv pr 2.03 8.7 23.44-0.13 RioAlg pf 2.34 11.0 21.25 + 0.25 Rouse pfZ 2.31 9+9 23.38 - 0.31 Rouse pfB 3.00 8.5 35.50 - 0.03 RBSc prB 2.80 10.8 26.00 + 0.05 RBSc prC 2.37 9.52494 + 0 RBSc prD 2.28 9.324.44 - 1225 RBSc prE 2.25 9.424.00 0.13 RBSc prF 2.13 9.4 22.75 + 0.25 Stock Div %Yld Last Chg RBSc. prG 1.85 8.4 22.08 + 0.14 RBSc PH 2.01 9.1 22.00+013 RBSc pri 2.22 9.4 23.56 - I RBSc pri 2.36 9.5 24.81 +0.06 RBSc pfX 2.13 8.525.00 +006 Royce pf 1.95 8.024.38 Royce pfA 1.83 7.823.44 +0.19 SCEG pfr 1.89 8.2 23.00-0.31 SEMCO pfl 1.10 9.8 11-19 +0-06 SEMC pfL .51p 25.31 Sl FnTr pt 2.38 9.3 25.64 +0.02 .G . PT 2.1 12 19.9 SL Im f 2 28.69 0.13 SPGPr PIS 2.19 9.1 24.00 -0-42 SSBH pf 1.80 8.1 22.13-0.06 SealAir pf Z00 4.0 50.06 + 0.69 Sempra pf 2.23 8.7

275 / C9 Day

25.75 +0.06 ShawC pfA 2.11 8.923.69 ShawC ptB 2.13 9.0 23.75 -025 Shurgd pfB 2.20 9.8 22.50 - 0.06 Shurgd pfC 2.18 9.7 22.50 +0.13 SierraP pf 2.15 9.0 24.00 -0.06 SixFlags pf 4.05 125 32.38 +0.44 SrcCp pf 2.40 8.6 27.75 - 0.06 Southn pfA I 94 8.1 23.88 -0.25 Southn pfB .78 7.922.56 -0.19 Southn ptC 1.72 7.9 21.88 +0.13 SoUnF pf 2.37 9.6 24.75 + 0.19 SwGas pf 2.28 9.2 24.75 - 0.06 SwtPS pff 1.96 8.3 23.75 - 0.13 SovrSS pfI3 2.46 11.1 22.13 -0.06 Spiekr pfB 2.36 9.5 24.88 +0 . 31 Spiekr pfC 1.97 8.6 22.81 +0.19 Spiskr pfE 2.00 8.7 22.88 +0. 3 StkVC pr 1.00 7.3 13.76 StonC pf 20.75+0.25 SuraC pfW 2.08 8.3 2519 +0.25 SunaC pfV 2.09 8.4 2494 -006 Suncor pf 2.28 9.3 2450 +0.19 SunsCT pf 2.90 16.1 1800 SuperT pf 4.25 18.4 23.13 -1.19 SwdEC pf 1.84 8.222.44 +0.13 SwdEC pfA 1.80 8.022.38 +0.25 Swepco pf 1.97 8.2 23.94 -0.06 TCI Cm pf 2.18 8.7 25.00 - 0.25 TCjCm pfA 2.50 9.825.58 -0.23 TCCm pfB 2.43 9.425.81 +0.05 TXI Ca pfS 2.75 8.6 31.94 TXUCa pfA 1.81 8.1 22.25 -0.13 TXUCa pfB 2.18 8.7 25.13 +0.19 TXU pfl 4.63 10.9 42.56 + 1.13 TXU pfA 1.80 7.1 25.23 +0.10 TXU pfB 1.81 7.2 25.00 + 0.13 TXU pfm 2.06 8.6 24.06 + 0.19 TXU 00 2.00 8.3 24.00 + 0.44 TXU Eu pf 2.44 9.5 25.75 + 0.06 Ta pfA 2.25 24-38 Tallissmm pfB 2.23 24.13 Taub pfA 2.13 11.4 18.75 +0.19 Tewo PfA 1.16 10.8 10.75 +0.25 TxCap pfA 1.72 7.8 22.13 TxCap pfB 1.40 7.3 19.19 Textr PIT 1.98 8.3 23.94 +0.19 Thorn pfA 2.42 11.5 21.00 - 0.31 TWCap pt 2.22 8.9 24.94 + 0.13 TItsnCp pf 1.00 4.9 20.50 +11.88 ToIE pfF 2.37 8.627.63 ToIE pfK 1.75 T.5 23.25 TolE pfL 1.88 8.1 23.25 +0.38 TmkCa pf 2.30 9.3 24.63 -0-19 Tottaukc. pr 2.22 9.1 24.50 TrCda47 pf 2.06 8.7 23.63 + 0.6i TrCda pfC 2.13 24.25 + 0.25 TCdaC g pf 219 - 24.88 +0.06 TravPC pf 2.02 8.2 24.50 -0.19 TwPC pfB 2.00 8.1 24.69 TriCntl pf 2.50 7.1 35.00 +0.38 UAL pfS 3.06 9.9 31.00 + 1.25 UAL PIT 3.31 11.2 29.50 + 0.44 UDS Ca pf 2.08 9.0 23.13 +0.13 USRst PIA 1.93 13.7 14.06 USB pfA 1.80 8.1 22.19-0.13 USX Ca pf 2.19 9.1 23.94 USXCa PIZ 3.37 9.7 34Z3 + 0.13 USX pfA 3.25 8.8 36.94 - 0.13 UnEl pfC 4.00 7.0 57.38 + 0.38 UCapF pf 2.41 9.625.06 +0.06 UDo. pfA 2.31 9.4 24.63 + 0.31 UDom pfE1 2.15 9.3 23.06 + 0.25 UliICo pfW 2.44 9.226.44 +0.44 U ICC pfC 2.22 9.0 24.75 -0.25 Valero pfU 1.94 7.4 26.13 -0.50 VaPw pfT Z01 8.324.25 -0.38 Vornado pf 3.25 6.1 5300 - 0.5 Vorndo pfB 2.13 9.7 22.06 +0.06 Vomdo pIC 2.13 9.3 22.88 + 1.00 WEC pfA 1.71 8.0 21.44 + 0.13 WHX pf 3.25 19.2 16.94 + 1.06 WHX pfB 3.75 23.4 16.00 -0.13 WeinR pfA 1.86 8.621.63 OJ WeinR pfC 1.75 4.241.56 -0.31 WelF pfB 2.75 6.741.00 Wendy PIT 2.50 5.3 47.50 +0.5 WstGR pf 2.28 9.2 24.81 +0.19 WstG pfA 2.63 7.5 35.00 +10.50 WtnAsC pf 1.97 8.8 22.38 -0.06 WstRes pf 2.13 9.4 22.69 + 0.06 Westpac pf 2.00 8.2 24.25 - 0.06 Winstn pfA 2.31 12.7 1825 XcelE pfD 4.11 6.9 59.44 0.06 XcelE PfE 4.16 6.762.50 Xce1E pfG 4.56 7.1 64.00 AMEX Alcoa pf 3.75 7.1 52.50 -2.00 Stock Div %Yld Last Chg AlIgntCa pf .99 10.3 9.63 ACoin pfA 1.05 17.1 6.13 BVBC pf .16p 8.19-0.06 Chfint pt 1.81 6.3 28.63 - 0.38 EBH Ca pf.75 10.0 7.50+0.06 EBICap pf 2.13 11.5 18.50 +0.25 FW Cap pf.94 11.8 8.00 -0.31 Frontin pf 60 13.3 4.50GlcWstr pf i.27 13.6 16.75-1.25 HrtlndF pf 2.13 8.7 24.50 IndepCT pf .85 10.3 8.25 Intrust pfA 2.06 8.6 23.97 +0.28 MBNK pf .96 10.1 9.50 - 0.13 Metrom pf 3.63 13.5 26.88 PGECap pf 1.97 8.3 23.75 PS BPk pf 2.31 10.023.13 +0.50 PcEn pfC 4.50 7.064.00 -0.25 PcEn pfD 4.75 6.968.50 - PGEpfA 1.50 7.6 19.63 + 0.13 PGEpfD 1.25 7.6 16.50 - 0.25 PGEpfI 1.09 7.0 15.63 +0.38 Pacif pf 5 7.6 POMC pf 2T2 5261+11.50 QuadCty pf .92 93 9.88 +0.13 RoyceM pf 1.94 7.9 24.50 +0.25 SCEd pfB 1.02 6.9 14.75 +0.38 ScEd pfC 1.06 6.9 15.34+0.34 ScEd pfD 1.08 7.9 13.63

Day C9 / 276

+0 06 SCEd pfE 1.19 8.1 14.75-0 25 SoCap pfA .83 9.2 9.00-0.13 SpecCap pf 1.00 9.6 10.38+0.38 StdAuto pf 1.02 11.3 9.00 TDSCa pfA 2.13 8.824.13 +0.19 TDSCa pfB 2.01 8 . 822 . 88-0.19 TolE pfB 4.25 8.1 52.50+0.25 TdE pfD 10.00 9.2 109.25 USHmG pf 2.35 14.9 15.75 -0.13 Wstmind pf -18.00+0.25 WisP pf 4.50 TO 64.13 NASDAQ ABI Cap pf .85 11.7 7.25 -0.38 AMCV pf 37.00-1.00 Alkerm pf 3.26 2.1 164.00+32 .50 ArkBst pf 2.88 6.5 44.00 +0.25 BBC Cp pf 2.38 12.4 19.19 Bando pf 2.13 11.8 18.00 BnkUtd2 pf 2.40 10.7 22.50-0.50 CFB Cp pf 2.05 9.2 22.25 +0.13 CaptlTr pf .85 9.6 8.88-0 3 CentBn pf.83 9.4 8.81 +013 CityHld pi 1900 +0.25 CstIBc pfA 2.28 111 2050 -0.25 CstlBc pf 2.5 11.4 19.75 - 0.13 DuraAt pf 1.88 107 17.50 +0.50 Dynex pfA 5.50 + 0.38 DyneX pf8 5.63 + 0.30 Dynex pfC 6.50 +0.25 ESB Fn pf .86 9.7 8.88 + 050 EmmisC pf 3.13 6.3 50.00+0.25 FCNB C pf 2.D6 8.6 23.88 +0.13 FNB pf 1.88 3.5 54.00 + 3.60 FidlCpl pi 8.50+0.13 FstPfd pf 2.31 9.5 24.38 - 0.13 FstCty pf 2.10 20.0 10.50 + 1.26 lstSrl pf 2.25 8.9 25.25 1stSfl pf 1.92e 8.8 2115 0.05 FstUtd pf .94 H 9.75 -0.19 FlgstrC of 2.13 9.9 21.50 -0.06 Flagstr pf 2.38 9.8 24.25 GBB Cl pf 2.44 10.0 24.50 +0.25 GCB Cp pf 2.50 10.3 24.25 + 0.13 GBCIC2 pf 1931 +006 HlwdEn 11.3 8.88 HmitnCp pf 8.1 3 HowIC pf 3.16 41.00 +0.38 ICO pf 1.69 147 11.50 US Cp pf.88 9.4 9.38 +0.38 dBkMI pf 2.31 9.424.50 IndCap pf 2.32 9.7 24.00 -0.13 IwFn pf 2.31 9.424.63 -0.63 JBI Cap pf 2.31 9.424.50 JamsIn pf 231 14.9 15.50 -0.50 Jamesn pf 1.70 14.4 11.81 -0.42 Ltchfld pf 10.63 LouG 5pf 1.25 8.8 14.25-0.25 MCI .ip. 2 00 8.3 24.13 -0.13 MV pf 1. M 8.3 23.00+0.25 MarCpT pf .83 11.9 7.00-0.13 MtrxBn pf 2.50 12.0 20.75 +0.48 MrcBnk pf 9.56 NCEIE C pf 24.56 NHTB pf 9.50+0.25 PCC Cp pf .94 11.1 8.50+0.38 PSINet pf 3.38 8.8 38.50 - 0.44 PplsCp pf 2.44 12.4 19.75 +0.13 PhilCnl pf .70 9.2 7.63 PriceEn pf 1.40 9.4 14.94 +0.25 ProFac pfl.72 10.1 17.00 +0.06 RBI Cp pt .91 11.7 7.75 SBI Cap pf 2.33 9.8 23.88 +0.13 SVB Cp pf 21.25 +0.19 SimnFC pf 1.14 9.2 12.38 SinclrB pf 3.00 8.9 33.75 -0.30 SthsdeS pf .85 11.1 7.63-0.98 SterBm pf - 24.13 +0.38 StrCpTr pf 2.38 10.2 23.38 +0.38 SuccssC of .90 9.9 9.13 +0.25 SunCap pf 2.46 10.423.63 -0.50 SmCapll pf.89 9.4 9.50 Tekinsgt pf 3.13 UPInt pfE 2.00 5.437.13 0. UtdGlb pf 3.50 8.640.56 -0.19 WstBnk pf 9.00-0.13 Wintrust pf 10.50 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 8.50 7.00 MSIDW oic .54 6.4 q 79 8.44 8.38 8.44+0.13 9.44 7.63 MSIDW tfa.51 5.5 q 660 9.31 9.31 9.31 9.44 7.81 MSIDW tfb .51 5.5 q 287 9.38 9.31 9.31 938 7.44 MSDW tfe .45 4.9 q 513 9.25 9 19 9.19 8.75 7.38 MSDW pia .54 6.2 q 98 8.69 8.63 8.69 13.31 11.44 MSDW iqn .78 5.9 q 20 13.31 13.19 13.25 4.38 12.06 MSIDW iqt.93 6.6 q 81 14.06 14.00 14.06+0.06 4.50 12.31 MSDW q .93 6.5 q 118 14.38 4.25 14.31+0.06 13.00 11.31 MSDW iqm .81 6.4 q 172 12.81 12.69 12.75+0.06 25.31 22.38 MSFn8.40 2.10 8.4 658 25.00 24.69 25.00+0.25 25.25 22.25 MSFn 8.20 2.05 8.2 147 24.94 24.75 24.94+0.06 155.25 104.69AMorgan 4.00 2.4 15 521162 168.94 161.63 167.19+16A 11.88 6.19WorrKnud 14 1940 12.00 11.75 12.00+0.44 3.75 1.88 MorrKn wt 19 3.69 3.19 3.44+0.13 30.75 16.38 MorrsnMgt .16 b 0.6 25 1239 27.56 26.13 26.63-1.06 21.75 13.00 MortnRst 11 469 21.13 21.00 21.00-0.06 61.50 27.38 Motorola a .16 0.4 69 128649 36.44 35.00 36.13+11.06 36.94 25.81 Mueller 11 1016 31.75 31.00 31.56+056 12.50 10.69 Muniast .82 6.8 q 203 12.00 11.94 12.10 12.44 10.81 MunAdv .72 6.1 q89 11.75 11.69 11.75 8.88 7.06 MunHi .58 6.9 q 167 8.44 8.38 8.44+0.06 22.13 18.06 MuniMtg 1.67 18.0 13 1154 21.50 20.8B 21.00-0.38 2.38

277 / C9 Day

10.56 Munfort .73 6.1 q10 11.94 11.94 11.94 2.06 10.44 MunPrt2 .75 6.5 q 2 11.63 11.63 11.63-0.06 10.25 8.63 MuntenhFd .64 6.3 q 744 10.25 10.13 10.19 4.00 11.00 MunihCA .74 5.6 1084 3.19 12.94 13.19+0-1 15.13 11.31 MunihCA5.8 q 1 4.44 14.31 14.44+0.25 3 N 3607 1 13.06 10.19 MunihFL .74 63 q 11.69 1.63 11.69 14.06 11.88 Munihld .83 6.5 q 145 12.81 12.69 12.81+0.06 12.88 10.19 Munihld2 .76 6.5 q 296 11.75 1.69 1.75 12.81 10.38 MunihIns .73 6.2 q 306 11.69 11.50 11.69+0.06 12.94 9.88 MunIns2 .68 6.2 q 804 11.00 10.88 11.00+0.13 13.38 10.56 MunihNi .71 5.8 q 240 12.25 12.13 12.25-0.06 14.00 10.81 MunihNYI .81 6.4 q 514 12.63 2.50 12.63+0.13 12+63 10.44 MuniQ .78 6.4 q 135 12.25 2.06 12.19 14.00 11.31 MunyIcCA .79 5.7 q 684 13.75 13.13 13.75+0.63 13.88 11.06 MunyCAI .76 5.6 q 334 13.75 3.56 13.69 14.31 11.13 MunyCA12.81 5.7 q 298 14.31 4.25 14.25+0.06 13.00 10.50 MunyFL .73 6.2 q 190 11.69 1.63 11.69 13.50 10.56 MunyFL1 .75 5.9 q 5 12.69 2.69 12.69 13.81 11.00 Muniyld .86 6.6 q 868 13.00 12.86 12.94 13.38 11.31 MunyIdIns.94 6.4 q 1594 13.19 13.06 13.13-0.06 13.19 10.63 MunyMI +75 6.3 q 157 11.94 11.88 11.88-0.06 13.25 10.88 MunyMll .78 6.3 q 273 12.44 12.25 1244+013 13.63 11.06 MunyNJ .79 6.0 q 156 13.19 13.06 13.19 14.19 11.31 MunyNJI .81 5.9 q 171 13.75 13.56 13.69+0.06 13.63 10+63 MunyNYI .77 6.1 q 472 12.69 12.50 12.69+0.13 13.44 11.00 MunyPAIn .79 6.2 c 138 1275 12.50 12.75+013 13.00 11.00 MunyQIly .81 6.4 q 962 12.69 12.63 12.63-0.06 12.94 10.25 MunyQft2 .80 6.7 q 406 11.88 11.75 11-88+0.06 69.06 48.19 MurpO 1.5Ot2.2 12 1812 67.94 66.19 66.75-0.94 9.75 5.88 Musicl-d 4 876 7.19 6.88 7.13+0.13 28.56 9.81 MutRisk .24 1.1 27 1058 21.75 21.13 21.25-0.94 3225 16.00 Mylan .16 0.6 98 7153 27.31 26.56 26.56-0.44 N 48.25 34.00 NCH 1.40 3.8 12 196 37.50 37.25 37.31+0.31 21.13 14.50 NCI Bld 7 332 17.63 17.38 17.63+0.13 47.00 26.69 NCR Cp 12 7109 41.00 39.81 40.38+0.56 24.25 20.00 NIPS Ga26 194 8.5 10 22.88 22.88 22.88 24.38 9.75 NL Ind .14 0.6 10 763 23.56 23.31 23.31-0.13 27.50 15.75 NRG En n 5579 26.56 26.00 2625+0.44 21.38 6.50 INS Grp dd 555 17.88 17.31 1763+0.06 30.75 22.94 NUI .98 3.3 16 302 30.13 29.94 3006-0.13 28.63 8.19 NabiscoGp .49 1.7 35 8571 28.19 28.06 2806 54.19 8.75 NabisH .75 1.4 38 3102 53.50 53.44 53 44 78.38 33.56 NACCO .90 1.9 8 140 47.00 46.38 4688+13.38 10.44 850 Nashua 9 21 8.25 8.06 8.13-0.06 14.94 7.75 NatcoG n 58 262 10.13 9.88 9.88 83.06 61.31 NtAust 3.58 a 4.8 401 74.56 73+38 74.50-0.38 29.06 2100 NtAust un 1.96 7.4 2401 26.88 26.56 26.63-0.25 10.63 6.63 NBGrce a .22 a 3.2 106 6.88 6.75 6.88+0.25 31.41 16.00 NatlCity 1.14 5.4 912646 21.19 20.13 20.94+0.81 43.00 20.75 NData .30 1.0 32 1677 29.81 29A 29.38+0.19 59.25 20.38 NatDiscB 12 839 36.63 35.75 36.19-0.25 12.50 4.38 Natl 987 5.25 5.00 5.25+0.25 53.69 39.38 NatFGs 1.92 13.7 15 264 52.69 52.44 52.44-0.19 23.31 18.38 NatGoff 1.80 B.8 18 371 20.69 20.38 20.50-0.13 48.25 34.00 NatGrid In 1.20 e 2.9 12 41.44 40.75 41.44+0.56 19.44 4.88 NtlHthInc 2.56 34.7 4 1025 7.50 7.31 7.38-0.13 37.63 12.00 Nat .0l [w] dd 2267 34.94 34.25 34.69-0.31 83.7542.38 NPwADS a 78 70.50 67.63 68.00-3.60 39.50 29.56 NtPrest 2.00 a 6.6 11 40 30.50 30.38 30.44+0.06 12.50 7.13 NatProc 15 356 12.13 11.81 11.81-0.25 25.63 8.00 NO RV 4 155 9.88 9.44 9.81+0.38 25.31 21.50 NRurU45 2.00 8.2 45 24.56 24.44 24.50 24.63 21.00 NRurU46 1.91 8.1 8 23.69 23.69 23.69+0.06 23.75 20.19 NRur47 1.84 7.9 53 23.25 2325 23.25 85.94 23.50 NtSemi 14 33656 45.00 4263 44.50+1.50 R Ou 18.25 NtSvIn 1.32 8.6 7 1029 20.13 19.88 19.94 8.63 188 NatlStI .28 6.9 did 96 4.13 4.06 4.06 24.94 20.63 NtlWstA 1.97 8.4 200 23.69

Day C9 / 278

23.50 23.52-0.30 8.94 8.13 NatnsBal .44 5.2 q 26 8.50 8.50 8.50-0.06 9.13 8.44 NatnGvO3 .46 5.1 q 211 9.06 9.00 UO 9.13 8.44 NatnGvO4 .47 5.2 q 14 9.06 9.00 9.00 7.75 3.38 Ntnsrent 9 101 4.00 3.88 3.88-0.06 42.00 19.60 NatwFS .48 1.2 12 18. 40.15 38.13 39.88+11.81 17.06 9.56 NatHP 1.134 12.7 10 477 14.44 14.25 14.44 54.25 2.81 NavigCons cd 5822 4.25 188 4.00+0.13 51.69 29.63 Navistar 6 3846 37.88 36.94 37.50-0.50 13.50 2.94 Neff Cp do 1262 5.50 4.19 4.88-0.44 35.75 19.38 NejmM A 13 2786 33.88 33.25 33.56-0.50 33.88 18.63 NeimMB n 1607 31.50 30.56 31.50+0.50 10.50 6.25 NelsnT .16 2.0 12 138 8.13 8.00 8.00-0.06 14.81 7.31 NtwkEq do 688 12.44 11.75 12.06-0.38 58.00 23.63ANeubBer n .40 0.7 21 146 59.38 57.94 59.19+1.25 4.31 2.88 Ne.Am .42 11.6 q 2228 3.69 3.56 3.63+0.06 29.94 13.25 NE Bus .80 4.1 9 101 19.75 19.38 19.69+0.44 25.13 22.75 NJEcon29 1.90 7.8 20 24.50 24.44 24.50-0.06 43.13 36.19 NJRsc 1.72 4.3 15 419 40.44 39.69 40.00+0.06 18.94 11.75 NPlanExI 1.65 11.9 10 1750 14.00 13.81 13.81-0.13 49.94 35.75 NY Times .46 1.2 20 6781 39.50 39.00 39.19-0.31 42.313 21.00 NewellRub .84 3.2 20 50606 26.50 26.81 25.94-0.13 45.38 21.00 NewtExp 25 1553 43.88 43.25 43.25-0.19 28.88 22.19 Ne.hal .40 a 1.6 9 408 25.50 24.13 24.63-0.88 30.06 16.94 NewrntM .12 0.6 old 33635 19.00 18.00 18.56+0.88 10.38 5.00 NwpkRs dd 970 10.38 10A9 10.250.13 42.25 24.75-NwpNws .16 0.4 16 944 43.00 41.75 42 50+0 56 67.00 26.31 NewsCorp .07e 0.1 45 3320 53.06 52.25 52.63-0.19 57.19 24.13 NewsCp A.18 a 0.4 3453 .50 43.63 44.25-0.06 16.19 10.81 NiagMH old 3237 13.00 12.63 12. + 40.06 29.38 Nicor 1.66 4.5 13 1456 37.56 36.75 36.75-0.69 59.2525.81 NikeB .48 1.2 1914185 40.94 39.56 39.56 -1 88 48.00 18.75 99 Cents a 59 867 45.56 44.19 44 94 -0.50 92.50 54.94 NippnTT .24e0.4 959 60.63 59. 60J9-0.44 24.81 12.75 NiSource 1.08 4.5 19 15750 24.06 23.81 23.94-0.13 42.38 19.13 NoblAf .16 0.4 19 3905 39.13 38.44 38.75+0.31 50.19 18.69 NobleDr 59 6160 49.31 47.63 48.50+0.63 62.50 20.00 Nokia a .19 a 0.4 160M 45.00 43.25 44.88+2.94 34.50 16.56 Nordstr .36 f 2.1 1316419 18.31 17.25 17.25-1.13 27.88 12.69 NorfikSo .80 5.0 52 8252 16.31 16.06 16.06-0.13 46.63 35.50 Nmk .96 a 2.2 28 335 43.31 43.19 43.31 +OD6 36 38 1825 Nortek -5 82 20.50 20.25 20.44+0.25 25.38 14.88 NortelInv .21 e 1.3 22 16.25 15.75 16.00 89.00 19.88 NortelNw .08 0.1 dd 91629 82.44 80.25 81.63+1.19 17.06 12.25 NEurO 1.49e9.1 11 12 16.38 16.25 16.38-0.13 21.69 14.44 NoFrkBc .72 4.0 13 5378 18.25 1 7.63 17.88+0.31 23.56 17.50 NstUt 30 1098 22.75 22.56 22.75-0.06 31.56 21.63 NoBordr 2.60 9.0 12 153 29.25 2835 28.88-0.50 81.38 42.63 NortrpG 1.60 2.1 9 4876 80.00 77.75 77.81-0.31 24.88 19.00 NwAir39 n 2.38 9.9 23 24.25 23.81 23.94+0.06 27.00 17.75 NwstNG 1.24 5.4 14 418 23.31 22.25 23.00+0.69 25.44 20.63 NwstnCp 1.11 5.1 13 684 21.75 21.56 21.75+031 25.06 15.38 NovaChem .40 2.0 5 150 20.00 19.63 20.00+0.13 35.19 10.50 Nova Cp dd 3780 14.50 14.38 14.38+0.06 40.56 34.63 Novartis n 1 D91 38.06 37.69 37.81-0.19 4.88 2.63 NovaStr dd 151 3.88 3.63 3.88+0.25 112.13 57.81 NovoNdk .62 e 0.6 27 306 103.00 101.13 101.50 -2.00 47.00 36.63 NSTAR 2.00 4.8 15 1525 43.19 42.00 42.06-0.69 14M 5.50 NuSkin 9 319 6.81 6.50 6.56 57.44 33.00 Nucor .601.6 11 5756 37.06 36.63 36.75+0.06 26.00 13.63 NuevEn 21 362 19.19 18.75 19.19+0.19 16.38 13.63 NuvAZ .82 5.5 q 2 14.81 14.81 14.81 15.13 11.56 NCADvA .80 5.8 q 220 13.88 13.75 13.75 16.25 12.63 NvCIQ .92 5.9 q 34 15.63 15.50 15.63+0.13 17.19 13.00 NCMM .94 5.9 q 22 16.06 16.00 16.00+0.06 9.88 7.44 NuvCal .52 5.6 q 247 9.31 9.19 9.31+0.13 17.13 12.75 NvCPP .92 5.9 q 210 15.63 15.50 15.63+0.13 16.88 13.06 NvCAQI .94 5.8 q 51 16.19 16.00 16.19+0A9 16.44 12.44 NvCSQ .91 5.9 q 134 15.63 15.44 15.50+0.06 16+00 13.19 NCTPI S2

279 / C9 Day

5.4 q 1 15.13 15.13 15.13+0.06 14+88 11.56 NuvDivA .83 6.4 q 697 13.00 12.88 12.94+0.13 1563 12 .81 NvFL .89 6.2 q 133 14.56 14.38 14.44-0.06 14.94 12.75 NFLO .88 6.0 q 57 14.75 14.56 14.56-0.06 15.75 12.38 NICAP .83 5.7 q 45 14.56 14.50 14.56 14.50 11.50 NICAP2 .77 5.5 q 181 14.00 13.88 14.00+0.66 15.06 12.50 NICAS .79 5.4 q 5 14.63 14.56 14.56+0.06 14.00 11.88 NIFLP .77 5.8 q73 13.38 13.25 13.38 14.56 11.50 NviMO .86 6.3 q 696 13.56 13.38 13.56+0.19 15.31 11.00 NINYP .80 5.7 q 93 13.94 13.81 13.94+0.13 14.50 12.25 NINYS .78 5.9 q 9 13.31 13.25 13.31 1 2.44 10.13 NIPIM2 .70 6.1 q 488 11.75 11.50 11.56 14.56 1.81 Nvin0l .88 6.3 q 348 14.13 13.88 14.06+0.06 14.63 11.50 W101 .86 6.5 q 462 13.25 13.13 1125 15.06 11.81 NMDPI .78 5.5 q 16 14.13 14.00 14.D6 -0.06 16.13 13.25 NvMAP .82 a 5.5 q 26 14.81 14.81 14.81-0.06 15.13 11.63 NvMIPI .83 6.2 q 78 13.44 13.25 13.31+0.06 16.56 12.50 NMIQI .88 a 6.4 q 46 13.81 13.75 1 3.75+0.06 15.13 11.75 NvMAd .86 6.5 q 929 13.31 13.13 13.25+0.06 12.00 9.88 NvMul .70 5.9 q 125 11.88 11.75 1 88+0.13 15.19 11.44 NvMO .90 6.6 q 329 13.69 13.56 1156-0.06 8.88 7.69 NuvMuVal 51 5.8 q 1377 8.88 8.81 8.81 16.06 12.19 NvNJ .92 a 6.1 q 150 1 5.25 15.13 15.13 15.19 11.75 NvNJPI .81 5.6 q 141 14.63 14.31 14.50+0.13 14.88 11.81 NNYDvA .78 5.9 q 24 13.25 13.25 13.25 15.25 12.38 NNYIQ .86 6.0 q 95 14.38 14.25 14.31-0.06 9.13 7.50 NNYMV .51 5.7 q 66 8.94 8.88 8.88 15.88 12.31 NvNYP .89 6.2 q 64 14.25 14.19 14.25+0.06 15.50 12A NvNYQI .85 6.1 q 241 13.88 13.69 13.88+0.13 15.75 12.19 NNYSO .88 6.3 q 128 14.06 13.94 13.94-0.06 15.81 13.06 NNCPI .75 5.4 q 12 14.06 13.94 14.00-0.06 17.44 14.94 NOHQI .92 5.7 q 74 16.38 16.19 16.190.13 16.25 12.75 NvPA 91 6.2 q 74 14.75 14.50 14.69-0.06 13.56 11.31 NvPAP2 .78 6.2 q 167 12.69 12.56 12.56-0.06 14.13 11.19 NuvPP .80 a 6.3 q 528 12.75 12.63 12.69-0.06 14.75 12.00 NvPIM .86 6.3 q 366 13.63 13.56 13.56+0.06 14.76 12.25 NvPMI .92 6.5 q 261 14.19 14.06 14.13+0.06 1350 11.00 NwPI .76 6.2 q 624 12.31 12.19 12.19-0.06 1525 12.25 NuVP12 .89 a 6 6 q 202 13.63 13.56 13.56-0.06 13.63 11.13 NuvP 4 .80 6.4 q 502 12.75 12.50 12.56 15.31 12.06 NuvQInc .91 6.7 q 707 13.63 13.50 13.56+0.13 HIGHS/LOWS THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 NEW HIGHS 137 AES Cp a CCFemsa Key3 Md n Pulte AES pfC ColumEn LabCp a QstDiag APW Ltd n CmtyHIt n LehmBr RehabCG a Adminstf ConsolEgy LibtPr pfA ReliaSir Alcatel CrosTbr LincNat ReliantEn AlIgEngy CrosT pfA MDC Saatchi AIIIAMkt DPL MFM AlliantTch DR Horton MISchott S acorS a Alza DeVry Magntk Seital Ame(en DeRigo Manulif gn ShawGp AmIntGp a Dexter Masscp Smucker n Americdt DomRes n MasPrt SnyderSNC Anadrk DrySIG MellonFnc SouthnCo Analog a DukeEngy MerrLyn StancpF ApIdPw s DukeR p1E MetLife un StdPac, AutoData EMC a MetrisCo a Stifel BUtcl PIES EdwLSci n MettlerT Suni-ife gn BkNY Elan wt B MidAtlan TB Woods Baxter EBrAero n MinTch BearSt EMInco2 MitchlEn TCF Fn Beverly EntPrPt MonSt TFIC Blackrck n Esterline MSDWit a Talbots Bocaflesrt FMC Morgan TchSym Boeing FahnVin MorrKnud Teekay BradRE FletEgy NeubBer n TVA 45 CLECO FoundHS NwpNws TollBro CMP Grp GabelliA OMI Cp TorDBk g CTG Res GoldmanS ONEOK TrvCp1-n Calpine a HancFab OrlentEH n UUniao CapOne HadeyD a Orthodon UtdhlthGp CardnIH Jabil a PacGulf CaremkRx JHFnSrv n PartnerRe UnvHIt CarpTech JNuveen PennVa Waters a CartWal KC Sou n PerkinElm WatsnPh ChoicePt a Keebler PioneerCp WidwDI NEW LOWS 29

Day C9 / 280

Autoliv HispBrd a MayDS Tndycft BASF n Cl McDnlds Target s Culp Inc Indones McMoRn TelNZ I MdbkIns FItCa pfK IndoSate A PacCCyb n Telstra FordM n JoAnnSt Pru UK n UCarb Gap LandsE Savia SA UPkMin GTribasa s Whys Simula WinDix 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 1100s High Low Last Chg 10.88 9.31 NvSMM .63 6.1 q 69 10.38 10.31 10.31 14.44 11.69 NuvSel .88 6.6 q 443 13.50 13.31 13.38+0.06 15.13 12.88 NSTFI .90 6.1 q 160 14.94 14.75 14.81+0.13 14.69 12.38 NSTF12 .87 U q 88 14.63 14.50 1450+006 1400 12.00 NSTF13 .82 5.9 q 45 13.88 13.81 1381 1006 8.44 NuvSnIn n 1.06 10.7 q 653 9.94 9.88 9 88 - 04 1488 11.50 NTXQI .88 a 6.6 q 67 13.25 13.13 1325+0.06 16.38 2.50 NVAPI .80 5.4 q 16 14.88 1481 14.88+0.06 39.13 14.00 Nvest 1.94 4.7 2380 39. 3 39.06 39.06 62.00 29.38 NycornArn .50 a 1. 1 714 4513 45.00 45.06 + 0.6 0 24+00 16.50 OGE Engy 133 6.2 12 1048 21.50 21.00 21.38+0.44 50.88 31.50 OM Grp .44 0.9 19 568 47.56 47.00 47.38+0.25 7.25 1.31AOMI Cp dd 4937 7.63 7.06 7.50+0.31 17.75 5.31 Oakley 37 3500 17.00 16.06 16.94+0.44 6.38 1.19 Oakwood .02j dcl 1752 1.75 1.56 163-0.06 25.25 15.75 OcciPet 1.00 4.6 9 19289 22.06 21.44 21.63+0.52 16.50 6.31 OceanEgy 45 4139 15.69 15.13 15.190.06 22.50 12.13 Oreaner 28 M6 17.75 15.94 17.44+1.98 13.00 7+69 Octel 4 29 8.69 8.56 8.63-006 9.25 5.25 OcwenFn cc 1691 5.88 5.69 5.69-0.25 14.88 5.88 OffcDpt 10 28403 7.44 7.25 7.31-0.19 8.75 3.75 Officemax dd 6466 5.19 4.94 5.19+0.13 23.19 7.25 Ogden dd 4014 17.50 17.25 17.38+0.13 24.94 20.90 OhP25 2.04 8.4 76 24.31 24.06 24.31+0.25 23.75 19.50 OhPw38 1.84 8.1 65 22.138 22.50 22.63 - 24.75 21.06 OhPw27 1.98 8.2 5 24.06 24.06 24.06-0.25 15.63 6.88 OilDri .36 3.9 12 47 9.63 9.31 9.31 40.25 22.75 OldKent .88 b 3.0 16 1186 29.50 28.44 29.31+0.63 24.63 10.63 OldRep .56 2.3 14 0708 24.00 23.50 23.94+0.56 2150 12.13 Olin .80 4.8 4 998 17.25 16.50 16.50 2125 4.38 OmegHlt 1.00 16.5 55 350 6.19 6.00 6.06+0.06 4.50 1.69 OmegaP dd 8 2.00 1.94 2.00 19LO 6.88 Omncre .09 0.7 25 3566 13.94 13.50 13.69+0.13 107.50 70.13 Omnicom .70 0.8 33 6627 94.31 83.19 83.44+0.88 1 13 4.38 Ofnnova n .20 3.3 12 862 6.00 5.13 6.00+1.00 2481 12.63 Oneida 40 2.9 34 64 3.88 13.75 13.75 3238 21.75 ONEOK 1.24 3.9 12 982 32.56 31.75 31.94+0.06 8.75 7.31 OppMS .84 10.0 q 181 8.38 8.31 8.38 10.00 2.63 OrbEng 340 8.94 8.69 8.88+0.06 23.75 8.19 OrbitalSci dd 1616 9.06 8.50 8.94+0.06 12.13 1.63 OreStl .08 3.1 dd 227 2.56 2.50 2.56+0.06 24.81 119.00 OfientEH n 2309 25.75 24.13 25.75+11.38 26.00 12.00 OnentFn .60 4.6 6 71 13.13 13.00 13.13+0.06 103.13 40.38 Orix a .06e0.1 33 67.13 66.63 66.88+0.69 32.38 11.00AOrthodon 29 8316 32.88 31.25 32.63+163 11.38 7.63 Osmonic cc 239 8.63 8.44 U-50 34.44 19.81 OutbkStk 13 11774 24.06 22.94 22.94-0.94 30.50 12.13 OvShip .60 2.0 dd 502 29.69 28.56 29.44+0.98 1825 7.56 OwensM .25 1.6 17 1150 15.44 14.94 15.31+0.31 2544 11.06 Owensill 8 2827 13.19 12.56 13.06+0.50 28. 4.88 OwenC .30 5.8 dd 2956 5.25 5.06 5.19 + 006 23.44 15.00 Oxford .84 3.8 7 33 22.13 22.13 22.13+0.06 PQ 16000 30.63 PE May a .17 0.2 cc 25735 99.94 96.06 98.38 + 1 98 276.00 13.00 PE Cdw a - 62 21597 109.00 100.13 108.00+8.66 49.75 30.75 PECO 1.00 2.1 18 14055 48.56 47.75 48.00 31.13 19.69 PG&E Cp 1.20 4.1 cc 8648 29.25 28.25 28.94+0.50 64.50 3350 PMI Grp .16 0.3 12 1496 62.44 6063 62.00+0.56 62.00 36.00 PNC 1.80 3.1 14 12767 59.75 58.06 58.94+1.00 65.06 40.06 PPG

281 / C9 Day

1.60 4.0 12 5291 4138 40.50 40.50-0.75 33.56 18.38 PPL Corp 1.06 3.2 9 8456 33.56 32.81 33.50+0.19 17.56 9.94 PXRE Grp .24 1.8 dd 316 13.75 13.63 13.63 13.31 11.63 PacAS 1.04 8.1 q 94 12.94 12.88 12.88-0.06 20.00 18.69PacCCyb n 21.57 18.81 18.63 18.81+0.06 23.50 13.13 PacCent .72 f 5.1 8 5927 14.19 13.31 14.00+0.63 27.06 19.25 PacGuff 1.76 6.4 16 554 27.94 27.00 27.50+0.44 25.00 21.50 Pcfcp35 2.09 8.6 25 24.50 24.38 24.38-0.13 1 2.75 9.25 PackArn n 131B 11.75 11.63 11.69 14.50 7.50 Pactiv n 8423 11.19 10.88 11.00 72.69 31.75 PainWeb .48 0.7 20 2297 71.50 70.25 71.50+1.13 3.44 1.88 Pakisinv .06 a 2.5 q 180 2.44 2.44 2.44 - 25.19 17.13 PallCp .66 3.1 18 8651 22.31 21.19 21.38-0.38 18.38 3.00 Pameco a 65 3.13 3.00 3.06+0.06 21.00 15.13 PanPacif 1.68 8.8 12 397 19.06 18.88 19.06+0.06 23.50 14.56 PanamBev.24 1.3 dd 1800 18.94 18.31 18.56-0.19 11.75 4.13 Panavis dd 7 7.88 7.81 7.81+0.06 8.44 3.00 ParTch -dd 32 3.19 3.19 3.19-0.13 41.38 18.13 ParkEl .32 0.8 22 380 40.19 39.56 40.19+0.44 14.94 9.88 ParkPlc 29 3316 14.88 14.60 14.69 7.44 3.00 ParkDrl dd 3753 7.19 7.00 7.13+0.13 54.00 31.38 ParkHan .68 2.0 11 4811 35.13 34.56 34.81+0.25 33.63 26.31 Parkwy 2.00 6.3 11 67 31.81 31.56 3175+0.06 42.31 28.WParbwRe 1.04 2.5 35 1579 42.50 40.13 411.94+11.91 21.88 7.06 Patina .08 0.4 13 1235 21.25 20.50 21.25+0.19 9.88 0.44 Patina wt 46 9.25 9.00 9.13-0.25 13.06 8.00 Paxar 7 1368 11.38 10.69 11.00+0.25 59.25 38.75 PaylSh 11 582 53.56 52.31 53.38-0.31 41.25 19.75 Pechny .38 a 1.6 35 23.25 23.00 23.25-0.13 17.38 6.00 Pediatm 16 1016 13.38 13.19 13.31+0.19 34.13 20.00 PennEMA .56 f 1.9 13 7 30.06 29.88 30.06+0.31 38.50 21.63 PennEM .56 f 1.7 14 127 33.31 3238 33.31+0.63 24.00 12.25 PennTrty 7 167 17.88 17.50 17.88+0.44 27.19 15.56PennVa .90 3.3 11 469 28.00 26.81 27.31+0.31 40.13 12.98 Pennoy 1.15 8.2 cc 48101 15.06 13.63 14.00-1.19 19.94 14.00 PenRE 1.88 10.8 7 131 17.63 17.44 17.44-0.13 14.44 8.38 PenzICIS T5 6.0 dd 1896 12.50 12.31 12.44-0.19 5.69 1.56 Pentacn 65 19 2.06 1.94 1.94-0.06 46.69 27.25 Pentair .64 2.0 11 3257 32.88 32.00 32.50+0.69 36.38 12.63 Penton.12 0.4 12 898 31.94 31.06 31.31 031 39.44 26.19 PeopEn 2.00 6.2 13 1075 33.38 32.50 32.50-0.69 15.69 5.00 PepBoy .27 4.6 28 904 6.00 5.75 5.88-0.13 33.63 15.50 PepsiBot .08 03 24 4895 32.00 31.56 3175 694 4.25 PepsiGem -3.04 4.94 4.88 4.94+0.06 47.06 29.69 PepsiCo .56 6 29672 42.81 41.19 4263+0.69 6.00 2.69 PepsiAmer dd 506 3.75 3.63 3.69+0.06 90.50 31.75APerkinElm .56 0.6 50 6053 91.25 88.38 89.94+0.44 21.44 13.38 PerezCo n .32 p 4858 16.88 16.56 16.81+0.31 6.13 4.25 Prmian .65 e 12.0 24 101 5.50 5.38 5.44-0.06 27.94 8.88 PerotSys 13 1258 10.38 10.25 10.38+0.06 11.69 2.31 PersGp 4 909 3.63 3.44 3.56+0.13 22.63 13.00 PetroC g .20 187 21.69 21.25 21.25-0.25 26.38 14.25 PetChins n 1533 23.94 23.38 23.751.13 33.00 24.50 Petrobrs n 11211 32.31 31.50 31.81-0.44 40.88 30.06 PetRs 2.33el.7 q 238 40.75 40.19 40.56+0.44 21.88 12.63 PetrolGeo 39 1469 19.13 18.50 18.88+0.06 48.38 23.00 FlfeifVac .38 e 0.9 43 31 41.13 40.75 40.75-0.25 49.25 30.00 Pfizer .36 0.8 47 IM3 43.44 42.56 4325+1.13 7.63 3.63 PhmRes Alp dd 356 6.50 6.19 6.38+0.13 59.75 32.75 Pharmacia .20 a 0.3 cc 32145 59.19 58.31 58.56+0.13 73.0036.06 Phelpll 2.00 4.5 dd 13609 45.00 42.00 44.50+2.56 22.38 19.75 PhilRet28 1.64 7.5 675 21.94 21.69 21.81-0.13 24.94 16.50 PhilaSub .72 3.1 20 590 23.50 22.50 23.44+0.69 39.38 18.44 PhilMor 2.12 f 7.2 .97 11.13 30.38 29.38 29.63-0.50 28.25 14.88 PhilLD .12 a 0.7 1 OF 16.88 16.75 16.88 55.75 23.75 PhilipsEl a 37 6421 49.31 48.50 49.31+1.75 17.50 14.56 PhilIntR 1.51 8.9 16 27 17.00 17.00 17.00-0.13 62.50 35.94 PhilPet 1.36 2.2 1410975 6228 6060 61.88+1.14 10.50 5.81 PhIVH .15 1.6 13 392 9.56 9.00 9.130.25 15.00 6.31 PhnxInvst 32 2.2 19 872 15.00 14.75 14.88+0.19 11.25 5.25

Day C9 / 282

Phosphate Ogj dd 272 5.75 5.50 5.50-0.06 7.81 2.25 PicCafe .12i 10 72 2.50 2.38 2.38 34.00 23.69 PiecING 1.46 5.3 14695 27.75 27.00 27.69 + 0 12.81 5.25 Pier 1 .16f 1.4 15 3870 11.94 11.69 11.75-0 06 9.69 7.75 PilgPrRTr .86 9.8 q 30.01 8.81 8.69 8.75+006 8.13 4.06 PilgPrA .06 1.2 3 16 5.19 5.13 5.13+0.06 11.00 6.06 PilgPrB .06 0.9 5 463 7.19 6.69 6.81-0.31 12.06 1.25 Pilowtex dd537 2.56 2.25 2.44-0.13 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chip 13.19 11.25 PimCom 1. 12 a 9.2 q 38 12.31 12.13 12.13-0.13 2406 1 4.88 PinnclEnt 7 919 20.94 20.38 20.63-0.13 42 63 25.69 PinWst 1 10 2540 41.94 40.81 41.19+0.19 42.25 16.63-PioneerCp .12 0 0.3 21 42.94 42.00 42.94+2.86 11.31 9.94 PionInt .92 8.2 q 32 11.31 11.19 11.19-0.06 15.63 6.75 PioNtrl 21 10682 13.94 13.50 13.88+0.19 65.38 3375 PitnyBw 1.14 3.1 14 7842 37.31 36.38 36.56+0.19 25.00 10.69 PittOrk .10 0.6 32 2382 16.94 15.56 16.56-0.94 17.50 7.69 PlacerlD .20 2.2 dd 21152 9.31 8.88 9.00+0A3 20.25 9.63 Plains 1.85 f 9.8 367 19.00 18.63 18.88+0.06 56.00 14.38 Plantron a 38 1916 50.81 49.38 49.94-0.31 24.94 10.25 Playby dd 276 13.56 12.88 13.50+0.94 29.50 11.38 PlaybyB dd 319 14.69 13.94 14.44+0.50 15.50 10.13 PlaybcPd 15 534 12.00 11.88 11.88-0.06 31.38 21.50 PlumCrk 2.28 9.4 -9 1067 24.38 24+06 24.25+0.13 29.75 15.63 PcgoPd .12 0.4 27 1191 26.88 26.50 26.88+0.06 4500 19.06 Pohang .51 e 2.4 1751 21.31 20.63 21.25+0.63 40.13 25.56 Polaris .88 2.6 11 360 34.13 33.44 3413+0.56 30.63 16.25 Polaroid .60 3.5 74 4108 17.31 16.81 17+00 32.44 8.00 PlcyMgt old 942 13.50 13.19 13.50+0.31 20.75 12.75 Polo RL 13 447 19.44 19.13 19.38-0.19 20.50 6.56 PolyGp .08 1.1 10 167 7.06 6.88 7.00+0.13 23.50 10.63 PopeTal .44 2.2 9 383 20.13 19.25 19.88+0.69 24.88 22.00 PortG35 2.06 8.5 - 10 24.25 24.19 24.25+0.06 14.88 11.44 Portugl 2.16e0.9 q35 11.75 11.69 11.69-0.06 16.25 7.75 PortgIT a .1 Be 1.7 22 2434 10.75 10.38 10.75+0.06 47.06 36.00 PostPrp 3.04 7.2 17 2264 42.44 41.81 42.31+0.25 60.06 42.00 Potash g 1.00 440 53.56 52.63 53.13+0.31 45.50 32.56 Potitch 1.74 719 34.00 33.25 33.63+0.38 25.00 22.13 PotEd25 2.00 8.1 13 24.88 24.75 24.75+0.13 28.06 19.06 PotmEl 1.66 6.6 15 2105 25.50 25.00 25.19+0.13 44.50 21.25 PwgnADS 248e 7.1 152 3435 34.13 34.75+0.13 54.94 31.38 Praxair .62 1.4 15 11997 44.56 43.31 44.25+0.94 7744 23.44 PrecCst .24 0.3 22 2186 76.75 75.00 76.00+0.19 40.38 19.13 PrecDr g 4333 37.811 33.7S 34.00-3.56 14.00 11.25 Pfdlrco .98 7.9 q 50 12.44 12.38 12.38+0.13 11.44 9.06 PrflOF .82 8.6 q 83 9.56 9.50 9.56 10.44 7.19 Premdr g 1.61 8.88 8.56 8.63-0.31 16.50 8.50 PremFarn .3le2.0 34 10 15.19 15.13 15+13-0.19 26.50 18.63 PrentPr 1.908.0 13 1037 24.50 24.25 2431 +0.06 39.94 19.88 Prepaidi-g 17 406 33.13 32.63 32.810.38 28.38 18.13 PnceCm cc 1250 20.69 20.44 20.50 26.75 11.50 PndeIntl dd 1150 25.25 24.50 24.63-0.38 37.63 19.56 Primrk 26 309 37.06 3663 37.00-0.13 16.88 11.63 PrimeGp 1.35 88 6 191 15.88 15.38 15.38-0.38 11.00 7.25 PrmHsp 10 978 10.44 10.19 10.38+0.25 7.94 0.22 PrmRetI dd 3266 0.69 0.56 0.69+0.13 34.88 10.75 Primedia - dd 1454 18.19 17.50 17.88-0.13 1 3.88 2.00 PrisonR dd 5527 2.38 2.06 2.38+0.25 118.38 52.75 ProctG 1.6 f 2 26 26736 62.25 6138 6181-0.25 10463 45.00 ProgCp .28 f 0.4 cc 3572 76.69 74.81 75.81+0.13 24.63 16.75 Prologis 1.34 5.9 20 3318 23.31 22.81 22.88-0+38 9.13 5.50 ProsSt .90 14.9 q 988 6.69 6.56 6.63 4.06 1.00 ProtctOne old 367 1.75 1.63 1.75 37.31 19.63 ProtLife .52 1.8 12 1302 29.19 28.75 28.75 42.50 27.00 PrvEngy 1.08 2.5 96 56 42.38 42.25 42.38+0.13 2494 18.69 ProvCap 2.19 93 49 23.50 23.13 23.50+0.06 118.50 58.13 ProvidF .20 0.2 27 6480 116.44 11344 114.94 +2.06

283 / C9 Day

3094 26.50Pru UK n 168 26.63 25.88 25.98-0.88 22.13 15.38 PubStREN .60 p 60 21.00 19.75 2050-0.50 22.25 14.63 PSAM 80 3.7 11 1466 22.25 21.38 21.380.38 41.88 25.69 PSEG 2.16 6.0 10 4296 36.38 35.75 36.25+0.44 26.94 20.81 PubStrg .88 a 3.6 18 2314 24.50 24.00 24.38+0.38 2313 18.94 PubStgA n 2.45 10.7 58 22.88 22.50 22.88+0.38 37.56 27.63 PR Can .76 2.5 17 20 30.50 30.25 30.25-0.44 24.81 18.63 PugetEn 1.84 7+9 11 948 23.56 23.06 23.38+0.25 46.63 32.81 Pulitzer .64 1.5 23 182 43.44 43.06 43.06-0.31 31.50 15.25APulte .16 0.5 8 3291 33.69 311.411 32.94+11.56 20.94 1 3 .88 PureRes n -204 19.31 18.38 19.31+11.00 22.00 17.75 PCOIT 1.86 a 9.5 q 67 19.75 19.56 19.56-0.13 10.06 8.63 PDIF .67 6.8 q 24 9.88 9.81 9.81+0.06 9.06 6.38 PH1CB .85 107 q 105 7.94 7.88 7.94 10.19 6.88 PHYM .58 7.0 q 212 8.25 8.13 8.25+0.13 13.94 10.25 PIGMT2 .79 6.8 q 71 11.63 11.50 11.63 14.19 9.69 PIGM 71 6.7 q 189 10.63 10.38 10.63+0.25 13.31 9.50 PMHYT 1.21 11.2 q 88 10.88 10.75 1081+0.06 11.06 8.00 PMMI .76 73 q 530 9.88 9.69 9.81+0.13 7.19 6.00 PMIT .66 9.9 q 517 6.75 6.63 6.69 7.06 5.69 PMIIT .64 9.9 q 1370 6.50 6.44 6.44 13.56 10.81 PMOT 91 7.2 q 194 12.75 12.63 12.69+0.06 7.31 5.31 PPrIT 64 9.9 q 1613 6.44 638 644 - 13+63 11.00 PTFHC 90 a 7.0q 124 13.00 12.88 12.94+0.06 17.44 13.38 QuakerCh.78 4.8 8 214 16.75 15.88 16.13-0.50 80.69 45.81 QuakrOat 1.14 11 26 15732 69.63 67.50 68.25-1.63 27.38 14.38 Quanex .64 3.4 11 311 1869 18.50 18.69 63.13 14.13 Quanta s 31 4876 47.25 45.13 46.75+1.25 20.00 8.00 QtmDSS 16 9937 13.69 13.13 1356+0.38 13.00 5.50 QtmHDD 4193 9.88 9.31 9.75+0.5 26.31 17.19 QuebWrid .28 1.2 36 120 23.25 22.38 2319+0.88 127.50 22.56AQstDiag cc 5757 130.50 123.00 123.75 +1.88 22.00 13.56 Questar .68 3.1 16 1189 21.81 2163 21.69-0.19 21.00 9.25 Quiksilv 13 2038 15.1914.75 14.880.13 14.25 8.75 Quilmes .30 a 2.7 17 458 11.00 11.00 11.00+0.13 14.94 8.25 Quinenc .85 a 9.6 dd 962 9.00 8.69 8.88-0.13 66.00 27.50 QestCm 88 46311 52.81 51.31 51.63+0 R 29.50 10.69 R&B Fadc did 17342 2875 28.19 28.50-0.04 9.69 8.25 RCM Str .89 9.2 q 94 9.63 9.56 9.63+0.06 8.63 2.88 8.50 Eq old 79 3.44 3.13 3.38+0-25 13+69 9.75 RFS Htl 154 123 83 282 12.56 12.25 12.50 2613 18.69 AGS Engy 1.80 7.2 9 1020 25.19 24.50 24.813+0.25 21+25 14.88 RH Donl . 18 a 0.9 17 2365 21.13 20.31 21.00+063 37.25 15.75 RJ Reyn 3.10 8.6 21 2474 36.00 35.13 35.88+0.88 39.63 26.25 RU Cp.60 f 1.6 13 295 38.50 38.38 38.50+0.06 10.75 6.88 ROC Id . q 379 8.00 7.81 7.81-0.06 .- 5.38 1 lpC 1 1.3 20 12 11.19 11-00 11-00 - 1375 8 63 RPM .47 4.9 25 3519 9.75 9.13 9.56+0.56 14.88 5.44 Rn Intl cc 523 14.13 14.00 14.06-0.13 67.50 34.25 RadianGp .12 0.2 12 4813 62.50 60.88 62.13+1.06 79.5035.06 RadiM .20 0.3 37 20522 61.63 S11.75 59.00-2.50 20.75 11.50 Ralcorp .11 367 13.50 13.44 13.50 24.50 6.75 RalsRP a .28 1.2 11 12111 22.88 22.44 22.63+0.25 16.25 11.75 RamcoG 1BB 11.9 11 32 14.13 13.94 14.13+0.06 5.63 1.44 RangeRsc -.21 6999 5.00 4.81 5.00+0.13 31.98 16.00 RJOMF .30 1.1 12 2421 30.38 28.50 28.50-1.36 48.88 35.38 Raynrinc 1.44 3.5 13 347 4188 41.19 41.56+0.25 29.13 16.88 Rayovac 17 439 18.06 17.75 17.750.06 4.44 2.63 v Raytc 1 466 3.06 3.00 300+006 68.13 17.88 Raythn .80 3.0 33 3527 26.94 25.31 26.56+1.25 69.26 17.50 RaythnB .80 2.9 34 9846 281326.88 27.81+11.26 41.88 26.75 RdrDg .20 0.5 24 1936 38.69 38.00 38.50+0.25 38.00 24.50 RdrDB .20 0.6 22 146 34.94 34.50 34.75+0.25 36.88 25.88 RdrDTr 1.93 5.7 38 33.75 33.13 33.69+0.31 24.63 19.25 RltyInco 2.18 9.6 14 337 22.75 22.44 22.63+0.13 24.13 21.13 RltIncO8 2.06 8.9 46 23.25 23.00 2319+0.06 26.94 17.56 Reckan 1.54 f 6.3 18 1538 24.94 24.31 24.31-0.69 27.88 18.88 RecksnB

Day C9 / 284

238 f 9.3 146 25.75 25.50 25.56-0.19 15.94 11.25 RedwdTr 1.68 f 10.6 1.39 15.94 15.31 15.81+0.56 20.98 6.94 Reebok 35 1865 19.50 19.13 19.19-0.25 40.88 22.56 Reedint .56 a 1.6 23 1 35.19 35.19 35.19 24.00 18.31 RgcyRlt 1.92 8.5 15 73 22.69 22.56 22.63 37.75 T.SVRehbCG 306015 39.6334.13 37.36+3.38 35.13 15.38 ReinsGp .24 0.8 28 287 28.88 27.81 28.50+0.69 53.75 23.75AReliaStr .88 1.6 21 7217 53.88 53.75 53.81+0.19 7.75 0.13 RelGrp .08 dd 4849 0.23 0.19 0.22 25.00 16.88 ReISHA a .22 1.1 10 412 20.63 20.06 20.63+0.56 37.50 19.75ARefiantEn 1.50 4.0 5 5947 37.69 36.94 3T13+0.19 51.13 33.19 RemisaRe 1.50 3.1 9 647 48.13 47.88 47.88-0.06 32.25 13.94 RentWay 14 494 24.63 24.13 24.50+0.31 24.25 18.00 Repsol .41 a 2.1 18 4479 20.06 19.69 19.81-0.13 18.50 7.69 RepGrp .36 2.0 12 622 17.88 17.75 17.81+0.13 17.50 8.98 RepubSv 12 3129 15.38 14.63 14.63-0.50 40.75 11.63 ResMed a 53 978 36.81 36.38 36.81+2.06 9.44 3.63 Resrtqst 23 78 5.88 5.63 5.88+0.06 25.81 5.75 Revlon dd 851 7.44 7.13 7.13+0.06 41.25 13.25 RexStore 8 839 18.00 16.63 17.88 33.00 15.94 ReynReyn.40 2.2 12 1278 838 18.06 18.13+0.06 24.19 13.38 Rhodia .37.2.6 1739 i 450 1 4.25 1 4.44-0.19 20.25 9.50 Rightch 15 45 19.88 19.50 19.75+0.25 19.63 9.25 RioAlgm g .28 103 19.56 19.38 19.50 97.25 57.13 Ritinto .56 a IS 11 864 67.63 64.75 66.50-0.81 38.69 18.25 Ritchie gn 1717 20.38 19.88 20.25+0.63 20.13 4.00 RiteAid dd 16510 4.06 4.00 400-0.06 24.81 15.00 RobbMyr .20 0.8 32 479 24.00 22.00 23.03+1.75 35.31 10.25 RobtHalf a 36 6882 32.44 31.06 31.81+0.19 16.44 B.38 RockTen 30 2.9 dd 1166 10.50 10.31 10.31+0.13 60.94 31.00 Rockwl 1.02 25 12 3357 40.94 38.94 40.44+1.25 34.50 14.88 RogCm g 968 25.13 24.63 24.75+0.13 39.50 15.63 Rogers a 25 89 35.19 34.75 34.88-0.31 55.25 20.75 RogWdss 134 31.19 29.88 30.38+0.75 49.44 25.69 RoHaas .80 f 2.8 18 7604 29.44 28.81 28.94-0.38 16.75 11.13 Rollins .20 1.3 56 103 15.00 14.88 15.00+0.13 12.19 6 RollLeas .22 3.3 4 1043 6.84 6.63 6.75-0.06 38.56 24.00 Roper .26 0.8 24 723 32.38 31.44 32.38+0.69 27.44 4.31 Rostele .03 a 0.2 629 14.44 14.25 14.38-0.38 8.94 2.38 RougeInds .12 3.4 dd 93 3.56 3.44 3.50 27.13 1975 Rouse 1.32 5.5 13 1042 24.38 24.06 24.13-0.25 33.00 13.75 Rowan cc 5586 31.69 30.81 31.00-0.25 9.81 3.81 RoweCos .14 b 3.2 5 39 4.63 4.44 444+0.06 6.88 4.00 RoylApl 16 707 6.81 6.75 6.81 60.25 38.00 RoyBk g 1.48 255 58.56 58.06 58.50+0.56 58.98 16.13 RylCarb .44 1.9 10 6707 22.88 21.63 22.88+0.69 65.88 50.44 RoylDut 1.37 a 2.2 19 1T761 61.69 60.63 61.19-0.63 25.13 16.88 RoylGp g 1640 21.63 21.13 21.56+0.38 15.00 1131 Royce 1.34e9.0 q 357 15.00 14.75 14.88 13.75 7.88 RubyTue s 05 0.4 22 759 12.50 12.19 12.50+0.31 19.06 10.25 Ruddick .36 2.9 11 602 12.56 12.25 12.25-0.19 26.25 16.98 RusBer .88 4.3 11 340 20.60 19.94 20.50+0.98 22.94 12.13 Russell .56 2.9 dd 780 1913 18.94 19.06-0.06 25.13 17.44 Ryder .60 3.1 13 2888 19.38 18.81 19.19 24.75 8.63 RyersTull .20 2.1 15 512 9M 9.31 9.44 26.38 15.19 Ryland .16 0.7 6 2047 24.56 23.00 24.56+11.63 S 10+06 8.69 S&PPrEqn q 612 9.75 9.69 9.69-0.06 85 94 32 50 SAP AG .2 11 3297 64.19 63.06 64.19+3.19 55 50 3481 SBC Com 102 2.4 24 50219 42.94 41.75 41.75+0.38 131.50 59.00 SBC 01 3.67 3.3 5 91.69 91.19 91.69+2.00 27.75 22.00 SCANA n 1.15 4.2 11 3059 27.38 26.75 27.38+0.56 63.19 19.50 SCI Sys a 53 x8767 61.76 59.31 611.75 +2.25 36.94 19.00 SCHE .40 1.8 9 5 1 2 .8 2 50 2 .7 + 0.3 16.06 10.75 SEMCO .94 5.6 17 174 15.31 114.94 15.050 137.25 SGL Crb 17 23.25 2300 23.13-0+75 52.63 9.63 SK -ncm 5738 25.63 2481 25.63-0.06 30.38 17.63 SI-Green 1.45 5.4 13 2249 27.06 26.75 26.81 Continued on Next Page

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TRADING IN STOCK OPTIONS THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 An option is a contract permitting (but not requiring) a purchase or sale of stock at a given price (the “strike”) by a specified date. A “call” is a purchase option; a “put” is for a sale. The lists of gainers and losers comprise only options that traded at $1 or above both yesterday and in the previous session. “Pr” and “Chg” are the price and change of the underlying stock. MOST ACTIVE OPTIONS Company Date Strike Ty Exc Vol Pr Chg %Chg Pr Chg Cisco Oct 00 62.50 c ACXP 29,580 838 + 1.38 + 19.6 6875 + 2+19 Staples Dec 00 20.00 c ACXP 20,007 0.56 -0.06 - 9.9 15.38 - 0.69 Cisco Sep 00 70.00 c ACXP 19,635 1.25 +0.66 + 81.7 68.75 + 2+19 NortelNw Sep 00 65.00 c ACXP 15.110 1725 +0.88 + 5.3 81.50 + 1.50 NorlelNwk Sep 00 75.00 c ACXP 12.538 T75 + 0.75 + 10.7 81.50 + 1.50 Oracle Sep 00 80.00 c ACXP 10,970 1125 + 1.38 + 13.9 90,94 + 2.69 Oracle Sep 00 70.00 c ACXP 10,047 20.50 + 2.00 + 10.8 9094 + 2.69 SprntFON Nm 00 55.00 c ACXP 9,045 038 -0.31 - 45.6 33.56 + 0.06 BestBuy Sep 00 65.00 p ACP 8,829 4.75 +3.19 +203.9 62+25 - 8.75 Cisco Oct 00 67.50 c ACXP 8,488 5.13 + 1.25 + 32.3 6875 + 2.19 VOLUME COMPARISIONS Call Volume Call Op Int Put Val Put Op Int Arnerican Stock Exchange 404,137 28,090,692 189.217 16,661,840 Chicago Board Options Exchange 827,195 35,676,161 358,745 21,433,795 Philadelphia Stock Exchange 297,509 17,897,060 82,097 10,787,530 Pacific Stock Exchange 281,632 25,512,720 113,790 15,046,757 Total 1,810,473 107,176,633 743,849 63,929,922 c-call, p-put, A-American Stock Exchange, C-Chicago Board Options Exchange, N-New York Stock Exchange, P-Pacific Stock Exchange, X-Philadelphia Stock Exchange.` PERCENTAGE GAINERS Company Date Strike Ty Exc Vol Pr Chg % Chg Pr Chg Anadrk Sep 00 65.00 p C 10 618.00 +615.20 +400+7 65.75 + 1.57 MofganJP Sep 00 160.00 c ACXP 955 10.25 +8.19 +396.8 167.00 +15-13 IntgDv Sep 00 85.00 c ACP 564 5.75 +4+50 +360.0 87.75 +10.50 MorganJP Sep 00 155.00 c ACXP 3,927 14.50 +11.00 +314.3 167.00 +15.13 MillPhar Sep 00 140.00 c XP 116 9.63 +7.00 +266.7 143.13 +13.13 Lattice Sep 00 80.00 c C 87 3.63 + 2.63 +262.5 77.88 + 5.81 Lexrnark Sep 00 60+00 c ACX 414 7.88 +5.69 +259.9 67.81 + 8.31 WebMeth Sep 00 110.00 c ACX 140 7.75 +5.56 +254.2 107.44 +10.13 Echelon Sep 00 45.00 c ACXP 257 3.75 + 2.69 +252.8 47.06 + 8.31 F5 Netw Sep 00 60.00 c AC 336 3.75 + 2.69 +252+8 58.50 + 6.75 PERCENTAGE LOSERS Company Date Strike Ty Exc Vol Pr Chg % Chg Pr Chg Anadrk Sep 00 65.00 c C 16 7301.00 +729910 -829.8 65.75 + 1.57 COW Cpt Sep 00 70.00 p C 15 1.75 -12.38 -87.6 73.50 + 4.23 Acltran Feb 01 50.00 p AXP 10 1.81 -6.94 - 79+3 53.56 + 3.19 IntgN Sep 00 80.00 p ACP 388 1.25 -4.26 -77.3 8775 +1050 Anadrk Oct 00 55.00 c C 300 36.00 +25.60 -76.5 65.75 + 1.57 Lexmark Sep 00 70.00 p ACX 102 2.88 -8.88 -75.5 67.81 + 8.31 MorganJP Sep 00 155.00 p ACXP 1,060 1.56 -4.81 -75.5 167.00 +15.13 Mcoata Sep 00 90.00 p ACP 96 1.50 -4.50 -75.0 107.56 +14.20 BestBuy Sep 00 65.00 c ACP 1,153 1.94 -5.81 -75.0 62.25 - 8.75 HumGeno Sep 00 140,00 p ACP 70 1.00 - 2.63 - 72.4 166.94 +10.63

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C10 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 52-Week Ytd Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg A 11.81 3.63 A Consul dd 1 7.19 7.19 7.19 21 88 6.13 AAON 13 79 25.13 24.00 24.50+0.1 2825 838 AS Watl dd 323 16.63 15.75 16.38+0.13 12.91 9.00 ABC Bop 8 f 9 116 10.00 9.88 10.00 16.75 4.16 ABC-NACO dd 934 6.63 6.44 6.50-0.06 9.38 4.00 AC Moore 12 332 9.00 8.81 8.94 18.88 3.50 ACE CO 41 2096 9.50 8.13 9.50+0 44.25 11.00 ACILN U a 14 773 42.1340.00 42.06+2.31 57.38 18.31 ACT Mf 52 8284 63.064826 50.94+3.50 51.75 10.63 ACTY dd 5784 17.98 16.83 17.81+0.75 49.00 8.88 ADC Tel a cc 147580 42.94 40.25 40.94-0.88 27.00 12.13 ADECP dd 1026 23.13 20.84 22.50+2.25 14.75 AEP Ind dd 10 29.63 29.50 29.56+0.19 29.38 5.88 AHL SN 9 502 8.44 8.25 8.31+0.13 7.00 0.50 AHT Corp dd 2450 0.5 0.50 8.00 1.69 AMBI 10 1111 2.00 1.91 1.94 14.38 1.38 AML Com dd 3754 4.25 3.00 3.31+0.44 8.00 4.38 ANC Rtl n 445 7.25 6.94 7.00 64.00 3.50 APA ci 11006 18.50 17.50 18.00+0.13 16.50 2.19 APACC 32 618 8.03 7.75 7.940.06 18.75 1.97 Net old 501 2.25 1.94 2.06+0.06 12.38 6.13 ASAT Hd n 2289 10.06 9.25 9.63-0.25 32.38 1.00 ASD Sys n dd 1275 1.59 1.44 1.50+0.13 36.25 17.25 ASE Tat 30 14T3 24.50 23.88 24.31+0.44 114.94 2.63 ASI Sol 21 922 14.63 12.50 14.50+1.50 37.63 7.13 ASM Intl 3833 25.50 26.00 25.13+0.19 50.25 20.50 ASM Uth s 24811 38.25 37.81 38.13+0.31 18.75 11.00 ASV Inc cc 80 13.38 13.13 13.38+0.38 63.25 29.00 ATT Cd s dd 1639 33.50 33.06 33.19+0.31 17.75 I5.25 ATT LA n 12403 15.31 13.50 14.00-1 38 6.38 1.97 ATG Inc 50 482 2.69 2.50 2.50-0.13 23.19 7.75 An Tech dd 1911 9.75 9.38 9.59+0.16 60.75 20.75 ATIV11 Inc 23 1427 28.00 26.75 26.80-1.08 16.50 7.81 ATS Mod cc 1304 16.50 15.81 16.50+0.50 27.25 2.88 AIA Bio dd 3453 9.38 8.50 9.19-0.06 13.75 0.88 AVA B wt 216 4.38 3.75 4.38 13.56 1.03 AVI Bio wi 54 4.44 3.94 4.25-0.06 36.13 4.75 AVT Cp s 5 2851 5.94 5.63 5.94+0.31 8.38 0.94 AVTM dd 868 1.47 1.38 1.41-0.03 49.56 10.88 AXTInc cc 497 38.75 37.94 38.63+0.50 9.06 0.31 Aastrom dd 13824 3.75 3.16 3.34-0.22 11.00 3.69 Abads cc 508 5.94 5.56 5.88+0.16 103.25 7.50 Abgenix s dd 10574 75.94 72.38 75.17+2.17 13.88 7.31 AbigallA .40 4.5 9 35 9.00 8.88 8.88 13.25 8.75 Abingl3c .36 3.4 8 103 11.13 10.63 10.690.31 83.38 13.56 Abiomd dd 1239 63.63 59.75 60.38+0.50 12.00 1.06 AbleTel dd 1346 3.16 2.94 3.13+0.13 1052122.50 About.cm dd 8616 46.88 39.00 43.63+5.61 59.00 7.19 AcaciaR dd 855 29.19 22.50 27.44-0.63 67.50 16.75 AccINtw n 3818 24.75 21.94 23.69+0.19 2.13 0.25 Acceir8 dd 280 0.47 0.44 0.47+0.03 13.38 7.28 AccNetw n 6206 10.38 9.66 10.13+0.38 41.75 l7.7514 .68 103643.31 40.75 43.31+2.44 75.00 12.63 AccrueS dd 2849 22.00 21.00 21.31+0.31 20.00 8.75 AceCash 14 197 11.00 10.13 10.75-0.13 12.09 7.75 Aceto .30 3.0 10 547 9.94 9.50 9.88+0.31 66.00 20.00 AdraBlo. n 7060 41.06 36.00 39.00-3.94 13.06 5.53 ACMT A 9 10 7.31 7.31 7.31 39.63 8.38 AcmeCm n dd 118 14.50 13.94 14.13-0.25 8.75 4.63 AcmeElec 56 399 8.38 8.19 8.34+0.09 55.38 15.13 Actel 28 2198 44.31 42.50 44.00 +1.56 28.69 3.19 ActPerf dd 1246 4.25 3.75 4.00-0.03 39.13 3.56 ActionPnt dd 264 9.13 7.94 8.06-0.38 74.00 12.86 AclCard n 3359 26.3826.13 26.00+1.38 64.76 40.00 AActPwr n SM 72.00 59.50 70.25+10.81 44.00 5.50 ZVoice a dd 2309 14.38 13.00 13.38+0.38 18.25 5.38 Activisn dd 8013 14.06 13.81 14.00+0.19 32.00 MWActradle 31 3172 34.56 32.00 34.38+2.44 36.50 7.26 Actuates cc Bill 26.06 25.44 2S.94+1.00 35.94 14.56 AcAorn 24 8746 26.56 25.25 25.50-0.88 26.63 5.63 AdacLabs dd 1056 22.56

287 / C10 Day

22.00 22.38+0.13 19.25 3.25 adam.com dd 691 4.63 4.31 4.31+0.06 3.75 0.81 AdmsGff dd 322 1.16 1.03 1.13+0.09 63.56 16.38 Adlaptec 19 ISM 24.75 23.44 24.50 +1.06 104.0 13.50 Adpdkd a dd 7172 32.50 28.00 31.26+2.81 70. 10.06 Adelphla dd 3743 15.15 13.97 14.94+0.94 76.44 28.94 Adolph h dd 312 13.1 33.25 33.50+0.31 63.63 5.44 AdWTsch U7 50.50 46.00 49.94+3.81 9.50 5.25 AdmBnc 1.15t 41 3 9.19 9.19 9.19+0.44 143.31 47.50 AdobeSys .10 0.1 58 8637 133.50 128.50 130.00 +0.44 80.50 33.13 Adtran - 32 5496 S4.75 $0.63 53.56+3.19 31.50 9.50 AdvPara a 29 3612 26.69 26.00 26.63+ 0 .56 6.75 1.53 AdvAS n dd 1101 2.75 2.47 2.50-0.03 2.50 0.09 AMS wtA 40 0.47 0.47 0.47+0.03 51.00 10.69 AdyDigl a 11.21 17.44 16.00 17.00+1.06 77.44 30.00 AdvEnId 47 1596 57.75 54.81 57.13+2.13 89.38 15.69 AdvFCm 16 2M 63.25 49.56 52.86 +2.73 23.75 4.75 AdvUght dd 6675 16.75 15.31 16.00-0.63 23.50 11.13 AdMkSv s .05 0.3 14 121 18.00 10.81 94+0.06 20.88 6.88 AdvNeur cc 88 18.94 18.00 18.94-0.06 3.13 0.94 AdvNutra dd 490 1.13 0.94 1.00-0.09 6.50 2.75 AdvPoly 68 651 3.56 3.25 3.38-0.19 27.00 15.50AAd n ISM 28.63 26.09 27.76+1.63 49.25 8.50 AdvRadio dd 2320 10.63 10.19 10.25-0.06 14.31 1.78 AdvTechP 2 64 3.22 3.03 3.03-012 15.63 2.13 AdvTiss dd 3080 7.19 6.53 7.13+0.50 21.88 10.69 Advanta .25 1.9 dd 281 13.06 12.63 13.00-0.19 16.00 7.50 AdvantB .30 3.0 dd 509 9.94 950 994+0.13 31.50 10.00 AdvLmg 55 2758 30.88 28.75 29.38-0.38 72.38 22.00 Advent 9 92 1627 63.00 56.06 61-63-0.38 10.00 4.00 AshrTest dd 62 6.75 6.50 6.75+0.25 47.63 4.25 Aeroflex s 67 3495 37.00 35.88 36.75+0.69 6.38 2.25 Aerow dd 35 3.38 3.25 3.25 11.50 7.88 aEtema gn 22 9.38 9.38 9.380.13 345.00 41.13 AethrSys n dd 4092 146.69 137.81 138.50 - 1.25 11.94 5.00 Aettium dd 1612 6.25 6.00 6.13+0.06 36.38 Allptat a 19.70 .4 1.38 73.19 79.00+6.06 13.88 5.00 Aftmarkt dd 284 6.25 6.13 6.13-0.13 14.60 125 Ag-Chm cc 391 9 5 +1.25 98.00 1 2 00 Agcy.cm n dd 10.85 24.29 27.37 .81 293-5904 0.63 112.50 18.31 AgilSft dd 6a22 69.88 64.81 69.44-0.25 12.75 4.88 AifCan 46 11.06 10.88 11.00-0.06 5.38 2.38 AirMeth 7 619 4.00 3.56 3.84-0.16 114.50 23.00 AWGte n dd 2679 68.44 66.66 68.06+1.13 62.00 10.88 KrNet n 823 a5.13 ano 33.19-1.19 49.02 12.50 AkepnNt n 2795 19.25 17.44 17.63-063 346256.63 Abmorr a 3VU 77.31 71.00 75J6+3.06 13.63 3.50 Mom 28 1680 10.44 9.56 10.19 13.36 3.75 AkspL dd 12161139 BAB 1111.88+11A 52.2636.50 Akzo .99e2.2 215 44.75 44.00 44.76+0.25 26.94 14.13 AaN8cp .84 4.3 9 47 19.50 17.13 19.31 +0 38 44.76 6.88 AladnKn 16 986 13.88 12.75 12.81-0.06 43.63 11.81 Alamosa n dd 1440 25.25 24.88 24.88-0.3816.75 7.69 AlskCom n dd412 8.09 7.88 8.09+0.16 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 4250 10.25 AlbnyMlc s 63 1346 3625 35.13 3575+0.63 .2410.50 Alcide dd 1 16.11 16.56 16.56 2.38 1.03 Aldila cc 836 2.25 2.02 2.25+0.22 27.50 17.94 AlexBld .90 3.4 14 972 26.69 26.19 26.31-0.38 119.0 12.00 Alexion dd 2428 108.00 97.76 106.00+5.56 19.00 14.50-AlfaCp .62 2.7 11 302 19.13 18.75 18.940.06 9850 13.63 Alkerm s dd 5381 47.63 44.63 46.25+0.50 24. 2.69 ARASem 14 86020.26 18.44 18.50-1.50 94.1323.00 Alialre a cc M 37.13 33.19 33.94-1.50 5.75 AllCity dd 1 10.00 10.00 10.00+0.50 110.13 33.00 AllegTel s dd 7001 50.25 48.75 49.81+0.81 12.00 6.75 Allegiant .22 2.6 9 107 9.00 8.63 8.63-0.13 18.69 1125 AlIrSpc dd 2 18.38 18.06 18.38+0.25 16.44 7.50 AlliAti g . 3 14.D6 14.00 14.06+0.25 21.69 14.00 AJliancB .56 3.2 10 184 17.38 17.19 17.31-0.06 31.38 16.25 AlIncFnc .70 b 3.8 1210 19.75 18.50 18.50-1.26 20.75 3.00 AlftmPh dd 9045 16.38 13.75 15.25+1.25 17.31 12.00 AlIncells n 2.00 13.1 429 15.31 14.94

Day C10 / 288

15.25 31.69 8.88 AllianSemi 2 6939 26.50 25.50 26.31+0.44 23.13 15.50 AldCap 1.809.1 11 2207 20.31 20A3 20.25+0.19 48.75 6.50 AIRiser n dd 10462 8.88 8.00 8 13-0.25 8.00 1.75 AlInCp dd 272 2.13 2.00 2 13 16.00 8.50 AllosTh n 782 13.13 11.44 11.75+ . 50 22.13 5.75 AlloyOnl dd 7441 9.75 8.25 8 . 8 1 -0.13 89.63 10.75 Allserpts n dd 525 29.63 29.19 29. 1 9-0.13 78.2522.00 Alpheirld a 7616107 52.50 47.60 50.44+3.26 11.38 2.00 AphaMic dd 1298 4.19 3.91 16.00 3.88 AlphaTch 14 321 13.25 12.94 13.13-0.13 11.75 2.38 AlphNet dd 125 4.13 3.88 4.13+0.13 9.47 2.00 AltairInt 1881 3.75 3.06 3.44+0.06 190.00 41.00 AltewW n dd 13445 149.50 145.75 148.00 + 2.13 65.6920.50 AtWCp a 9050711 66.06 60.75 64.81+4.44 6.88 1.00 AltResc dd 289 1.31 1.13 1.13-0.13 24.13 4.88 AltiGen n dd 1366 5.44 5.25 5.25+0.13 14.94 0.75 AlysIsT dd 256 2.69 2.25 2.440.19 113.00 27.88 Amazon dd 43993 43.19 41.14 41.50-1.44 18.75 12.25 AmbancH .52 f 3.4 18 145 15.75 14.94 15.13-0.56 18.00 9.88 Ambin 63 57 16.44 15.88 16.38 17.13 10.88 Amcor 3.26e7.9 93 12.88 12.44 12.44+0.06 25.25 15.63 AmcorF .64 3.5 11 1284 18.13 17.94 18.06+0.19 30.25 16.00 AMERCO 8 166 19.88 19.50 19.63-0.16 17.31 7.56 Amdana .60 5.9 9 40 10.19 10.19 10.19+0.06 10.63 7.75 AFstApt .90 9.7 40 9.44 9.31 9.31-0.13 6.50 4.00 AME 54 102 1263 5.47 5.25 5.31-0.16 9.25 6.97 AmOnLA n 4408 8.00 7.63 7.81-0.06 20.50 11.75 AmSvoe 13 84 19.25 18.50 18.75 15.25 2.94 AmerAir 45 165 4.28 4.00 4.09-0.16 20.13 9.00 AmBcp .60 5.1 7 23 12.13 11.75 11.75-0.25 26.00 9.34 AmBsnF .32 2.7 3 102 11.75 11.63 1 1. 75+0.13 27.75 16.94 AmCapStr 1.96 f 8.2 862 23.88 23.75 23 88+0 06 36.00 16.8 AClasVoy 7144 17.50 15.25 17 00-0.63 12.50 5.75 AmrDnfl 9 8 7.94 7.63 7.94+0.06 58.50 11.63 AlEagleO 19 34332 30.38 29.50 29.91+1.63 4.25 0.91 AmEcol 9 29 2.88 2.75 2.88+0.13 18.19 10.81-AmrFncl n .60 3.3 436 18.94 17.84 18.00 21.94 10.75 AmFrght 9 2467 17.06 16.38 16.440.38 7.25 3.50 AmHlthwy 19 9 6.00 5.91 6.00-0.03 5.00 0.94 AHomstr dd 96 1.47 1.25 1.31 2.06 0.38 AmIntPt dd 67924 0.66 0.50 0.53 9.19 5.13 AmLckr 5 19 6.38 6.19 6.38+0.22 44.38 14.00 AMS 1237275 19.69 18.50 18.69-1.00 14.38 10.88 AnyMed n 2310 13.44 12.00 13.06+1.06 3.13 1.00 AMedTech 3 117 1.38 1.25 1.34-0.03 25.00 11.00 AmerNtl .60 f 3.8 11 6 15.75 15.50 15.75+0.63 4.88 2.63 AmNtlFn .40 13.9 oc 9 2.88 2.75 2.88+0.13 71.63 49.00 ANtIns 2.84 4.6 7 664 61.94 60.25 61.50+0.38 10.69 5.25 AmPac 472 5.75 5.38 5.38-0.19 5.06 2.25 APhyG 5 75 3.44 3.38 3.44+0.06 48.84 16.00 APwCnv 22 16344 24.13 23.38 2381+044 24.44 2.38 ASoft dd 1694 4.38 4.00 425-002 75.13 11.81 AmSupr dd 1884 44.25 41.63 4244+038 28.13 14.13 Mood .20 0.9 11 388 23.50 23.00 2319+013 4.88 2.56 Amrhost 15 1 3.50 3.50 3.50+0 . 06 14.88 7.00 Ameripath 14 2025 13.88 13.50 13.63 - 6.00 3.00 AmerCas 51 86 4.88 4.56 4.56-0.19 31.00 10.50 AmrTrde dd 14135 18.81 18.38 18.81+0.28 36.63 4.53 AmesDS 6 12507 5.13 4.81 5.06+0.22 80.44 37.00 Amgen s 71 67201 76.63 72.69 75.81+2.75 65.31 15.63 AmkorT 42 9801 34.81 33.50 34 13 +0 1 35.00 5.38 Ampal 19 749 15.73 14.00 1556+0 63 3.00 8.63 Amplicn 16 1.8 5 10 9.50 9.13 913 1.25 8.00 AmresCT 1.59 e 14.8 10 607 11.09 10.69 10 . 75-O.1 36.56 1.06 Arrvesco s 489 1.16 1.06 1.13+0.06 8.25 4.75 Amsg A 13 148 7.38 7.06 7.25 8.25 5.00 Amsg B 14 2 7.25 7.25 7.25-0.06 22.00 8.63 Amtran 9 16 12.50 12.50 12.50 18.88 2.47 Amylin dd 1824 13.63 13.31 13.56+0.06 19.19 0.23 Anacrnp dd 5942 0.94 0.77 0.84-0.06 9.13 0.28 Ancmp wt 14 0.56 0.56 0.56 112.13 17.88 Anadgc s .51 15639 37.50 35.88 36.00+0.13 50.25 23.00 Anlogic .28 0.7 38 176 37.56 36.88 37.50-0.06 15.50 7.75 Analysts .40 4.8 19 979 8.38 8.00 8.31+0.06 1.56 AnlySur dd 957 2.00 1.69 1.75+0.06 6.50 4.38 Anangel dd 1102 5.19 5.00 5.13 142.75 16.25 Anaren a cc 2969 120.00 108.811118.06+9.31 16.94 12.75 AncBWl .30f

289 / C10 Day

1.8 14 244 16.55 16.25 1631+006 71.97 31.00-AnchOm 13 1080 73.26 68.98 7 lJ5 +425 40.00 4.13 AndrGr dd 234 13.00 10.88 li.75+0.75 10.75 6.88 Andrsons 24 2.7 8 278 8.97 8.75 8.78+ 0 .03 32.63 24.88 AndovBc .96 3.3 10 69 29.31 28.81 29.25+0.25 42.38 11.19 Andrew 35 5634 30.56 28.88 29.63+0.56 90.00 19.25 AndrCp s 75 7441 88.75 85.50 87.00+0N 34.19 7.38 Anesta dd 6494 24.00 23.19 23.81+0.31 4.94 1.13 Angeion dd 327 1.69 1.47 11.50 99.0023.00 Angtech n 514 45.38 .13 45.25+0.69 12.00 1.22 AnikaTh 6 253 1.84 1.59 1.75+0.13 29.13 16.00 Annuityl-f .16 0.6 21 1055 26.63 26.00 26.25+0.50 16.63 5.50 Ansoft cc 137 14.88 13.75 14.00-0.25 40.38 9.25 Ansthink 49 3689 18.25 16.88 17.130.31 15.00 8.06 Ansys 11 251 10.76 10.31 10.56+0.25 61.2528.94 Antec 31 9967 38.13 35.00 36.06-2.00 27.13 8.25 Antenna TV 29 19.63 19.00 19.00-0.38 71.50 10.00 Antignes n 71017.00 15.50 16.56+1.31 45.00 11.25 Aphton dd 210 28.88 27.38 28.88+0.44 17.50 4.00 Aplan dd 63 6.06 5.88 6.06+0.06 8.63 3.25 ApogaeE .21 4.7 13 1088 4.47 4.13 4.44+u.zb 42.63 17.56 ApolloG 49 5647 42.56 40.76 40.81-0.75 72.50 14.25 AppNet -20.526 51.44 47.25 49.44-0.63 75.25 28.75 AppleC a 30 7160 61.50 58.94 60.94+1.4 37.56 20.44 Applebee .10f 0.4 11 3357 23.81 22.38 22.69+0.13 10.00 4.00 ApdExtr 14 113 4.69 4.50 4.58-0.05 14.60 6.13 AppAnl m 42 9.25 9.00 9.00-0.06 18.00 1.63 ApDg n dd 8776 4.22 3.88 4.06 42.00 3.00 AppFlms 55 736 34.75 33.88 34.75+1.00 10.31 3.00 AppGrph dd 417 3.97 3.59 3.81 8.13 0.53 App Imag dd 1326 4.88 4.38 4.63+0.31 28.25 3.41 Apidinov 45 3279 23.50 21.38 23.00-0.25 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 115.38 33.88 ApIdMat a 43 101937 87.63 85.00 86.31 +1.94 200.50 22.63AAMCC a oc 35058 2000 197.13 202.94+5.25 23.13 3.13 ApMicro dd 443 11.50 10.31 11 00+0 . 69 36.9424.19 AppMok n 5389 33.31 26.72 32.19+r m 45.00 11.63 ApdSc 13 5783 15.69 14.88 16.44+0.44 29.75 7.00 ApIdSig .25 2.5 12 1D80 10.75 8.88 9.88+0.63 37.88 5.00 AppldThry dd 1214 8.D6 7.50 8. +0.47 26.69 3.63 Applix 51 2640 4.81 4.44 4.63+0.13 69.00 7.75 Apropos n 1286 12.75 12.13 12.75 11.38 1.06 AquilaB n dd 433 4.63 4.25 4.63+0.16 40.38 4.63 ArQuie dd 1013 21.13 20.50 20.56+0.25 2.75 0.44 ArabArn 6 136 0.69 0.63 0.69-0.06 46.75 6.38 Aradigm dd 1925 18.25 16.75 17.88+0.94 15.56 7.50 Arinxintl 14 45 13.00 12.75 13.00+0.69 1675 11.00 ArchCap dd 11 15.19 15.19 15.19-0.06 338 0.13 ArchCm wt 268 0.64 059 0.59 3.50 ArchCm 2116 5.19 478 5.19 + 0. i4 12.75 8.63 ArcticCat .24 2.0 38 210 12.00 11.75 11.84+0.03 42.38 27.88 ArdenGrp 10 26 33.50 32.13 32.13-0.38 30.75 18.50 ArdaBnc .24 1.1 10 67 22.94 22.00 22.50+0.44 22.50 6.25 ArelCom 1.231 28 105 8.88 8.44 8.44 51.25 9.00 ArmsSft n 25 1014 28.13 25.69 27.26+1.19 38.00 21.W Ph n ISN 47.44 WSO 46.25+10.75 26.63 14.44 ArgoGp 1.64 9.9 dd 209 16.50 15.63 16.50+0.31 27.69 10.00 AWnwA n 1808 18.98 15.63 17.38+1.75 9.00 3.53 ArgsyEd 14 13 6.88 6.75 6.88+0.13 Argues 31 2353 20.19 19.00 19.88+0.38 48.50 0.50 AfiadP 16 3874 13.00 12.25 12.63+0.44 183.38 30.00 Arica dd 58181 159.00 147.38 157.38 + 4.88 57.00 1.19 AAelCp dd 2037 3.31 2.75 3.09+0.03 16.44 2.56 ArisCorp. dd 332 3.81 3.44 3.50-0.31 10.88 5.75 ArkRst dd 54 8.88 8.00 8.00 17.00 9.00 ArkBest 6 713 15.13 14.88 15.06 50.00 8.36 ArmNid a 6874 41.13 38.00 40.88+4.6 15.81 9.00 Amid .44 2.8 659 15.69 15.25 15.56-0.13 6.00 2.34 AronxPh dd 8885 3.75 3.00 3.69+0.72 21.25 14.25 ArrowFn s .80 5.1 9 79 16.00 15.81 15.81-0.06 40.13 23.25 ArovAnt .24 0.7 20 704 36.00 35.03 35.63-0.38 126.8B 9.75 ArtTech dd 14673 102.50 98.94 101.94+0.06 31.75 21.00 ArtesRes 1.10 4.7 15 6 23.25 23.00 23.25+0.50 41.69 15.00AArtesyn 34 8674 42.38 40.88

Day C10 / 290

41.56+0.N 79.25 15.38 ArthroC a 82 3068 45.31 43.88 4450+0.48 39.81 10.44 Arliflife dd 86 15.88 14.88 14.88+0.38 30.00 7.25 ArtisanC cc 361 11.88 11.50 1.50 24.19 4.44 Artsft dd 700 10.88 10.25 10.75+0.4 12.75 1.94 Artchrect n 680 2.81 2.28 2.44-025 35.00 2.50 Ashford n dd 1066 3.00 2.75 2.81 -06 11.56 2.50 AshtnT dd 1163 3.72 3.59 3.59 7.50 1.50 AshInt wt 64 2.44 2.25 2.44 + 0.6 5.69 3.75 Aahwrth 12 2210 5.63 5.38 5.53+0.16 15.94 2 50 Asiat n 2115 3.81 2.88 3.38+0.56 111.19 2156 AsiaInfo n 3273 33.88 29.75 31.50-1.06 190.913.53 AskJvs dd 23358 31.50 28.50 30.50+2.50 69.94 10.75 AspectCm dd 4929 22.94 21.00 22.66+1.38 66.50 16.34 AspctMd n 834 19.88 18.63 19.25+0.56 56.38 8.13 AspenTc cc 4817 49.00 40.38 45.94-3.06 30.00 2.75 Aspeon dd 1992 3.69 3.50 3.56+U6 36.8820.13 AsdBnc 1.16b4.6 10 1768 25.56 24.75 25.11+0.36 19.25 10.75 AsdMati .10 0.6 5 33 16.00 16.00 16.00 9.25 2.00 AstaFd 4 31 6.88 6.50 6.56-0.31 8.38 0.75 Astes. 2.05005.0 dd 30 1.16 1.00 1.00+0.03 35.13 14.75 Astec. 12 1152 19.75 19.38 19.63+0.13 39.19 21.75 Astorial 1.04 3.0 8 2942 35.94 35.06 35.13-0. 1 3 7.50 4.75 AstroM .16 3.2 16 75 5.00 5.00 5.00 . 12.75 6.69 Astronic 12 1 10.50 10.50 10.50+0.1 49.38 10.88 Astrpwr cc 3293 35.00 30.63 34.38+3.19 67.00 13.00 AsystTch s 29 8902 27.50 25.88 26.19+0.31 59.75 12.88 AtHome dd 61871 15.00 14.25 14.56-0.19 9.06 7.63AANGnc n 7M 10.94 8.50 9.98+1.31 3.94 1.88 AtlAm 5 54 2.38 2.19 2.25-0.13 38.38 16.25 AfiCstAir 24 1755 33.00 31.50 31.75-1.75 12.00 2.50 AtlData cc 402 481 4 N 4 01+0.19 30.75 7.63 Aftnel a 57 UM 20 8 1875 20 0+ 1.38 14.00 8.19 Atrion 12 130 12.38 12.06 12.13-0.31 16.56 3.31 AtrixL dd 663 15.50 15.00 15.31-0.25 18.44 1.09 Audible dd 2840 1.97 1.75 175-0.13 152.00 27.63 AudCdes oc M2 114.50 111.00 112.38+0.38 72.50 11.50 Audvox 13 4190 18.88 17.75 18.13+0.25 9.50 12.25 AugstTc n 1076 13.38 12.88 13.13 3.00 4.94 Ault 839 8.19 7.44 8.00+0.38 140.00 9.00 AuroraBio cc 7831 70.00 66.50 68.38+1.88 19.00 3.88 Auspex dd 8392 8.88 7.88 8.75+0.25 14.38 6.00 Athrszr n 494 11.50 10.50 11.25+0.13 20.38 4.00 Autobytel dd 2056 5.25 4.75 5.06 56.06 17.00 Autodesk .24 0.9 23 5214 29.00 28.00 28.13-0.50 6.88 0.38 Autoirnu do 1909 2.50 2.31 2.34 4.25 2.00 Autolog n dd 1 3.06 3.06 3.06 54.38 24.63AAutomny a 997 64.00 55.00 63.00+11.50 14.13 1.50 Autoweb dd 1339 1.81 1.69 1.72-0.03 273.510 47.38 Avanex n dd 24395 157.00 142.38 151.47+9.72 25.25 8.91 Avanti 8 6193 15.13 13.00 14.56+0.19 18.75 1.38 Avantimm dd 7180 9.75 9.38 9.69+0.69 23.38 15.63 Avatar dd 112 19.25 19.25 19.25+0.25 89.00 6.31 Avenue A n 2649 8.38 7.81 8.13-0.06 Aven Alle 0.8 31 47 22.75 22.00 22.06-0.69 174.989.94 Avicitys n 7612 151.00 134.94 10.81 25.66 8.75 AvidTch dd 3980 14.13 13.13 114.06+0.81 89.00 8.13 Avigen dd 1143 36.88 35.13 36.44+1.25 54.38 14.81 Aviron dd 4606 45.63 41.63 45.00+2.94 14.00 7.81 Avistar n 2183 12.19 11.13 11.69+0.56 60.75 39.76 AAvoctep n 6636 51.25 48.60 48.63-2.13 67.00 20.50 Aware cc 2367 45.19 43.88 44.81 -0.38 9.50 6.50AAxcanPh n 69 9.94 9.31 9.56+0.25 27.50 13.50 Moshe n 4533 18.63 17.94 18.06-0.25 . 11. AxentT 72 5515 24.31 23.63 23.75 23.44 9.38AAxsysTch 27 581 23.63 22.38 23.38+0.75 20.25 2.69 AxySPhm dd 6459 8.00 7.34 7.75+0.38 B 2.33 1.13 BCT Int 7 32 1.63 1.50 1.63 19.19 5.75 BE Aero dd 4462 16.50 16.06 16.19+1.06 28.50 9.25 BESemi 304 12.38 12.00 12.13-0.13 78.U 5.88 BEA Sp a dd M33 68.63 62.75 611.06+4.66 3.47 0.63 BEI Mod dd 10 1.06 1.06 1.06+0.03 57.38 10.50-BEI To n .08 0.1 49 1546 58.38 54.63 57.19+0.63 10.00 6.50 BF Ent 12 3 7.75 7.75 7.75 11.50 6.53ABFiA .12 1.1 18 63 11.63 10.75 10.75+0.13 9.25 3.81 BI Ino 46315 06 8.03 8.06-0.01 75.50 41.38 ABISYS 30

291 / C10 Day

3470 76.50 75.13 75.31+0.06 6.6316.13 BMC Sft 2857416 28.00 26.19 27.00+2.06 8.81 6.69 BNC 16240 6.00 5.75 5.75-0.25 22.50 14.88 BOK .66 t 10 411 18.13 17.75 17.88-0.13 25.75 16.75 BSB Bcp 1.00 4.5 12 96 22.00 21.63 22.00+0.44 26.50 14.00 BT Fin .84 4.7 14 70 18.13 17.63 18.00-0.13 11.00 6.00 BTG Inc 1530 8.56 8.31 8.31-0.19 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 18.50 4.00 BTU Int 21 126 12.50 1213 12.50+0.25 12.00 3.00 BVR Sys n dd 36 4.41 4.25 4.28-0.41 Fn 2.30t 13 26 23.00 23.00 23.00+0.25 1 .1 7.38 BYL Bmp 13 202 11.25 10.88 11.00+0.25 16.25 1.13 Baan Go dd 619 2.50 2.19 2.190.06 59.13 11.75 BwkWb dd 5950 20.63 18.13 18.38-0.98 7.81 3.63 BadgrP dd 137 4.00 4.00 4.00 7.88 4.19 Baked .06 1.2 8 220 5.13 5.00 5.00 23.94 15.00 BaldLyB .40 2.1 14 61 20.25 19.00 19.44+0 56 9.63 5.00 BaldPla dd 33 5.13 5.13 5.13 144.94 22.38 BallardPw 2661 102.75 98.50 101.38+2.11 8.88 6.38 Baltek 6 10 6.75 6.75 6.75-0.13 46.00 5.88 Balftech s 4412 27.63 24.06 26.25+3.44 12.25 4.38 BamCp 24 134 5.81 5.63 531 +0.06 37.13 24.75 BncFstOK 2.0 11 50 32.75 31.38 31.81+0.44 3.56 0.53 BncQuad 10 0.63 0.63 0.63-0M 25.25 13.98 BcfstOH .58 3.9 9 x268 15.00 14.63 15.00+0.75 10.75 6.75 BandoM .65 a 7.4 6 162 9.00 8.75 8.81+0.06 5.13 1.38 BankPlus dd 297 3.50 3.25 3.38+0.13 12.31 9.00 Bankill n .40 3.3 9 2 12.19 12.19 12.19-0.06 44.00 22.38ABnkUntd .74 1.6 12 2619 45.63 43.75 45.00+1.25 32.38 16.13 BkGranite .4411.9 17 59 23.00 22.88 22.88 20.69 13.75 BnkOzrk .44 13.0 8 4 15.00 14.69 14.69-0.06 11.75 7.13 ABnkFrst n .08 0.7 16 973 12.00 11.69 12.00+0.31 9.88 5.88 BnkUtd 9 782 7.75 7.36 7.50+0.06 19.56 10.38 Banknorth .50 3.1 12 2721 16.81 16.31 16.38 6.13 4.38 BanyRT .48 8.3 10 349 5.75 5.56 5.75+0.6 14.38 2.00 BbqsGal 8 4 7.75 7.63 7.63 - 0 13 23.50 3.44 barnbl.cm dd 3909 4.00 3.75 4.00 + 0.22 13.75 7.25 Barnett n 14 1053 12.63 12.31 12.44-0.13 63.63 18.94ASwra 25 2604 63.81155.25 57.63-4.13 8.81 5.00 BarreftB 8 9 5.25 5.25 5.25 9.50 4.41ABarrngTch 21 539 9.88 9.13 9.38-0.06 25.00 7.38 BasExpI 17 1295 20.63 19.81 20.00+0.13 20.75 11.13 BassettF .80 5.8 9 76 13.75 1338 13.75+0.44 20.25 14.50 BayBnc .24 1.6 10 6 15.31 15.31 15.31+0.06 60.88 3.38 BeFree s dd 16674 6.63 5.91 6.06+0.19 39.88 3.28 Be Inc dd 2100 5.00 4.56 4.66-0.06 16.63 7.75 Sessleyll n did 107 13.63 12.06 12.31-1.25 5.63 1.75 BeauCtI dd 136 3.88 3.25 3.25-0.63 m.13 6.88 BebeStrs 13 2535 16.00 15.00 15.69+0.31 22.75 11.00 BedBath s 37 25M5 17.88 17.06 17.56+0.13 14.38 6.25 BedfrdB .40 4.6 8 3 8.63 8.63 8.63 37.38 14.81 BeFum A 17 154 35.88 34.00 34.75-0.88 3656 14.50 BeFuseB s.20 0.6 18 564 36.38 33.56 34.88-0.75 33 63 9.63 BellCda gn 244 27.31 26.00 26.75 +0.81 34.63 6.44 27 4634 33.94 30.69 33.25+2.63 10.25 3.75 Bellweth 3 887 8.02 7.88 7.97-0.06 16.75 10.58 Benihan 11 1 14.00 14.00 14.00 18.25 7.75 BerdhnA 10 66 13.00 12.00 12.88-0.13 55.50 30.00 Beringer 19 8690 55.38 55.19 55.31 26.25 14.00ABerkley .52 2.0 dd 2149 26.81 26.00 26.50+0.50 38.00 23.88 BerkEn 1.18 3.1 36 38 37.69 37.69 37.69-0.06 12.25 4.94 BetaOG 364 9.13 8.75 8.88-0.13 Rm 0.75 Byrid.cm n dd 19444 1.56 1.03 1.22+0.25 45.00 7.2S Blacore 1 29.75 29.75 29.75+11.26 10.06 1.44 Bldcom g 2959 2.45 1.91 2.16+0.22 8.50 3.25 BigDogH .10 1.9 12 326 6.00 5.00 5.38-056 14.00 9.25 BigFoot .20 1.7 48 69 1 1.81 1 L 9.38 0.44 BigStar dd 248 0.66 0.50 0.63+0.03 9.94 3.13 BillConc dd 2721 3.44 3.19 325-013 28.75 5.66 Billserv It 69 9.25 8.00 8 26-0.11 45.75 6.00 BindVw a cc 5357 9.88 8.75 9 81+0 94 14.88 4.69 Biot-ogic 18 18 5.25 5.06 5 25-0 06 9.38 1.88 BioVasc cc87 4.44 4.31 4 44+0.16 10.88 4.25 BioRince cc23 10.25 9.88 10.25+0.38 32.00 3.25 BioSrce 99 729 22.75

Day C10 / 292

21.88 21.88-0.31 8.75 1.06 BloSpecd 3063 1.56 1.50 1 .50+0.1 23.00 4.44 BloTrans. dd 3166 13.00 11.50 12.81+11.06 6.00 2.06 BioantyS dd 2 2.94 2.94 2.94-0.19 35.13 19.44 BioPharm 4104 21.50 21.06 21.31+0.31 37.25 15.50 Biocryst dd 472 32.00 31.00 31.94+1.19 129.00 48.50 Biogen 33 2BB61 71.44 66.25 69.13+0.44 41.25 10.00 BioMafin dd 383 17.06 16.50 16.88-0.0 35.25 16.38ABiMet s .16 10.5 51 9646 35.38 33.63 33.81-0.63 22.13 2.41 Biomira 7437 10.50 9.81 10.25+0.56 6.75 1.38 Biond dd 79 2.75 2.50 2.75 64.50 8.00 Blopure dd 3126 16.38 15.56 116.00+11.06 36.42 3.98 More dd 14 5.63 5.13 6.63+0.75 71.13 7.63 ABiosDiag cc 2876 84.63 69.50 69.56-0.19 31.38 10.50 BioSphre n 409 12.00 11.31 11.44 15 10 4.00 Biosph dd 335 7.00 6.88 6.88-0.13 21.00 8.44 BioTcG 66 6881 14.00 13.63 13.94+0.50 10.75 5.00 BiperSA .311 26 4 5.00 5.00 5.00 16.50 1.48 Bitstrm dd 635 4.19 3.69 4.19+0.56 22.75 0.75 Bitme dd 264 4.97 4.63 4.72+0.03 11.25 2.50 BizOnl dd 40 2.88 2.75 2.75-0.03 92.25 42.75 BlackBx 22 1582 60.63 59.00 59.50+0.50 8.00 5.00 BlkHwkG 4 249 7.00 6.25 6.81-0.13 39.00 7.38 BlazeSft n dd 1637 19.13 18.50 18.88+0.19 46.OD 24.44 BlckD 1.28 3.2 16 705 41.38 38.63 40.50-0.13 .63 41.50 1.57 .50 72.25 63.44 69.50+16.00 15.W 3.13 BlueRh 8 2685 4.78 3.34 3.81+0.31 24.38 3.06 BlueWave 34 2713 6.25 5.94 6.19+0.31 9.81 5.00 BlueZone n 1804 6.50 6.31 6.50 MOD 13.31 Missing. n dd 6152 24.60 21.63 23.38+1.13 22.06 12.00 BobEvn .36 2.1 12 889 17.50 17.00 17.00-0.25 9.75 2.88 BocaRsch dd 838 3.63 3.31 3.31-0.19 16.00 5.25 BogenC 19 1045 7.59 6.88 7.41+0.53 15.38 3.41 BolderT dd 416 6.38 6.13 6.25+0.25 6.38 1.75 BmTon 13 2900 2.38 2.13 2.38+0.31 27.00 8.00 BoneCre dd 301 22.94 22.69 22.81+0.06 21.38 6.63 Bonso 50 81 9.44 9.00 9.00+0.44 94.6327.75 BooMm .69 62.50 59.50 61.75+5 00 12.00 3.06 BookMill 10 331 3.38 3.19 3.25 20.5016.38 BorlBnk .75 a 3.8 10 15 19.88 119.116 19.83+0 it 10.75 4.94 BorLePr 35 584 9.94 9.38 9.88+0 38 18.75 9.00 BostAc .34 2.7 10 137 12A 12.13 12 3B .4 16.97 2.25 BostnBio n dd 1135 4.75 3.75 4 00+0.1 17.00 3.50 BosinCom cc 1062 15.00 13.00 14 38+11.13 1 6.13 3.25 BstLfSci 17.21 8.13 7.50 7.75+0.19 13. 31 7.25 BostPrv .12 0.9 20 147 13.31 13.25 13.31+0.19 64.88 12.63 BttrnInT dd 986 31.94 30.06 31.69+11.66 18.88 1.81 Bradleas dd 360 2.56 2.44 2.56+0.16 4.31 0.97 BradPhm dd 41 1.31 1.25 1.28+0.06 7.00 2.88 BrmsEgl 5 636 4.88 4.44 4.88+0.59 . 9.81 BraunCrksN 27.34 17.38 14.88 16.25-0.8 .86 so 115.31 a dd 9173 16.60 14.76 14.88-1.19 53.13 19.25 Brze.cm n 2430 44.13 41.88 43.31 -1.69 15.00 7.44 BrentBk .35 2.9 15 269 12.25 12.13 12.23+0.11 13.00 8.00 BrdgF .28 2.2 15x1 12.88 12.88 12.88+0.13 3.25 1.00 BrigExp dd 192 2.59 2.22 2.22-0.38 .30 00 12.50 BrghtHr n 3560 25.00 24.50 24.50-0.25 15 75 3.13 BrghtStn 145 4.00 3.50 4.00+0.38 12.94 1.88 BrghtStr dd 849 2.50 2.09 2.50+0.44 17.30 3.50 Bdghtpt 12 6531 6.63 6.06 6.31+0.09 64.50 5.88 BrioTech dd 5558 9.59 8.75 9.25 + OW 13.63 3.25 Britesmile dd 404 7.13 6.75 7.00+0.13 8.63 2.50 BdtBio 104 3.00 2.81 3.00. 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 93.25 10.25 BroadVis a cc 17.52 .26 36.75 33.69 34.50 86 00 7.75 75.80 22.19 20.81 20.94-1.05 2.75 51.63 Brdcm 9 cc 86677 250.50 230.00 260.00+1136 22475 43.50 BrcdeCrn a cc 19821 229.38 220.19 225.81 +2.44 7 . 00 5.00 BrockTc n 103 5.25 5.00 5.13+0.06 15.25 10.38 Brookdlei -.16 324 15.38 15.13 15.13-0.05 12.00 8.63 BrklnB .24 2.0 15 86 11.81 11 63 1181+0.06 91.88 16.69 BmokAu cc 4495 57.44 51.50 S5.31 +3.31 19.06 9.03 Brookstn 9 498 13.01 12.94 13.06+0.13 50.75 11.25 Brooktrt 19 2736 38.00 34.00 34.00 23.50 11.60 BrowriTorn 27 661 23.38 21.25 21.75-1.63 39.56 19.19 ABrukDah n 2591

293 / C10 Day

51.38 38.13 6026 +26.75 19.50 BrynMw .68 3.4 12 16 20.50 20.06 20.25-0.13 56.50 12.00 Bsquare n dd 1422 17.25 16.06 17.00-0.06 18.25 8.38 Buca 8 3291 12.19 11.06 11.31-0.56 13.80 7.91 Buffets 12 W7 13.44 13.25 13.25-0.06 11.88 7.13 BldgMat 6 79 9.63 9.50 9.63-0.13 7.88 1.88 BullRun dd 66 2.63 2.63 2.630.06 150A 21.26 BusnObjs cc SM 115.00 106.63 114.50+7.63 12.94 6.13 Butlerint 8 272 6.63 6.44 6.63+0.06 35.44 2.34 Buy.com n 5252 2.78 2.50 2.78+0.09 C 25.50 10.00 CF Fnc .52 3+3 10 21 15.75 15.75 15.75+0.50 57.00 10.50 CCORnst a 45 6841 21.69 1 9.50 19.50+0.31 24.25 14.25 C-CuboM n 11034 23.81 22.31 23.25+11.06 17.81 4.00 C2 Inc 23 111 10.25 9.75 9.75-0.25 48.63 7.50 CAIS Int n dd 2217 8.25 7.88 8.06-0.06 28.88 4.94 CAM Cmc 27 200 6.31 5.63 6.22+0.59 15.50 8.00 CBRL Grp .02 0.2 15 6384 12.44 11.88 12.06-0.13 65.00 14.03 Cbridge n dd 811 17.25 16.63 16.88-0.06 2.25 0.81 CCA Inds 139 1.16 1.06 1.16+0.03 22.50 11.75 CCBT .64 3.6 9 20 18.13 18.00 18.00 30.38 8.25 CCC info 9 380 9.88 71 91+0 8.06 1.13 CD Wrhs dd 1460 2.39 1.2 25 74.0021.26 COW Cpt a 50 4471 74.00 68.75 73.50+4.23 18.13 2.03 CDnow dd 18.60 3.00 2.88 2.97+0.06 25.38 21.50 CFIB Cap 2.22 9.4 7 23.50 23.38 23.50 +0.13 15.50 3.00 CFC Intl 14 17 7.00 7.00+0.50 17.00 6.75 CFM T dd 1358 10.75 10.00 10.19-0.19 10.81 7.50 CFS Bn .36 3.6 16 279 10.13 10.00 10.13+0.13 47.88 20.13 CFW Cm .46 1.4 cc 130 34.44 33.88 34.00-0.44 64.38 27.44 CH Rbn .32 0.5 40 745 59.50 59.13 59.19-0.13 5.75 2.06ACHC Hall g -1.48 5.88 5.38 5.75+0.44 1.10 30.10 CGI dd 81392 46.56 44.25 44.75-1.06 15.75 8.19 CNB FnNY 36 4.1 9 59 9.00 8.75 8.81-0.19 17.50 8.75 CNBT Bn .48 a 2.8 17 145 17.38 17.31 17.38+0.06 79.88 21.25 CNET 8 9778 34.69 32.88 33.60-1.13 8.2.9. CNS dd 286 4.50 4.31 4.44+0.13 8.38 5.25 CPAC .28 3.7 8 287 7.91 7.13 7.63-0.19 29.25 20.75 CPB .60 2.3 13 114 26.25 25.63 25.88-0.88 23.75 15.88 CRH .20e 1.2 52 17.25 16.75 17.25-0.02 74.50 21.75 CSG Sys 33 3605 45.88 43.50 45.19+1.06 17.00 4.56 CSP 1.55 t 33 234 5.50 5.25 5.25-0.25 35.00 18.50 CT Com a .26 1.1 23 50 24.38 24.19 24.25-0.13 56.13 9.25 CTC Cm a dd 1001 25.75 23.50 24.63-0.63 31.00 18.88 CUNID 27 284 28.75 27.88 28.50-0.06 49.63 5.25 CUseeMe dd 1390 8.50 7.31 7.31-0.38 84.00 10.38 CV Thera dd 1544 75.38 72.38 75.00+1.13 69.31 22.00 CabotMc n 3414 59.31 54.25 58.38-0.88 7.00 2.88 Cache 40 156 3.50 3.56+0.31 1811927.00 CadieFl n dd 10406 110.50 99.98 109.36+4.38 30.25 16.75 CACI 7 150 22.60 21.50 22.50+0.53 12.75 5.56 Cadiz dd 291 9.69 9.19 9.69-0.13 13.13 6.13 Cadmus .20 2.5 dd 78 8.19 8.00 800-0.25 56.00 28.38 CaDve 48 2020 57.88 54.75 57.50+2.19 4 88 2.50 CIMaine .05 1.5 dd 62 3.44 3.44 3.44-0.06 33.00 5.38 Cakiwa n - INS 8.75 6.88 7.75 +11.13 9.75 1.06 Caliber dd 221 3.25 3.00 3.00 75.75 5.56 Calico n dd 2338 10.31 9.38 10.09+0.41 63.00 11.19 CatAmp 6348 44.69 41.13 41.75-1.94 4.44 1.13 CalFdCt 342 2.19 1.97 Z19+0.19 2.00 0.63 CalFSecCt 120 0.72 0.72 0.72+0.03 24.05 12.02 Califind .44 b 2.1 36 3 21.50 21.00 21.00+0.25 45.06 2.88 C11 97 74625.60 23.88 26.26+11.25 25.63 l9.0O CalPzza n 1539 25.88 24.88 24.94 -0.13 2D2.00 22.50 CaliperT n dd 3058 65.00 62.00 62.13-2.13 6.44 1.44 CallNet 264 2.06 1.88 1.88-0.06 1.75 0.81 Calloways 4 199 1.47 1.28 1.28-0.06 7.50 1.88 CambHrt dd 965 4.00 3.63 3.75-0.13 27.00 5.94 CambTch dd 14815 6.38 6.06 6.16+0.09 12.56 8.00 CamcoF .48 4.8 10 16 10.00 10.00 10.00-0.13 18.50 10.50 CammF n.60 3.4 144 17.81 17.13 17.81+0.06 33.50 7.56 Carninus n dd 865 17.13 15.63 16.88+2.13 9.41 4.50 Camtek n 2440 10.00 9.00 9.50+0.50

Day C10 / 294

18.88 6.13 Candle a 11 851 13.25 12.63 13.13+0.25 21.00 5.00 Candle wt 1 13.00 13.00 13.00+0.06 2.34 0.56 Candies dd 610 1.28 1.22 1.25 4.00 1.38 Cndiewd dd 498 156 3.50 3.50 10.00 5.09 Canondle dd 78 6.31 5.78 6.31+0.53 w.75 25. 15 Canon Inc As 0.4 cc 1241 45.75 44.88 45.25-0.81 34.13 6.38 Cantab dd 59 14.38 13.88 14.38+0.50 5.69 1.50 Cantbry 40 1649 4.06 3.88 3.97 59.00 4.06 CapRck n dd 3022 6.31 5.94 5.94-0.19 16.06 10.63 CapAuto 1.49 110.7 1 2 794 14.06 13.63 13.88-0.19 26.00 15.00 CapCtyBk .53 2.7 12 x 136 20.00 20.00 20.00+0.19 13.38 7.75 CapWast 9 37 11.88 11.63 11.63 16.50 7.50 CapCrss n 6 208 8.75 8.63 8.75 79.13 44.00 CapSw .60el.0 20 61.00 60.50 60.50 16.94 8.06 CaptiBc .36 3.3 11 21 11.00 10.38 10.75 + oi 14.69 8.94 CapFedF .48 f 3.3 17 501 14.66 14.44 14.50 14.75 9.38 CapTrns .28 2.4 9 109 11.94 11.69 11.81+0.06 90.00 27.38-CpstnTrb n 5528 98.60 94.25 92.311+6.69 11.81 6.00 CaptecNt 1.52 14.6 6 630 10.63 10.19 10 44+0.0 25.98 12.25 Caraustr .72 4.7 13 519 16.00 1 5.38 1 5.44-0.31 13.63 2.25 CrGrpt dd 127 4.50 4.38 4.50 11.50 1.06 C rdPth dd 34 5.33 5.00 5.00-0.25 16.00 2.50 CardDyn n dd 9358 7.00 6.06 6.44+0.47 13.38 0.38 Caredata dd 351 0.56 0.50 0.50 37.26 1 1.00-CarserEd s 48 1442 40.06 36.2S 39.94+4.13 88.00 14.38 Creinste dd 1231 23.25 22.00 22.38+0.13 9.75 0.06 CareMatrx 2280 0.41 0.31 0.38 12.13 5.63 CareSci n 79 6.38 6.25 6.25-0.25 27.00 6.50 Caryint 15 24 18.19 18.13 18.13-0.06 16.13 4.75 Carlislel-ld 137 8.88 7.94 8.06+0.19 70.50 33.88 CadCm 1.33e2.5 28 55.75 54.00 54.00+0.50 14.75 5.00 Carreker 32 406 14.38 14.00 14.19-0.06 35.00 7.25 Carrier 1 n 2165 B.63 8.25 8.50-0.13 71.75 32.56 CarrAcc 41 2333 48.44 46.06 47.88+1.81 10.50 1.50 Caringtn dd 233 2.06 2.00 2.00 11.56 1.38 Carrizo 4 393 11.50 10.75 10.75-0.19 11926 5.66 Caselle It 13 140 11.11 1.11 9.75 921-IA 14.44 7.88 Caseys OB 0.7 14 827 11.63 11.13 11.38-0.06 7.50 2.75 Casinol -8 1932 7.50 6.63 7.50+0.52 25.75 18.63 CassCo .80 4.2 11 x17 19.75 19.25 19.250.44 10.50 4.63 CastleE a .20 2.7 2310 7.28 7.28 7.28 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 21.00 5.13 Catat dd 57 5.94 5.56 5.94+0.3B 18.13 7.50 Catalyt 40 5546 13.50 12.94 13.31+0.38 22.26 6.50 CtpftCm 36 1102 18.76 16.31 18.00 41.31 80.00 34.69 CathBcp .84 1.7 13 13 49.88 49.31 49.88+0.69 15.63 9.19 CatoCp .40 3.2 9 1090 12.44 12.00 12.38+0.25 22.50 9.50 A Catskill .53 2.3 dd 6 22.88 22.44 22.88+0.44 20.63 10.63 CBncp s .20 1.7 23 4 11.63 11.63 11.63-0.13 11.13 2.50 CedaraSft 180 3.50 3.44 3.44 33.00 5.25 Celaclon dd 90 11.63 11.38 11.311-0.25 9.38 0.94 Celeds dd 70 2.38 2.06 2.06-0.13 85.25 5.00 ledtk dd 3502 45.00 41.75 44.U+3.26 70.75 5.50-Ceigerw s dd IMI ISM H.00 74.00+41.63 61.7S 6.75 ColKiens 10 10626 31.13 29.19 30AI +11.94 66.00 6.63 CollPath did 7460 34.63 30.38 33.44+IJB 52.00 1.31 Ceirrh dd 3986 47.44 43.25 46.50+2.73 10.w 3.00 CellegyPh dd 94 8.69 8.44 8.63+0.19 46.56 14.88 Cellpoint n 621 25.63 24.13 24.63-0.63 13.13 2.00 Cellstar 29 7880 4.38 V5 4.00+0.25 18.56 3.19 GellrTch 5130 9.63 8.81 9.06+0.25 19.50 9.50 CenitBep 60 4.5 10 6 13.50 13.38 13.38+0.13 12.88 5.88 CentlBc 1.39t 11 536 6.63 6.44 6.44-0.13 39.63 12.88 CentCom s 56 231 16.63 15.81 16.19+0.13 21.75 13.00 CenterBep.60 4.3 11 3 13.88 13.63 13.88+0.13 35.38 10.00 CtrSpen dd 211 15.94 14.13 115.94+11.941 98.25 19.94 Centillm n 932 75.50 71.63 74.50+2.25 0.38 5.56 Coati n 305710.19 8.94 9.19-0.81 22.50 14.25 GentdBcp.40 2.1 10 16 20.00 19.50 19.50 20.00 14.38 CntdCst 1.75t 14 2 16.25 16.25 16.25-0.25 6.94 3.56 CentEr 15 20 4.00 3.63 3.63-0.34 26.00 3.50 CEurMd dd 169 4.50 4.00 4.38+0.50 13.94 6.7% CenGardn 11 1339 8.00 6.50 7.50-0.38 18.88 0.56 Centra

295 / C10 Day

8ft dd 2337 3.50 3.25 3.41+0.03 17.00 8.75 CentAi .20 1.5 11 471 13.06 12.56 13.06+0.69 18.75 11.88 CntyBcMA .32 2.3 8 612 13.63 13.44 13.63+0.13 12.94 1.50 CentBusn 62614 1.81 1.69 1.75-0.06 25.25 17.00 CtrySo .52 2.4 69 21.94 21.25 21.88+0.63 88.63 14.00 Cephin dd 5374 51.50 50.13 50.31+0.25 27.50 6.13 Cepheid n 1152 12.38 11.63 12.13+0.63 12.25 3.38 Cerdyn 21 56 9.75 9.13 9.13-0.63 8.31 5.75 CerssGrp 7 429 6.75 6.50 6.63 8.50 7.25.CereusT n 495 9.25 8.31 8.81+0.31 40.88 12.19 Cemer cc 2943 40.25 37.75 38.06-1.44 21.00 Al. Cerprbs did 1079 17.25 15.50 17.00+11.06 37.44 12.38 Cerficom s dd 1100 34.13 32.88 33.50+0.63 78.50 20.38 CerusClp dd 1032 54.13 52.88 53.06-0.06 9.63 7.13 Chalons 30 162 9.03 8+75 8.81+0.19 7.38 2.00 Champin .20 6.4 11 50 3.13 2.94 3.13-0.13 6.50 1.88 ChmppsE n did 1262 6.00 5.75 5.75+0.06 8.75 6.00 Chanin cc 26 7.81 7.50 7.81 21.00 615 Channell 13 335 13.63 13.19 13.38 14.19 4.13 ChrlsClvrd dd 6.52 4.63 4.53 4.63+U9 36.138 10.88 ChdsRAsc 10 716 11.25 10.88 11.25+0.38 2215 8.00 CharRss n 17 16 1250 12.19 12.50+0.25 8.25 4.56 ChrmSh 11 853 5.44 5.06 5.44 27.75 10.00 ChartCm n 8783 15.63 15.06 15.31-0.31 28.88 ChrtSm n cc 10.16 85.25 83.38 84.88-0.75 28.13 9.75 Chaftm 6 115 12.50 12.19 12.19-0.44 43.38 9.38 ChpTick 486 10.81 10.44 10.63-0.06 147.50 18.254ChkPoint s cc 21577 149.63 143.25 145.81+3.19 8.38 1.88 ChkTch cc 41 4.69 4.38 4.313 0.38 0.03 ChkDr wt 222 0.09 0.06 0.06 5.50 1.16 Checkers dd 149 4.22 4.16 4.19+0.02 125.63 28.50 ChkFree dd 3199 52.13 50.50 51.81+0.94 37.13 16.38 Cheeseck s 43 2436 37.13 35.94 36.06-0.69 32.38 -.81 1.88 4.1 1177 21.75 21.06 21.50+0.13 9.50 6.25 Chwokee 1.00 10.5 8 169 9.56 9.38 9.66+0.06 7.00 2.25 ChespBio 1.41 .50 4.13 4.00 4.09+0.09 17.38 11.90 ChestrV .36 b 2.1 15 9 17.38 17.13 17.25 34.88 10.60 ChiRex cc 353 31.25 31.13 31.13 40.00 8.81 Chicos 31 4956 39.97 38.75 39.00-0.06 ChildCmp 7.63 2.13 C 7 91 2.81 2.63 2.63 37.50 10.38 ChildPic 21 2238 30.44 28.94 29.50-0.44 14.00 6.13 Chldtime 11 2 8.25 8.13 8.25+0.13 80.00 0.88 CMnaBr 7468 6.13 3.81 5.06 +11.25 78.00 10.50 chndtcm s 58M 18.60 15.31 11.63+2.13 19.50 11.88 ChipPac n 9860 MOO 15.69 18.25+0.31 72.56 25.44 Chiron 51 14379 55.00 52.50 54.06+1.56 71.38 14.31 ChceOne n 3452 17.38 15.50 16.00-0.13 10.44 4.88 Cholest 26 257 7.50 6.88 7.44+0.25 54.06 5.25 Chordal n 2087 13.06 12.W 12.06-0.56 39.19 6.39 Chdsf s 26 2884 38.38 34.13 35.50-2.69 24.25 8.63 ChrVisn dd 156 12.75 12.06 12.50+0.19 11.00 4.94 Chronimd cc 668 7.44 7.19 7.31 29.00 20.00 Chrchll .50 2.1 18 145 24.00 23.50 23.63-0.06 16.13 2.69 Cidoo dd 399 3.75 3.311 3.53-0.22 214.56 29.3MIsnaCp cc 48141 22141 M.31 2211.611 38.88 5.58ACIMA Lb cc 3228 41.63 38.06 41.36+3.0 7.13 1.75 Cimahn dd 296 2.81 2.38 2.69+0.34 43.31 26.19 CinnFin .76 2.0 25 1897 39.00 37.69 38.88+0.25 9.25 4.88 Cinram g.08 24 5.25 5.25 5.25 48.88 23.13 Cintas. a 36.45 42.06 40.56 41.56-0.06 15.25 8.47 Ciprico 77 122 12.38 12.00 12.38+0.25 10.50 8.63 CircInc .78 8.1 q 28 9.75 9.63 9.6 34.63 16.56ACircleinfl .27 0.8 256180 35.94 34.25 35.81 + 1 21.69 2.31 Crcl.cm n dd 721 3.63 3.31 3.38-0.06 29.56 9.31-CWrus 12 311979 30.50 28.81 3025+11.66 82.00 32.50 Cisco a cc 439058 88.94 67.00 68.75+2.19 65.63 22.0 CMWelC dd 61.77 23.13 20.13 20.60-2.60 29.94 15.50 CitizBkg 1.04 4.5 18 693 23.13 22.69 23.00+0.25 122.31 14.25 CitfixSy a 3831030 22.75 21.75 22.00-0.13 Z3.38 5.88 Ctyl-ild .32 4.2 dd 66 7.75 7.50 7.56-0.06 24.44 2.25 CityTlcm n .05 e 18.6 247 3.13 2.50 2.69+0.19 16.75 11.88 CivicBc .67 t 12 108 15.00 14.88 15.00+0.13 13.63 4.50 Clare cc 333 5.56 5.38 5.53+0.19 178.75 29.50 Clarent did 6138 50.88 47.19 47.75-1.13 21.00 8.50 CirkBrds 12 12 10.13 10.13 10.13+0.13 144.00 7.75 Clarus dd 9673 63.50 66.50 60.50+2.38 39.00 3.69 ClassCm n dd 147 5.38 5.00 5.00-0.26 43.88 9.00

Day C10 / 296

ClayEng 19 636 41.00 39.13 40.38+1.13 4.25 1.06 CleanH cc 46 2.97 2.81 2.910.03 2.25 0.75 ClerCd g 64 0.97 0.91 0.91-0.06 50.25 14.80 Cleamet 3052 44.50 43.88 44.38+0.44 36.60 14.00 CNckCrn n 89S 30.00 28.26 30.00+11.31 .11 22.94 5.91 clck2lrn dd 595 16.00 15.19 15.19-0.44 25.50 4.98 CNckAct a cid 345 13.89 12.44 13.00-1.00 9.75 3.88 ClickSft n 502 4.97 4.63 4.88+0.38 6.75 2.28 Clintrials dd 85 5.00 4.88 4.94+0.06 27.00 11.13 CloaMed dd 623 21.42 AN 21.42 +11.86 53.69 14.31 CoStar dd 88 27.63 26.69 27.63+0.13 4.25 1.31 CstDntl dd 7 1.91 1.88 1.88-0.06 2.13 0.69 CstFedL rt 62 1.56 1.31 1.34-0.28 20.25 12.75 CowdBcp .40 f 2.2 9 3 18.56 18.50 18.56+0.06 34.00 4.63 CobMGrp dd 813 5.38 5.00 5.19-0.13 2.00 25.00 CobWM n dd 6501 60.60 47.38 49.63+2.13 Continued on Next Page NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 15.50 8.38 St. Ind .10 0.8 cc 133 12.25 11.50 12.00+0.31 24.88 7.94 SU Inc .40 4.2 9 775 9.63 8.88 9.63+0.63 49.75 28.38 SPSTech 10 152 47.19 46.19 47.06-0.06 186.00 73.00 SPX Cp 48 3439 171.38 164.00 170.00+5.63 73.88 21.25 STMicro s .03 a 62 6349 61.94 60.44 61.69+1.69 35.00 16.63 Saatrhi .14 a 0.4 67 36.00 35.63 35.63+0.88 17.44 11.50 SabnR 15 120 17.44 16.88 17.000.38 53.5022.31 SabreHold 5.20 a 12 3322 28.25 27.63 27.88-0.06 99.94 20.38 SfadSci a 27 15748 29.75 28.50 28.94+0.13 53.63 29.31 Safeway 24 15B63 49.38 48.63 49.31 +.31 39.63 9.00 SagaSys 27 1325 13.88 12.66 12.63-0.81 31.38 20.06 StJoe .08 0.3 31 353 29.38 29.25 29.31-0.06 22.13 19.94 StJol-P 1.00 4.6 25 41 2194 21.75 2124 + 0.13 46.13 23.63 StJude cc 5492 40 . 88 39.06 39.63+0.81 49.56 21.31 StPaulGos 1.08 2.3 11 7311 48.13 47.00 47.63+0.38 18.88 9.25 Saks 8 6819 10.38 9.81 10.00-0.31 9.88 7.63 .88 9.4 q 320 9.50 9.31 9.38-0.06 21.13 16.00 SalirnSBF 3.73 a 0.7 q 716 18.56 18.31 18.56+0.19 13.31 10.06 SalmHIF 1.50 11.6 q 78 13.00 12.94 12.94 12.50 9.94 Salml-112 1.56 12.5 q 1332 12.50 12.25 12.47+0.16 13.19 10.00 1.43 a 11.3 q 194 12.94 12.56 12.69-0.19 138.75 65.75 SaloSB01 3.48 3.2 7 ID9.63 109.63 109.63 -1.94 11.00 8.63 SaNik02 130 9.19 9.06 9.19+006 60.88 24.25 Sefton 7 1069 37.81 37.06 37.63+0.7510.69 7.81 SJuanB .96 a 9.0 43 1032 1063 10.38 10.63+0.19 37.44 22.25 SanPaolo .93 a 2.6 126 35.75 35.25 35.75-0.19 20.38 16.63 SFeEnTr 2.01 e 10.1 27 19.81 19.69 19.81+0.06 41.75 19.00 SFeIntl .13 0.3 49 7002 39.31 38.13 39.31+0.69 14.13 6.06 Slsabei .02 p 94 6.50 6.13 6.13-0.25 17.50 11.38 SantaridBc .44 3.7 6 40 11.88 11.50 11.75+0.13 11.75 6.06 Sappis . 19 a 2.2 8 666 8.75 8.56 8.63+0.19 27.50 13.38 Saral-asi .54 2.9 1462916 19.25 18.56 18.63-0.56 14.94 7.50 SauerDanf .28 3.1 11 430 9.38 9.13 9.13-0.25 16.88 13.98 SaulCntr 1.56 9.9 15 131 15.81 15.63 15.81+0.06 22.50 18.69 SaYnElc pf 1.71 7.9 4 21.75 21.63 21.63-0.38 23.94 18.50YSavia SA 148 18.56 18.19 18.56+0.06 38.06 22.50 ScarriaB .79 e 3.5 10 23.00 22.50 22.50-0.75 9.75 7.50 Schawk .13 1.4 19 417 9.63 9. 9.44-0.06 57.44 30.50 SchergPl .56 1.4 2631152 40.31 39.69 40.13+0.25 88.88 46.88 Schlmb .75 0.9 cc 19278 85.94 84.06 85.31+0.40 44.75 18.00 Schwab s .04 0.1 71 36161 38.69 37.00 38.31+1.13 16.94 11.69 SchMau .60 4.1 8 471 14.50 14.13 14.50 25.88 14.50 SciGames 19 136 25.88 288 25.88 94.00 23.50 SciAll a .04 0.1 83 17340 78.50 75.00 77.940.94 53.63 38.38 Scor 1.33 e 3.0 10 78 44.38 43.44 43.69 39.25 22.00 ScoftPw 2.l8e7.2 1647 30.69 30.00 30.13-0.56 42.00 28.50 Scoffs 20 513 31.50 30.88

297 / C10 Day

31.00-0.06 52.00 41.50 Scripps .56 1.1 27 1386 51.00 50.50 50.69-0.56 5.50 4.56 ScudGlbHi.60 11.3 q 259 5.38 5.31 5.31 20.50 13.00 ScudNA .61 a q 337 13.94 13.75 13.94+0.06 32.19 20.44 SeaContA 1.20 4.2 13 721 28.50 27.63 28.50+0.63 32.00 20.50 SeaContB 1.08 3.8 13 15 28.38 28.13 28.38+0.38 45.25 29.00 SeacorS s - 33 2233 46.25 44.88 45.56+0.69 76.0026.56 1314601 60.00 57.38 59.38+2.63 24.63 20.69 2.00 8.3 176 24.19 23.88 24.06+0.06 65.25 36.63 Seagram .66 1.1 dd 21185 61.88 59.88 60.19-1.56 60.94 40.00 Seag adj 3.75 6.8 187 56.25 54.13 55.00-1.25 61.88 43.38 SealAir 28 2447 51.56 50.19 51.31+0.88 43.50 25.25 Sears .92 2.9 7 23977 32.25 31.06 31.19-0.44 23.44 18.75 Sears 138 1.75 8.2 144 21.69 21.38 21.38-0.13 23.50 18.69 Seam -38 1.74 8.1 48 21.63 21.50 21.56+0.06 63 11.88 SecCG B 33 918 17.31 17.00 17.00-0.31 19.69 13.38 SocCRtty 518 19.00 18.50 19.00+0.13 15.44 50 Seitel 46 1394 15.75 14.94 15.69+0.69 12.25 10.81 SeligQual .77a6.4 q 19 12.00 11.94 11.94 10.13 8.75 SeligSel .65 a 6.5 q 165 10.00 9.94 9.94 23.19 16.12 1.00 5.1 10 13984 1963 18-63 19-63+0-88 7.63 6.06 SenHgh 85 12.5 q 649 6.81 6.69 6.81+0.06 16.94 7.30 SenHws n 1.20 13.2 9 278 9.13 8.75 9.13+0.25 23.19 10.50 Sensormt 21 1881 17.38 16.25 16.63+050 69.50 30.25 SaquaA 10 66 46.44 45.56 46.25+0.56 31.9424.26 Serono n 8013 29.75 28.63 28.63-1.38 14.19 2.13 SvceCp dd 15188 2.38 2.13 2.31+0.19 16.75 838 Svcnistr .40 4.1 13 8308 9.88 9.63 9.75-0.06 21.25 7.97 7-Eleven 13 292 13.69 13.31 13.38-0.44 7.75 2.94 ShanHua .42 a 5.5 1 761 7.69 7.63 7.63-0.06 25.50 10.31 ShanglPt .60 a 3.8 4 161 16.00 15.81 16.00+0.06 29.50 13.13 ShawC gs 947 22.31 21.94 22.31+0.25 54.81 19.0 GAShowGp 31 568 55.69 54.00 55.69+1.31 20.88 10.94 Show .30 2.4 8 3689 12.66 11.63 12.44+0.81 54.25 39.63 ShellTr 1.45 a 2.8 cc 1444 51.69 51.00 51.44-0.63 27.63 17.13 Shemin .54 2.3 12 5131 23.13 22.63 23.00+0.31 30.00 11.38 ShopKo 4 3580 11.75 11.44 11.44-0.31 27.25 20.31 Shurgard 2.04 f 8.6 16 350 23.81 23.38 23.81+0.31 45+25 23.75 SiderNac .96 a 2.6 1201 36.38 36.00 36.25-0.13 12.50 2.44 Sieffal-IS dd 1130 2.75 2.63 2.75 25.31 12.13 SWWc 1.00 5.7 24 3523 17.81 16.75 17.69+0.94 5.19 2.00 SilcnGph s dd 6935 4.88 4.69 4.69-0.13 7.50 2.63 Silvertf 3 38 3.75 3.50 3.75+0.25 32.00 14.76 Marine n 715 21.00 20.06 20.94+0.94 27.13 20. SirronProp 2.02 8.9 23 3940 23.38 22.75 22.75-0.31 53+00 38.00 SlmpsnMf 14 90 47.00 46.50 47.00 +0.44 7.38 1.31.Simula dd 403 1.44 1.25 1.38 9.44 6.19 Singap q 148 7.19 7.00 7.19+0.13 9.75 3.50 Sitel 82 1122 6.06 5.75 5.75-0.25 35.88 13.38 SixFlags dd 12566 15.19 14.75 14.94+0.06 8.94 6.38 Welarl .92 11.5 29 170 8.00 7.75 8.00+0.19 3.63 1.25 Sizzler 24 1435 2.19 2.06 2.13+0.13 18.50 3.25 Skechers 21 846 17.88 16.88 17.81+0.25 28.25 17.81 Skyline .72 3.3 13 56 22.25 22.00 22.13 10.50 5.50 SmrtFn 2944 7.81 7.69 7.75 20.50 8.88 SmischtA .47 e 2.3 - 6 20.13 20.00 20.00 18.38 8.13 SmedvB .47e2.7 1 17.63 17.63 17.63+0.13 42.50 26.38 SmithN s 1 41.19 41.19 41.19-0.50 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 31.56 14.94 SmithAO .52 f 3.3 7 485 15.94 15.69 15.75-0.19 88.5031.63 Smithin 64 3980 80.94 78.94 79.50-0.50 44.63 31.25 SmithRR 2.20 5.3 16 234 41.31 41.06 41.13-0.06 29.75 14.88 SmithficIF 12 1143 26.88 26.38 26.56-0.31 72.38 52.50 SmithBoh 1.13e 1.7 40 2506 65.56 64.69 65.31+0.56 18.88 18.13Smucker n 64 3.3 21 549 19.31 18.63 19.19+0.56 35.00 20.88 SnapOn 960.1 12 2509 31.88 30.00 30.Bl +0.63 27.00 9.75 SnyderSNC c1d 29009 28.19 27.00 27.38+0.75 29.5014.75 SnyderSt 1.68 6.2 .57 27.50 27.00 27.00+1.76 35.1320.19 SocQM .88 e 3.8 84 23.31 22.75 23.31+0.13 34.5021.44 SocQM A 8B

Day C10 / 298

a 3.5 96 25.00 23.50 25.00-1.00 19.31 10.13 SodxMar .08 a 0.5 18 761 16.44 16.25 16.25-0.25 16.88 4.00 Sola dd 3.07 7.13 6.69 7.00 49.50 28.25 Solectin s 52 25262 45.75 45.00 45.06+0.19 21.00 11.25 Solutia .04 0.3 10 5264 15.44 14.75 15.06+0.19 13.00 7.63 SonicAut 7 393 10.69 10.50 10.56-0.13 25.56 17.50 SonocoP .80 4.1 10 1444 19.94 19.13 19.31-0.06 157.38 63.38 SonyCp a .47 a 0.4 66 4565 115.19 111.44 11425+4.13 36.3B 14.50 Sothbys cc 1233 20.81 20.38 20.69+0 38 52.63 45.69 SourcC 4.60 9.2 q 13 50.56 50.06 50.13-0 25 30.25 24.50 SGJefln 1.46 5.4 13 100 27.06 26.81 27.00+0 25 70.69 45.31 Soudwn .60 1.0 11 1150 63.44 61.50 6275+1 75 19.00 10.75 SouAfrica .05e O.4 q 141 14.00 13.75 14.00+0.13 29.75 20.38ASouthrCo 1.34 4.5 1527643 30.06 29.31 29.94+0.56 18.19 10.63 SPeruC .24e 1.7 20 798 14.13 13.75 13.94-0.06 20.63 12M SoUnCo .82 1 cc 437 17.94 17.56 17.94 25.00 14.38 SwatAirl .02 0.1 24 11196 23.06 22.38 22.63+0.19 28.75 16.88 SwtGas .82 4.3 20 1556 19.25 18.81 18.88-0.13 45.38 16.50 SwstSec. .36f 1.1 5 2190 34.75 33.19 33.19-1.19 23.81 19.56 SthBell48 1.72 7.7 68 22.38 22.T3 22.27+0.02 10.38 5.44 SwnEnrg .12j dd 328 7.75 7.44 7.69+0.19 24.00 17.50 SovranSS2.28 11.7 10 508 19.44 18.69 19.44+0.50 18.38 11.81 Spain 4.33 q 111 12.75 12.38 12.38-0.25 40.5022.00 Spartch .34 1.4 14 2807 25.13 24.13 24.75-0.44 6.31 3.56 Sparton 4.13 3.94 4.13+0.19 30.38 15.00 SpcIEqp 12 1168 27.06 26.88 27.06+0.06 47.60 19.00 Speedlill 23 314 26.94 24.69 26.81+11.113 28.38 10.813 Spherkin 9 2921 13.00 12.06 12.31-0.25 57.00 32.2S SpiekerP 2.80 5.1 16 1835 54.94 54.63 54.63-0.06 12.56 SpinkrEx n cc 668 36.38 35.25 36.38+0.44 9.88 2.19 SportSup. dd 150 2.98 2.75 2.81 4.06 1.13 SptAuth dd 537 2.13 2.06 2.13 51.00 29.88 Springs 1.32 4.4 7 346 30.31 29.88 29.88-0.19 75.94 30.25 SprntFON .50 1.5 1264120 34.25 32.63 33.56+1.13 66.94 29.00 SpmtPGS a - dd a2814 50.63 49.25 49.81+1.31 39.38 20.94AStancpF .28f 0.7 14 600 40.31 39.06 40.00+1.38 5.50 2.75 StdCm .20 4.3 6 40 4.63 4.63 4.63+0.06 23.50 7.38 StMotr .36 3.7 39 685 10.31 9.50 9.69-0.63 16.38 8.WStdPac .32 1.9 7 947 16.44 16.19 16.44+0.19 27.44 12.06 StdRegis .92 7.2 10 243 1 2.88 12.63 12.81+0.19 27.13 1 4.34 Stanclex .80 4.3 9 93 18.63 1 8.31 1 8.56+0.2 33.6322.00 StanlWk .92 f 3.4 14 x972 27.13 26.56 26.75+019 17.50 12.25 StarGas 2.30 13.4 24 209 17.31 16.75 17.13+E38 9.25 4.38 StarGsSr .25 p 2 8.19 8.19 E1.19-0.06 25.25 16.13 Starret .80 4.4 11 253 18.88 18.00 18.313 -0.44 .79 .25 .21 38 Stanek 34 1035 41.88 39.06 39.19-1.25 35.56 19.50 StamdHtl .69 2.2 26 2902 32.81 32.00 32.100 0.56 123.00 55.50 StateStr .68f 0.6 29 4784 120.25 113.00 117.75 +4.00 20.38 15.63 StlsBcp. .52 f 2.8 12 172 18.44 18.38 18.44+0.06 20.00 11.00 StatnCas s 7732 15.56 14.38 14.38-0.44 18.44 10.25 Steelcsa .44 2.7 14 605 16.56 16.13 16.56+0.38 22+13 14.50 Steinwy 9 49 17.75 17.75 1775 25.00 19.63 Stepan .65 3.1 12 10 21.00 20.88 20.88 - 04 15.00 7.94 Starts cc 5960 10.44 9.81 1025+038 18.88 14.00 StrlBcp .56 3.1 11 33 18.13 18.00 18.13-0.06 21.50 10.13 StewInfo .04j 35 457 13.44 13.00 13.44+0.38 13.25 8.88 Stifel .12 11 160 13.44 13.00 13.00-0.06 52.25 36.75 StilwelIF n 9D07 49.13 47.56 48.38+1 . 13 62.56 31.81 StoneEn 22 662 61.25 59.63 59.81-1.13 19.50 7.50 Stonerdg 6 224 10.69 10.25 10.38+0.38 23.94 10.00 StorTch dd 3331 16.00 15.56 15.81-0.13 32.00 26.00 StorUSA 2.76 9.2 13 178 30.75 30.13 30.13-0.56 10.94 9.44 StrGlob 1.24 11.5 q 305 10.75 10.63 10.75+0.06 9.06 5.00 StrideRt .20 3.3 9 577 6.13 6.00 6.00-0.13 23.63 18.75 StrPCwde n .16 a 0.8 2 21.00 21.00 21.00-0.25 50.0024.38 Stryker a .07eO.2 61 2548 45.94 44.00 44.81+0.31 50.50 37.13 StuLnCp 2.40 5.0 10 171 48.00 47.69 47.69-0.25 10.69 8.13 SturmR .80 9.6 7 359 8.38 8.19 8.31 20.88 16.44 SubPpne 2.00 10.0 12 402 20.38 20.00 20.00-0.25 51.38 30.56 SuizaF 15

299 / C10 Day

1541 50.44 49.75 50.00+0.06 28.81 1738 SulzerM .29 e 1.0 10 28.19 28.00 28.00+0.13 35.50 22.13 SummitB 1.40 5.1 11 4977 27.94 26.75 27.69+0.94 24.00 16.50 SumtPrp 1.75 7.5 13 893 23.44 23.13 23.25 35.88 26.88 SunCmts 2.04 6.6 18 106 31.00 30.88 30.94-0.06 32.38 15.75 SunIntH 6 82922.00 20.69 21.75+1.13 20.19 8.69-SunUte gn 508721.25 20.00 21.06+11.06 6.31 1.75 Sunbeam dd 2304 2.00 1.94 1.94-0.06 6.38 4.13 Sunburst 8 84 5.19 5.06 5.130.13 24.94 17.63 Suncor gs 236 23.13 22.69 22.75-0.19 40.00 16.88 SunGard 27 2277 36.38 36.00 36.00-0.63 34.3821.94 Sunoco 1.00 3.7 16 6331 28.19 27.06 27.19-1.25 7.13 3.75 SunMed cc 388 5.63 5.19 5.63+0.06 7.44 3.44 Sunsource 1 69 4.44 4.38 4.38-0.13 76.0045.06 SunTrst 1.48 3.0 13 9828 50.81 49.00 49.38-0.19 18.81 12.88 SuperSol 1.94 e 10.4 75 10 18.69 18.63 18.630.13 34.3822.94 Supertrid .40 1.2 11 609 32.44 31.13 32.44+0.56 27.13 7.00 SuperTel .251b3.0 8 585 8.44 8.31 8.44+0.19 3.50 1.88 SUnimarc .16 a 7.3 10 2.19 2.19 2.19 23.25 14.00 Supvalu .55f3.7 8 6170 15.25 14.98 14.94-0.06 29.66 9.75 SwltEng 18 4319 28.94 27.06 28.94+2.88 15.44 12.63 SwisHeIv 1.07 a q 196 14.75 14.63 14.75-006 44.00 27.31 Swisswm .90 a .2 387 28.50 27.75 28.19 +0 .69 33.06 16.38 Sybront 17 3151 22.94 22.50 22.75+0.25 69.00 1 9.76 SybITc a .02 45 7654 43.25 40.63 41.25-0 06 8.88 3.31 SymsCp 38 261 3.88 3.75 381 2219 14.00 Synovus .44 2.2 23 2638 19.88 19.25 19.69+0.11 45.38 26.13 Sysco .48 1.1 32 6719 42.50 41.75 42.31+0.38 11.38 2.50 Systemax 7498 4.50 4.31 4.31 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg T 11.13 8.19-111 Woods .36 3.2 10 199 11.25 9.88 11.25+11.38 32.94 18.00 ATCF Fn .85 2.6 15 5198 33.00 32.06 32.81+0.88 11.38 9.00 TCW .84al.4 q 406 11.38 11.25 11.38+0.19 9.88 9.25 TCW 00 .24 2.4 q 412 9.88 9.81 9.81 9.44 8.81 TCW 02 .48 in 5.1 q 234 9.38 9.31 9.38+0.06 9.44 8.63 TCW 03 .56 m 6.0 q 841 9.38 9.31 9.31 - 27.00 11.44 TD. Whir SM3 20.31 19.69 20.25+0.88 15750 87.75 TDK 6 4 cc 26 148.50 146.38 147.50 +0.13 25.56 17.25 TECO 1.34 55 17 1761 24.69 24.38 24.56+0.1 31.25 13.94 TJX .16 09 1 1 23601 19.06 18.13 18.81 +0.38 30.94 20.50 TNTPost .34e 1.4 .26 23.56 23.44 23.50 14.50 5.94 TRC 23 1330 14.81 14.38 14.63+0.25 65.00 39.75 TRW 1.32 a 2.9 7 6459 46.31 43.94 45.69+0.50 17.75 3.75 TV Aztec .03 e 0.2 dd 2069 13.75 13.13 13.44+0.19 8.75 1.50 TVX Gid s dd 3281 2.19 1.94 2.06+0.19 41.88 25.94 TXU Corp 2.40 6.9 8 12299 35. 34.38 34.94+0.50 26.25 16.56 Taiwan q 304 17.63 17.25 17.63+0.D6 56.25 22.13 TaiwSem 9686 35.44 34.75 35.00+0.63 40.56 27.50 TaiwSern n 102 35.25 34.75 34.88+0.13 69.63 28.25ATalbots .56 0.8 26 xl 70.06 65.75 66.941.94 37.00 22.69 Talism g 1073 33.88 33.50 33.69+0.38 3.50 2.25.Tndycft dd 306 2.13 2.00 2.06-0.19 24.88 18.50 Ta 822423 10195 1177 131 21.31 21.06 21.06-0.13 39.25 25 .4411 220911 23.69 21.63 23.19-2.88 13.88 8.13 Testy .48 4.2 11 589 11.38 11.06 11.31-0.06 14.56 2.75 Tatneft 924 13.19 12.88 13.19+0.19 13.06 9.75 Taubmn .98 9.0 cc 376 11.00 10.88 10.94-0.06 29.69 16.25 TchSym 57 27 29.75 29.69 29.75+0.13 143.76 31.66 Technttrl .27 0.2 31 3652 138.75 127.50 127.60-5.75 45.94 13.31 ATeekay .86 1.9 cc 4497 49.25 45.75 46.25+0.69 20.25 8.94 Tefron 16 23 14.25 14.13 14.25+0.06 31.19 19.81 Toolinch cc 111 26.00 24.75 24.75-1.38 87.31 28.38 Tektmx 12 cc 4459 76.38 73.50 76.19+2.50 69.25 16.31 TelCelSul .23 a 0.6 445 40.25 38.00 39.75+1.25 15.88 3.13 TeICnOes .16el.3 837 13.00 12.63 12.75+0.06 49.75 27.00 TeIeDan .6412.2 175 30.19 29.56 29.69+0.56 71.25 25.00 TelLeste 1.95 a 4.0 55 46.50

Day C10 / 300

45.50 45.75+0.31 89.0022.00 TelNrdeC .32 a 0.5 414 61.00 59.00 60.00+1.00 73.0021.00 TelNotCel Age 1.6 64 43.25 43.00 43.13+0.31 27.38 13.00 TelNorL .37 r 1.5 4793 25.88 25.25 25.50-0.06 63.13 18.38 TelSuCel .21 a 0.9 43 24.69 24.13 24.50-0.25 46.75 21.88 TlcmArg 1.36 a 5.8 5020 23.88 23.25 23.50+0.25 38.94 22.5 TeloNZ 2.04e9.2 11 860 22.38 22.19 22.25-0. 210.00 82.50 Telltalia 2.95 a 2.4 252 124.25 122.25 124.00+2.63 118.88 49.88 TelBrasH s 1.30 r 1.4 4098 91.94 90.00 91.63+1.00 37.88 13.44 TelSPaulo 1.20 a 6.7 1258 17.81 17.06 17.81+0.63 28.50 7.81 Teledyne n 14 2869 20.25 19.75 20.13+0.06 47.88 26.13 Teleflex .60 1.7 13 1081 36.19 35.00 35.63+0.69 94.94 45.13 TelefEsp 39 11026 57.94 56.69 57.31-0.69 50.0023.81 TelArg 1.4Oe4.4 24 524 32.50 31.75 31.94+0.13 21.38 9.00 TelPeru .67 a 7.2 142 9.25 9.00 9.25+0.06 78.0034.25 TelMex s .98 a 1.8 168112 54.94 53.56 54.44+0.75 39.00 14.81 Telegllb 1. 15 21.06 19.81 20.06+0.19 107.75 26.00 Telem .37 3745 65.0057.00 66.00+8.00 67.6022.38 Telspcsi .1590A 4987 37.26 36.36 36.76+11.44 5.63 2.25 TelAxlh I 30 3.00 2.88 2.88 23.88 45.92 .4 380 18.44 18.19 18.38-1.13 69.56 40.75 Templeld 1.28 3.0 14 4378 43.19 42.19 42.44 8.50 6.50 TmpChm .15 a 1.9 q 218 8.13 8.00 8.06 10.19 7.44 TmpDrgn 1.211113.4 q 933 9.19 8.94 9.06+0.13 12.3B 8.63 TEMAF .48 a 4.8 q 66 9.94 9.88 9.94+0.06 14.06 8.25 TEMA .01 eO.1 q 270 9.31 9.13 9.31+0.19 10.75 9.19 TEMIF 1.24 11.7 q 321 10.69 10.63 10.63 6.50 5.31 TmpGGv .60 10.2 q 167 5.88 5.81 5.88 6.63 5.50 TmpGib .60 9.7 q 938 6.19 6.13 6.19+0.06 21.38 10.31 TmpRusa .14 a 0.7 q 71 19.44 19.13 19.38+0.13 9.81 6.00 TmpViet q 6 7.00 7.00 7.00+0.13 32.69 16.25 Tened-ilt 3016405 31.25 30.38 31.00+0.69 11.50 5.25 TncoAut n .20 2.8 271 7.31 7.00 7.13+0.06 23.56 20.38 TVA 28 1.69 7.6 69 22.44 22.31 22.31-0.13 22.75 19.65 TVA 29 1.63 7.5 80 21.75 21.63 21.63 25.38 23.88ATVA 45 2.00 8.0 474 25.56 25.06 25.13 25.13 22.13 TVA 46 1.88 7.6 205 24.63 24.44 24.63+0.13 26.50 17.13 Teppco 2.00 8.4 13 221 24.00 23.75 23.75-0.13 115.44 26.94 Teadyn 30. BM 65.38 64.00 64.81+0.38 31.50 11.13 Terex 3 565 18.56 18.13 18.31-0.44 3.88 0.94 Terra dd 352 1.69 1.56 1.56-0.13 9.75 3.00 TerraNitro 11 34 4.50 4.38 4.50+0.13 18.81 8.94 Tesoro 5 831 10.13 9.63 9.63-0.25 14.94 6.06 Tetra dd 1404 13.69 13.25 13.63+0.38 68.3839.50 Texaco 1.80 3.5 1517082 52.56 51.31 51.50-0.42 43.3828.06 TexInd .30 0.9 11 $81 34.13 31.94 34.13+2.25 .7537.88 Texinst s.09 0.1 39 66087 68.00 66.06 68.00+1.50 47.50 34.38 TxPac .40 1.0 34 25 40.00 39.56 39.63-0.38 112.94 51.00 Textron 1.30 2.3 14 4716 57.50 55.50 56.06-0.94 5.69 2.81 ThajCF q 108 2.94 2.81 2.81-0.13 9.50 4.38 Thai q 56 4.69 4.56 4.69 16.63 6.56 Theragen 12 1267 7.44 7.13 7.13+0.04 26.88 12.75 ThermoEl 33 7112 23.50 23.00 23.13+0.13 53.69 17.31 ThmBet 1.12 6.0 16 3493 19.00 18.63 18.75-0.25 20.88 15.94 Thomind .30 1.5 11 135 20.25 20.00 20.19-0.06 73.25 13.60 ThMft a 119 61.50 59.00 61.50+2.38 30.56 20.75 Thodnd .08 0.3 8 178 23.75 23.00 23.31+0.06 9. 7.06 Thombg .96 11.7 8 336 8.56 8.19 . 1 - 82.50 9.13 Threel S a 44 3076 34.50 32.88 33.25-0.50 42.31 23.56 Tidwtr .60 1.5 206531 41.13 39.88 40.38-0.31 4 Tiffany a .16 0.4 36 18M 42.56 40.50 44.50 16.88 Timbrld a 25 1518 42.63 40.75 40.76-1.63 105.50 57.19 TimeWrn .18 0.2 99 34758 86.94 85.00 86.00-1.25 21.81 13.50 Timken .72 4.4 16 1366 16.81 16.26 16.31-0.08 M50 10.00 TtanCp - dd 15485 26.00 24.63 24.63+0.56 12.25 4.75 Plan Intl .06 1.2 13 45 5.06 4.88 5.06+0.13 9.63 3.13 TitanMet dd 14738.75 8.50 8.75+0.25 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 9.56 6.63 ToddShp 9 2 7.94 7.94 7.94+0.13 31.00 16.56-ToliBro 11

301 / C10 Day

32.811131.00 32.63+11.63 18.50 9.75 Tomkins 12.11 11.50 12.56 -0.06 36.98 6.31 THlffgr 2.1 1.25 9.69 10.88+1.19 36.25 13.56 Too Inc 28 216 25.75 24.63 24.63-0.25 42.44 27.75 TootsieR .28 f 0.7 27 316 40.50 39.63 40.25-0.06 8.25 3.75 TorchEn 1.40e 19.5 3 1887 7.56 6.75 7.19-0.38 36.00 18.75 Trchmrk .36 1.3 12 3432 29.13 27.31 28.06+0.38 38.00 27.25 Toro .48 1.6 9 667 30.25 30.00 30.25+0.44 28.63 18.63 ATorDBk g 1.00f 728 28.69 28.44 28.56-0.06 33.81 23.81 Tosco .28 12242 30.63 30.31 30.50+0.06 81 26 59.56 TotFinaEf 1.12 a 1.5 46 10816 75.69 73.88 74.50-2.81 38 6320.00 TatalF wt 6 34.00 33.63 33.63-1.50 8.63 2.06 TotRed dd 1402 7.00 6.50 7.00+0A9 20.63 14.13 TotalSys .05 0.3 39 466 17.13 16.50 16.50-0.25 20.75 10.88 TwrAuto 5 4339 11.56 11.06 11.38+0.25 18.94 16.00 TwnCtry 1.68 9.5 10 169 17.94 17.63 17.69-0.25 108.25 60.75 Toyota 230 87.25 86.75 87.25+0.25 19.25 9.75 ToyRU 9 10500 18.38 18.06 18.19-0.19 15.8B 10.31 TrammllC 9 751 14.25 13.88 13.88-0 . 19 14.69 6.75 TrCda g 1.12 2142 9.81 9.69 9.81+0.19 23.38 19.56 TmsFin281.78 7.8 240 22.94 22.56 22.75-0. 1 33.69 TranInc 1.88a8.1 q24 23.19 23.13 2 1 91.56 68.75 TmsatlH .54fO.6 19 161 87.44 85.50 87.19 + 13.50 2.88 TrnsRty .60 4.8 2 16 12.63 12.56 12.63+0.1 5.94 1.81 Trmedia.04 1.1 dc 123 3.50 3.50 3.50-0.13 61.94 23.88 Tranaocn .12 0.2 cc 22653 60.38 59.31 59.75-0.29 8.63 2.38 TrMMex 11 223 8.50 8.38 8.44+0.06 8.50 2.00 TMMexA 7 433 8.25 7.94 8.060.13 9.56 7.13 TrGasSur .60 a 8.0 873 T56 7.38 7.50+0.06 3.50 1.13 TmsCpn 25 26 1.50 1.25 1.25-0.13 7.56 4.25 Tmspro .20 4.5 5 20 4.44 4.44 4.44-0.06 15.69 8.00 TmsTec .26 2.8 13 58 9.38 9.06 9.31+0.25 14.69 WTrvCpLn 1.46 9.8 q 397 14.88 14.69 14.88+0.19 32.38 16.06 Tredgar .16 0.8 11 684 19.50 19.31 19.50 33.63 13.25 Tremnt .28 0.9 dd 9 32.25 32.13 32.25 22.13 1 2.00 Trenwick 1.04 5.5 dd 440 19.06 18.63 18.94-0.25 58.94 20.63 Trex - 24 735 31.00 30.50 31.00+1.00 29.25 22.63 TriContl 4.09 a 1.5 21 836 27.13 26.81 27.06+0.38 2188 16.81 Triarc. A 608 22.94 22.50 22.75+0.19 60.88 27.88 Tribune .40 1.1 27 7467 36.81 35.69 35.81-0.63 27.00 12.06 Tribune 01 1.75 12.6 30 14.00 13.88 13.880.13 190.00 106.50 Tribunl n 3.14 2.4 214 130.75 130.13 130.50+0.56 28.50 7.56 Tricom 19 102 15.94 15.50 15.94 46.25 23.56 TriconG 8 8141 29.44 29.06 29.13-0.31 61.44 21.50 TrigonH 41 1649 53.31 51.63 51.63-0.44 33.25 18.19 Trinityin .72 3.7 5 1336 19.81 19.13 19.38+0.06 48.38 11.31 TntEng dd 2867 45.19 43.89 44.00 -0.88 33.6022.75 Triumph 11 117 30.69 29.50 30.69+1.44 20.13 12.75 TrizecHhn .22 28 8579 15.81 15.66 16.81+ 0 25 52.88 32.06 TrueNth .60 1.3 48 1743 47.00 45.00 46.38+025 5.19 2.06 Trump dd 292 2.88 2.75 2.75-0.06 25.69 10.25 TuckerAS .20 0.8 11 955 24.38 23.50 23.56-0.63 24.50 14.56 Tuppwre .88 4.4 12 2011 20.44 20.13 20.19+0.06 18.63 13.00 Turkeell n 1964 13.56 13.38 13.44 22.13 6.56 Turksh q 581 14.00 13.88 13.88011 23.00 14.00 21Centins .32i 22 512 16.31 15.81 15.81-0.25 1 TwinDs .70 4.2 12 36 17.00 16.63 16.63- 111 - 50 13.81 13.06 2002TT .78a5.7 q 68 13.81 13.69 13.69 - 0 06 58.26 22.50 TycoIntl s .05 0.1 27 41363 57.19 55.31 57.13 + 1.56 42.88 32.75 Tycorn n 11630 42.38 40.00 41.75+1.38 8.94 1.88 TylarTech dd 408 2.25 2.06 2.19+0.06 18.13 8.50 Tyson .16 11 12 3774 9.38 9.00 9.19+0.06 U 79.00 45.75 UAL .31 p 7 6528 48.88 47.69 47.75-1.63 153.56 129.75 UBS n 413 146.50 145.13 146.19+1.31 28.00 11.25 UCAR Int 30 2328 13.75 13.00 13.63+0.50 24.19 18.19 UGI 1.55 6.8 14 589 22.94 22.63 22.81 +O.23 28.50 3.38 UICI 7318 6.94 6.63 6.63-0.19 53.63 37.88 UIL Hold 2.88 5.7 11 88 50.31 49.81 50.31+0.56 44.50 24.50 UPM Ky 2.01 a 7.8 575 26.13 25.38 25.76-0.69 25.88 10.75 URS 6450 13.19 12.94 13.19 20.25 9.50 US Agg .12 0.7 2376 17.25

Day C10 / 302

16.94 17.25+0.25 24.81 12.00 US Can 1332 19.13 19.06 19.13 19.00 8.06 US Rest dd 346 11.00 10.81 10.94+0.06 53.94 27.81 USA Educ. .64 1.6 12 5665 39.31 38.25 39.19+0.81 16.00 11.88 USB Hid .32 12.4 12 8 13.44 13.38 13.380.13 11.44 3.44 USEC .55 12.6 cc 1496 4.38 4.31 4.38+0.06 53.1328.38 USG .60 1.9 4 1 32.44 31.00 32.19+0.94 32.31 13.88 LIST Inc 1.76 8.1 8 11243 21.69 20.75 21.63+0.81 33.88 20.69 USXMar .92 13.4 8 105D2 27.75 27.25 27.44+0.14 33.00 16.75 USXUSS 1.00 5.8 16 8044 18.00 17.38 17.38-0.19 28.63 20.56 UltramDS 1.10 4.7 7 6339 23.75 23.19 23.44-0.19 13.56 8.00 UftraWn .33e3.0 253 11.06 11.00 11.00 16.38 10.81 UniSrcEn .32 2.1 7 791 15.75 15.25 15.56+0.11 34.75 17.00AUUniao .91 e 2.7 3535 35.00 33.50 34.00+0.75 5.75 0.06 UniCapital dd 11670 0.13 0.06 0.13-0.02 46.94 30.94 Unicorn 1.60 3.5 13 4073 46.13 45.38 45 69 +15.88 7.81 Unili 17 1832 11.50 11.19 1 1.314 06 16.88 7.44 UniFirst .15 1.5 13 88 10.19 10.06 0.13-0.0 36.44 15.13 Unigrph 17 75 20.56 20.25 20.56+0.38 71.38 39.25 UnilevNV 8.00 a 2.5 17 6487 47.94 46.94 47.25-0.44 39.81 21.13 Unilever .84e3.3 15 1149 25.63 25.25 26.50-0.38 23.00 18.94 UBnCaJF 1.84 8.4 145 21.94 2175 21.94+0.06 68.44 40.25.UCwb .90 2.2 14 6930 41.25 40.06 40.40-0.23 56.50 34.25 UnionPac 80 2.0 11 5019 40.06 39.56 39.75+0.25 46.44 25.25 UPIntr 2.00 6.6 10 4044 30.81 29.56 30.31+0.69 46.44 17.94 UnBnGW 1.00 4.0 8 3719 24.88 23.94 24.81+0.88 49.69 9.13 Unisys 9 52708 13.38 12.50 13.00 16.25 4.88 Unit 41 848 15.75 15.19 15.63+ 24.88 13.75 UAM .80 3.3 22 906 24.56 24.44 24.50-0.06 13.13 7.13 UtdAuto 8 369 8.81 8.25 8.44+0.44 24.56 15.13 UlDomIn .44 2.7 9 105 16.13 15.81 16.06+0.13 11.75 9.13 UDomR 1.07 9.9 43 1886 11.06 10.81 10.81-0.19 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 25.38 22.06 UDom 2.12 8.8 12 24.00 23.94 24.00 10.31 7.38 Unifind .40 4.0 17 186 10.13 10.00 10.06+0.06 MS 4J.W UPS B n .68 1.2 75 6729 56.13 55.25 55.44+0.31 29.69 19.3UPkMin dd 3 19.25 19.00 19.00-0.38 26.94 13.00 UtdRentl 12 1286 21.00 20.50 20.75+0.13 51.50 17.44 US Airway dd 1311 34.25 34.00 34.00 -0.19 38.06 16.88 US Bancp .86 3.9 11 25854 22.06 21.25 21.88+0.81 16.81 10.75 US Inds .20 1.6 8 3454 12.88 12.56 12.75 69.06 46.50 UtdTach .80 1.3 31 12591 62.63 60.94 62.44+1.44 23.13 16.75 UtdUtils 1.52 a 7.8 15 193B 19.38 19.38-0.63 8.25 3.81 UtdWisc .05 1.0 dd 15 5.25 5.19 5.25 94.63 39.38 URdhitift .03 25 9674 95.98 90.411 94.50+3.98 35.50 20.63 UmCmpr n 102 32.88 32.00 32.88+0.63 29.75 13.50 UnvslCp 1.24 4.8 7 277 26.38 25.88 25.88-0.38 23.00 16.00 UnivFd 53 Z6 13 1368 20.69 20.25 20.50+0.06 19.44 14.25 UnvHR 1.84 f 40 5 11 74 17.81 17.44 17.56-0.13 7025 23 13 AUnvHlt 29 2606 72.00 68.38 70.75+2.63 62.75 36.63 UnMsM s 96 612 46.69 43.66 44.13-2.25 12.63 9.56 UnoRst 1.03 1 10 88 9.75 9.63 9.69 43.38 25.00 Unocal .80 2.4 16 8513 33.94 33.31 33.38 -01 16.13 6.81 Unova 16 698 7.69 7.38 7.50-0.13 37.75 11.94 UnumProv .59 2.7 dd 13388 22.13 21.25 21.69+0.50 25.13 20.88 UnumPr25 2.20 9.0 180 24.63 24.38 24.56+0.06 7. 5 4.00 UrbnShp 2.36 6.8 27 453 34.81 34.94-0.06 7 . 69 6 63 UrstdBid +70 10.1 1121 7.00 6.81 6.94-0.06 8.31 6.75 UrsBidA .78 10.8 11 21 7.50 7.25 7.25-0.25 956 7.69 UsIfeF .72 m 8.5 q32 8.50 8.44 8.50+0.06 24.94 15.19 UtiliCo 1.20 5.0 13 1718 24.00 23.75 23.81 V 38.13 20.94 VF Cp .88 3.8 8 1893 23.25 22.75 22.88-0.19 23.50 14.75 VailRsrt 36 86 18.50 18.25 18.38+0.13 46.50 25.25 Valassis 12 2998 29.94 28.50 28.88-1.06 29.88 26.63 ValDRio n - M 28.81 27.19 27.19-1.31 32.75 17.25 Valero

303 / C10 Day

.32 1.1 36 4530 31.06 29.88 30.13-1.06 13.69 10.19 Valhi .20 1.6 5335 12.94 12.81 12.81-0.19 27.00 20.13 VlyBcp 1.04 b 4.0 15 237 26.44 26.19 26.25 43.31 28.13 Valspar .52 1.8 15 545 29.75 28.69 29.50+0.75 19.50 7.94 ValueCty -9 733 9.00 8.75 9.00+0.31 14.38 11.81 VKAdvM .86 6.3 q 73 163 13.50 1 3.56+0.06 16.25 12.88 VKAdPA .96 6.5 q 39 15.00 14.75 14 75-0 19 17.69 15.56 VK Bond 1.40 8.2 q 71 17.13 17.00 1 7 13+0 06 15.06 12.75 VKCAV .84 5.7 q 92 14.75 14.63 1 4.75+0 13 16.94 13.25 VKCAQ .93 5.7 q 47 16.31 16.19 1 6.19-0. 15.56 13.13 VKFLQ .92 13.2 q 25 14.81 14.75 1 4 81 6.50 4.25 VKHiIncT .62 11.5 q 273 5.38 5.3 1 5 38 + 04 8.00 5.69 VKHInco .82 11.9 q 86 7.00 6.88 6.88-0.13 6.81 5.63 VKIncoTr .60 8.9 q 168 6.81 6.75 6.75-0.06 975 7.75 VKIGM .59 6.7 q 49 8.75 8.69 8.75-0.06 9.31 7.38 VKMIT .60 6+8 q 532 8.81 8.69 8.81+0.06 14.63 12.63 VKMOT .90 6.4 q 165 14.19 14.06 14.13+0.13 12.81 10.81 VKMOT2 .78 6.5 q 191 12.19 12.00 12.D6-0.06 1 4.75 12.13 VIMuTr .94 7.0 q 513 13.50 13.44 13.50 12.94 1 1.00 VKVaIMu .81 6.5 q 123 12.63 1 2 50 12.50-0.06 15.31 12.69 VKNYQ .90 6.3 q 19 14.56 14.31 1 4.38+0.06 14.13 12.06 VKNYV . 84 6.1 q 91 13.81 13.75 13.75 17.75 14.50 VKOHQ .95 5.8 q 30 16.50 16.38 1 6.38 16.50 13.69 VKPAQ 1 . 00 6.6 q 67 15.38 15.19 1 5.19-0.i 13.50 11.06 VKPAV .78 5.9 q 7 1131 13.25 13.25 9.44 7.88 VKSdnc .84 9.5 g 4512 9.00 8.88 8.88 12.75 10.38 VKStrS .76 6.3 q 246 12.06 11.88 12.00+0.19 15.69 13.56 VKTIM .96 6.5 q 117 14.81 14.75 14.81+0.06 1 6.75 13.13 VKTCA .99 6.9 q 43 16.75 16.69 16.69 16.44 13.31 VKTFL .93 6.2 q 24 15.00 15.00 15.00 OJ i 15.13 12.56 VKTIG . 97 6.9 q 232 14.13 14.00 14.06-0.06 16+56 13.75 VKTNJ .97 6.3 q 13 15.38 15.31 15.31 16.13 13.50 VKTNY 1.03 6.4 q 33 16.06 16.00 16.06 16.31 13.31 VKTPA .97 6.5 q 11 15.00 14.94 14.94 25.38 10.00 Varoo dd 1882 20.44 20.13 20.19-0.25 50.00 19.41 VadanMS 35 977 46.75 45.31 45.94+0.50 9215 31.25 Vastar .30 0.4 30 1294 82.75 82.63 82.75+0.13 20.50 10.63 VectorGp 1.00 b 5.0 33 488 20.50 19.94 20.06-0.31 21.38 15.75 Vectren n .97 5.1 17 435 19.19 18.94 19.00 16.50 5.00 Venator 17 14756 14.50 4.00 1 4.00-0.19 5.50 2.69 Ventas. 8 559 4.94 4.75 4.94 30.00 12.44 VedtDGC 0 506 26.69 26 00 26.69+0.38 69.50 39.06 VarizonCrn cl 3 44371 44.50 43.38 43.63-0.56 7.88 3.44 Vestains .03 a 0.6 dd 728 5.13 4.94 6.00 13.38 11.63 VestSe 1.04 8.2 q 28 12.63 12.56 12.63 76.06 40.31 Viacom cc 1263 70.31 67.63 67.75-2.50 75.8839.81 ViacomB cc 36320 69.63 67.06 67.31-2.38 30.81 20.25 ViadCp .36 1.2 8 x1907 29.56 29.19 29.31 23.06 8.38 Viasyst n 2162 17.00 16.44 6.50-0.44 14.06 10.63 VidSanN n 1458 10.94 10.75 0.88+0.06 53.19 12.19 VimpelCm dd 499 28.88 28.31 28.38-0111 .5 .69 VinaCorc .61 a 1.7 96 36.00 36.75 35.94-0.31 25. 9.06 VilvtgPt 9 3364 22.1321.00 21.00-0.89 24. 22.19 1.68 7.1 42 23.63 23.63 23.63 23.25 19.63 .79 8.0 78 22.63 22.50 2250 62.63 13.25 40.50 38.00 40.31+1.31 19.25 11.94 Visteon n .06 p 24690 16.19 15.56 15.69-0.50 5.88 2.94 Vitro .29 a 9.1 143 3.19 3.19 3.19-0.06 8.31 1.50 Vlasic dd 1037 1.69 1.56 1.63 64.3835.88 Vodiftee It .23 9 0.6 50M 41.25 39.50 41.13+2.6 VoltInf 17 161 34.19 33.69 33.81-0 . 31 40.75 29.69 Vomdo 1.92 5.2 18 3338 37.50 37.00 37.00-0.19 23.25 13.69 Votomtrn n .43e2.1 146 20.31 20.00 20.13-0.19 48.88 34.31 VulcanM .84f 1.9 18 1810 44.44 43.50 44.31+0.75 W 33.75 28.50 WBK ST n 3.14 9.5 482 33.19 32.81 33.19+0.38 10.38 3.31 WHX Cp 7 127 3.81 3.75 3.81+0.06 23.38 14.88 WK4C Ltd .74eS.9 15 19.00 18.75 19.00+0.13 18.38 7.38 WMS 17 1262 16.88 16.00 16A-0.81 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg

Day C10 / 304

20.00 15.63 WIP Carey 1.69 9.8 dd 92 17.44 17.31 17.31 32.25 22.63 WPS Res 2.06 16.9 13 292 30.31 29.94 30.06-0.13 22.50 9.75 Wabash .16 1.4 7 1242 11.13 10.88 11.13 - 20.75 8.44 Wabtec .04 0.4 12 417 10.59 10.31 10.38-0.19 88.88 53.56 Wachovia 2.40 14.2 13 4288 57.75 56.75 57.31+1.13 24.94 12.38 WackhA 11 367 14.25 13.94 14.19+0.06 20.06 7.75 WackhB 63 230 10.13 9.81 10.13+0.19 6.25 WackCor 9 358 9.13 8.88 9.06+0.13 38.50 13.50 Waddell s.35 1.0 29 3801 35.63 34.88 34.88-0.06 36.00 13.25 Wadd B a .35 1.0 416 33.75 33.06 33.63-0.06 70.25 43.44 WalMart .24 0.5 37 121599 48.75 47.13 48.000.19 36.00 21.94 Walgm .14 10.4 48 22575 33.75 32.69 32.88-0.69 22.94 8.66 WallCS .66 5.7 17 3980 11.6310.00 111.63+11.311 13.69 7.25 Waltefind .12 1.5 old 289 8.38 7.81 8.25 22.75 3.94 Wamaco .36 7.2 25 2254 5.00 4.88 5.00 29.44 21.75 WashGs 1.24 4.9 17 481 25.88 25.19 25.31-0.38 9.50 4.69 Washl-Im 6 409 9.31 9.00 9.00-0.38 37.00 21.63 WA Mutl 1. 16 13.3 10 44573 35.38 3188 35.00+1.13 587.00 467.25 WshPst 5.40 1.1 28 53 512.75 509.00 509.00-3.50 19.75 13.81 WRIT 1.25 6.5 17 425 19.19 18.94 19.19+019 22.75 13.00 WsteMInc .04 0.2 old 28W 19.31 18.94 18.94-0.13 10.50 5.88 WaterPk n 8 458 8.88 8.38 8.75+U0 3.94 1.69 Waterfink dd 229 2.56 2.31 2.31-0.13 85.00 187 16.38 8.31 Watsco .10 0.8 12 287 12.88 12.56 12.75+0. 61.69 26.50 AWatsnPh 17 8347 62.38 60.25 61.88+11.75 15.75 9.69 Wattsind a .24 2.1 10 x1159 11.25 10.88 11.25+0.38 14.63 8.44 Waus-M .34 3.8 12 1086 9.00 8.88 8.88-0.13 49.69 18.88 WeathInt a dd 6154 48.00 46.75 46.94-0.75 24.94 12.00 Webbl 6 1636 22.50 20.75 22.311+11-63 4.94 2.63 Weider .04 1.0 cc 618 4.06 3.94 4.06+0.13 42.50 34.56 WeinRl 3.00 7.4 14 311 40.63 40.31 40.50+0.13 11.00 1.94 Weirt old 2447 3.31 3.13 3.19 45.25 32.00 WeisMk 1.08 f 3.2 18 122 34.31 33.88 34.00+0.31 24.00 11.81 Wellmn .36 3.0 37 1333 12.31 11.94 12.06 92.31 48.25 WellptHlt 18 4135 87.06 84.38 86.31+1.94 49.94 31.00 WellsFrgo .88 2.0 18 44463 .44 43.19 43.31-0.19 28.88 14.00 Wendys .24 1.3 16 3891 19.06 18.75 18.88-0.25 1744 550 Wescol 11 224 9.00 8.81 8.94 2500 2238 WPen25 2.00 8.1 67 24.63 24.25 24.63+0.13 39.31 19.63 WestPhrm 72t 3.5 9 240 20.88 20.63 20.81+0.06 19 75 1350 WstctE g 1.28 104 19.31 194 19.19-0.13 863 600 WcstHosp 11 4 6.31 6.31 6.31 -1.63 10 00 Westep .40 f 3. 9 13 -0-06 6.31 13 13.06 8.81 2.75 WDigitl 25 5.75 5.88+0.06 23.50 10.63 WstnGR .20 0.9 56 2058 22.19 21.25 21.94+0.69 24.50 14.69 WsInRes 1.20 6.0 25 7529 20.13 19.38 20.00+0.38 15.50 12.00 Westfield 1.48 9.9 359 15.00 14.81 14.94 37.00 29.38 Westpac. 1.51 a 4.1 18 82 36.63 36.38 36.44-0.13 23.00 8.38 WstpntSW .08 a 0.6 old 854 14.19 13.56 14.06+0.50 34.75 24.44 Westvaco .88 3.2 13 3337 28.13 27.38 27.38+0.D6 40 38 18 38 WstwOne a 87 1519 28.56 27.31 27.81-0.81 74.50 42.00 Weyerh 1.60 3.5 12 6643 46.88 45.50 46.31+1.25 74 63 31 50 Whdpl 1.36 3.6 6 10855 38.75 37.06 38.00+0.13 168.DD 101.56 WhtMtIns 1.60 1.0 dd 12 163.00 162.75 163.00 27.75 7.13 Whitehall a 8 309 9.13 8.94 9.00 17.19 10.38 Whitmn .04 0.3 29 1593 13.63 13.00 13.19-0.38 26.00 13.75 WileyJA .1610.8 25 190 20.38 19.88 19.88-0.50 5 .1610.8 25 34 20.00 19.75 19.88-0.63 48.69 27.19 Willamt .84 2.8 12 2415 30.88 29.75 K50+0.69 7.63 4.13 Willbros dd 296 7.00 6.63 7.00-0.06 9.88 3.00 WLyonHm 2 111 6.56 6.25 6.56+0.31 9.44 5.88 WilmCS 1.23e 14A 4 208 9.00 8.63 8.75-0.06 61.81 23.25 WmsCom n dd 6026 29.75 28.13 29.38+1.19 49.75 28.00 Williams .60 1.3 38 8584 46.50 45.13 46.06+0.33 60.31 17.13 WfnsSon 31 7611 37.60 35.63 35.94-1.75 56.50 40.56 WilmTr 1.80 3.6 15 1248 50.63 48.94 50.38+1.13 36.50 13.5WinDix 1.02 7.3 30 5116 14.19 13.44 13.94+0.38 28.25 12.06 Winnbg .20 1.6 6 223 12.94 12.72 12.81 9.00 7.06 Winstonl-I 1.12 12.9 36 219 8.69 8.63

305 / C10 Day

8.69+0.06 2525 16.81 WiscEn 1.56 7.3 13 2858 21.38 21.00 21.25+0.38 4.88 2.00 WiserC .12 3.1 dd 494 409 3.88 3.88-0.06 1 8.75 11.38 WolvTub 29 17.00 16.44 16.63+0.25 13.50 9.00 WoIWW .14 1.3 10 1861 10.94 10.38 10.94+0.56 11 63 575 WldFuel .20 2.6 8 120 7.88 7.69 7.69+0.06 1838 175 MdPages old 989 4.19 3.88 4.19+0.19 2.75 0.13 Mdtex old 689 0.31 0.31 0.31 625 4.75ANdwDir .59 9.3 q 233 6.31 6.25 6.31+0.13 17.69 9.94 Worthgtn .64 16.1 10 1777 10.44 10.06 10.44+0.44 84.50 59.88 Wrigley 1.40 1.9 27 1744 75.00 74.00 74.06-0.81 3.94 1.69 Wyndham dd 740 2.13 2.06 2.06 XYZ 72.38 39.00 XL Cap 1.76 2.6 18 4001 69.94 66.88 68.94+2.25 26.69 16.13 XcelEngy 1.50 6.0 14 15139 25.25 24.75 25.06+0.31 50.13 14.56 Xerox .80 5.0 23 45773 16.75 16.00 16.D6-0.38 41.0 U JUJU XIRA 9 49 44.50 44.25 44.38+0.19 26.94 12.38 YankCcH 28 1619 20.56 19.60 19.69-0.86 Yanzhou .58 a 4.0 88 14.63 13.94 14.63+0.63 43.31 18.13 Yorkin .60 2.4 11 14764 24.88 22.00 24.88+0.81 23.75 16.81 YorkCap 2.02 9.1 77 22.56 22.31 22.31-0.19 73.2637.13 YngRubi .10 0.2 26 7196 68.76 58.13 58.50+3.13 51.75 32.06 ZaleCp 12 3513 37.38 36.38 36.94-0.06 6.94 2.94 Zapata dd 219 3.19 3.13 3.13 10.00 6.75 Zemex 27 98 7.75 7.25 7.63+0.38 2434 18.75 ZenNtl 1.66 dd 44 23.25 23.13 23.19-0.06 5.81 4.31 Zenix .65 12.5 q 190 5.19 5.13 5.19+0.06 13.75 5.25 ZiffDavis a old 1704 11.50 11.00 11.00-0.45 34.56 8.88 ZDnet dd 1148 20.06 19.38 19.50-0.75 11.06 9.06 Zweig q 981 10.31 10.19 10.25+0.06 8.50 6.13 ZweigTl .84 12.1 q 1020 7.06 6.94 6.94-0.06

Day C11 / 306

THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 1 C11 NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 8.38 300 CobraEl 7 252 6.56 5.88 6.19-0.19 59.13 36.50 CocaBl 1.6b 11 58 27 4100 40.00 40.06 69.00 33.50 Coflexjp .55 e 0.9 1208 62.38 58.75 59.41-1.72 73.1326.13 Cognex 34 6495 41.25 38.13 40.00-0.61 45.1 3 11 721 Cgnlc- g c 7 15.94 15.50 15.50+0.31 . 5 74.50 0 h c63 269 44.69 42.25 42.75-0.56 W.50 9.75 Cognos gs 64 3784 43.44 42.06 43.19+1.13 107.38 17 88 Coherent 66 1660 82.00 77.50 80.50+1.25 17.00 5 25 CohsnTc 11 741 10.94 10.44 10.75+0.25 15.81 9.3BACohoesB .28 1.8 21 491 16.00 15.69 16.00+0.25 61.75 15.63 Cohu s .20 1.0 10 1879 21.25 20.25 20.50+0.13 25.31 6.69 Coinstar dd 625 11.75 11.44 11.50-0.25 3B.50 14.50 21 234 33.19 32.00 32.00-1.00 31A 7.63 C nex dd 105 9.75 9.47 9.75 50.13 13.88 ColiTh dd 830 28.88 28.19 28.25-0.25 10.38 2.31 CllctUnv n 111 3M 3.50 3.50 7.19 3.00 Collins .7 6 131 4.00 3.63 3.75-0.25 18.25 10.75 ColoBus .24f 1.6 1888 15.44 15.13 15.44+0.19 19.63 3.28 ColoMED 44 9091 8.94 8.19 8.88+0.69 36.81177.19 CoRTl did 4006 138.3 123.09 135.50+1925 13.63 8.25 ColurnBc .36 3.6 12 14 10.06 9.88 9.88 8.25 5.50 Col .28 4.5 9 10 6.34 6.16 6.16 15.63 10.00 ColBnkg 1.25t 11 325 14.00 13.88 14.00+0.13 15.60 7.75 CokjFnKy .28 3.2 27 462 8.75 8.60 8.75+0.75 43A 13.88 ColSprt 26 1200 41.13 40.63 40.880.06 1925 9.75 Colmbus .28 1.9 13 73 15.06 14.63 14.63-0.25 84.00 10.38 Com2l dd 3942 17.06 16.38 16.63+0.25 50.50 17.00 Conirco 51 1174 35.06 30.50 31.50+0.50 R63 27.94 Comcast cc 619 36.94 36.13 36.69-0.31 67.69 27.88 Conic sp cc 19533 37.38 36.56 37.25 23.50 1.81 Corridial 38 504 2.44 2.28 2.28-0.03 43.00 25.13 Comitilli n .72 2.7 12 7 2625 25.50 26.2S+1.13 6850 12.38 COMTch dd 11M 22.26 26.31 22.00+1. 6.06 1.25 CmndSys dd 15 2.31 2.31 2.31 41.50 26.38 CrncBM0 .62 1.7 13 615 36.56 35.88 36.00-0.06 165.50 7.13 ComOne s dd 172784 65.06 60.00 62.53-0.72 14.13 9.50 NY .34 2.8 726 12.88 12.00 12.D0-0.5 22.88 16.63 CmdBsh .72 4.0 12 5 18.19 18.19 18.19+0.19 21.25 13.25 CnidNat .68 4.3 12 27 16.00 15.00 16.00+0.25 5.81 0.75 CmHldgs 3 8 1.00 0.94 0.94-0.06 18.75 11.25 CwlthBcp .44 3.1 11 632 14.69 13.88 14.38-0.38 16.75 3.31 Cmwind .20 4.0 11 825 5.50 5.06 5.06-0.06 61.88 36.06 CmnwtT 47 425 40.63 38.38 38.63-0.50 24.00 10.25 ComSys .40 2.3 17 440 17.13 16.81 17.13+0.06 8.13 4.88 CmtyBcp.36t 16 9 6.75 6 50 675+0 13 23.25 16.25 CmtyBsh .80 f 4.4 8 6 18.38 8 38 1838+0 63 13.06 7.25 CmFnIL .25 2.6 18 224 10.00 8.94 9.50+0.44 24.00 13.50 CmtyFst .69 3.8 22 18 18.00 8.00 18.00+0.13 21.38 12.31 CornFBk .60 3.3 12 2873 18.06 17.81 18.00+0.13 20.88 13.13 GmtyTrBc .76 b 4.9 8 77 15.56 5.44 15.44-0.06 17.00 4.50 CmtyWest .04 dd 210 6.50 6.25 6.25+0.13 28.31 15.50 CompsBc .88 4.8 9 4644 18.56 18.13 18.25+0.25 27.63 7.75 ComplTI n 7226 8.56 8.13 8.50-0.13 28.00 11.25 CmplBusn dd 1678 14.00 13.50 13.50-0.50 12.75 5.50 CmpDyn 14 14 7.63 7.63 7.63 7.69 1.3B Crnporn 70 959 3.56 3.41 3.50 49.13 18.00 CompCrd 20 2414 40.25 38.88 39.63+0.63 14.00 10.06-Compon n 5516 16.06 13.19 15.75+2.63 27.13 9.38 CmptHz dd 3551 9.75 9.44 9.56+0.02 4.81 0.56 CptrLrn dd 1133 1.69 1.41 1.44-0.25 14.38 5.88 CmpMtn dd 195 9.75 9.13 9.25+0.13 27.63 7.38 CptNwk cc 1262 20.56 19.69 20.00-0.38 40.00 7.50 Compume 14 117969 11.00 10.25 10.56+0.56 .8.75 2.69 Conishr 59 350 5.00 4.69 4.75+0.06 29.50 8.63

307 / C11 Day

Conitech 19 415 18.00 16.38 17.75+0.50 123A 38.13 Comma a 76 31136 92.25 87.00 91.94 +4.38 115.25 3.63.ConceptsD dd 1 3.56 3.56 3.56-0.19 9.75 1.00 Concepts dd 939 9.13 8.75 9.00+0.19 54.50 3.88 Concero 29 1148 8.38 7.94 8.25 30.00 4.13 CodCan s 27 2302 22.00 21.19 22.00+0.75 66.00 20.25 CnordCorn 32 615 24.63 23.50 24.00-0.63 33.50 15.31 ConcEFS s 43 11425 a2.56 31.13 32.13+1.00 38.63 3.00 ConcurTch dd 4156 3.44 3.00 3.06-0.19 27.25 5.50 ConcCm dd 21082 19.81 17.00 17.13-2.13 25.00 16.00 ConestEn .84 4.2 51 22 20.00 20.00 20.00 132226.60 Conell nt s dd 38831 37.941 35.94 37.19+11.69 32.00 12.00 Conmed 8 1744 14.25 13.13 13.50+0.31 17.50 9.38 ConnBnc n 215 17.38 17.25 17.38 37.00 25.50 ConnWtr 1.20 f 4.2 18 71 29.50 28.06 28.50-1.00 20.50 4.06 Connetics dd 6661 18.25 17.25 17.81-0.19 9.75 2.88 Conradind 53 101 9.69 9.50 9.50 12.25 4.00 Cn FrtC n dd 878 4.75 4.56 4.58+0.01 8.25 6.00 ConsorWtr 10 63 7.38 6.94 6.94-0.06 2.94 0.44 ConPort dd 111 1.81 1.69 1.75 18.13 1.38 CntnwsS n dd 378 2.50 2.25 2.25-0.13 18.75 3.00 Corvrgntn 11 4.1 3.94 3.97-0.03 7.75 4.60 ConvOrp 7.63 5.63 6.00+1.14 7.13 2.50 Coolsav n 44 3.44 3.25 3.44+0.13 13.00 8.00 CoopBk .20 2.2 11 6 9.13 9.13 9.13-0.38 50.00 14.75 CoorsTk n 17 496 47.81 45.25 46.86+2.06 25.88 7.00 Copart s 34 1615 17.19 16.44 16.94 126.00 35.25 CopMntn 95 43998 62.88 58.25 59.94 -1.6b 4.16 0.72 Copytele dd 2967 1.75 1.56 1.59+0.06 63.00 8.50 CarTher a 12184 58.00 9.75 4.38 Core Inc cc 230 6.63 6.00 6.00 - it 38 52.75 11.06 CoieCorn s 18.57 12.69 11.63 11.94-0.31 400 2.81 CorelCp dd 7149 3.63 3.44 3.50+0.09 32.81 6.88 Corillian n 314 7.94 7.44 7.81-0.13 50.00 15.50ACorinthC 363601 57.50 49AT 64.00+5.00 21.75 9.75 n 3436 13.50 12.44 12.94-0.19 72.00 11.00 CorixaCp dd 1232 53.6131 50.06 51.19+1.06 74.00 33CorpExc 96 569 74.75 71.00 71.00-1Z9 7.75 2.78 CoffeGSv 6 874 3.88 3.50 3.88+0.19 34.63 5.06 Comadr 149831 12.50 10.50 11.00-1.44 11.25 5.44 Cortech 16 12 7.361 7.38 7.38+0.13 34.25 20.25 CorusBk .60 1.8 10 63 33.75 33.00 33.00-0.06 18.06 2.00 Corvas dd 3516 16.13 15.38 15.94+0.31 29.69 16.94 Corvel 18 129 27.56 27.00 27.00-0.38 114.75 73.00 CorvWp n 51810 106.00 88.44 103.81 +1546 40.50 15.02 CostPlus s 35 757 34.00 32.38 33.63+0.56 6.00 1.25 CstULss dd 44 1.88 1.56 1.63 60.50 25.94 Costco s 27 39083 35.88 34.00 34.44-1.19 7.25 3.25 Cott Cp 608 5.19 5.00 5.00-0.06 52.25 11.63 CftrPhr dd 2144 31.38 29.81 31.31+1.19 14.50 1.44 Counsi g t 327 3.13 2.94 2.94-0.06 30.75 21.25 Courier .06 1.7 9 60 28.50 28.25 28.25-0.25 66.88 13.31 CovadCrn s dd 52890 16.88 16.13 16.31+0.19 18.25 7.56 Covenant 9 113 10.50 10.00 10.50 17.88 5.00 Coventry 20 1971 16.75 15.75 16.00-0.25 14.94 8.50 CoVstBc .32 2.7 11 107 11.75 11.38 11.75+0.38 4.75 0.50 CovoTech dd 807 3.25 2.81 3.06+0.06 9.69 4.00 Crftmde .16f2.0 12 86 7.94 7.88 7.94+0.13 12.00 2.88 Crayi c 12582 6.00 5.13 5.91+0.66 166.00 3.75 Crayfish n 14938 8.06 5.41 6.88+1.38 38.81 9.63 CreTcLtd .25 a 1.1 11 528 2.2.25 21.13 22.00+0 79.38 19.00 CredSys s 42 5370 59.17 57.88 58.56+0.31 6.81 3.00 CrdAcp dd 119 6.25 6.00 6.00-0.25 14.50 3.63 CrecUng dd 1172 5.75 4.88 5.63+0.50 202.00 31.56 Cree Inc cc 13688 142.44 136.50 137.75-1.61 62.00 15.63 CreoPrd dd 246 28.56 28.31 28.38-0.19 21.00 17.44 CresPh .49 e 2.4 dd x22 20.75 20.38 20.38+0.50 11.06 7.88 Cresud .92e 110 142 9.00 8.38 8.38-0.25 119.50 26.00 CfitPath dd 14974 79.38 72.00 77.25-0.50 7.25 1.75 re dd 368 3.03 2.88 3.00+0.13 15.63 3.50 CrssKys n 546 13.50 13.00 13.25+0.25 25.75 14.14 Crossmn 5 35 18.38 18.25 18.31+0.06 202.25 4.25 Crssrds n dd 21801 12.63 10.63 11.25-0.63 10.50 1.44 Ik n dd 548 2.25 1.75 2.06-0.06 15.00 12.94.CrsswvC n 1897 13.19 12.75 12.94-0.03 25.25 8.50 CrasWdd n 1715 22.81 21.63 22.00+0.13 9.19 3.88 CmnAn dd 104 4.25 4.00

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4.25+0.06 44.75 14.69 CmnCab dd 6740 35.50 33.81 34.69-0.63 6.00 3.88 CmnGrp 3 101 5.13 5.00 5.D9+0.09 18.13 10.00 CrwnMd n 2128 16.06 15.44 16.06+0.69 4.75 0.38 CmnRs dd 356 0.56 0.47 0.56+0.06 10.25 5.75 Cruslild .50 t 5 100 8.25 7.94 8.22+0.03 42.00 15.50 Crypflgc n 123 22.56 22.31 22.31-0.56 23.00 7.38 CrySys 17 321 8.81 845 8.63-0.06 71.50 7.38 CubistPh dd 4151 63.00 60.44 61.13+0.31 55.44 7.06 CurnMed dd 920 7.56 7.38 7.38+0.06 12125 5.00 CtersGen s dd 6M 48.00 41.60 44.38+3.38 9.38 4.13 CurHlth 8 187 5.25 5.00 5.13+0.03 2725 13.88 Cufis n 4344 20.69 20.00 20.31+0.13 17.75 6.31 CutterB 13 2748 13.94 13.38 13.50 4.50 0.50 Cyanotc dd 2333 1.81 1.63 1.78+0.03 12.25 2.19 Cybear dd 165 2.94 2.69 2.75 60.38 9.88 CybrOpt s 51 2241 29.25 27.98 29.00+1.69 16.00 3.63 CybrCsh dd 1149 5.81 5.38 5.44-0.19 40.00 0.94 CyberCare dd 9283 6.50 5.75 5.94-0.06 15.94 3.06 CybrOtp dd 3651 3.88 3.39 3.75+0.31 29.75 11.56 Cyberom dd 1027 16.63 15.50 16.44+0.50 70.60 6.69 CybrSree 8521 13.00 9.69 12.38+2.81 20.88 7.00 Cygnus dd 2346 12.56 11.88 12.19+0.13 22.75 6.25 Cylink dd 421 14.44 13.75 14.25+0.38 67.0026.19 Cyffm 37 7144 47.94 44.19 45.94+1.81 29.94 3.09 CyprCorn n dd 2702 5.47 5.16 5.25+0.13 13.63 3.88 Cyrk cc 560 4.56 4.03 4.56+0.44 63.00 7.38 Cysive s 21 5179 8.75 8.25 8.31-0.19 19.00 4.13 CytoPh dd 1207 10.13 9.13 9.56+0.19 21.81 1.38 Cytogn dd 8585 9.25 8.75 8.88+0.13 6.44 0.75 CytRx 1 703 1.31 1.00 1.13-0.13 70.44 14.63 Cytyc s 88 7668 50.00 46.26 46.63+2.94 D 24.38 7.50 DK Hitcr 8 219 14.25 13.50 13.94+0.75 6.31 1.19 DA Cons dd 414 1.75 1.50 1.75+019 41.13 9.50 DD4 n 719 38.13 35.13 38.13+2.38 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 13.50 5.81 DECS IV n.91 11.4 1266 838 7.19 8.00+0.13 38.13 15.98 DECS V 1.39 4.6 39 30 5 30.00 30.00-1.63 91.0034.63 DECS TrVI 2.46 3.6 669 69.00 64 00 69.00+8.0 5.69 1 DGJewI n 6 10 1.38 138 1.38 49.00 11 2.8 DMC Strtx 88 7166 25.75 260 25.56 + 0. b 4 . 8.63 11.69 DSET Cp 37 2428 27.66 26.36 27.06+11.56 10.50 4.00 DSG Int 8 363 5.06 5.00 5.06+0.06 32.56 2.41 DSL.net n dd a2230 6.69 6.00 6.13-053 74.50 18.38 DSP Gp a 17 5155 46.75 46.06 46.25+013 37.88 12.38 dd 438 29.88 29.13 29.31-0 38 15.50 5.00 Daisytek s 28 2562 7.00 6.63 6.88-013 18.25 638 Daktron s 20 537 14.00 13.31 14.00+1.56 55.00 938 DaleenT n dd 533 15.06 14.88 15.00-0.38 48.63 7.75 dd 2289 16.13 15.50 15.58-0.23 14.13 1.75 Danka dd 8280 1.88 1.63 1.63-0.19 5.75 134 DaouSys dd 576 2.13 2.00 2.00-0.13 121.19 36.63 Dassault .25 e 0.3 9 89.00 87.00 89.00+2.50 14.50 3.38 DtBdcst dd 1513 4.00 3.81 4.00+0.03 50.75 5.50 DataCrit n did 379 9.06 8.81 9.00+0.13 7.56 1.13 DtaDimn dd 335 1.38 1.28 1.38+0.06 7.19 1.06 Data 10 dd 21 4.25 4.00 4.06-0.06 10.63 4.63 DataFlesh .12 1.8 14 10 6.75 6.63 6.63 94.25 13.25 DataRet n dd 4202 21.50 19.13 19.92+0.61 7.56 2.19 DataSyst dd 314 5.00 4.88 5.00+0.13 36.50 10.56 Datalink 33 1616 16.75 16.56 15.66-1.19 44.63 3.50 Datalink s dd 1582 15.69 14.94 15.50+0.56 47.50 6.38 Datarem s 35 2609 33.13 ROO 32.63+1.25 42.6029.75 Dabscpe .16 0.5 17 260 37.88 35.13 35.25-2.00 47.50 7.13 Datastr dd 1247 9.63 8.69 9.13+0.38 19.00 2.06 Datatec dd 2666 4.94 4.00 4.81+0 69 18.50 1.56 Dataware dd 212 4.06 3.94 4.00+0.06 7.44 0.63 Dtawtch dd 95 1.81 1.75 1.81+0.06 8.88 0.88 DataRce dd 2724 5.88 5.50 5.81 25.81 5.05 Datron 19 417 16.25 14.20 14.44-0.56 40.94 6.00 Datum cc 1460 40.00 36.50 39.94+1.44 39.00 7.75 Davox 15 528 12.69 12.06 12.63+0.50 3.81 0.44 Daw Tch dd 574 1.38 1.25 1.31+0.06 11.75 7.66 Dawson did 71 10.13 10.00 10.13+0.25 9.00 4.25 DrbmBn n - 17 39

309 / C11 Day

7.00 6.88 6.94+0.06 24.50 8.50 DebShp .20 1.8 7 616 11.50 11.25 11.41-0.16 6.50 2.50 DeckOut 9 273 6.25 5.38 5.44-0.44 31.50 22.00 DecdGen n 1329 28.13 27.38 27.63+0.13 8.80 5.75 Decoma .24f 17 7.44 7.38 7.44+0.06 10 75 7.19 DelGlobaJ 11 48 9.38 9.09 9.31 64 .00 8.38 DelanoT n 359 10.44 10.13 10.13-0.19 1363 1.88 Delias dd 895 2.56 2.44 2.50 59.75 34.88 DellCptr 65 626144 .06 40.00 43.631+3.69 17.75 13.63 DellNG 1.14 6.8 12 15 16.94 16.75 16.75 27.50 14.94 Deftagen n 8042 32.00 26.38 28.98+2.75 6238 5.75 ditaThr n dd 1363 7.00 6.38 6.38-0.06 21.00 5.75 DeltekS 9 584 7.50 6 88 7.44+0.31 24.75 9.25 Dndreon n 1 1626 20.50 19.25 20.50+0.50 39.00 14.00 DwKke s 46 7432 27.00 25.44 26.66+11.13 15.00 8.50 Denison 16 300 13.63 13.56 13.63 17.69 1.91 DnsePc 36 6949 7.13 6.50-6.50 0.611 37.38 20.50 Dentsply .25 0.7 18 4771 35.63 32.88 33.38+0.75 91.61 3.14 DescSys dd 2410 47.25 46.13 46.31-0.19 26.50 16.00 Down n .18 0.8 6 22.75 22.13 22.13+1.00 2.69 1.03 Designs dd 490 2.25 2.06 2.19-0.19 18.50 10.44 Deswell n .88 e 5.5 8 55 16.13 1.50 16.00+0.06 15.50 8.31 DetSys 23 187 9.25 9.06 9.13-0.19 7.50 2.88 Devcon 399 7.13 6.75 7.13+0.44 19.69 3.75 Diacdn n dd 548 9.50 8.63 9.06-0.06 5638 34.69 DIgSerm n 7 49.00 48.25 49.00-1.00 13.50 3.88 Diametrc dd 378 7.13 10064 69.13 63.00 63 19 40.00 9.11 GADlsnon 65 1396 .75 40.00 .76+5.25 20.88 9.63 DClark 1.38t 26 84 11.00 10.25 11.00-0.25 5.69 1.31 Diedrich dd 209 1.88 1.63 1.81 50.50 11.25 DigeneCp dd 393 41.13 39.50 39.81-0.26 185.00 21.19 Digex dd 5647 86.13 84.50 84.69-1.38 17.76 4.63 Diglint dd 1988 7.75 6.50 7.75+11.06 88.00 13.13 Digimrc n dd 1768 15.00 14.13 15.00+0.25 19.69 2.27 DigitBio 55 487 5.06 4.75 4 14.50 3.38 DigCourier dd 593 4.38 4.00 4.28+0.28 10.50 3.13 DigtlGen dd 184 6.44 6.00 6.06+0.06 dd 849 10.75 9.53 9. - 7 86.00 19.00 DgInsght n dd 1990 26.63 25.13 26.50+ 15694 15.50 Digisid dd 29557 32.13 29.13 29.69-0.63 150A 6.00 DigLght cc 10626 88.63 94.50 87.75 +5.25 43.63 5.38 DigRiver dd 2896 7.06 6.81 6.88-0.13 62.00 15.00 DgTtmk n dd 7163 34.75 31.76 34.06+11.69 40.00 10.00 Digites. n 3523 15.75 13.63 13.75-0.75 22.31 13.13 DimeCBcs .76 13.8 11 212 20.25 19.75 20.13+0.25 34.25 3.88 Diodes s 1 7 1 731 22.00 19.75 21.38-0.13 48.75 21.41 Dionex 20 478 30.00 28.13 29.50+1.19 38.63 11.00 DirFocus s 15 MIS 31.00 28.50 29.94+11.69 21.38 17.38 01scPart In 1592 21.00 19.88 20.88+1.00 5.00 1.38 DisplayTc .21 t 8 331 2.20 2.06 2.13-0.06 140.19 24.26 DitechCo s 40 6496 60.00 54.63 59.00+4.50 169.19 15.56 Diverse n 2448 28.88 27.25 28.50+075 12.44 6.25 DivinVnt n 3050 9.38 8.31 9.06 +.56 7 3.50 DixieGrp 7655 4.00 3.56 4.00+0.19 30. 16.88 DbanCm n dd 513 21 B9 21.19 21.56+0.13 14.25 Docdata 2 5.88 5.88 5.88-0.13 3 3.25 DocuCp 24 177 3.88 3.75 3.81 6.25 1.31 DocuSci 11 11 1.81 1.78 1.78+0.03 106.00 14.13 Documnt cc 2811 75.50 70.25 71.56-0.06 48.2520.88 DoflrTree s 39 TM 43.75 40.38 40.55-3.ig 7.53 5.25 DominHm 5 121 6.88 6.75 6.88+0.13 15.50 8.63 DoralFin .05 2.7 9 410 14.94 14.72 14.88+0.06 15.50 8.75 DrchHu .72 a 5.0 13 56 14.50 14.38 14.38-0.25 -.50 1526 Dorellad 10 10 18.88 18.81 18.81-0.88 136.25 27.56 DoreCick dd 28654 43.13 39.13 40.69-1.38 4.63 0.97 g 1610 3.09 2.91 2.97+0.03 U94 13.56 DresB 12 213 21.38 20.69 21.31 -0.26 20.00 6.50 DMdr 32 367 18.88 17.81 18.69+0.69 27.00 14.00 DreyarG .12 0.6 31 956 22.63 20.13 2dd 40060 1.72 1.34 k 20.13 0.66 DrKoop 16 2150 12.50 DroversBc .52 b 3.5 14 3 14.88 14.88 14.88 - 7.88 0.50 DrugE dd 362 1.25 1.06 1.19-0.03 66.00 4.69 Drugstre dd 1169 6.31 5.94 6.13+0.13 81.2540.56 DuPontP 47 1344 76.50 73.75 75A + 1.88 12.75 3.00 DualStar dd 1298 3.38 3.06 3.22 +0.03 10.13 5.63 Duckwall 7 111 9.81 9.50 9.63+0.25 6.00 0.75 DunnCm dd

Day C11 / 310

1069 1.34 1.19 1.28-0.09 29.06 9.88 DuraAto 3 1303 11.13 10.50 10.75-0.19 2B.50 11.00 DuraPh 34 9218 28.25 27.38 27.56+0.06 1.00 0.19 DuraPh wt 32 0.75 0.63 0.75+0.13 13.44 4.25 Duramed dd 1057 6.94 6.56 6.75-0.16 2.88 0.91 DurbanRo 5205 1.16 1.09 1.16+0.06 4.44 2.00 DwyerGp 10 43 2.50 2.38 2.38 31.50 Dy&xCp n 2216 36.00 31.00 36.00 + 5.00 15.00 3.88 Dynaoq s 11 146 9.13 8.94 8.94-0.19 3.91 0.88 DynHlth 1123 1.50 1.25 1.31+0.09 9.50 3.50 DynRsh dd 14 7.63 7.44 7.44-0.19 E 8.56 1.00 EComVnt 1203 1.34 1.13 1.19-0.06 40M 13.13 ETrade dd 23357 18.50 17.69 17.75-0.25 39.00 5.31 E-SIM Ltd dd 420 9.56 8.50 8.94+0.19 44.88 0.75 EStamp n dd 163271.69 1.44 1.50-0.38 39.00 3.00 E-loan dd 821 3.59 3.38 3.47+0.03 16.81 3.00 e.spire dd 2813 4D6 3.97 4.06+0.03 Q.00 3.06 eBT Intl dd 2357 6.31 5.88 6.06+0.19 127.50 43.50 eBayInc s cc 16927 62.88 61.13 62.00+0.94 25.00 2.25 ECCS dd 263 4.00 3.50 3.69-0.06 39.88 23.75 ECI Tel .20 0.6 13 7324 32.25 31.27 31.38-0.19 3.13 0.63 EDP TM dd 505 1.25 1.03 1.030.09 4.00 1.50 EFTC Cp dd 941 3.00 2.56 2.63-0.25 49.00 20.38 EGL Inc s 34 5475 36.13 34.69 35.94+1.06 15.25 1.19 eGlobe dd 5153 2.19 2.00 2.09-0.09 15.00 8.00 ELXSI 3 77 11.50 11.06 11.50+0.25 10.81 1.55 eLotinc dd 1753 1.88 1.75 1.81+0.09 11.06 6.81 EMC In .60 6.2 cc 13 9.63 9.25 9.63+0.38 13.94 1.25 EMCEE dd38 3.75 3.56 3.75+0.13 28.13 16.81 EMCOR n 9218 24.25 23.19 24.20+0.58 30.00 6.63 EMS Tch 48 288 18.13 17.06 17.19+0.19 8.25 2.72 EP Med dd 52 4.13 3.75 4.13+0.50 15.38 9.00 EFIQ Sys 46 23 13.50 13.25 13.250.25 74.63 7.75 oPlusinc 21 374 19.88 18.38 19.56-0.31 40.56 6.06 ePresence 5 1011 7.72 7.34 7.50 -0.06 12.50 8.38 ESB Fncl .40 f 4.0 9 57 10.13 10.06 10.060.06 19.88 3.69 ESCMed dd 1924 19.63 19.00 19.38-0.19 13.63 2.50 ESG Re .32 11.0 dd 288 2.94 2.91 2.91 2006 2.44 ESPS Inc 251 2.94 2.88 2.94-0.06 27.00 10.50 ESSTech n 22 1583 17.75 16.63 17.31+0.50 2913 3.13 eShareCm dd 234 4.06 3.75 4.00-0.06 15.00 7.88-EXE Tch n 15315 18.69 14.66 17.94+3.19 92.50 36.75 EXFO gn 3385 58.25 55.00 56.75+0.38 2050 10.56 EglBsh .64 5.9 8 57 12.06 10.94 10.94+0.19 Hi 0.94 EglFd dd 203 1.14 1.09 1.13-0.03 7.88 4.00 EagPnt 71 777 4.50 4.13 4.25-0.13 7.13 1.38 ErthShll dd 7271 2.16 1.81 2.000.13 13.50 5.00 ErthCare dd 336 6.00 5.63 5.75+0.25 33.00 9.38 Erthlink n 21456 12.06 11.14 11.25-0.25 55.31 8.13 ErthWeb dd 417 13.63 12.50 13.63+0.69 17.38 9.44 EstWstB .12 0.7 12 3022 17.13 16.38 17.06+0.56 4.47 2.03 Eaterie 61 155 4.25 4.13 4.25 79.00 10.88 eBenX n dd 994 21.50 19.25 21.00+1.63 43.00 5.25 eboDkrs n 94 7.31 6.63 6.63+0.38 9.30 6.75 eChpmn n 55 6.94 6.88 6.88 113.00 6.88 EchelonC dd 13125 47.25 38.69 47.06+8.31 81.25 18.13 EchoStar s dd 300 49.81 46.13 48.7S+2.98 18.69 2.88 EclpSurg dd 3014 4.09 3.81 3.94-0.19 32.00 6.44 Eclipsys dd 3364 14.81 14.38 14.38-0.13 8.13 1.06 EooSoil dd 1032 1.50 1.34 1.44+0.13 5.88 0.56 Ecogen dd 13191 2.50 0.81 1.06+0.19 17.50 2.63 eCollege n dd 604 6.63 6.25 6.63+0.38 29.50 9.88 Ecsoft 63 1 10.75 10.75 10.75 41.26 10.00 ECtelUd n 60613 23.13 22.00 22.98+1.38 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 1544 863 Edelbrck .04 0.4 7 43 11.38 10.75 10.75-0.13 16.00 3.00 EdgrOnl dd 1770 5.03 438 4.38-0.50 7.38 1.50 EdgePet dd 278 3.63 138 3.50+0.13 1 206 444 Edgewater dd 1761 6.81 6.19 6.25-0.38 138 5.00 EdisCtr 7 206 6.38 538 6.38+0.06 34.25 12.50 EdsnSch n dd 2117 31.19 WE 31.00+0.63 LclucMgt 33 362 26.50 25.00 25.25-0.88 5.25 2.00 EduDv .02 0.6 15 2 3.50 3.50 3.50-0.38 dd 532 1.38 1.06 1.13-0.03 186.81 31.00 EtNtwr dd 24705 65.00 61.50

311 / C11 Day

53.73+2.61 14.00 8.25 eFunds n 594 9.00 8.59 8.94+0.25 74.00 6.50 eGainCm n dd 18229 13.31 12.00 13.06+1.56 27.81 2.06 Egghead dd 3878 2.88 2.56 2.81+0.13 16.25 1.00 Egreet n dd 273 1.19 1.09 1.19+0.06 2 LOU 3.94 Eiclos a 332 7.25 7.06 7.13 13.00 7.56 BOOJR 13 21 12.94 12.81 12.81-0.06 44 0.47 Elan rt 1999 0.94 0.88 0.94+0.03 97.00 6.38 Elantec a cc 3402 91.50 95.56 88.50+3.81 20.75 7.00 ElbitLtd .32 3.2 28 190 10.00 9.81 10.00+0.38 14.00 7.31 ElbitMd n dd 44 8.25 8.19 8.19+0.03 19.50 12.31 ElbitSys n .32 2.2 12 263 15.19 14.63 14.75-0.69 3.56 1.06 ElbitVisn dd 54 1.25 1.06 1.06-0.13 58.00 3.28 Elcorn n dd 3700 6.38 5.56 5.88+0.13 8.00 1.19 Elcotel dd 168 1.50 1.44 1.44 7.52 3.09 ElderBr 7 17BO 4.50 4.38 4.50+0.13 12.13 6.31 Eldorado 300 8.13 8.00 8.00-0.38 2.59 0.41 ElectGas 76 1.06 1.06 1.06 23.88 1.06 ElclFuel dd 1374 10.009.44 9.63-0.13 27.00 12.13 Elacl-ght dd 520 1 3.31 13.00 13.00-0.13 13.19 9.31 ElctroRnt 12 281 12.25 11.75 12.25+0.56 69.13 19.75 ElectSci a 28 3504 42.00 39.13 41.19+0.19 44.13 16.01 Elctrgis 15 3615 22.75 21.50 22.44+1.31 54.63 25.00.EluxAB .77 a 3.1 17 578 25.50 24.63 25.13-0.75 124.44 49.00 ElcArt cc 6115 108.48 104.00 107.94+0.75 26.31 12.75 ElecBtq 24 986 22.50 21.66 22.50+0.81 69.31 20.38 EFH 1551064 30.00 25.00 26.00-3.06 11.13 4.13 EliteInfo 14 1427 6.38 5.13 5.75-0.25 7.38 2.26 EllettBr .16 4.9 7 6 3.25 3.25 3.25+0.98 45.00 4.00 Eloquent n 1102 5.09 4.88 4.91-0.09 40.50 10.50 eLoylty n cc 1513 14.13 13.31 13.63-0.44 55.13 20.88 ElronEl 3.06 a 7.5 22 33 41.00 40.00 41.00+1.50 19.75 3.13 Eltrax dd 3602 5.25 4.75 5.00+0.19 10 00 1.94 eMachns n 2685 2.03 1.98 2.00-0.03 42 509 42.88 41.38 42.00+0.44 20.00 7.00 Embrex 16 220 12.69 12.50 12.69+0.19 173.00 11.25 Emcore dd 1035 116.31 105.00 111.50+4.03 70.50 8.66 elffirgelat n dd 1914 22.63 19.88 22.06+2.31 15.13 1.22 EmrgVis n dd 290 1.63 1.56 1.56-0.03 84.50 11.00 EmisTch dd 2333 34.00 31.75 33.00-0.19 62.38 27.00 EmmisC s dd 6011 33.13 32.38 32.81+0.44 225.50 31.00 Emulex a cc 18219 105.52 .06 104.69+4.19 26.19 1.47 Emusic dd 4639 1.84 1.50 1.69+0.13 55.00 5.75 EnPointe dd 361 8.25 7.34 7.50+0.13 23.63 16.00 Enbrdg gs .16 32 22.84 22.38 22.75+0.13 7.31 2.69 Encad dd 44 3.22 3.13 3.13-0.06 30.63 1.88 EnchBiat dd 861 6.25 6.00 6.13+0.13 4.50 1.63 EncrMad 13 333 2.09 1.88 1.88-0.19 1.63 0.16 EncrM wt 50 0.34 0.34 0.34 10.38 5.25 EncoreW 17 1249 7.88 7.56 7.69-0.06 14.00 2.50.EndoPh wt 405 2.52 2.00 2.380.13 14.50 6.38EndoPh n 6.56 5.00 S.13-1.38 13.75 5.63 EndcrdS dd 207 7.88 7.63 7.88 22.56 5.13 Endocre dd 3990 17.63 16.75 17.56+0.63 10.81 3.00 Endsonc dd 1388 10.81 10.56 10.75 60.8822.63 Energis a 224 48.75 43.00 46.81+4.81 31.44 8.00 EngyComr dd 1664 26.13 26.38 27.94+1.56 9.13 7.00 EngyWst .50 f 6.1 13 452 8.31 8.25 8.25 25.00 17.00 Engysth 1.00 f 5.4 10 39 18.50 18.25 18.50 95.00 7.46 Eng dd 31629 14.75 13 38 14.19+1.31 21.69 10.60 EnCP .0 . 4 0.2 13 1269 20.38 19.25 20.38+0.94 20.38 5.75 EngineerA dd 1123 11.38 10.88 11.00-0.25 10.75 4.50 EngMea. dd 1024 1013 9.69 10.13+0.25 1 5.25 8.63AEnglHm .24 1.6 5 825 15.75 14.75 15.38+0.44 15.25 7.00 Eniegris n 2318 1 1.25 1 0.75 1.13+0.25 101.25 20.06 Entrelvid dd 1368 30.75 28.50 29.75+1.00 150.00 18.31 Entrust 74 22892 30.88 27.38 29.75+3.19 72.75 22.75 Enzon dd 3672 61.75 59.50 60.88+0.63 31.13 3.00 eOnCom n 553 3.53 3.25 3.44-0.25 12.00 2.31 EpicorSft dd 1597 4.25 4.00 4.03+0.03 21.38 1.94 Epimmune dd 158 5.56 5.31 5.38-0.06 324.88 36.00 E.piph n dd 120 105.50 93.50 104.00+8.00 18.19 4.38 Epitope dd 818 13.38 12.56 12.63+0.06 26.75 4.63 EpixMed n dd 230 15.13 14.56 15.00 14.31 5.44 EpochPh n 828 12.81 11.75 12.06+0.31 27.44 7.38 EpriseCp n 1156 15.69 15.25 15.56-0.13 16.25 11.60 Eguinix n 24966 16.75 14.88 16.19+2.00 14.38 4.88 Equinox 55 371 5.53

Day C11 / 312

5.38 5.53+0.16 19.44 7.00 EqtyMkt 9 84 14.31 14.00 14.13+0.13 3.00 0.88 EqtOil 11 1883 2.88 2.69 2.75+0.09 ErgoSci dd 303 1.06 1.03 1.03 26.38 7.50 ErIcTel s .06sQ.3 122122 20.75 20.06 20.50+101.61 34.0026.25 Erielrid .54 1.7 15 127 31.00 29.06 30.94+1.56 20.31 9.75 Escalcle 1.00 a 5.3 7 4 19.00 19.00 19.00 11.50 7.38 Eskimo 27 152 10.16 10.13 10.13-0.06 42.88 2.63 eSoft dd 4182 7.69 7.25 7.50 89.8820.00 eSpeed 174 31.128.56 30.75-1-2.25 14.76 9.38AIEsperion 123 17.25 14.60 16.06+2.13 13.50 2.88 Etinuum n 352 5.44 4.88 4.88-0.50 86.00 3.88 eToys dd 21 8.50 4.97 4.22 4.50-0.25 33.75 3.06 Euro 90g 2022 7.88 7.03 7.17-0.52 16.50 2.50 EuroMic dd 128 8.38 7.88 8 19+0 31 14.38 5.28 EvnSut dd90 7.06 6.75 6 75-013 30.75 5.25 Evercel a 252 15.81 15.2 5 15.75 30.50 14.84 EvgmRs 6084 29.25 28.88 29.19+0.19 12.56 8.88 EverTrst n .32 f 2.7 110 12.06 11 S8 12.00-0.25 12.75 4.81 EvkeCm n 9924 11.00 9.63 11.00+0.56 23.25 9.00 Evivelift n 4507 23.19 19.60 21.38+2.00 15.22 3.00 EvolvSys 43 463 6.50 6.00 6.00-0.44 10.88 3.13 Exabyte dd 364 6.44 5.88 6.00+0.13 22.00 10.75 Exactch 24 49 16.50 16.38 16.38-0.13 123.50 21.00 Exar a cc 1449 123.00 116.00 120.63+5.00 59.50 7.81 Excalb dd 337 50.38 47.38 47.50-1.94 52.88 12.88 ExciTch 30 1049 37.63 36.25 36.94+0.38 27.50 2.7S eXcelon dd 4633 8.28 7.19 8.06+0.81 74.75 10.13 ExchApp a - dd 3592 24.56 22.72 24.56+2.19 29.0023.75 ExchNtl n .76 3.2 9 24.50 24.00 24.00-0.13 11.88 6.00AExcoRes 11 281 12.38 11.50 11.50-0.38 50.50 13.50 Exelixis n 1210 45A 44.75 45.00 89.88 15.13 ExodusC a dd 118M 69.00 64.56 68.44+0.56 65.88 5.25 Expedia n dd 223 16.06 16.00 16.06 61.31 31.50 ExpdInt .14 .3 39 2118 50.00 46.75 49.00+2.00 11.31 4.38 Exponent 9 208 8.75 8.63 8.69+0.06 92.3828.50 ExpScript 31 3061 72.25 70.00 71.1 +1. 150.00 4.25 ExtndSys dd 1962 47.50 39.38 45.88+5.69 83.50 9.50 Exterrety n 2641 24.1 22.11 232.11-1.75 95.5021.25 ErtNetw a cc 31946 93 .7 8713 9 .06+8.81 12.60 7.00AExuMnc n 3189 14.00 12.00 13.38+1.25 6.63 1.25 Ezcorp .01 dcl 394 1.28 1.25 1.28+0.03 14.25 2.69 Ezenia dd321 3.88 3.50 3.88+0.25 F 30.25 16.00 F&M Be 1.08 5.1 17 28 21.19 21.00 21.13+0.13 40.98 24.25 FYI n 22 567 39.06 38.63 39.00 160.50 28.38 FS NOW 6423919 60.00 52.44 58.00+5.25 21.00 11.75 FCNB .64 3.4 21 646 19.31 18.69 19 06+025 34.50 6.75 FEI Co dd 710 31.88 29.88 30.13-0.63 18.00 11.25 FFLC Be .48 3.5 10 280 13.69 13.50 13.63 19.00 9.38 FFY Fn .50 4.1 12.13 12.13 12.13-0.38 19.25 5.25 FUR dd 2215 5.75 5.38 5.56+0.06 22.00 6.00 FNB NC .48 4.8 13 6 10.00 10.00 10.000.06 26.63 17.25 FNB CpPA .72 b 3.3 12269 22.00 21.50 22.00+0.50 23.00 14.00 FNB VA .72 14.5 10 42 16.00 15.88 15.88+0.13 14.50 10.13 FNB FS .44 a 3.8 11 18 11.44 11.00 11.44-0.56 23.00 10.38 FPIC Ins 8 754 15.50 15.13 1519+0 13 14.00 10.17 FSF Fin .50 4.0 1030 12.50 12.50 250 24.00 6.19 FSI Intl dd 1539 17.94 17.06 1775+0.56 27.25 4.25 FVC.com dd 1198 7.69 7.00 706-0.19 9.13 3.75 FX Ener 989 4.25 3.88 400-0.25 43.13 17.98 Factory2l.l 31 4964 35.60 33.94 34.66+1 9.38 6.75 FactData dd 16 8.88 8.69 8.88+0.19 53.50 3.50 FairMkt n 1296 4.75 4.19 4.31+0.25 5.13 1.69 FDaves dd 92 3.56 3.44 3.44-0.06 15.56 6.38 FantomT g .20 7 25 6.63 6.63 6.63-0.25 1 7.75 2.50 Far9oE1 n 339 6.00 5.50 5.75-0.22 203.00 150.00 FarmBr 3 . i6f 1.4 i630 183.06 172+00 172.31 6.69 6.00 2.25 FaroTch del 79 3.88 3.56 3.56+0.06 8.63 1.53 FashnMll 257 2.25 2.06 2.16+0.03 73.31 34.00 FastenI .08 f 0.1 33 1309 68.88 63.81 63.88-4.31 22.03 1.63 Fastnet n 207 2.38 2.06 2.19+0.16 42.25 3.06 Fatbrain n dd 2041 4.25 3.66 3.97-0.03 7.00 2.50 Feathrite 660 3.00 3.00 3 00 19.88 8.50 FbwNet n 643 17.13 15.76 1 7 00+0 13.19 3.25 Fibrstrs 6863 11.00 10.88 1 0.88 19.81

313 / C11 Day

15.00 FidBcpChi 2.7 9 180 17.63 17.38 17.50 19.00 13.38 FidellBksh 1.00 5.6 11 23 18.00 17.63 18 00 25.25 1.25 FdltyHld a dd 479 1.38 1.34 1 34 + 0.6 10.00 5.25 FideINU .20 2.8 10 77 7.19 7.00 7.06-0.06 50.25 29.38 FfthThrd s.18 0.4 31 10469 46.56 44.38 46.19+11.81 46.81 10.00 HeNet 25 5122 19.48 18.75 19.25+0.44 12.00 1.50 FndWhat n 406 3.52 3.13 3.44+0.19 61.75 19.13 Finisar a cc 46520 46.63 44.81 46.38+1.69 1163 4.44 FinLine 13 1407 8.00 6.75 7.94+0 06 14.94 9.25 Finlay 19 63 13.00 12.63 12.63-0 38 7.63 1.25 Firebrand 5 5 1.53 1.53 1.53-0 03 108.13 14.00 FirePd n 2604 21.50 20.13 20.88+0.75 47.63 11.25 FAlban .20b 1.1 7854 18.00 17.38 17.50+0.25 7.44 4.50 FrstA 3 3 5.38 5.38 5.38+0.38 20.00 10.25 FtBcpNC s .52 3.6 9 9 14.25 14.00 14.25+0.25 11.50 8.38 FBncplN .16 1.4 12 5 11.06 11.06 11.06 11.53 9.00 FstBkshs .16 1.6 12 10.31 10.31 10.31 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 17.00 10.25 FstBell .48 3.0 9 116 16.38 16.13 16.13+0.31 26.50 16.38 FrstBsey .48 2.6 19 33 18.69 18-50 18.50-0.31 11.63 2.69 FstCsh 8 84 3.00 2.69 2.69 22.19 12.00 FstChartr .72 14.5 15 439 16.17 15.88 16A +0 31 80.38 55.88 FCtzBA 1.00 1.5 8 34 65.81 65.00 65.81+0-50 3.94 0.56 FstCity dd 655 2.13 1.94 2.00+0-19 15.38 12.88 FrstCom n 1 15.38 15.38 15.38+0.63 18.13 15.06 FrstCmF .33f 1.8 19 108 18.13 18.00 18.00-0.06 20.50 5.25 FstCnsit dd 863 8.13 6.88 7.00-0-75 12.50 7.63 FstDefiFn 44 4.9 6 26 9.00 8.75 9.00-0.19 FmtEcm n 5416 9.34 7.16 8.50+11.50 18.19 12.75 FtEsex .72 4.2 10 106 17-75 17-00 17.13-0.75 16.131 .40 2.2 11 748 18.75 18.13 1 8.13 . 10.38 7.25 FFdBksh .32 f 3.4 9 29 9.38 9.31 9.38 + 013 16.25 10.13 FtFCap .44 3.8 10 96 11.69 11.13 11-56 + 0.19 24.98 15.13 FFGdKY .72 4.1 12 6 17.50 17.00 117-50+11-00 25.38 FFdEH .80 2.7 11 3 29.50 29.50 29.50 23.56 15.50 FFncIOH 60 3.6 15 426 17.38 16.88 16.88 -0.38 34.44 23.94 FtFnBk 1.32 t 4.1 12 246 32.50 31.75 32.00 41.50 29.00 FstFnIN 1.04 t 3.4 9 4 31.38 31.00 31.00-0.13 14.25 9.75 FFinCpRI .48 4.4 7 3 11.00 11.00 11.00-0.25 19.94 MOO FstFHld .56 3.8 10152 14.75 14.25 14.56+0.3 37.2520.76 FstHith 21 3831 31.60 29.13 31.06+1.69 18.00 FstINCp .56 2.7 11 92 21.19 20-38 20.94+0.23 11.00 6.00 FrstIntl .01 1.5 11 33 8.06 8.00 8.00+0.13 6.44 4.13.Firsbnv n 8 75 4.25 4.00 4.19-0.31 12.00 8.50 FrstKs n .20 1.7 74 1115 11.69 11.75+0.06 13.31 8.38 FstKeyst .28 2.8 7 29 10.13 10.13 10.13-0.50 34.25 17.50 Fst M&F 1.00 5.2 10 1 19.13 19.13 19.13+0.88 12.06 4.88 FrstMar .021 23 4 5.06 5.06 5.06-0-06 29.25 18.50 FstMerch .92 f 4.1 14 176 22.69 22.25 22.31+0.06 30.13 21.00 FMidBc s .72 2.8 15 432 26.13 25.38 25.81+0.31 14.63 8.75 FtMdwF .52 5.2 12 121 10.00 9.50 10.00+0.25 12.88 9.00 FMutBcsh .20 2.1 7 37 10.00 9.75 9.75 20.00 13.25 FrstNtIL .64 f 4.1 8 10 15.50 15.50 15.50 11.19 8.25 FNiagara .28 2.9 13 94 9.75 9.63 9.66 15.00 8.25 FNthCap .44 3.2 17 12 1328 13.75 1388 20.25 13.25 FOakBrk .44 31 9 191 14.56 14.13 14.25+0.19 12.50 9.38 FrstPlce .40 f 3.6 1546 11.44 11.25 .1 25-013 8.50 6.50 FRegBc 1029 7.06 6.BB 7 03-003 21.00 13.00 FtSvBanc 1.04 6.1 1143 17.00 16.06 17 00 + 0 13 35.00 10.75 FSecCp .04 3.7 18 3970 15.56 1513 15 25 13.98 10.56 FrstSecF .52 f 3.7 11 5 13.88 13.98 13 88+0 6 9.25 6.75 FSentBc .24 a 2.6 14 273 9.25 9.09 9 13 28.88 14.88 1st5roeCp .36 b 1.9 10 26 18.94 18.50 18.63+0.06 23.38 17.56 lstStncp .32 1.6 174 21.00 2038 20.50-0.13 15.38 9.7S FeStilep s .32 12.5 10 15 12.76 12.63 12.63-0-88 19.50 7.75 FstSterl .32 f 2.8 15 1 11.50 1150 11.50+0.25 3.50 1.31 FtTearn 64 1.88 1.75 1.81-0.19 18.00 10.00 FtUtdBs .58 13.6 12364 16.63 16.13 16.25+0-06 9.25 12.63 FstWABcp .56 3.8 9 267 14.88 14.75 14.81+0-25 2.38 6.75 FstYears .06 0.5 12 105 11.00 10-

Day C11 / 314

81 11.00+0.13 22.00 14.75 FrstSpr n 1.00 5.0 11 34 20.38 20.00 20.00 14.00 8.50 FstBkNW .36 3.0 10 20 12.00 12.00 12.00 28.13 13.38 FstMerit .88 3.8 13 1611 23.38 22.94 23.31+0.31 15.00 9.81 FstSvc 27 12.13 11.69 11.69+0.25 23.00 1. Firstwave dd 1942 4.75 3.00 4.44+11.414 39.63 2.44 FrstWdd n 973 3.25 3.06 3.19+0.13 5.88 0.81 FischIm dd 361 4.00 3.50 3.78+0.03 57.00 23.88 Fiserv 43 3854 54.75 53.50 54.19 9.25 413 FlagFincl .24 4.4 cc 13 5.75 5.44 5.44 44.00 11.00 FIagTIc n dd 4769 16.25 15.38 15.63-0.25 22+50 7.38 FlagstrB .40 3.4 6 229 12.13 11.50 11.75+0.22 12.94 1.00 Flameff dd 1949 8.19 7.06 8.13+0.75 4.13 1.31 Flanders 22 190 2.75 2.53 2.69+019 14.13 11.38 Flexsfl .52 4.2 7 113 12.44 12.25 12.25 95.31 27.13 Flextrn s dd 21964 83.88 80.88 83.31+1.63 7.50 4.88 FloridaB - dd 311 5.56 5.50 5.50 11.56 7.25AFlaFstB n .16 1.4 16 184 11.69 11.56 11.56 5.19 0.75 FlorshGp did 1147 1.00 0.75 0.88-013 6.00 1.31 Fiourcty dd 1101 13.81 3.56 3.81+009 12.88 9.25 FowInt 24 1 06 1.13 10.50 10.75-0.25 31.00 15.13 Flowers n 881 28.50 26.00 26.38-050 17.75 12.50 FlushFn .40 2.7 10 140 15.25 15.00 15.06-0.06 10.38 4.16 Foamex 7 217 5.94 5.81 5.81 85.00 18.50 FoclCom dd 3569 31.81 30.88 30.94-0.06 10.63 2.31 Focal Inc dd 135 3.06 2.94 3.06+0.06 22.00 0.81 Fogdog n dd 3317 1.00 088 0.94-0-05 4.50 2.50AFoilmark 20 2112 4.81 4.16 4.69+031 14.13 8.88 Footind .32 3.3 9 57 10.00 9.63 9.63-0. 3 16.00 4.09 ForbesM n 63 5.13 4.63 5.05+017 25.98 14.50 Forcnrgy n 491 24.63 24.06 24.19-0.25 92.19 23.00 FormSys 8 64 51.00 50.00 51.00+0.50 81.50 15.25 ForrestR s 91 1073 62.00 59.63 61.13-0.63 22.75 5.50 Forsoft 211 7.44 7.19 7.19+0.13 7.50 1.50 FortGrp 1 73 3.00 2.75 2.81-0.06 48.25 13.25 FomrdA 55 911 45.94 42.63 45.88+1-00 32.88 15.81 Fossilinc 11 1623 18.25 17.25 17.44 - 0 06 5.81 3.02 Foster 20 174 3.69 3.56 3.63 8.91 3.00 Fotoball 3 139 3.47 3.25 3.47+0.22 21.00 51.88 Foundry 9 cc 26046 95.00 87.50 93.06+7-00 4.19 2.00 FountPwb 50 2.50 2.44 2.50 40.00 9.38 4FrntTch dd 1853 17.94 15.75 15.80-1.95 93.25 15.38 4KidsEnt s 7 4198 21.25 20+06 21.00+050 9.48 2.38 FrthShift dd 31 2.81 2.69 + 0 06 10.94 6.69 FrnkBk .28 3.5 20 142 8.13 8.06 8.06 73.8862.75 FrnkEj .88 1.3 13 12 65.25 64.88 65.25+0.25 24.50 10.69 Freds .20 0.8 24 348 24.25 23.63 24.00 .1. 37000 36.75 FreeMkt n . 21472 82.31 77.50 81.38+0-38 159.75 21.50 Fmosrv 64 39.25 38.26 38 50+11.88 61.00 3.00 FreeShp n 868 4.19 4 00 403-0-03 9.63 5.50 FrenchF 7 154 7.50 7.00 713006 11.00 1.13 FreshArn dd 36 2.56 2.38 2 38-8.19 6.81 1.38 FrshChc 12 117 2.75 2.25 2.38+006 10.00 4.25 Friedmn .06 1.2 4 764 5.25 5.00 5.06-009 16.06 7.88 Fritz 32 13123 15.13 14.75 14.81-0.13 19.00 8.25 FrontrAi. - 8 1631 17.50 17.00 17.13-0.13 26.00 16.25 FrntFml .44 12.3 12 39 19.31 18.88 19.25+0.25 68.31 12.60 FmtCap n cid 2146 17.75 16.63 17+56+0.94 23-25 2.03 FrontinLtd .10 0.6 728 16.13 15.38 16.00+0.38 6.i 2.25 FrozenFd .12 4.7 dd 414 2.75 2.28 2.56-0.28 12.56 1.75 ftd.com dd 710 2.50 2.19 2.44+0.19 116.00 10.88AFuelCell s dd 4290 121.94 109.66 119.00+5.88 71.7529.06 Full .84 2.4 9 698 36.69 34.19 34.31-2.50 22.75 15.00 Fulton 64 b 3+0 15 851 21.00 20.63 21.00+0.38 43.00 10.00 Funditch dd 453 24.06 22.88 24.06+11-119 2515 9.50 FusnMed dd 269 11.25 11.13 11.25+0.13 20+88 0.75 FusnNet dd 7066 1.75 1.00 .75+0.59 38.50 150 Ftrel-ink n dd 4541 5.56 506 3R 1 0 19 G 43.50 14.75 G&K .07 0.2 16 293 29.00 2775 29.00+1.00 2300 14.50 GB&T Bn .30 11.8 10 16.50 16.50 16.50+025 R44 17.75 GBC Bcp .40 f 1.1 12474 37.88 37.00 37.88+0.26 13.25 10.00 GS Fncl .36 2.8 2331 13.00 13-00 13-00-0.13 19.50 10.50 GSB Fnc .24 1.3 18 8 18.50 18.50 18.50-0.44 43.50 4.19 GSI Lum

315 / C11 Day

22 3439 27.44 26.00 26.19-0.31 73.75 1.25vGSV Inc s dd 34 1.50 1.03 1.44-0.28 28.00 11.25 GT Grp n 460 15.88 15.50 15.88+0.31 11.13 5.63 GTS Drtk 13 91 8.75 8.50 8.50 11.50 2.00 GTSI 15 16671 5.56 5.06 5.13+0.06 7.50 2.50 G-1.11 7 21 6.63 6.38 6.63 7.00 3.50 GZA 15 41 6.16 6.06 6.06 24.75 6.00 Gadzooks 16 641 15.31 14.97 15.00 98.00 7.63 Gadzoox dd 4186 9.44 9.00 9.06-0.19 24.69 5.38 Gaiam n 85 62 17.88 17.75 17.88+0.38 5.50 1.00 GalaGen dd 178 1.22 1.13 1.13-0.09 34.56 12.56 GafileoT s 47 18478 29.94 28.13 29.44+1.06 9.50 3.38 GameTc 7 26 425 4.13 4.25+0.09 20.06 9.94 GardenFr 13 242 13.00 11.88 12.50-0.50 24.13 t50 Garden.cm dd 1257 1.75 1.50 1.69+0.06 9.25 3.44 Gardnbrg dd 329 5.19 4.94 5.00-0.06 11.25 4.00 GartSprt 6.60 10.25 9.75 10.00-0.25 47.25 13.76 Gasonics - 25 1321 25.00 22.00 24.00+2.00 13.13 10.00 GstnFed .24 2.2 22 1 10.138 10.88 10.88+0.13 9.63 1.97 GeedWd dd 67 2.94 2.50 2.50-0.44 22.00 13.00 Gehl 4 21 14.75 14.31 14.31-0.06 39.63 9.13AGelTex n dd 6688 40.75 36.38 40.52+3.02 22.36 15.00 GerniniG n 1159 17.63 17.38 17.50+0.2 107.44 29.63 Gemstar s oc 61771 91.63 81.38 90.25+8.06 26.25 13.00 GenaisPh n 1 9 23.88 21.75 22.31-1.19 152.50 4.00 GoneLgc dd 16916 25.67 21.63 24.66+2.94 16.50 2.31 Genei-Tc 1589 4.28 4.03 4.06 34.31 18.00 Gomm n 6891 32.50 24.38 31.13+6.38 21.75 6 .00 GnBnd dd 9 9.00 8.88 8.880.13 7 88 3 75AGnCom dd 4100 8.00 6.75 8.00+1.31 1W.75 1.31 GMagic dd 8675 7.31 6.88 7.03+0.03 16.81 4.78 GenBiotc n 4535 16.63 14.63 16.44+0.69 22.69 11.13 GenWyo 5 80 21.50 21.00 21.50+0.75 30.69 14.63 GenMcr 60 1993 19.56 17.19 17.94+0.56 35.00 3.50 Onintm dd 10.13 15.98 14.88 15.88+0.8 29.60 1.40 4.6 dd 620 31.00 28.56 30.63+2.06 26.13 17.75 Genlyte 9 223 23.50 23.31 23.38+0.31 75.38 3.38 Genome cld 8813 26.38 24.13 25.13+0.38 30.13 7.88 Gen S1 n 880 16.50 15.69 15.94-0.19 78.94 7.98 Goneet 1307 28.38 27.13 28.38+1.38 22.88 3.00 Gensym dd 89 3.63 3.44 3.63+0.25 15.88 2.00 Genta dd 3358 9.13 8.75 8.88+0.06 39.98 16.00 Gentex 28 3559 26.06 25.00 25.88+0.69 14.50 1.75 GentiaS cc 576 4.50 4.25 4.38+0.13 11.50 5.25 GenWa n 655 11.69 11.00 11.13 24.38 6.13 Gentnr 28 516 15.19 14.50 14.94+0.56 1 1.25 6.50 Genuity 34061 8.81 7.88 8.63+0.56 17.75 1.91 Genus cc 976 6.94 6.56 6.94+0.28 75.00 30.75 GenzymGn 1.611 t 32 19753 76.50 73.00 75.06+2.06 11.63 1.31 GenzTisRp dd 1564 5.59 5.38 5.47 42.00 3.88 GnzMic dd 1517 14.50 13.50 14.00-0.06 20.00 4.63 GzymSrg dd 873 10.75 1000 1 0.25 50.00 5.44 GenzyTr dd 1436 37.50 36.38 37.19+0.75 54.88 2.31 Geoworks dd 5324 11.69 10.88 11.44+0.38 14.56 0.75 GrldSWe dd 23250.94 0.81 0.91+0.06 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 76.88 9.25 GeronCp dd 13567 35.00 31.81 32.31-2.00 52.25 8.06 GetThere n dd 1899 17.44 17.31 1738 64.38 18.13 Gettylm - 2672 42.38 40.63 4200+0.88 26.00 2.81 GibrStl .12 10.7 8 64 17.50 17.13 17.60+025 15.00 2.66 Gigainfo dd 97 7.00 6.25 6.3R - 0 38 22.00 2.50 GigaTr 26 185 8.38 7.50 8.25+0.75 91.00 6.88 GigaMed n dd 1084 11.13 10.50 10.50-0.31 31.25 16.75 Giganet n 2999 29.98 26.06 29.17+0.92 45.75 11.50 GilatCo dd 2376 12.67 12.25 12.50+0.06 181.50 41.75 GilatSat cc 5722 80.88 78.00 80.25+1.25 10750 37.00 AGilead dd 5657 111.56 104.44 108.00 +3.56 12.88 3.50 GilmnCio dd 43 4.00 3.94 3.940.06 7.75 1.94 GishBi dd 11 2.28 2.28 2.28-0.22 18.63 11.00 GlacrBc .60 b 4.7 11 283 12.88 12.69 12.69+0.19 3000 228 Glenayre dd 4203 11.44 10.88 10.880.44 27.69 7.754 Gliatech dd 19689 9 1 - 62.00 20.13 GlblCrss dd 99763 30171 2 20.88 5.81 Glblmg 8 364 6.19 5.88 600+0.13 19.88 6.00 Globlind dd 3190 13.38 12.38 12.44-050 12.38 4.50 GlblPay dd 163 6.56 6.25 6.56+8.06 99.88 21

Day C11 / 316

M GlblSrc n 80 33.63 32.50 33.19-0.31 25.25 4.31 GlblSp dd 1039 8.88 7.69 8.75+11.03 21.50 1.38 GlobTch s 392 3.63 3.38 3.50+013 8.47 1.63 Glbmdia n 863 2.38 2.00 2.25-0.13 57.50 7.63 GlblNet n 556 10.69 9.75 9.88 53.75 5.81 Globalstr 17806 10.25 9.75 9.88-0.06 41.13 8.63 Globeco dd 981 11.38 9.88 10.50+0.50 167.00 16.38 GlbeSpn s dd 128% 126.00 119.811 120.44 - 1.94 67.44 7.63 GlobixCp s did 2811 27.19 25.38 26.811+11.119 25.00 4.25 GloboCabo .22 p 2922 16.20 16.00 16.13-0.06 111.75 35.44 Go2net did 11189 70.50 66.50 69.00+3.50 19.31 5.25 GoAmer n 2687 11.44 1075 10.94-0.50 12.81 4.00 GoldBnc G8 1.5 12 393 5.50 5.31 5.36-0.02 4.00 2.31 GoldEn .24 7.7 31 10 3.13 3.13 3.13-0.13 1.56 0.69 GldBtbc wt 3166 1.31 1.16 1.31+0.06 6.19 3.03 GldStVnt 19 191 5.63 5.13 544+041 4838 8.25 GldTlcm n dd 66 32.38 29.50 30 75 -E88 11.00 2.06 GoodGy dd 1717 7.88 6.91 775+0.69 10.38 3.50 GdyFam 57 528 4.59 4.44 4 59+0 09 114.50 10-00 GoTo.cm dd UN 19.00 17.25 18 63+11.113 2.63 0.94 Gradco 6 53 1.50 1.44 144 14.50 4.38 GranBd 4 646 5.06 4.94 494-0.13 23+75 14.50 GrantSt 9 11 16.88 16.88 16.88 32.00 4.50 GraphOn cid 3106 6.50 5.00 6.25+11.119 15.50 10.50 GA Bcp .44 3.1 21 3 14.25 14.25 14.25-0.75 13.13 9.00 GrPeDe .40 3.7 23 14 10.81 10.81 10.81-0 . 06 83.50 16.00 GrtPInsSft 35 693 28.00 27.19 27.19-0.31 63.00 32.63AGrtrBay .80 f 1.3 23 9596 65.50 61.31 62.00+3.00 11.38 5.25 GrtrCoB .30 f 3.6 1215 8.25 8.13 8.25+0.44 20.75 6.75 GmMtn 1952 19.13 18.69 18.75-0.25 27.81 7.69 GManning dd 896 9.19 8.56 9.19+0.31 33.00 24.06 GreifBrA .56 f 1.9 11 37 29.63 28.88 28.88-0.75 13.50 7.00 GrekaEgy 7 598 12.00 10.50 11.88+0.38 630.00 328.00 GreyGlbl 4.00 0.7 31 17 590.00 545.00 545.00 -15.13 75.00 6.64 GncCm n dd 1358 11.50 10.31 10.53-0.41 24.56 5.38 Group 1 s 16 266 17.50 16.94 17.25+044 18.44 13.63 GpFnGal n 4338 18.00 16.S6 17.63+0.88 12.50 9.13 GuarFBc .46 f 3.9 17 A 11.94 11.94 11.94+0.94 11.38 7.00 Guarlin .24 3.4 dd 20 7.13 TOO 7.13-013 38.25 13.13 GulifirdlPh dd 8418 29.25 25.00 26.75+11.75 15.88 7.44 GuitarC 13 2764 15.13 14.63 15.00+0.25 19.50 7.00 Guffisland 45 257 18.75 18.50 18.50-0.13 10.25 8.50 GlfWstB .49 1 17 4 8.38 8.25 8.38+0.13 26.2S 10.50 GlfMrk - dd 8 25.00 24.00 24.00-1.00 36.06 8.06 GurnTch dd 300 12.81 12.13 12.69+0.31 7.63 2.25 Gymbree dd 1893 5.56 4.75 4.94-0.56 H 28.60 12.63 HPwrCp n 312H 20.75 17.50 20.50+2.94 10.13 4.44 HID Vest 23 62 6.13 5.75 6.13+0.25 25.38 5.00 HEIMncid 4816 24.88 19.98 23.25+3.00 13.63 8.00 HF Find .42 f 4.5 7 42 9.63 9.25 9.25-0.13 13+38 9.63 HMNFn .48 13.8 8 7 12.75 12.69 12.69+0A3 4.98 1.00 HMT-Tch dd 7996 2.50 2.00 2.47+0.47 13000 34.19 HNCSft dd 4675 55.38 50.94 54.41+0.09 7.50 0.94 HTEInc dd 408 1M 1.38 1.42+0.05 15.00 10.31 Haggar .20 1.6 9 92 12.88 12.25 12.31-0. 8.19 1.66 HaglerB n dd 922 5.09 5.03 5.09+0.03 37.75 20.00 HainCelest 50 4742 31.56 30.13 31.25+1.13 46.25 7.50 HaIn 35 6274 34.13 31.19 33.00+2.00 11.88 8.00 HllmkCa .20 2.0 9 45 10.13 10.00 10.13+0.06 9.44 3.50 HllwdEn 11140 9.00 8.75 8.75 26.00 13.50 HamltnB 7 333 15.00 14.88 14.88-0.06 16.06 4.75 HanaroT n 1302 5.16 5.00 5.09-0.09 44.38 30.63 HancHd 1.00 3.1 10 x87 32.25 31.94 32.13+0.25 48.00 22.38 Hndsprg n dd 2557 36.00 34.38 35.25+0.88 18.25 11.25 HarbFed .52 2.9 14 169 17.88 17.50 17.69-0. 1 14.06 8.75 HarbrFL .35 2.9 14 381 11.94 11.75 11.94+0.13 16.50 6.38 Hardinge .56 5.1 15 68 11.88 11.00 11.00-0.81 19.75 11.63 Harleys .56 f 2.9 18 268 19.25 19.13 19.25+0.13 36.44 23.75 HarlyNat 1.16f3.9 10 34 30.13 29.50 30.13+0.06 1625 12.25 HadySv .44 2.9 9 60 15.00 15.00 15.00+0.13

317 / C11 Day

31.81 8.28 Harrnon .12 0.4 31.00 29.88 30.69+0.38 157.50 21.50 Harmonc s dd 35225 35.50 33.00 33.50+0.44 7.50 3.50 HarmonyG .18 e 3.4 3744 5.47 5.19 5.25-0.06 8.19 5.50 Hrringtn .12 1.7 dd 1 6.88 6.88 6.88+0.63 35.75 2.00 HarisMa 1502 7.75 6.41 7.25+0.98 11.00 5.88 HaffisFn .24 3.1 15 60 7.81 7.63 7.63-0.06 24.00 3.00 HarrisInt n dd 468 4.19 3.94 4.13+0.09 14.00 9.00 Harrod n .60a5.2 48 11.50 11.50 11.50 9.63 HaInd 41 4.00 2.75 3.00-0.38 7.13 1.81 HarveyE dd 11 275 2.50 2.50 10.13 1.19 Hastin s d 7 3.00 2.69 2.69+0.13 51.00 5.13 HaupI d. 2142 10.008.94 9.50+0.50 5.56 0.56 Hauser dd 170 0.69 0.59 0.66+0.0 27.25 11.75 HavenB .30 1.1 18 122 26.69 26.50 26.63+0.13 8.25 3.00 Hkrft dd 295 6.81 6.28 6.63+0.25 8.88 7.06 HawkC .30 3.9 10 57 7.81 7.75 7.750.06 14.97 7.03 HawtFn 8 303 11.69 11.50 11.50-0.19 26.13 5.75 HeadHnt dd 12096.16 6.00 6.00-0.03 9.69 3.50 HlthCSv 10 465 5.13 4.94 5.06-0.06 8.00 2.50 HlthMSys 8 207 2.94 2.75 2.78+0.03 9.56 4.38 HlthRsk dd 69 6.00 5.50 5.63-0.13 7.00 1.13 HealthSys dd 74 1.59 1.41 1.50-0.13 4000 2.38 HlthAxis dd 385 2.94 2.78 2.84-0.09 5.19 2.56 HlthcrRc 10 886 4.38 4.06 4.19+0.16 6.50 1.53 Hlthcrecm dd 2476 3.44 3.00 3.19+0.06 16.50 2.38 HlthCent n dd 18655.50 4.22 4.44+0.22 75.19 11.00 HthWMD dd 50232 18.00 17.38 17.63+0.25 12.38 2.50 HlthExt n 114 4.25 4.13 4.13+0.09 15.25 0.94 HlthGate n dd 775 1.34 1.25 1.2. 11.00 1.59 HlthStrm n 5011 2.44 2.19 2.+ 21.00 6.25 HlthTrnc n 65 247 14.25 13.75 13.75-0.25 37.50 3.44 HearMe n 13857 9.25 738 869+1 19 19.38 12.38 HrtindE 13 499 17.50 16.31 17.50+11.13 8.31 1.94 Heartprt dd 715 3.63 3.38 3.53+0.09 75.00 14.98 HeldrkS 25 498 59.25 57.63 58+13+0.19 15.00 4.63 HelenTr 18 538 5.88 5.50 5.63+0.09 80.19 26.98 HellxTech .48 1.3 29 6886 37.98 34.56 37.88+313 18.75 7.38 HelloD 12 298 11.00 10.81 10.81+0.06 20.63 10.00 HSchein 12 754 18.50 18.25 18.38 60.00 15.50 HenryJk s .200.5 56 2971 45 88 44.06 44.38-0.63 16.38 7.75 HerbalifeA .60 6.2 6 13 9.69 9.38 9.69 16.25 6.50 HerbalifeB .60 6.4 6 368 9.44 9.25 9.38 15.50 9.50 HrtgeCo 1.43t 22 183 10.38 10.00 10.31+0.06 9.75 7.06 HrtgeFn .32 f 3.4 16 167 9 69 9+50 9.50 20.00 11.06 Harley 12 109 18.44 18.13 18.44+0.06 7.00 2.00 Herly wt 17 3.88 3.88 3.88+0.19 6.00 1A HeskaCp dd 1448 3.75 3.31 3.75+0.13 8.69 3.56 HiTcPhr 11 208 4.44 4.19 4.25-0.13 151.76 25.50 hi/fn Inc 74 3251 64.73 60.50 63.50+3.69 26.00 12.50 Hibbett 15 5 23.63 22.63 22.63-0.88 8.25 4.00 HibrnFd 10 6.06 6.06 6.06+0 13 21.81 10.00 Hickory .44 2.2 33 222 20.13 19.63 20.00 5.11 0.69 HiPlains 90 983 3.00 2.66 2.69-0 30.50 416 HighSpd n dd 2237 5.94 5.41 5.75+0.25 1 14.69 Highland .30 1.2 10 75 25.25 25.25 25.25 1025 5.00 HinesH 6 1155 5.75 1.10 121 15.75 10.00 HingmSv .52 3.6 8 149 14.50 4.25 14.50+0.13 2.13 0.75 Hirsch dd 189 1.25 1.13 1.25 15.00 4.25 HispTelv n 250 5.13 4.94 5.00 12+75 8.00 Hoenig 13 84 10.750.25 10.25-66 7.13 3.31 HldyRV 41 187 4.50 4.19 4.50+0.06 19.25 7.72 HlsEden n 259 9+88 9.31 9.88+0.25 18.06 6.06 HlywdE dd 49347.13 6.88 7.00-0.06 24.50 7.31 Hollywd.cm dd 266 8.56 8.13 8.38+0.25 11.00 3.00 Hologic dd 541 8.60 7.81 8.44+0.75 6.75 3.06 HoltCgr .08t 17 4.25 4.25 4.25+0.25 -.50 14.50 HmeBc .40 2.1 17 1 19.25 19.25 19.25-0.31 9.50 6.16 HomeCnt 2 7.25 7.25 7.25+0.25 26.63 15.75 HmFdIN 55 3.3 9 69 16.75 16.31 1 .75+ 1 36.13 19.25 HmPrt 1.00 2.8 12 139 35.88 35.81 35.88+0.06 13.88 1.88 HmePrd old 1513 2.06 1.88 2.00 16.25 3.19 HmGrcr n 3975 4.44 4.06 4.06-0.16 5.00 3.00 HmIndH cc 148 3.63 3.25 3.50+0. 9 16.50 8.00 HmeServ n 17 9 11.50 11.50 11.50+0.13 13B.00 14.06 HoffeStm dd 15945 55.00 53.00 54.19+0.19 9.63 1.13 HmeAuto dd 114 1.91 1.69 1.69-0.19 18.81 6.50 Homers dd 178 7.25 7.00 7.00-0. 1 3 20.00 8.38 HopFedB s .44 4.9 11 9.00 8.88 9.00 12.38 8.41 HorznFin .48 4.9 9 121 10.00 9.75 9+75-0.13 8.25 4.44.Hod.HC 4 11 4.53 4.31 4.31-0.50

Day C11 / 318

18.25 4.31 HrznOff cc 503 18.63 17.63 18.63+0.38 13.50 6.56 HorzOrg 79653 9.38 8.63 8+72-0.47 40.63 2.38 HotTopic a 17 5096 32.75 28.25 28.31-2. 38.75 14.50 HotlRsrv n 669 35.50 34.69 35.19+1.06 48.00 6.88 HotJobs dd 3080 19.38 18.88 19.06-0.06 23.69 10.50 HubGrp 13 12 13.50 13.00 13.50+0.63 1769 12.63 HdsnCity. .32 f 1.8 462 17.38 17.13 1T31 +0.06 1250 8.75.HdsnRvr .12 0.9 18 720 13.00 12.31 13.00+0.69 444 1.25 HudsonTc 59 2.63 2.56 2.63-0.13 232.75 33.00 HumGen dd 20611 173.50 160.19 166.94+10.63 60.44 19.38 Humbird 13 34.50 33.00 3300 8.38 6.06 Humphry .92 11.5 11 315 8.13 8.00 8.00-0.06 17.50 10.50 HuntJB 18 402 13.88 13.44 13.50 0.13 28.13 13.75 HuntBnk .80 b 4.7 10 5116 17.13 16.56 16.88+0.38 32.75 9.38 HutchT dd 37875 24.50 18.60 23.75+5.31 13.25 5.66 HybrdNt n 994 7.50 6.03 7.13+1 13 9.00 1.06 Hycor 63 189 7.38 6.88 6.38-013 11.50 2.75 HyperFeed dd 1274 4.25 3.94 4.25+0 19 65.00 15.13 HyperSolu 36 1829 32.13 30.53 31.6.3+1 13 139.50 3.06 Hyseq dd 1315 42.66 40.13 41.94+2.13 16.00 7.75 I-Many n 2020 14.00 12.31 14.00+11.75 22.50 10.13 I-STAT dd 618 18.94 18.25 18.56+0.19 223.50 15.13 Q Tech a dd 24571 174.50 168.00 169.19 +0.44 33.06 5.13 i3Mobile n 2765 9.13 8.25 9.06+0.19 3.00 1.25 IC lace did 25 1.94 1.91 1.91-0.03 39.25 5.63 ICO Com dd 9424 6.03 5.78 5.97-0.03 2.56 1.00 ICO Inc dd 387 1.75 1.63 1.69-0.19 68.00 24.00 ICOS dd 2820 59.81 57.75 58.69+0.94 45.00 15.00 ICOS Via 29 108 39.75 38.44 39.00+0.88 15.63 4.50 ICT Grp 26 194 11.19 10.63 10.63 10.00 4.38 ICTS Intl 16 40 7.00 6.63 7.00+0.13 31.75 10.69 ICU Mad 19 234 24.31 22.50 23.440.81 173.00 42.75 IDEC a cc 6232 142.69 134.13 139.63 +3.69 30.44 14.25 IdexxLb 28 2068 27.19 26.00 26.13-1.13 19.00 6.66 IDG Bks 10 48 9.13 8+88 9.03+0.16 45.00 18.50 IDTCorp 1331 40.31 39.75 39.75-0.50 49.13 10.38 IDXSys n dd 422 18.00 16.81 17.00-0.19 3.78 1.00 IEC Elc dd 361 1.75 1 .63 1.63 30.63 17.75 IFCO Sys n -413 21.25 20.00 20.13-1.00 13.00 2.94 IFR Sys .13 2.7 547 4.81 4.63 4.75+0.13 41.00 11.50 IGEN dd512 19.38 18.63 19.00+0.5 77.13 6.63 iGateCap 19 4484 7.44 7.06 7.28+0.22 74.00 10.60 1141 47 2076 55.13 50.00 53.75+3.63 11.38 5.50 IL Fom 17 505 8.50 8.00 8.13-0.25 19.19 7.00 IMRglobal dd 2316 12.25 11.88 11.88-0.31 22.50 9.75 IPCHold 318 16.75 16.19 16.75+0.63 37.50 6.75 ISG Intl dd 569 13.88 10.44 13.31+0.19 43.50 13.00 ITC Dita dd 8779 16.60 14.00 14.13-2.00 5.13 1.13 ILearn dd 49 1.44 1.19 1.44+0.25 2.44 0. 38 TEQ Im dd 602 0.50 0.47 0.50+0.03 16.00 10.75 ITLA Cp 6 1363 15.00 13.75 14.00 124.75 16.38 ITXC Cp n dd 8766 21.69 19.60 20.00-1.06 25.00 1.56 iTurf n 1373 1.75 1.63 1.63-0.06 6.81 2.25 IVI Chck n dd 349 2.91 2.81 2.81-0.06 68.75 9.56AXL Entp dd 24188 10.88 9.00 9.56-1.31 12.50 6.44 ftiafts n 3576 11.38 9.75 11.19+1.13 94.25 13.00 iBasis n dd 5823 23.60 20.25 20.75-1.25 29.44 6.81 iBeamB n 6469 11.38 10.25 10.63+0.63 19.75 11.13 Iberiabank .64 3.7 11 27 17.19 17.13 17.13 135.00 28.31 IbisTech 2152 44.00 41.13 43.60+2.50 37.50 6.00 iCable n 582 10.50 9.56 .56-0.38 23.50 12.19 IconPLC 34 122 17.75 17.50 17.75+0.13 15.50 2.50 IdeaMall dd 121 4.00 3.44 3.94+0.16 26.13 2.00 iGoCorp n dd 334 3.00 2.75 2.75 15.50 6.75 kos 19 482 12.88 12.03 12.63+0.63 54.13 12.00 IlexOnco. dd 845 34.00 32.81 33.00-0.69 9.06 0.78 ilife.corn dd 112 1.88 1.75 178-009 48.2529.50 Illumine n 3362 47.25 39.88 44.75+41.76 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 10700 5.50 log cc 600 57.88 56.00 57.00 -40.00 36.81 39.75+1 13 7.38 2.75 ImagEn 20 759 4.13 3.88 4 13+0 19 45.00 3.97 ImageX dd 2206 4.63 4.19 4.47+025 40.06 6.63 iManage n dd 5515 11.50 10.50 11.00+0.38 4.94 1.03

319 / C11 Day

Imatm old 3312 2.50 2.38 250 29.41 17.00 Imax Cp 30 497 27.56 26.94 2731 +0 19 171.98 16.25 ImcIne 4321 98.63 95.25 9638+081 79.00 12.56 Immersn n dd 1759 17.25 16.06 17.13+0.75 34.88 10.56 immtech dd 130 21.25 20.63 21.25+075 16.88 3.25 Imucor 12 502 3.94 3.53 3.75+031 20.50 1.75 Imungn dd 4023 17.25 16.25 16.88+0A4 19.75 2.56 ImunAsp dd 3436 950 8.75 9.00+0.25 84.00 13.75 Imunex a cc 55340 51.13 48.56 50.25+1 63 41.13 1.00 Imunmd dd 4149 26.31 23.76 25.00+11.13 40.00 8.53 Impath s 17 1 49 36.88 3513 3594-0 13 52.88 9.98 ImpcoTch . 2111 24.25 21.94 24.06+206 6.50 1.63 ImpCrd dd 2117 2.00 1.88 200 9.00 2.56 Impreso n 19 28 3.69 3 56 3.56-0 19 20.00 1.31 ImpNNt n 96 2.00 194 1.94-0 06 46.50 8.88 ImpsatF 1988 16.06 15.50 15 50-0 3 4.25 1.69 InHome 5 137 3.34 3.25 3 31 52.25 24.06 Inamed n 2807 33.38 32.00 3269+0 14 11.00 0.50 IncaraPh dd 627 3.72 3.13 3.31 -0 0 289.06 16.44 Incyte dd 16848 84.38 80. 82.94+3 19 14.00 9.69 IndpCmty .28 2.1 14 1063 13.63 13.44 14.75 9.13 IndepHld .05 b 0.4 9 2 12.75 12.75 12 75 14.25 9.50 IndBkMA .40 2.9 13 227 14.00 13.50 13.81 +031 17.50 10.38 IndBkMI .60 3.8 16 147 16.38 15.63 1588-0.38 57.13 4.25 IndepEn 5519 6.31 5.94 6.23 + 0 2 37.63 3.88 IndepFncI .25 t 13 123 4.69 4.44 464-030 23.00 14.50 IndUtd .66 4.4 11 20 15.00 15M 15.00-0 12 9.00 2.56 IndigoNV dd 2119 6.94 6.44 6.81+0114 4.44 0.34 Indigo wt 71 1.88 1.75 1.75+0 19 7.13 1.03 IndvInv dd 377 1.88 1.63 1.63-0.19 13.63 4.75 IndusIntI dd 564 8.00 7.44 772+034 17.00 1.66 IndusMate dd 1529 3.56 3.28 3.50+003 19.00 10.00 IndsBc .76 16.3 9 50 12.13 12.00 12A+0 38 4.31 0.75 IndusHId dd 364 2.47 2.38 2.38+006 74.9825.06 InetTech 49 2398 40 63 38.75 40.38+2.38 8.63 1.00 Infinium dd 967 238 2.56 2 88+028 39.25 15.50 InfVista n - 149 34.00 32.63 33.38-0.48 138.50 9.25 InfoSpce s dd 216205 41.00 37.00 39.00+2.38 17.75 4.25 infoUSA 26 1008 6.50 5.75 6 19+038 7.13 Inferssing dd 108 21.88 21.25 21 50+025 37.38 3.69 Infocure dd 4236 4.44 3.88 3.98-027 48.00 13.06AInFocus 33 6108 49.44 45.25 48.38+288 2563 4.38 Infogrms dd 159 7.81 7.44 744-056 11.81 2.50 InfoNo n 1. 287 3.53 3.00 3.31 0 P8 110.88 22.50 Informat s old 2903 100+13 97.88 10000 28.94 0.69 InfoArch dd 5585 6.63 6.00 638+038 44.56 13.00 InfRscEng dd 1083 37.44 36.00 36 000 12.06 3.44 InfoRes dd 354 7.00 6.13 6.81 22.50 3.69 Informx 25 74759. 6.81 6.06 6.13-0 19 100.13 21.25 Inforte n . 449 37.50 35.50 35.94-1.56 375.00 48.75 Infosys a .04 a cc 2346162.00 149.06 15612+12.08 8.75 0.75 IngenCorp dd 415 1.75 1 47 1.72+0 13 13.75 8.13 InglMkt .66 6.7 10 65 10.00 9+50 9.88+038 70 75 13.25 InhaleTh s dd 4785 50.63 49.00 50.50+0 14 241.50 46.88 Inktomi a dd 28163 131.00 12400 130.38 +4.38 9.94 2. Innerdyn 53 479 6.50 6.31 6.38 . 16.75 5.13 Innodata s 35 223 10.31 10.06 10.19 +0 On 18.50 4.00 Innotrac 716 5.50 5.00 5.25+025 2.75 0.50 InovGme 47 0.69 0.66 M9 14.50 10.63-InmvSoi n 1014 14.88 14+25 14.38 8.00 3.19 Innoveda n 1055 4.06 3.94 400-033 15.00 7.13AInnovex dd 815 15.26 14.06 18.00 + 0 38 20.00 3.44 Inprise dd 2036 5.88 5.75 5.84+0 13 35.69 1.13 InsWeb n dd 1363 2+41 2.06 2.19+0 13 33.88 12.00 InsghtCo n dd 2290 18.00 16.38 17.81+106 74.3822.75 Insight 3012873 52.73 45.75 50.26+4.69 2T81 4.00 InsgBol n c1d 337 6.88 6.13 25.50 6.75 inSilicn It 744 20.38 19.00 20.38+0.88 38.00 20.38 InsitTc 26 513 30.75 30.06 30.69+025 19.94 10.25 Insmed 1641 19.50 18.50 19.44-006 11.13 2.00 Inspire dd 975 2.59 2.25 2.50 + 0 u9 19.00 13.50 InspPhar n 1278 18.00 15.94 17.50 - 0 50 24.63 11.75 InsAut 12 3836 17.25 15.13 16.50-6M 6.88 1.13 InsrMngt dd 93 1.63 1.56 1.63 + 0 06 6 38 1.19 Integ dc247 138 1.28 1.38-006 21.88 16.25 Integral. 804.4 14 100 19.38 19.19 1925+006 20.00 5.38 ItgLfSci dd 343 14.81 14.13 14.63+0.38 4.75 2.31.IntegMed 113 2.88 2.00 2.25-063 56.00 13.00 Integral 28

Day C11 / 320

157 15.25 14.44 15.13 +038 5.69 1.03 IntegraIVs dd 643 1.56 1.38 156+025 10.19 7.63 IntgBus n 185 9.00 8.81 8.88+0 3 26.50 g.WIntgCirc n 2961 28.38 24.25 27.50+3.25 80.00 15.06AIntgDv 49 76183 90.38 77.88 87.75+10.50 28.00 4.75 Integirif n 433 6.98 1.12 1.02-1.98 24.31 9.75 IMSC 19 230 1.00 17.9 1 7 8 . 0.13 41.81 5.47 ISSA cc 7766 29.00 27.38 29.38+156 28.19 118.2 IntliTlem n 10511 31.44 26.63 31.44+4.06 75.81 32.50 Intel s .08 0.1 66 262339 75.63 73.63 7.18 + 1 38 6.50 1.50 Intelefilm dd 41 1.88 1.75 1.75-0 13 22.50 1.09 InteliDta 11 1794 7.30 6.50 694+006 16.59 1.44 Intelligr a dd 801 2.34 2.22 231 -0.03 9.44 5.88 IntParfu a 16 72 7.38 6.88 7.25 46.38 12.00 InterTel .04 0.3 dd 1812 15.88 14.81 15.31+069 22.13 12+02 IntrWBc .56 4.2 19 65 13.69 13.25 1325-0.14 45.25 9.00 IntactCm n c1d 1356 10.88 10.25 1038-0.44 54.50 18+50 IntactInt n dd 146 44.88 44.00 44.31-063 68.25 6.75 IntactIm n 81 7.38 7.25 7.25 - 32.03 12.50 InterCept 49 95 24.00 22.69 23.25-069 9.13 2.88 InterlDnt 14 1668 4.25 4.06 4.06-0 19 82.00 488 Interflig cc 2928 18.13 17+31 1788+038 16.25 5.00 Interep. n dd 16 6.75 6+38 6.38+0.63 9.06 3.06 Intrface .18 2.6 37 2522 7.06 6.75 6.94-006 82.00 5.94 Interface dd 700 16.75 15.69 16.25-038 9.00 3.19 Intgph dd 1747 6.06 5.88 6.00 24.00 10.88 Intergrp 2 13 20.50 19.88 19.88+0 13 12.00 6.56. Interland n 6279 7.75 6.44 6.88-044 55.50 9.25 Intdiant dd 2335 13.25 12.50 13.25+069 69.13 4.50 IntednkE s cc 2238 27.50 25.88 2SM-11.25 5.69 2.00 Interlinct dd 155 419 4.00 4 19+0 19 31.63 9.50 Interlogix dd 112 15.38 13.00 15.38+1.88 77.38 14.75 IntmdCm dd 9574 21.63 20.38 20.75-0 13 14.50 4.56 IntmetC .16 2.1 7 1089 9.63 6.25 7.75-1.66 47.88 11.00 IntrMune n 1614 38.38 37.88 38.06 +019 111.00 19.50 IntrNAP a dd 456N 36.30 33.13 36.00+3.00 7.25 4.56 IntlAir 9 46 5.81 5.56 5.63-O.D6 39.00 29.38 IntlBcsh s 1.00 13.3 8 123 31.94 30 +69 30.69-100 38.25 4.50 IntFibcm 76 3061114 25.38 23.00 23.63+11.00 71.13 30.13 IntlSpdw .06 a 0.2 41 492 34.13 33.13 n-88 4 30.00 2.94 IntntAm dd 494 4.13 3.75 3.75 R.00 23 13 IntmtCap a 7451672 37.75 34.00 34.88-1.13 50.00 5.63InvintmtGold 1463 5.88 5.38 5.440.19 132.81 28.60 Itmadnltv 1503 40.63 35.00 36.00-2.06 46.25 6.25 IntnelPict dd 6733 8.11 7.09 7.81+038 141.00 22.50 IntntSec cc 5043 82.00 79.50 81.00+175 72.25 12.25 Intmt.cm dd 2798 32.19 30.00 31.50+11.63 8.75 1.13 Interneur 10 661 2.38 2.25 2.28-0.03 49.00 12.50 Intphse 30 1414 21.38 18.19 20.63+1 - .88 4.69 1.56 Interplay dd 626 3.78 3.50 3.63 - 14.25 4.94 Intpore dd 570 8.44 8.13 8.19-0 19 95.2524.63 Intersill It 13500 56.63 48.50 54.00+4.88 39.94 10.00 Intspeed n dd 2917 11.75 11.00 1144+050 7.75 4.69 IntstNDS 11 148 5.50 5.44 5.44 . 99.75 12.75 InttrstT a did 7664 16.44 15.94 16.06-031 38.75 5.63 IntVcBr del 10438 12.69 10.98 12.44+1.75 75.00 7.69 IntrWave n did 4913 12.13 10+69 11.31+019 93.50 10.00 InterWorld dd SM 21.69 19.38 20.13 + 1.00 100.00 18.38 Intnmm a dd 11354 99.75 94.50 96.00-006 26.25 6.50 IntestCorp 11 300 10.75 10+63 1 OM + 0.6 8.50 2.13 Intevac. n dd 90 5.84 5+25 5.25-025 33.00 5.50 IntrBiot n 210 22.38 20.94 21.00-1.38 55.50 7.50 IntnetSol cc 2236 45.63 44.00 4531+0.19 99.00 5.25 Intrawre dd 71323 11.19 9.81 1050+0.13 31.60 4.50 Intmn.cm 11 2633 15.00 13.41 14.88+1.75 90.00 22M Intuit a 42 32844 60.00 56.06 59.88+2.00 19.06 7.98 IntSurg n 427 15.25 14.00 14.50-050 57.19 15.63AInvFnSv s .06 f 0.1 67 1879 61.75 55.69 61.66+4.118 9.38 3.31 InVision dd 289 4.25 4.06 4.06-0 13 99.5023.25 Invitrogn cc 16MI 64.13 60.13 63.113+113 14.00 8.00 Invivo 11 44 11.88 11.00 11M . 44.00 2.00 lonNet n dd 6284 4.09 3+63 3.75-022 102.00 12.13 IonaTch oc 5176 85.38 76.91 83.31+5.69 28.50 2.50 Print n 525 3.56 3.44 3.50+0 Or. 1288 5.88 IpswichBc .40 4.3 783 9.38 9.38 9.38-006 18.50 3.63 Index 25 361 9+38 9.00 9.19+013 33.00

321 / C11 Day

13.38 IroquoisB .48 1.5 19 5 32.69 32+69 32.69-0 19 24.38 13.44 .24 1.6 9 146 15.13 14.75 14.81+006 6.50 3.38 dd 1 4.25 4.25 4.25+0 13 39.00 3.88 Isis dd 3687 13.19 12.69 1106 +0 25 17.75 9.00 IsleCapri 13 3633 16.75 14.69 15.63+0.88 6.97 1.95 Isolyser 43 722 2.63 2.31 2.56 12.13 10.26AIstaPh n 1780 13.81 11.69 13.19 + 1.44 11938 47.50 ItoYokad .31 a 0.6 36 265 51.00 49.00 50 00 8.75 3.98 Itron dd 127 6.00 5.75 6.00 + 0.25 42.50 5.63 IVillage dd 1756 7.06 6.63 6.69-0.38 45.38 1.50 IxysCp a cc 1184 41.13 39.75 4025 J 22.75 12.50 AJDSn 10 540 14.13 13.13 14.13+088 49.88 10.25 JD Edwr 16142 25.17 23.81 24.81+0.88 29.63 8.50 JDASoft 46 5729 13.50 12.88 12.94 038 153.38 25.98 JDS Uni a dd 180510 125.25 118.25 124.48+6.48 8.19 2.50 JLM Ind n dd 37 4.19 2.88 3.94+0 19 1114.75 20.00 JNI Corp n cc 3286 68.19 63.38 67.13+2.94 14.94 4.09 JPMCo n dd 190 6.38 5.38 6.38+0.97 5.75 2.31 JPS Ind 10 171 5.06 4.94 506+006 5.00 2.25 JPS Pck dd 40 3.25 3.25 325 37.38 7.44 Jacada n 1818 10.38 9.06 9.94+0.81 12.31 JksnvilBc.50 3.7 8 46 13.63 13.50 13.63+0 13 20.88 1.63 JacoElec s 17 1273 19.00 17.75 18.27+020 8.19 4.00 Jacbsn 7 17 4.88 4.69 4.75 - 0 25 16.50 8.60 JacrCm wl 263 12.50 11.38 11.38106 -38 13.25 JkksPac a 11 1711 18.19 17.38 17.75-0.06 9.25 6.31 James .98 13.3 26 183 7.50 7 38 7.38-0 13 8.06 2.50 JawsTch n 1648 2.66 2.50 2.50 - 0 06 137.01) 21.00 Jazztel n 3400 31.38 28A3 30.88+2.50 3.75 9.63 JeffSvg .28 2.6 9 29 10.88 10.56 10.88+0 13 3 25 3.00 JetForm -6.08 4.69 4.44 4.50-0 19 8.63 1.00 Jfax.com dd 2277 1+63 1.44 144-0.09 17.69 2.91 JlGrp did 860 9.50 8.81 9.25 -0 25 22.75 1.44 Jmar dd 4508 10.38 9.50 10.13+0.13 9.75 5.75 JohnsnOut did 708 7.31 5.75 675-038 53.00 15.98 JonesPh s .08 0.2 36 22743 41.88 35.38 35.76-4.94 1319 450 JoreCorp n 125 5.25 5.00 5 13 - b 13 625 225 JosBank 8 182 4.50 4.03 403-02.344 075 Judge.com 6 71 1.33 1.28 1+33 +0 08 211.56 28 25-JnprNtw cc 50509 214.38 206.25 213.75 +9.88 87.00 450 JunoOnl dd 7382 6.69 6.25 6.25 + 0 13 47.38 16.63 JuptrCm n cc 372 23.94 23.00 23.81 38.13 10.00 KSwiss .06 0+3 8 258 22.56 22.38 22 50+0.06 K 11.75 0.75 K-tel dd 1824 2.00 1.63 1.75+025 98.50 29.88 KLA Tnc s 49 32632 66.94 6438 65.63+U 44 92.2524.25 KPNOst It 1235 33.56 32.13 33.19+3.69 17.94 12.50 KTrw 7 6 17.60 17.00 17.00-0 13 10.25 2.03 KVHInd dd 277 6.94 5.81 6.94 +1.00 19+38 10.50 KajsVent 5 7 12.69 12.00 12.69 15.63 8.77 Kaman .44 3.4 11 1370 14.38 12.88 13.13-0.94 175.50 22.75 KanaCm s dd 35735 40.63 37.75 40.13+1.50 11.88 5.00 KayeGrp .10 1.3 8 8 7.50 T50 750—038 6.88 3.06 KeithCo 7 3 4.50 4.31 4.50+0 19 1 35.88 Keistrm n 7 1065 5.25 5.13 5.13-006 30.75 22.06 KellySA 1.00 4.3 10 267 23.25 22.75 23.13 - 0 CW 14.50 5.38 Kandla 37 233 8.72 8.16 8Z3+0 34 11.25 4.25 KndyWll 11 623 6.81 6.56 663-0.19 22.13 8.50 KenseyN 22 200 13.06 12.56 1288+025 4.75 1.63 KntckyEl 10 11 2.00 2.00 2A + 0 19 16.44 2.19 KeraVis dd 1580 3.88 3.69 3.75 . 13.38 9.50-KeryxBlo It . 3878 14.50 10.94 13.88+106 15.50 9.25 Ke-Sc 2.7 9 129 10.98 10.50 10.50 11.19 5.19 Keylech 12 53 8.69 8.63 8.69+006 4.94 2.38 KeyTrn dd 761 5.25 4.50 4.94+050 177.00 17.25 Keynote n dd 8347 31.38 28.75 30.25+025 15.UU 4.75 KeysAuto 14 449 5.75 5. 0 06 27.38 14.06 KeystnFn 1.16 5.0 25 2398 23.06 22.63 23.00+0.25 18.25 3.88 ktorce.com - dd 508 4.63 4 13 4.56+006 20.50 10.75 Kimballint .64 3.8 14 1454 17.13 16.56 17.00+044 10.13 425 Kinnard 12 804 8.94 8.69 8.75-0.13 7.26 2.25 Kirin 3 201 2.50 225 2.47 1463 9.75 Klamath .52 4.3 10 35 12.25 12.00 12M - 0 13 60+06 21.69 KnqhtTrd 15 28112 32.13 30.75 31.38-075 19.75 10.75 KnightTr 15 12 17.22 16.88 17.00-

Day C11 / 322

025 24.25 11.50 KnightT 2.44 1094 24.00 23.25 24.00+0.25 Continued on Next Page NASDAQ SMALL CAPITALIZATION 500 MOST ACTIVE BY DOLLAR VOLUME/THURSDAY, AUGUST 31. 2000 Stock Last Chg ACS Elc 12.13 +11.13 AberDmnd 8.13 - .28 AccessWw 1.63 + .13 Acclaim 1.88 AcmHold 2.63 .38 AcresGm 1.75 .09 ActTele 5.75 .19 ActApp 4.88 + .38 Adatorn 1.16 + .09 AdvESP 3.63 + .94 AdvErw 1.53 - .13 AdvtRst n .66 AffTech .78 - .03 -Agrtope n 5.44 AlancoTch 1.78 - .09 Alkerm pf 154.00 +32.60 AlliGarn 2.50 - .13 AdDevic 3.44 + .13 AJphHsp 1.63 Alpnet 2.31 AmerAcc 5.97 - .03 AmBiogn n 1.69 + .09 AmChmp 1.00 - ut. AmerTch 5.00 + .44 Amplidy 3.03 .16 Amtech 21.56 .84 AngloAmr 56.75 +1.17 Antenna 2.63 - .13 ApcheM 1.00 + .03 Apco 23.50 .50 AquisCom .56 06 Aristotle 5.60 88 ArkBst pf 44.00 + 25 Armen 5.19 - .06 AtTrack 1.44 + .13 AtlTech 3.22 - .03 AtornicElur .63 - .06 Attorneys 1.91 + .11 audhghwy 1.13 - .06 AvadoBrd 1.47 + .03 AvaxTch 9.81 + 75 Axonyx n 10.38 + 19 AztecTc 1.56 + 03 b2bstors n 2.00 BAB Hid 4.13 + BOE Fncl 11.31 BOSLtd 7.78 - 1i BVR 8.00 Bary-SIR 2.38 - .13 BarPoint n 3.56 + .03 Stock Last Chq BelBcp 2.88 BwgHid 2.00 BerkshEn 30.81 - .94 BikeDrm n .47 BioPlex 2.25 - .41 Bioject 8.50 - .06 BbLase 2.28 + .16 Biomune .56 + .03 BioShld n 11.50 Bluefly 3.19 BmdEm 1.47 + .13 B tCp 8.38 - .38 BrazilFst 3.25 + .56 BrdgTch n 7.63 + .26 CPI Aero 3.60 - .06 CSK 26.69 -3.31 CT Hold n 1.94 + .13 CTN Mda 7.03 - .03 Calypte 3.50 + .44 GanSoPt 6.06 - .06 CwtbrPk 8.00 CapEnvr 3.00 CapsuleCm 1.25 - .19 Cardima 1.09 + . 03 CardFnc 5.25 + .13 CaroSthn 12.63 +11.50 Castelle 1.25 CaviwT n 4.66 - .06 CecoEnv 2.25 CnPacMin 4.69 + .03 Cheminfl n 1.50 + .09 ChenEnr .94 + .03 CtiPizza 2.63 - .09 Citinalles 5.91 +11.06 Choicetel n 3.50 - .19 ChromIn n 5.50 + .25 ChromCS 1.81 + .06 CitzFnCp 13.50 + .50 CityBk 28.63 Clummet 4.16 - .22 clickNsttle 3.13 - .06 CodaMus. 3.81 + .06 ColCmc. 4.69 - .19 CmnwlB 6.50 - .25 Comintell 3.38 + .06 CmBcNJ 14.50 - 50 CmpWell .72 + .22 Compostch .41 - .09 Cptconc .88 Conductu 19.39 - .61 Stock Last Chg Conolog n 1.50 ContlInfo .75 Comednet .94 + .06 CovlGrp 3.34 + .09 GoverAll .53 - .03 CrtHstSv n 7.00 CredoPt 5.88 + .25 CryoCell 4.69 + .13 CurtisInt 1.31 CyprBio 1.84 + .03 DF Chma n 1.69 + .56 DISC 3.88 - .63 DTM Cp 5.69 - .44 DallsGld 8.00 Datakey 8.88 - .56 DaughRs 2.56 - 13 DBeer 27.75 + .44 Dectron 3.50 + .50 Dltdt 5.75 + .22 Denali 1.25 DntlMed .94 DstFear 5.25 DeSys a 9.06 + .06 DialCpA 1.00 + .13 DigtlVid 7.44 + .19 DiscGph n 2.38 34 DiscvLabs 5.75 + .38 Dimnt g 9.06 + .31 DblEgI 5.44 + .06 DrugMx n 7.50 + .25 DtchFrk n 13.06 + .06 DynOil 1.38 + .03 DyntrCp 1.34 - .03 E-Cruitr n 3.81 + .25 E-Sync n 4.13 .13 EA Eng h .88 .13 eGarnes 1.41 + .19 EPL Tch 1.00 + .03 eUnivrse n 5.00 + .44 EaglSup n 3.94 - .06 eB2B Cm n 3.94 ebix.corn 4.56 + .19 EduVdeo 14.38 + .31 800 Travel 1.75 - .06 eLecCorn 2.16 + .22 ElClear 1.78 - .03 Elcts.rc 5.25 + .50 ElmrSv 19.50 - .13 EltekLtd 5.69 + .19 Emerginf 2.44 + .06 EngCrw wil 11.13 + .88 Stock Last Chg EnerSrch 5.69 + .06 EnlghtS 1.94 Entropin n 8.63 + .81 Entrpin wt 2.94 + .19 EnvrTch 14.98 1.94 EnvoyCm n 8.59 .16 Equitex 6.50 .06 EquusG n 1.38 + .25 eRoomSy n 5.94 + .06 Esenjay 3.50 + .13 EshedR 5.81 Eufaula 8.25 EuroSrv 8.50 + .50 Euroweb 3.63 - .13 Exigent 2.34 - .41 ExpTell n 9.63 + .19 Explor 3.13

323 / C11 Day

FarmCB 36.13 + . 25 Fauquier n 17.00 -11.25 FdScrw 38.38 - .13 SFAveChan .41 -1 FilmRm 1.06 + .16 Finet.com .56 FingerLks 6.88 - .13 FFdMN 7.50 FtIndp 10.13 + FstNiles a 10.13 + 50 FstPrpor 1.72 - .16 FrstWB 9.25 + .13 FstU 35.25 + .50 FocusEn 1.63 - .09 Fonar 2.50 - .03 FoodTch 3.25 - .31 Fortel 1.69 + .09 Forward 1.13 + .03 FrisBay 3.25 + .25 FuelTch 2.25 FujiPh 35.75 -1.13 Ftrmdia 1.00 - .03 GenBear 5.81 + .00 Gauss 1.97 + .09 GlblCap 6.88 GoldFLtd 3.63 + .06 Goldlsl 6.75 + .25 GmdToy 2.59 + .03 GreystDg n 5.50 - .13 GrowBiz 4.31 + .31 Gyrody 13.00 + .44 HMG Wd 3.13 - .13 Hansen 5.13 + .06 He 7.50 - .38 Stock Last Chg Hawks 7.25 + .50 HlthGrds 1.06 + .03 HvnlyDoor .50 + .03 HenlyH 1.06 - .03 HrtgBVA 5.63 - .06 HerzfIdC 4.75 - .25 HiRise .78 + .03 HmStkOG 11.50 + .06 HrnecmC .75 - .06 HrneSkrs n 2.69 + .03 Ho IC pf 41.00 + .38 Howtek 1.75 + .13 Hyprtnsn 8.88 Hyprtn wt 2.00 Hdeldvl 13.31 - .50 I-Link 3.50 - .03 IBS Intact 3.94 - .06 ID Bic 7.56 - .06 ID Sys 5.25 - .25 iEntertain 1.91 IFS Intl n 2.94 - .13 IFX Cp 8.69 + 1.41 I-Flow 3.25 - .03 US 6.19 - .19 ImaginOn .81 - .03 ImpaxLab 5.81 - .06 IncrnAG n 2.09 + .78 IndSrvAm 2.50 InfiniteGp 4.19 + .06 Infinity 9.50 +1.56 InfoIntA n 4.00 + .41 Infonau 3.25 - .13 InfuTech 5.13 +11.00 Inkine n 9.50 +1.41 InnoMed 2.91 - .16 Innovo h 1.25 - .13 Insci-state 2.81 - .19 InSghtH 8.13 + .13 Insignia 7.25 - .75 Intasys 2.56 + .06 IntegSrg .84 + .02 Integrity 3.38 Intelect 1.91 Intelli 1.38 Interiors .38 Interleuk 4.56 + .44 IntlAsst 5.88 IntlElec 2.25 + .06 Inflisotp 3.63 - .06 Stock Last Chg ItmetCm 15.38 +1.25 Internt 1.00 + .06 IntwstHM 5.13 - .38 Intmet 2.00 + .09 Irvine 3.16 - .09 Isornet 17.50 +2.75 Isonics n 3.50 + .13 Ivanhoe n 4.19 + .06 JB Oxfrd 4.53 + .25 J2 Com. 13.63 JadeFncl n 12.00 JunipGrp .78 + .06 JunoLght 5.44 + .19 K2Desgn n 5.09 - .03 KnCtyl- 33.38 + .19 LIAL Pay 8.00 .06 LeslieFy n 3.56 - .06 Lifschlt 14.75 - .06 Littlefield 2.19 + .25 LundnOil 2.75 + .09 M-Wave 12.98 + .94 MDI Ent n 2.28 - .13 MTR Garn 8.47 + .47 Macatw. n 11.13 - .13 MagelPt 1.16 Manatron 5.25 + li Margate 5.13 MktSpec n 1.75 Mathsft 2.25 .09 MaxInet n 3.56 .06 maysj 9.00 +11.60 McGlenlG 1.22 + .03 MedDsg 15.50 + .63 MdEmrn 1.75 + . Me mi + .10 MedCr. 50 - 9 Medcom 1.91 + .16 MediJect 5.13 + .13 MedCtd 6.00 - .13 MedisTc n 19.56 +2.81 Mediwre 7.00 + .31 MetalMgt .59 Metalcid 3.16 1.1 MetrBcp 6.25 .44 Micront 9.63 + .38 44 MrchDnt 2.31 + .31 Mortind 4.06 MountPr .34 - .03 MultiLnk n 8.25 - .19 Stock Last Chg MultimdG 4.50 Mltmd KJD 1.25 - .25 MuseTch 2.06 - .06 MyTurn n 10.63 + .44 NCS Hit .31 NESCO 3.91 - .06 NtlBnksh 16.50 NeoMdia 4.44 - .38 Neoware 3.69 + .69 NetCurmts 2.00 + .16 NetLojix 2.41 .03 NetNatn n 4.00 .13 Netplex 1.31 + .06 Netsmrt 3.50 - .13 NetSlInt n 26.00 + .50 NetWolv n 10.25 + .63 NtwkCn 2.19 + .06 NetwSys n 2.75 + .31 Network 1 6.88 NetwNrth 6.50 + .38 NeurbioT n 8.38 + .56 NewFmt 6.19 + .44 NewTel 9.31 + .94 Nexilled n 14.81 +1.81 NexusTl 2.44 + .19 Nhnemnt 14.25 + .25 Nissan 9.88 - .13 NogaElc 1.63 + .19 Norsatintl 7.47 + .34 NorSys 9.00 - .31 NAmTech 2.38 - .09 NthnStat 20.25 + .25 NotifyTch 4.00 - .38 NuWveT 2.00 .13 NyerMd 4.25 - .13 NymoxP n 3.81 .06 ObjSoft 1.16 OlyCasc 7.25 - .25 OmnjsTc n 7.06 - .69 OneidaFn 11.00 - .25 onlinetrd n 5.25 + .25 Ontro 1.94 + .06 Optlcm 8.38 + .63 OryxTc 1.44 - .06 PCC Gp 1.75 + .13 PacerTech .98 + .08 PacMagt n 3.25 + .63 PacHith 2.19 - .06 PalmrM 2.91 - .16 Stock Last Chg PanRoyl 12.00 PwaMed 4.69 - .13 PardMsc .94 - .13 PerncoAvi 12.26 -1.00 PennOct 7.13 PntaStar n 23.38 - .25 PplFnMS n 19.25 +

Day C11 / 324

.25 Perfdta 4.00 + .56 Perfcnt 13.25 + .25 PerleSys 2.75 + .22 Per.Fix 1.63 PtHel vtg 12.00 + .50 PtHel nv 11.06 - .69 Pharmos. 4.16 + .16 Photogen n 5.94 - .06 PhotMdx n 13.00 + .25 PionrCos 3.81 - .06 PlPolyT n 2.56 + .19 PollumRs 1.84 + Z Polydex 6.69 - .16 PooreBr 2.50 - .22 PopMail n S8 + .06 PrecisSm n 2.75 - .19 PrcAuto 1.50 + .56 Prcuptup 12.50 .06 ProfFms 1.31 Proflech 3.25 PrtSrce n 5.98 PulaskjBcp 9.50 Q Med 8.00 Qlsound 1.63 + .16 QuadCty 13.13 + .19 Quadrmd 1.69 - .06 Quirros 6.50 RF Inds 6.31 - .56 RacingCh 1.47 - .03 Ramtrn 14.88 RandCap 3+13 + .06 RankGrp 5.00 RegMgic 1.16 - .03 RepFBcp 4.44 - .19 Rexam 3.75 Robocrn 1.81 + .06 RuralMet 2.00 SafTLok 1.03 - .03 SafeSci 2.75 - .03 Saffink 2.19 + .06 SBarbRest .91 .03 Santos 13.25 .06 Sanyo 43.63 + .84 Stock Last Chg Sasol 8.02 + .23 SedonaCp 2.50 Senetek 1.75 + .03 SensarCp 22.63 .56 SenseTch n 14.75 .98 Sensytch 5.19 + .69 SentoCp 3.44 - .13 SigaTech 3.50 + .50 SilcLtd 8.00 + +50 SilvStd 9 1.28 D3 SimCent 2.75 - .13 SimPlayer 4.38 + .13 SmarTire 3.00 + .19 Smtek 4.50 + .16 Somaptc 3.25 .31 SrceCap 4.88 .13 SrcngLnk n 5.56 + .44 SouAla 10.00 + .25 SsdeBcMo 9.88 SpatiaLt n 2.38 StakeTc 1.38 + .13 Stant-ee n 10.00 StkhsePart 4.75 - .25 StratusS n 6.50 + .44 Sunhawk n 15.75 + .38 SupG 10.63 -3.63 SurgeCm 4.31 - .19 Surrey 1.31 + .13 SymboIn 5.00 + .38 Synagro 2.88 .13 SynergyB 1.19 TVG Tch 2.53 + .06 TeamStff 3.09 + .09 Techdone 2.78 - .19 TechRsh 3.19 + .06 TechSys 8.75 Tekinsight 2.63 + .06 TelefMex a 2.63 + .06 Tinetics n 2.38 - .38 Teltron 2.75 + .19 Texoil 8.13 - .44 Thrmogn 2.56 + .19 Thinkpath 2.28 TitarMot n .34 - .03 Toplmge 6.94 + .06 TchApld 1.38 + .13 Tmscnd 4.00 6 Tmsmat 3.00 - .1 TmsmAsia 1.88 TrvlNow n 11.00 + .13 TrmtAdv a 9.13 - .13 Stock Last Chg Tricord 14.00 + .75 Trimark 9.31 + 03 TriBio 2.81 + .09 TripPNV 1.38 Tristar 5.75 - US ESys n 4.88 - .13 US ES wt 1.50 - .25 USHmGrd 2.31 - .06 US Labs 4.38 + .25 US Lbs wt 1.44 + .50 US OfcP h .44 + .03 USPhys 1 US Chhd 1 1 +6.1 USA Bio 1.94 - +13 UHrtg 2.38 + .06 USecBsh n 30.00 +2.25 UtdShip 6.63 + .56 UnivAuto 2.69 + UnvDisp n 24.88 +3.06 UniView 3.25 - .03 Uromed 1.94 - .03 VOneCp 2.88 Vasomed 450 + .56 VCampus 7.25 + .38 Velcro 11.38 + .13 VTTeddy 3.63 + .25 VstinGrp n 7.69 + .44 VidaMd n 2.63 - .09 VideoNetw 2.25 + .19 Vids 1.16 + .28 ViewCast 3.06 - .13 VaCmwFn 20.69 +1.19 VirgGas 3.69 + .19 VirtlCom 1.25 + .06 Wacoal 44.00 +1.94 WayneBcp 15.81 - .94 WebFncl n 3.59 + .06 Wegenr 2.53 + .16 WstnPwr 5.38 + .19 WdeCm 3.88 - .38 WidePoint .63 + .03 WillmVV 1.91 + .22 WldAir n 69 - .13 VVwE&Sp n .88 - .09 WyantCp 3.88 - .06 XATA n 4.50 - .75 Zapwodd n 5.38 + .19 Zeroplus 2.19

325 / C12 Day

C12 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg Continued From Preceding Page 21.00 2.88 Knot n 123 3.50 3. 5 1 1 7 88 1 0.50 Kola a 16 194 14.63 13 14. +.13 Kornap dd 13851 2.75 2.31 2.69 +49.88 6.25 Kopin a cc 16034 34.00 32.50 33.44 82.00 7.25 KoreaThr n . 11977 8.98 750 844+100 22.13 4.38 Kos Phr old 521 14.25 13.75 14.00-0.19 20.38 9.13 Koss 10 4 19.75 19.75 19.75 94.00 29.00 KrspKrm n 1074 93.75 88.75 93.00+3.44 27.75 4.38 KrolIoGar old 1201 5.13 4.94 5.13 80.00 21.00 Krows 27 195 37.88 37.00 37.38-0.25 43.63 9.63 Kulicke s 16 13963 19.13 18.00 18.19-0.50 9.00 1.22 Lk dd 346 1.66 1.63 1.63 L 763 2.31 LCA Via 26 947 3.09 3.00 3.06-0.03 4550 5.44 LCC Intl 31 1280 24.00 21.75 21.94-0.63 800 2.00 LJ Intl 5 454 3.50 3.13 3.44+0.22 2.50 0.69 U Intl wt 85 1.19 1.00 1.19+0.19 4.38 2.00 LMI Aer dc 97 2.56 2.50 2.50 25.63 18.00 LNB Bnc n 100 14.9 9 18 20.50 19.63 20.50 19.25 11.88 LSB INC .56 4.3 12 27 12.94 12.00 12.94+1.06 17.25 11.00 LSB Fn .36 2.8 8 2 12.88 12.88 12.88-0.13 2550 12.50 LSI Inds .32 a 1.6 12 x96 20.25 19.63 19.88+0.38 52.25 11.63 LTX .1. 1528631 26.94 24.13 25.56+1.63 1925 11.63 LVMH s .13eO.8 554 15.88 15.25 15.63-0.02 12.25 0.22 LaJollPh dc 423 6.75 6.63 6.75+0.13 725 3.69 LaCrose .13 3.5 dd 28 3.88 3.75 3.75-0.03 10.38 4.00 LabOne .72 8.9 47 701 8.25 7.00 8.06+1.69 12.75 5.56 Ladish 12 1186 12.63 12.13 2.50 + 0.06 12.00 9+00 LakeldB n 30 2.6 141 11.63 1 1.50 1.63+0.13 1825 11.25 LakeFnc .52 3.7 16 14.00 14.00 14.00+0.19 7.50 228 Lakelnd 6 109 6.50 6.50 6.50+0.25 1 IM 6.63 LksGarn 4 255 9.13 8.94 8.94-0.06 56.81 18.00 LamRsch s 20 34443 30.63 29.56 30.13+0+75 70.25 36.50 dc 1565 47.00 46.13 46.44+0.06 11.75 7.19 LarmarCap .20 2.5 9 5 8.00 8.00 8.00-0.13 6.25 0. LanVision dc 5 1.25 1.25 1.25+0.13 37.00 18.50 LarcastrC .64 2.8 9 2684 23.63 22.69 23.06-0.25 13.44 8.88 Lance .64 6.9 11 153 9.50 9.25 9.31-0.16 21.75 2.25.Lndcorp n 919 2.50 2.09 2.38+0.08 6.25 3.25 Landair 2 4.81 4.81 4.81 8.81 4.00 Landec -dd 437 5.94 4.88 5.94+1.19 21.50 13.25 LandBnc .60 3.2 10 38 18.50 18.13 18.50 11.19 3.25 LndmrkS 40 294 4.06 3.94 4.00 69.75 32.75 Landstr 11 294 52.56 50.50 51.00 - 43.75 3.38 Lanopti 527 17.06 5.84 6.75-0+ 13 8750 8.75 LanteCp n 3035 10.25 9.13 9.38+0+44 1238 6.56 Lantronx n 2441 10.81 100 0.19-0.38 28.75 19+00 LrgSCale n 34 32.75 27.94 30.91+2.78 1150 1.69 Lxscom dd 445 9.38 8.50 8.88-0+25 14 94 2.28 LasPMd 5 328 3.50 3.13 3.50 13.50 1.09 LasrPwr dc 166 5.94 5.63 5.69-0.16 18.31 1.34 LsrSght dc 678 163 3.44 3.50+0.06 2556 3.88 13 2056 6.16 5.81 6.16+0.22 4.00 0.63 Lasrscp dd 327 2.09 1.94 1.94-0+06 5050 1.13 Lason dd 714 2.50 2.34 2.38+0.03 46.50 8.75 Lastmin n 39 12.81 12.50 12.81+0.56 36.13 4.56 LatCom 22 4073 9.75 8.50 8.97+0+53 93.38 27.25 a 35 16438 79.00 72.25 77.88+5.81 2T50 5.00 Fa OM dd 273 7.56 7.06 7.56+0.25 8.94 6.63 LawrSB .28 3.3 12 46 8.63 8.50 8.56-0.19 26 00 20.50 Lawsn .60 2.4 10 94 25.50 24.25 2525+0.75 1238 3.56 Layne - dc 35 4.50 4.38 4.50+0.19 22 00 9.38 LeCroy n 15.50 14.98 15.13+0.06 11050 14.56 LeapWr dd 1554 81.25 77.50 79.38-0.75 9.75 2.09 Leapnet dd 3937 3.25 2.69 3.13+0.41 9.50 1.59 Learn2cm dc 4873 2.63 2.41 2.50+0. 9 65.53 12.25 LrnTree 45 4624 70.00 65.00 68.44+6.44 5.00 1.19 Led dd 15 2.72 2.69 2.69+0+06 11.50 8.50 LeftFdl .60 4.9 - 40 12.25 11.75 12.25 + 82.50 8.13 Legato dd 20450 13.38 11.94 12.13-1.13 15.75 0.81 LeisTim old 23 1.44 1.38 1.38+0.09 1650 0.94 LeisurpInt

Day C12 / 326

dd 488 1.63 1.38 1.63+0.31 18.88 15.38 Leitchl gn 40 17.38 1738 17.38 2100 4.75 LndTree n 645 5.13 4.94 4.94-0.13 7250 15.38 LerHaus s cc 7987 30.00 28.75 29.19-0+56 18.38 12.88 Lesco .15f 0.9 11 271 17.63 17.56 17.56+0.06 132.25 49.88 LeveM dd 39554 87.75 84.13 87.23+3.48 49.13 10.63 Level8 1001 22.38 20.00 20.00-2.00 14.50 7.7S LeurMd n 5810 IS.50 13.38 115.22+11.66 31.44 18.75 Lexent n 3900 37.81 25.50 33.56+7.50 49.25 8.00 LexGnt n 4430 33.50 30.38 33.25+2.63 148.50 10.63 LibteTch dd 60291 31.38 29.06 30.75+2. 9.00 5.75 cp .10 1.2 21 225 8.75 8.50 8.63-0.13 75.75 15.50 LibDigH dd 2354 25.00 23.25 24.75+11.25 7469 39.00 LibLv dc 34 50.00 49.00 49.06-0.81 5.50 2.16 LifoFinl dd 125 3.13 3.00 3.13+0.09 23 75 5.63 Lfecore dd 345 8.13 7.75 8.00+025 1263 4.06 Lifecell dc 617 4.94 4.70 4.91+0.22 18.50 7.50 LteIneS 34 16 14.75 14.25 14.75+0.50 9.38 2.13 Lifomark 21 849 9.98 9.13 9.88+0.88 94.81 15.00 LifeMind n dd 6018 30.19 26.25 30.00+3 29.88 6.88A H dd 2984 30.13 29.50 30.13+0.44 8.70 4.78 LifeHoan .25 3.8 22 38 6.63 6.50 6.50-0.13 9.19 4.25 Lifeway 46 13 6.13 5.50 5.50-0.38 2650 6.44 Ligand B dd 2406 13.56 12.38 13.00+0.13 69.50 2.16 61 52.50 52.75-3+69 3463 13.00 Lghtbd n 25 751 18.13 17.38 17.50-0.38 25.38 2.38 Lghtspn n dd 611 3.63 3.44 3.55-0.02 2416 6.13 LhirGld n - 49 8.25 7.75 8.25+0.75 40.00 20.88 Lincare 13 15118 25.63 23.50 25.50+0.56 1250 9.19 Bc .32 2.8 16 182 11.69 11.63 11.63 2438 13.75 LincEl .56 3.8 6 642 15+19 14.38 14.63-0.13 1150 5.50 Lindbrg .32 4.6 7 28 7.06 7.00 7.00-0.38 7475 27.63 LinearT s .12 0.2 8326408 72.25 69+44 71.94+2.44 89.00 48.00 Llonblo n . 1243 90.88 83.50 87.38+4.63 37.38 7.06 Ljonb dg old 382 9.63 9.25 9.44+0.19 55.50 42.38 LiquiBox .80 1.9 11 10 43.00 42.75 42.75 49.25 5.69 LiqAudio 897 7.06 6.63 6.97+0.22 3000 3.94 Litronic old 181 5.42 5.19 5.31-0.06 51A 19.50 Littelfuse 23 2215 38.00 36.00 36.31-1.44 11.00 5.38 LifePrsn n 151 7.06 6.50 6.50-0.25 31.38 4.88 L90 Inc. n dd 1926 7.75 7.19 7.69+025 9.50 6.25 LoJack 14 172 7.75 7.38 7.50-0.13 10.88 7.38 Locall incl 9 315 10.25 9.63 10.25+0.58 2825 12.00 LodgEnt dc 800 26.88 26.25 26.56+0.31 28.50 1.75 LgOnArn dc 173 3.81 3.17 131 -0.13 8.81 1.25 LogicD 29 528 3.00 2.63 2.630.25 23.63 2.75 Logility 78 99 4.06 3.88 3.88-0.06 3900 7.38 Logifh s 4 637 34.00 32.50 33.06-019 47 50 600 Loisla n dd 77 7.75 T50 7.75 1300 7.00 LneSStk .50 5 9 17 8419 8.56 8.38 8.44 13.25 10.00 LlFwCp .32 2.6 12 13 12.13 12.13 12.13+0.63 72.00 12.50 LkSmart n dd 3498 17.00 16.56 16.75 -0.06 54.00 8.00 Loudeye n 1089 11.13 10.63 11.00+0.19 7.25 3.28 Lowr 9 24 4.38 4.38 4.38 21.88 12.56 Lufkin .72 3.8 32 45 19.19 18.81 18.81-0.69 29.50 8.30 Lumenon n 4553 24.75 22.13 23.25-1.31 52.00 5.75 Luminant n 3674 8.94 7.63 8.38+0.5 64.13 13.25 Lurninex n 414 40.94 39.31 40.00-0.1 5.28 2.06 Lurnisys n dd 201 2.84 2.50 2.94+034 93.63 34.13 Lycos . 34148 72.94 7.88 71.00+088 99.50 9.06 LynxTh dd 1091 35.38 33.00 34.75+1.50 M 93.72 7.63 M SysFD cc 2586 80.13 75.75 78.25+1.88 1750 8.19 MACC s 23 9.25 919 9.25+0106 2369 15.50 MAF Bc .40 1.9 10 1092 21.50 21 13 2150+038 75.00 16.38 MCK Cm n dd 13015 29.00 27.00 205 +1.25 43.25 IS. 50 MCSI Inc 42 1009 34.38 32.88 341.36+11.38 17.13 6 . 38 MDC g 19 7.75 7.56 7.75 0.06 90.00 11.63 MDSI g 44 194 16.25 15.44 15.69+0.19 22.25 14.94 MFB Cp .38 2.2 9 4 17.25 17.25 17.25-0.13 12.25 6.76 MFC Bn 5432 8.50 8.00 8.50+0.50 5.75 3.25 MFRI .28 7.7 725 3.63 3.63 3.63 54.75 9.75 MGI Phr cc 2328 35.25 33.06 34.69+1.19 6.97 2.50 MHMeyer 8 952 6.00 5.09 5.31-0.16 97.5026.75 MIH Lid . 1652 38.13 34.88 37.38+2.19 8.63 1.50 MIM Cp dd 505 2.00 1.88 1.91+0.06 111.63 16.63 MIPS Tc n 83 1796 57.50 55.38 57.25+0.70 53.06 31.50 MIPS TcB

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n 1506 52.13 50.69 51.75+0.38 62.25 16.81 MKS Inst 32 4162 35.13 34.00 35.13+0.44 12063 16.38AMMCNt cc 14039 123.00 118.00 121.81 +3.56 7.69 4.38 MOCON .22 3.9 11 2 5.63 5.63 5.63-0.06 64.63 6.50 MP3.cm 4554 8.63 8.13 8.25-0.19 9.63 4.50 MPW Indl 18 5 6.94 6.94 6.94 97.50 8.25 MRV Cm s dc 16513 79.50 76.75 77.06+1.88 2975 16.13 MS Carr 8 152 18.44 17.88 18.44+0.56 1244 2.50 MSI Hold n dd 1319 4.50 4.19 4.50 54.38 3.56 MTI Tch 16 6790 6.56 31+0.75 11.25 5.38 .24 3.8 dd 62 6.31 1.25 1.31 9+75 0.88 MaceSec dd 906 1.56 1 25 125- 0 7.50 3.75 Mackie 11 175 7.50 7 31 7.47+059 8.88 4.00 MacroCh 701 5.56 5.31 553 0.88 37.38 Macrmdia cc 10566 69.69 6775 6911+0.46 32.50 9.88 Macronix 4.63 1 437 21.88 21.50 21.88+0.75 10788 13.38 Macrvsn cc 2203 108.25 104.50 106.63 +0.75 22.69 5.50 Madden 11 4055 12.44 11.63 12.31+0.19 10.50 3.16 Madefte dd 14 3.88 3.38 3.88+0.25 17.38 1.44 MadgeNt dd 7979 3.94 3.00 3.56+0.53 23.00 16.75 MadGE 1.32f6.6 13 46 20.00 19.75 19.98 10.69 0.81 MagPhr dd 3.75 3.50 3.72+022 5.13 2.38 Magal .10 3.2 10 143 3.25 3.06 3.13-0.13 33.00 5.38 MagicSft s 19 1920 9.13 8.76 9.00 7.88 2.81 MagnaE n 944 6.94 6.58 6.78+0.09 15.25 6.75 Mahaska .60 7.9 9 42 7.75 7.56 7.56-0.06 29.00 4.50 Mail.cm dd 24.65 6.59 6.31 6.31 4.00 2.19 MainSt 37 612 2.94 2.75 2.94+0.19 1144 8.00 MainStr .56 6.9 27 39 8.06 8.03 8.06-0.13 19.38 10.0 Mainsprg n 66.07 10.88 9.52 10.38+0.38 12.25 7.75 Makita 19e 2.5 32 42 7.88 7.75 7.75 9.75 3.81 Mallon dd 305 7.00 6.75 6.88-0.13 41.88 9.00 MgeNetw n 20.79 22.81 18.50 20.06-2.75 9.13 2.56 MncEqp 9 227 5.28 4.75 5.00 52.00 3.50 MwAssc cc 1539 48.19 44.69 46.38+1.69 9+00 1.13 Manntch 14 611 2.81 2 5+103 1.8977 N2 75+1.8 90.06 9.06 Manugist dd 14350 93.31 78 0 1 20.00 3.06 Mapics dc 405 6.25 6.00 6+00-0.13 4800 11.38 MapInf s 57 186 43.00 41.25 41.50-1.50 81.13 15.00 MarchFrst dd 39556 20.81 18.50 19.38-1.19 20.00 10.00 Marex n -2134 19.00 13.26 19.00+4.88 68.88 11.50 Marimba cc 1577 17.44 16.88 16.98 3.94 1.75 MarTms dd lB9 2.25 2.13 219-0.13 24.38 14.13 MarCap .88 3.6 14 103 24.34 23.75 24.34+0.47 29.50 3.56 MktSe dd 1234 5.25 4.88 5.13+0.13 64.81 11.00 MktWtch c1d 1217 11.88 11.31 1115 + 0.19 13.50 8.38 .44 4.0 8 3 11.00 11.00 11.00 1700 1225 MrshSu .44 2.9 11 59 15.81 15.31 15.31+0.06 32.00 5.25 Martelk dd 384 22.66 21.00 22.50+11.25 16.00 9.50 Marten 7 2 14.25 14.25 14.25+0.63 2.34 0.88 MartnIn .08 7.3 dd 34 1.09 1.09 1.09-0.13 74.69 41.63 MaNelIT n . 19 73.94 69.75 71.38+1.13 37.38 26.75 Massbnk 1.20 4.2 9 8 28.63 28.13 28.25-0.13 73.50 32.98 Matav n 3.55 a 8.3 14 194 45.00 42.63 42.63+2.13 6.56 2.75 MatriaH n - 4 4055 3.97 3.64 3.75-0.25 1938 0.75 Matritch dd 1843 8.38 7.75 8.00-0.22 15.13 5.50 MatrBnc n 6 262 6.75 6.69 6.69 22.06 3.50 MatrxPh dd 1276 15.50 14.56 14.63-0.44 7.00 3.56 MatrxSv 10 33 4.88 4.75 4.88+0.13 95.00 17.60 MatrixO n . 15826 35.25 30.98 34.50+3.50 30.38 20.00 Matthintl .19 0.7 17 184 29.00 28.88 29.00+0.25 50.50 11.00 Mattson 35 2800 23.25 21.75 21+88-0.88 36.50 15.50 M-Tube dc 1804 28.63 28.06 28.06-0.38 9.00 6.50 MaxEr 15 51 8.88 8.63 8.63 1075 6.00 Maxco dd 13 7.06 6.50 6.94+0.44 7.00 1.25 Maxcorl n 4 207 1.47 1.28 1.28-0.09 4.88 015 MaxcrHIt dd 505 1.44 1.22 1.25+0.03 85.00 31.00-Maxim s cc 23906 88.00 93.56 87.69+4.31 79.50 7.50 MaximPh c1d 1535 61.38 59.63 61.19+1.94 14.81 4.81 Maxtor dd 51122 8.38 7.19 7.84+0.81 11.13 7.38 MaxvAlSh 6 50 10.75 10.50 10.50 23.69 6.75 MaxwllT dd 539 16.44 16.19 16.38+0.25 186.00 31.98 Maxygen n dd 2568 54.75 49.25 53.75+4.19 18.25 9.00 MayflCo .60 5.6 10 13 11.00 10.75 10.75-0.50 26.13 9.50 MaynOl 10 29 18.00 17.25 17.38-0+63 11.75 6.00 MazelSt n 10 16 7.00 6.50 6.50-1.00 63.75 15.56 McAfee n dd 1635 28.00 26.27 26.31+1.06 6.81 3.88 McCln 7 97 4.59 4.31 4.31-0.25 19.00 14.00 McGrth

Day C12 / 328

.56 3.3 8 11 17.06 17.00 17.06-0.25 38.00 10.88 McLeod s dd 44660 16.25 15.63 15.81+0.31 17.13 6.50 McNghtAp 6 587 16.56 15.75 16.00-0.56 95.00 68.00 AMcData It 17311 110.00 96.00 107.56+14.20 4150 9.88 MeadInst s 30 4537 24.25 22.50 24.00+0.44 4.50 2 13 MeaVlly n 6 100 2.56 2.44 2.50 0.25 0.06 MeaVly t 61 0.31 0.25 0.31+0.06 7.38 4.25 MechDy 20 42 6.00 5.88 5.94+0.06 33.63 4.88 MechTch s dc 1814 11.63 11.31 11.31+0.06 82.31 29.634 s cc 33150 94.75 80.13 84.13+4.19 22.25 14.00 MedalFin 1+44 18.9 203 16.25 16.00 16.13+0.13 206.00 5.00 Medarex - dd 4900 11550 106.50 110.50 +4.00 18.75 12.06 MedfdBc .48 3A 9 42 14.13 14.06 14.13+0.06 7400 20.00 MedjaM dd 2255 25.38 24.63 24.75-0.50 52.76 5.13 Medial 80 1652 18.98 IS- go 18. 38+2.60 16.88 1.50 MediaBay dd 860 2.31 219 2 28+0.03 21.00 7.00 Mediacm n 130 14.25 1 3.94 1 4.23+0.17 15.13 4.13 Medialk 22 58 6.75 6.44 6.75+0.38 104.13 6.13 dd 11220 13.13 10.94 12.69+2.00 54.00 5.00 Medlgic n dd 1828 6.75 6.31 6.69+0.28 5.63 2+66 MeclAct 10 176 4.00 3.81 181 -0.03 6.00 1.09 MedAllia 21 106 4.44 4.03 4.03+0.03 10300 18.25 MedMgrCp 3955 44.75 42.56 43.75+0.75 27.38 1650 MedCo n 1556 27.00 23.50 25.00+0.31 11.25 0.44 Mdlcnslt dd 5654 0.94 0.66 0.84+0.16 10.00 0.75 MedinexS dd 139 1.00 0.97 1.00 8.00 1.00 MedPlus dd 61 5.81 5.53 5.81+0.13 45.88 16.88 MedOst 14 1742 20.56 19.25 19.38-1.31 8.00 4.38 Medstone 8 86 5.B8 5.50 5.50 1994 1113 Meemic 7 5 19.81 19.81 19.81+0.09 5.13 3.56 MegoFnc 4 311 4.50 4.44 4.50 86.38 20.00 MemWks 49 272 29.31 27.44 28.13-0.88 33.63 1725 MenW. 18 3211 32.50 2950 3050-125 34.25 13.50 Mentor .10 0.5 17 3099 21.50 20 13 211.119+11.00 21.38 7+7S MentGr 48 5169 20.38 1 a 69 18.98-1.38 3913 7.00 Merant dd 84 7.75 725 7.750.06 15.63 9.25 MerctleB 12 25 11.63 1113 1125+0.13 3750 23.66 MerctlBk 1.04 13.0 14 1992 35.50 34.44 149.88 13.44 Mercator dd 16464 16.38 15 56 15.63 +0.13 11.19 3.50 Mercer dd 334 9.94 9.69 9.88+ 19 25.00 17.69 MerchSsh .88 3.7 10 4 23.63 23.63 23.63 20.15 16.00 MerBNY s .60 2.8 16 164 18.00 17.06 17.94+ .94 68.13 12.75 MrcCmp s 26 2109 28.50 26.00 28. + 22.88 Mefchitr s cc 23389 123.50 118.19 122.19+5.06 1.00 5.94 MeridDl .24 3.1 25 431 7.75 7.38 7.75+0.38 975 11.25 Merdins .32 b 1.8 13 182 17.88 17.44 17.44-0.06 13.38 3.50 MeddMed 28 5 11.75 11.75 11.75 3.69 0.50 Merisel dd 9415 1.09 0.91 1.09 + 06 11.38 3.78 MertMd 24 147 5.94 5.81 5.81+0.06 54.88 6.13 Merix Cp s cc 1058 49.75 48.00 48.50+0.06 10.13 9.81 n 211 10.00 9.81 9.81-0.06 7.25 4.25 MesaAir dd 303 5.94 5.56 5.56-0.25 7.00 3.50 MesaLb 9 173 5.47 5.31 5.11-0.13 - 8.88 mus- .08 0.7 8 158 10.88 10.25 0.88+0 56 21.88 2.19 MessgeMd dd 1003 3.69 3.44 3.59-0.03 35.88 13.56 MetaGp 16 2096 14.63 13.884.50+0.06 - 4.94 MetaCreat dd 35619.25 8.25 8.38-0.63 73.50 15.00 Metalink n dd 856 25.130 23.63 23.81-0.69 12600 29.50 MetaSolv n cc 1892 42.75 40.56 40.88-0.81 7.25 2.00 Metatec. did 187 3.00 2.50 2.94+0.31 40.31 9.50 Metawve n - 742 21.98 19.81 20.63+1.00 7.63 2.25 Meteor dd 165 5.75 5.56 5.56-0.25 2.19 0.13 Metex wt 36 1.31 1.31 1.31-0.31 5.75 1.63AMethanx dd 34679 6.00 5.64 6.00+0.34 65.50 14.00 MethdS .20 0.3 69 4 60.25 60.00 60.25+4.25 66.44 13.50 MethdA .20 0.3 69 5400 60.44 66.69 60.13+3.38 18.00 2.94 MetretekT dd 219 4.38 4.19 4.19+0.06 109.90 18.94 Metrern dd 10977 41.25 38.88 40.69+1.81 2806 6.00 Metront 13 198 7.44 7.25 7.38+0.13 MetrIntA n 28 16.00 12.00 12.00 10.00 17.00 9.00 9.00-1.00 20.00 8.00 MtroOne 48 444 13.50 13.00 13.50+0.25 10.00 6.25 MetroCpB.24 3.3 13 67 7.25 7.13 7.25+0.19 17.22 1.13 Metrocall dd 3256 4.28 4.00 4.19-0.06 19.00 10.13 Metrolog 15 8 14.00 14.00 14.00 51.88 11.13 MtrmdF s dd 63509 40.00 37.50 39.94+2.75 36.00 6.63 Matron n 22 1366 13.44 12.63 13.25+0.31 7.38 2.63 MetroFncl 12 19 4.25 4.130 4.06+0.03 7.38 5.25

329 / C12 Day

MetroWst.24 a 4.0 10 25 5.94 5.75 5.94+0.19 2806 19.13 MichlF .32 1.3 11 1063 24.25 23.50 23.75-0.19 49.6324.98 MichStr 1515151 40.63 34.75 36.00-6.38 75.13 18.25-Micrel s cc 8931 77.00 73.25 76.44+3.50 12.63 2.94 MicroCT dd 2852 9.25 8.75 9.13+0.06 21.50 9.50 MicroGn n 45 12.63 12.13 12.50+0.38 12.50 4A Microl-in dd 573 5.75 5.25 5.25-0.13 13.50 4.75 McrThrp dd 269 6.88 6.50 6.88-0.38 9.94 Microcil n 3162 39.31 37.00 37.13-0.75 77.38 33.25 Microchip s 47 12779 72.50 67.00 68.06-0.88 26.00 4.88 MicroPh dd 417 9.25 8.63 9.25+0.56 7.88 0.88 Micrgfx dd 98 1.72 1.56 1.69-0.06 2D6.00 27.50 Mcrofnse s 7750 167.75 151.88 151.88 -15.00 20.69 8.19 MicronEl 41 18675 14.44 13.44 13.81+0.31 76.25 12.81 Micros 2019556 19.98 1725 17.56-6.44 19.81 2.50 MicrosTo cc 427 5.75 5.25 5.25-0.75 51.00 6.25 MicSern cc 272 42.25 40.75 42.25+1.13 11994 60.00 Microsft 41 342149 71.31 69.63 69.81-0.19 333.00 16.56 MicroStr s dd 12212 29.13 27.50 27.88-0.31 1915 3.00 Micrtest 34 1251 8.53 8.19 8.25-0.44 1850 6.81 MictchSy dd 282 7.13 6.97 6.97+0.03 57.56 26+00Microtne n 7975 58.63 51.94 54.50-1.50 68.50 12.50 Micrvisn dd 1781 43.13 40.06 40.88+0.06 11.50 1.41 Micware n old 1022 1.88 1.59 1.88+0.22 17.25 3.75 MicPwr dd547 8.00 6.88 7.50+0.75 36.0021.00 MidStB n.64 2.2 14 104 29.75 29.50 29.75-0 06 7.75 4.16 Mid1by 412 6.81 6.63 6.69 + 0.28 37.0025.00 MdsxWat 1.22 4.2 25 52 29.13 28.00 29.13+0.88 27.44 18.50 Midland .30 1+2 7 75 26.00 25.38 25.75+0.38 8.75 4.63 MdwyAir dd 158 5+97 5.63 5.63 6.00 MidwGr A 1.1 17 56 9.00 8.75 9.00+0.25 9.19 3.63 Mikohn 26 101 7.38 7.25 7.31+0.06 10.25 7.25 MillCell n 921 9.88 9.31 9.75+0.38 158.00 28.38 MillPhar s old 28097 144.31 133.00 143.13 +13.13 8.88 4.63 MilrBld 7 867 8.31 8.28 8.28-0.03 2.94 0.75 MillerEx dd 320 1.75 1.59 1.69+0.5333 94 19.13 MillerHer .15 0.5 18 2848 32.63 31.31 31.94+0.50 34.75 24.34 Milcmln dd 4370 45.38 42+75 44.19+1.31 10.75 7.25 Mind CTI n 1052 10.13 9.50 9.94-0.06 78.94 25.13 Minililed s cc 2S54 76.13 71.75 71.80-4.33 4.50 1.38 MiningS .03 1.2 22 24 2.44 2.25 2.44+0+31 13.63 5.56 Minntc .10 1.6 9 290 6.44 6.38 6.44 1050 7.13 MinutInt .28 3.4 6 68 8.25 7.50 8.25+0.50 23.00 5.00 MiraeCp n .07 a 1.0 . 99 6.88 5.94 6+69-0.25 30.00 8.88 Miravant dd 1401 25.13 22.76 25.06+2.06 14.25 4.63 Mi nix 159 7.88 7.50 788+0.38 32.31 21.13 MissVly .40 1.6 11 33 25.63 25.25 25.50+0.25 6.75 3.16 Mitcham dd 142 5.88 5.69 5.69-0.13 16.69 2.56 MitekS n 36 252 6.38 6 06 6.06-0.25 20.75 9.50 MityEnt a 11 102 10.31 10+06 10.06-0.13 15.50 MoblMin 19 688 18.88 18.00 18.69+0+69 16.50 7.75 MoblElec n 693 11.88 11.50 11.75-0.06 16.88 2.75 Mobjus dd 176 3.88 3.63 3.75-0.03 56.94 9+63 ModemM s dd 1147 10.88 10.25 10.56+0.13 279.44 110946 MdrTms 31 143.94 138.00 143.88 +12.38 30 50 19.94 Modine 1.00 3.6 13 389 29.00 28.00 28.13-0.63 11.88 4.75 ModtecH 15 45 9.88 9.81 9+81-0.06 31.06 13.13 Moldflow n 605 28.06 23.27 26.31-0.66 122.X25.88 MolecDev 76 1207 83.25 77.50 82.81+4.44 63.7624.38 Molex s .10 0.2 47 4101 53.19 49.50 52.81+2.75 47.25 21.50 MolexA s .10 0.2 38 2734 40.63 37.50 40.13+2.38 13.50 7.00 MomenB dd510 10.50 9.69 10.44+0.44 17.50 3.50 MonCasn 5.63 5.38 5.63 4463 29.00 Mondavi 16587 41.00 39.25 41.00+1.50 5.50 4.50 MooRE .58 11.5 1270 5.06 5.03 5.06+0.03 10.25 5.75 MonmM . 10 65 10.13 9.81 10.13+0.13 15.50 7.00 MontBB .08 1011 8.75 8.75 8.75 4.81 2.56 MomPas 8 1468 4.50 4.16 4.50+0.28 18.81 0.81 Mrtg.com 1302 1.06 0.94 0.94-0.136 14.56 0.38 MthrNtr n dd 1499 0.72 0.66 0.66 15.38 6.00 MothrWk 11 10 9.19 9.00 9.19+0.38 41.50 7.88 Motient dd 9024 12.25 11.69 12.13+0.25 7.50 3.38 MtrCrgo 8 99 5.44 5.31 5.38+0+06 27.13 7.56 Movado .10 0.7 19 101 14.00 13.69 14.00+0.13 6.25 2.88 MovieGal 6 332 3.88 3.69 388-0 06 52.00 MpwrCm s dd 3777 19.13 18.44 1844-

Day C12 / 330

0 13 37.50 21.00 MuellerP 2.40 8.6 10 10 28.00 28.00 28.00 +050 39.88 12.50 Multex 4695 21.81 19.88 21 75+11.63 875 525 MultClr 4 65 8.60 8.38 8.38 1700 313 MultZns dd 912 4.80 4.38 4.50-0.25 406 867 msicmkr 712 0.94 0.84 0.94+0.06 13.69 8.69 MtlFrst n .28 H 186 13.69 13.63 13.69 97.69 10.00 MyPoints old 4433 13.63 12.31 13.63+11.00 234.00 11.63 Myriad n dd 1685 146.36 136.25 13988+5.00 13.50 9.75 MysticF 11 15 98 13.31 13.25 13.31+0.06 N 33.13 2.44 N2H2 dd 1275 3.25 2.88 3.06+0.19 12.00 3.06 NABI 63 4310 8.63 8.00 8.13+0 16 106A3 US NBC Int n dd 7217 10.50 9.75 10 50+0 81 18.75 9.38 NBT Bcp .68 b 6.0 10 355 11.38 11.06 1 38+0 19 19.06 5.50 NBTY 10 5057 7.25 6.94 7 06 + 0.06 54.88 15.50 NCO Grp 28 2511 18.00 16.88 1738+0.25 88 26.00 NDS Grp n 2123 79.13 78.13 78.25+1.25 162.00 79.38 NEG .29e 0 2 124 145.13 143.50 144 .88-0.06 100.00 24.38 NICESys 76 476 81.00 80.00 80.00-0.25 7.50 1.75 NMT Mod dd 77 2.75 2.38 2.50 1138 5.88 NN Inc .32 3.7 15 94 8.88 8.38 8.63+0.19 12.88 7+25 NPC Intl 1133 9.88 9.44 9.88+0.25 39.94 3.44-NIPS Phm dd 3356 46.00 37.69 44.25+6.25 10975 38.00 NTL Inc s dd 9100 44.44 42.69 43.81+0.19 3.88 0.75 NamTai wt 146 3.63 3.47 3.47-0.03 19.50 11.56 NamTsi 1.26e70 7 446 18.19 1788 17.94-0.19 8.31 2.06 NamjbMin .03 f 1.0 16 472 3.06 2.97 3.00-0.06 10194 6 50 Narlogen old 1886 25.00 23.19 24.13+1.13 52+i3 8 .50 Nanomtr 65 1471 49.75 48.75 49.75+0.88 4.94 2.88 Napco 6 14 3.63 3.50 3.50-0.13 10.50 2.00 NaProBlo dd 644 7.94 7.00 7.88+0.84 12.50 6.50 NaraBnk .66 t 8 147 12.63 12.25 12.50 10.63 5.84 Nashl .36 33 5 223 10.00 9.75 9.75 8.38 1.56 Nastech dd 485 6.44 5.50 6.25-0.06 4.88 2.63 Nathans dd 140 3.59 3.59 3.59 1.38 0.38 Nathns wt . 4 1.38 1.38 1.38 20.38 13.38 NCtyBcp .56 f 3.1 9 298 18.00 17.50 18.00+0.38 26.50 15.19 NCmcBc .42 2.2 1827311 19.44 19.00 19.31-0.01 72.69 32.50 Nucptr .20 0.3 50 3326 72.63 72.56 72.63 18.63 10.13 NtDontex 11 7 17.00 16.75 17.00 6.75 1.75 NHltCrd 7 490 2.25 188 225 + 019 6.94 3.50 NtHHIt 9 83 6.81 6.56 6.56-0.13 78.00 6.19 Natl Info dd 13019 10.19 8.94 9.50-0.31 50 25.50 NatInst 44 1704 45.00 42.50 43.19-1.56 28.00 16.75 NatPenn .80b 4.0 13 11 20.38 20.00 20.25+0.13 6.50 0.50 NatRecd dd 370 0.72 0.56 0.72-0.03 7.94 3.06 NTeam 25 1082 3.94 3.75 3.75 7.00 2.19 NTech .04 1.4 33 455 3.00 2.69 2.94-0.06 91.50 66.00 NtWnU 4 10 70.75 69.75 69.81+0.31 36.2S 13.00 WMIre 92 105 23.00 21.50 23.00+11.50 9.38 1.94 Natrol 11 118 3.06 2.94 2.94-0.06 4.88 1.31 NaturlAlt dd73 2.00 1.94 2.00 77.00 5.WNatMicr a dd 9176 78.63 69.75 74.56+4.81 2.63 0.88 NatWndr dd 101 1.28 1.13 1.28+0+16 10.63 6.63 NatrSun .13 1.7 8 161 7.88 7.69 7.88+0.19 16.69 8.38 Nautica 9 1021 12.00 11.25 11.81+0.06 15.50 1.19 Nwaffe 1196 2A1 2.28 2.31-0.13 22.06 5.56 Navidec dd 766 8.50 8.19 8.3 . +0.13 12.50 5.94 NavigntInt 10 697 11 + 50 963 10.50-0.38 165.00 14.13 NviSite s 2430 50.00 47.13 4813+138 23.75 14.75 NeNana gn 153 22.81 22.56 2275+050 12.13 2.69 Neolvlgic 24 1334 3+63 3.53 3.59+0.D6 70.00 1.13 NeoRx dd 3097 19.31 18.26 19.00+1.00 Neorhera dd 435 8.00 7.76 T81 +0 06 15.88 2.00 NeoThr wl 24 3.44 3.25 3.44+019 78.75 2.63 Neofonn n did 5260 3.13 2.88 2.94-0.09 8.25 5.00 Neogen 1278 6.44 6.19 6.31+0.13 41.00 10.00 NeonSys 43 112 17.31 16.44 16.81 -H3 32M 12.50 NeoPharm cc 352 24.13 21.50 24.13+0+56 60.13 9.94 NeoseT dd 907 45.00 39.25 41.00+1.00 8.75 2.13 NeraAS 4 6.50 6.38 6.38 -0.22 66.50 10.00 NetPrcp dd 5985 14.75 12.63 114.119+11.50 34.38 8.56 NetBank 42 1274 11.44 11.00 11.38-0.13 59.00 7.75 net.Gene n 1456 8.69 8.13 8.38-0.16 4000 600 Net2000 n 2774 9.06 8.63 8.75-0. 92.63 22.50 Net2Phn dd 3372 30.25 29.00 29.56+ . 81.50 20.63 NetlQ did 5123 56.75 51.75 56.50+1.69 2925 6.75

331 / C12 Day

NetSpk did 3984 12.3 96.00 9.25 Netcntvs n dd 4126 10.13 9.38 9.63+0.19 109.00 33.60 NetCom - 8 53.25 51.25 63.26+2.94 69.75 17.50 14Ncreat n 39 14 21.38 19.19 21.13+2.00 17.25 4.75 Netease n 2696 7.66 6.88 7.63+0.63 97.50 20.63 Netegrity dd 1817 90.50 83.06 88.00+ 37.97 3.75 Netergy dd 3476 12.63 11.50 11.88+0.63 14.13 0.88 Netgtwy n dd 1786 125 1.06 1.16-0.03 58.00 4.00 netguru a dd 718 18.94 17.38 17.88+0.69 47.50 13.13 NetialLtd 148 22.00 21.25 22.00+0.75 10.13 1.94 Netmng dd 3394 3.06 2.72 2.84+0.13 45.69 2.75 NetObjct did 1685 3.69 3.38 3.63+0.03 92.0027.00 Netopia dd 2984 39.26 36.50 36.632.31 26.13 4.13 Netpince n 4452 5.44 4.94 5.31+0.06 14.00 1.50 NetRadio n did 76 1.94 1.81 1.91+0.09 55.00 13.25 NetRatn n dd 382 18.00 17.31-0.6 32.00 2.38 Netrix dd 1792 7.38 7.03 725+0.1 11963 22.00 NetroCp 7295 85.88 80.63 82.63-1.1 41.25 10.00 NtScout 565 15.25 14.50 14.69 - 49.00 8.63 Netsilcn cc 457 25.98 24.38 25.88 +. 75 61.50 6.56 NetSolw n dd 5065 9.19 8.38 8.88+0.56 40.00 6.25 NtwAcc dd 1438 8.38 7.63 7.94+0.06 124.00 15.63 NetwkAp a cc 56839 119.44 112.13 117.00+5.56 37.19 16.25 NetwkAsc 74 20465 26.00 25.00 25.88-0.38 25.94 3.50 NtwkCm n dd 1651 5.53 5.25 5.50 9.63 1.03 NwkCmp dd 767 1.31 1.19 1.25+0.09 35.26 23.31-NtwrEng n 6329 41.00 35.19 39.13+ 4 .016 79.00 11.06 NtwkPeH dd 2616 14.69 14.00 14.38 + 0.06 62.63 7.69 NtwrkPl dd 7736 12.13 11.00 11.44 - 0.56 31.00 4.50 Netzee n dd 189 5.59 5.38 5.50 40.00 3.19 NetZero n 11694 4.41 4.13 4.22+0.16 47.50 4.00 Neurcrine dd 3176 41.38 38.31 41.38+3.44 51.63 12.88 Neurgn dd 615 38.31 36.75 38.19+0.19 16.88 4.50 NBwnS .75 t did 38 8.25 7.88 T88-0.38 18.25 1.13 NwCntF 16 4452 11.75 10.81 11.44+0.63 11.00 2.75 NwChina n 85 3.63 3.44 3. - 0.06 4.94 0.63 NwChn wt 28 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 96.25 16.00 NewEra dd 10M 38.60 34.50 35.06-2.11 165.13 40.00 NewFoc n - 2732 140.38 132.38 138.06+6.06 14.38 10.25 NHmpTh .64 5.4 8 14 12.00 11.88 11 BB-0.13 25.88 10.94 NHrzWrl 24 253 21.38 20.25 21.31+0.88 13.50 9.63 NMilBc .40 3.8 10 14 11.00 10.38 1063+ 0 25 4.00 1.00 NwWCfM 8 680 2.13 1.98 2.09+0.09 1938 813 NwgnRsl 23 1298 1T50 17.25 17.38 825 481 Newmrk 3 184 7.63 6.50 6.50-0.50 11.00 5.38ANewport a 02 cc 10287 160.88 152.15 169.00+8.88 12.88 1.38 NewsEdge did 402 2.34 2.06 2.13 14.88 0.53 Nexell wt 110 2.88 2.56 2.56-0.19 67.00 4.00 NexellTh a dd 1998 13.38 12.50 12.75-0.38 202.00 39.38 NextLevl n dd 36185 45.50 41.00 44.13+3.50 53.13 5.25 NextCrd dd 4962 8.44 7.88 8.22+0.03 93.0027.75 NextelC a dd 9902D 56.00 51.69 55. +4.38 40.13 13.00 NextlPrt n 16885 31.00 28.88 30.19+0.91 13.63 2.88 Nextera - 1548 3.84 3.69 3.75+0.13 5.44 0.91 NextHlth 14 98 4. 4.00 4.06-0.19 66.38 23.13 NeAlink s did 14728 37.25 34.75 35.06-0.75 5.38 3.50 NiagCp n 7 22 4.03 4.00 4.03-0.09 105.81 14.25 NlkuCp n dd 35M 27.38 22.38 27.06+4.06 10.00 5.13 NobelLm 30 13 9.69 9.50 9.50-0.25 7.88 4.44 NobltyH 13 178 5.88 5.63 5.88 17.50 7.75 NobleInt .08 p 4 123 8.88 881 81810.19 12.06 4.63 Nogatech n - 2127 9.94 945 9.78+0.09 20.19 12.69 Noland .32 1.8 6 10 17.75 1775 1775-0.38 65.98 36.13 Nordsn 1.04 1.6 23 148 64.88 63.56 64 75-013 1138 3.00 Norstan did 5132 3.44 3.13 119-025 34.88 6-88 NoAmSci 34 1995 24.13 22.84 24.113+11.31 1 7.50 12.75 NCeniBsh.50 3.1 9 20 16.38 16.38 16.38 19.25 1.75 NrthPtt .68f4.8 18 102 14.19 13.94 14.13+013 12.50 8.13 NthValBcp .40 3.2 10 24 12.50 2.31 12.38+E06 14.63 9.63 NelNBc .40 b 3.5 8 22 11.50 il.38 11.38-0.06 15900 27.88 Nrthesto did 1015 46.44 42.44 44.44+1.13 82.38 40.13 NorTrst s.54 0.6 44 10462 85.50 82.25 84.31+2.06 41.50 10.00 NthfldLb did 459 15.63 14.50 15.63+0.63 7+69 1.41 NorCran l6i dd 483 1.63 1.50 1.63 - 39.13 10.00 NorthPnt 11621 1131 11.38 1144+0.06 10.63 7.06 NorthHm .20 b 23 9 117 8.69 8.19 8.69+0.50 2838 20.00 NrthwFn .60 2.6

Day C12 / 332

9 2 23.00 2100 23.00 +0.63 Continued on Next Page FOREIGN STOCKS THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 Stock Price Chg ARGENTINA (Arg. Pesos) Banco Frances 7.29 +021 Ban Galicia BA 2.82 -005 Banco Rio de Is 4.35 0.05 City Equity 3.80 +0.15 PIC Holdings SA 1.67 +0-01 Renault Argentin 0.58 0.02 Siderar S A. 313 +0.08 Siderca 217 +0.03 Telecom Argen 470 +0.05 Telefon Argen 316 Electrobas SA 3380 0.1 Embratel Partici 40.40 +0.60 Petrobras First 57.65 -1.05 Tale Norte Leste 46-50 -0.20 Telesp Celular 27.00 +1-27 Banco de Chile 22.50 Banco Santiago 10.60 -0.30 Distribution Y 638.00 -1900 S.A.C.I. Falabel 535.00 -4.00 AUSTRALIA (Australian $) AMP Limited 17.82 -0.16 Austr NZ Bank 13.03 -0.10 Broken Hill Pr 18.97 0.38 Cable & Wireless 4.62 +0.04 Common BK Aus 27.68 -1.10 Neff Austral Bk 25.40 -0.77 News Corp 22,63 -0.31 News Corp 8.80 -0.60 Telstra, Corporal 6.31 -0.46 Westpac Eking 2.65 -0.10 AUSTRIA (Euros) Austria Tabakwer 43.73 -0.72 Bank Austria 60.83 +0.40 Erste Bank Der 50.10 +0.21 EVN Energie 34.97 -0.19 EA Generali 481.00 -6.00 Cast Elektriz A 105.01 -0.24 OEMV 93.70 -2.05 VA Stahl 29.80 -0.15 VA Technologic 54.75 -0.65 Wienerb Baus 24.00 -0.10 BELGIUM (Euros) AGFA-Gevaert NV 27.50 -0.01 Almanij 48.67 +0.47 Delhatze LE Lion 62.90 0.40 Dexia Belgium 158 20 +060 Electrabel 24050 +1 10 AG Fin 3421 +032 Grp Bruxelles La292 50 -500 Kredietbank 5150 -060 Solvay 7330 -095 UCB SA 42.88 -0.65 BRAZIL (Brazilian reals) Bradesco 15.30 +0.24 Brahma 1825.00 -5.00 Itaubanco 174.00 -6.00 Petrobras Pref 55.10 -1.30 Telecom cis Sao P 32.90 + 1 .60 BRITAIN (British pence) Abbey Nall 834.00 -3.00 Ango American 3881.00 +21.00 Zeneca Group 3140.00 +41-00 Barclays 1720.00 +1.00 BG Pic 429.00 -4.00 BP Amoco PLC 630.50 -12.00 Brit Telecom 875.00 +24.00 British Sky Broa 1121.00 -47.00 Cable & Wrels 1273.00 +3800 Diageo 588.00 -1000 Glaxo 1981.00 +3100 Halifax Group PI 538.00 -2000 HSBC Hldg 991.00 +9.00 Lloyds TSB 648.00 +6.00 Marconi Pic 1222.00 +4200 Prudential Corp 902.00 -2500 Shell Transport 588.00 -8.00 Smith, Beec A 897.50 +1250 Unilever Pic 431.50 -8.50 Vodafone Group 278.25 +5.50 CANADA (Canadian $) Bk Nova Scotia 3865 -0.55 Bk Montreal 60.40 -0.45 BCE 33.00 -0.05 Bombardier Inc 24.30 -0.15 JDS Unphase Can 182.15 +7.70 Nor Tel 120.25 +1.30 Royal Bk Can 86.15 +0.60 Stock Price Chg Seagram 88.05 -3.15 Thomson Corporal 5690 +1.30 Toronto Domin 42.05 0.20 CHILE (Chilean pesos) Empresas CMPC6300 00 COPEC 2300.00 -260 Telefon Chile A 2460 00 +9500 Endesa 20150 +200 Enersis 1 9200 -3.00 Entel S.A. 5435 00 +1500 DENMARK (Danish krones)

333 / C12 Day

Carlsberg B 303.00 -2.00 D/S 1912 B 100000 -50000 Darmpskib Sven 139500 +50000 Denise. 274.00 -1.00 Den Danske Bk 105000 +5.00 GN Store Nord 1125.00 +11500 Nordic Baltic 58 00 +0+70 Novo, Nordisk B 1705M -4000 BG Bank 23400 -200 Tele Danmark 505 00 +800 FINLAND (Euros) Comptel Pic 18.96 +0.16 HPY Holding A 42.80 +030 Forturn 197 -0.01 Metso Oyj 13.60 +0.40 Nokia 49.37 +2.60 Sonera Group OYJ 37.60 +0.40 Enso Oy A 100 Enso Oy A 1050 +0.30 Tieto Corp 36.65 +2.15 UPM-Kyrnmene OY 28.45 0.77 FRANCE (Euros) Alcatel Alsthom 92.05 +1.15 AXA 160.3 - 4.2 Carrefour 82.1 + 4.7 Elf Aquitaine 170.0 -24.7 France Telecom 128.5 - 0.5 L’Oreal 81.4 - 3.0 LVMH Most He 874 - 1.0 Sanofi-Synthela 54.9 -2.25 Total Fr Petr B 167.1 - 6.5 Gen des Eaux 92.0 + 0.0 GERMANY (Euros) Allianz Hldg 380.00 -3.50 Bayer 47.55 -0.42 DaimlerChrysler 5822 -0.68 Deu Telekom 43.58 -0.04 Deutsche Bk 98.40 +1.25 Veba 53.90 -1.50 Infineon Tech 74.80 Muenchener Rueck309.00 -2.00 SAP AG 285.50 +13.50 Siemens 181.50 +4.85 HONG KONG (Hong Kong $) China Telecom 60.00 -0.25 Cheung Kong 101.50 +1.00 China Telecom 60.00 -0.25 Citic Pac. 37.20 -0.60 CLP Holdings Ltd 35.00 -1.00 Hang Song B1 83.75 0.25 HSBC Hldga 111.00 +1.00 Hutchison Wins 110.00 -0.50 Johnson Electric 16.35 -0.40 Pacific Century 14.50 -0.15 Sun Hung Kai 7425 +1.00 H$BC HIdgs 11100 +1.00 Pacific Century 14.50 -0.15 ITALY (Euros) Banca Intesa SpA 4.80 +0.03 Enel SpA 4.48 -0.05 EM SpA 6.53 -0.08 Generali Assuc 34.52 -0.14 Mediaset 20.06 +0.58 1st Bn San Paolo 19.87 -0.05 Tecriost SPA 383 +0.16 Slat 13.87 +0.30 TIM 970 +030 Credito Italimo 580 +01 JAPAN (Japanese yen) Mitsubishi Blk 1306 - 26 Canoninc. 4770 - 120 Fujitsu Ltd 3090 + 80 Hitachi 1263 - 42 Honda 3900 + 11 Matsushita Elec, 2920 + 30 FOREIGN STOCK INDEXES Local Currency US$ YTD YTD Country & Index Level Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg Britain FTSE 100 6672.70 +57.60 + .87 -3.72 -13.88 France CAC 40 6625.42 - 9.20 - .14 +11.20 - 188 Germany DAXI 7216.45 + 30.89 + .43 +3.71 848 Netherlands EOE Index 189.52 + 421 + .61 +2.70 9.38 Spain IBEX 35 10884.70 + 15.10 +1.14 -6.50 -17.49 Italy MIS Telematico 33007.00 +374.00 + 5 +13+91 + .52 Switzerland SMI 8219.90 - .10 + 8.58 - 87 South Africa JSE Indus 9034.90 1.92 -13.50Canada TSE 300 11247.91 +74.29 + .66 +33.68 +31.33 Mexico Boise 6664.82 +91.91 +1.40 -6.52 - 3.44 Argentina Merval 474.66 - 1.30 - .27 -13.77 13.76 Chile Selective 99.82 + +60 + .60 - .18 - 6.00 Brazil Ibovespa 17346.70 67.58 - .39 + 1.49 + .13 Australia All-Ord 3261.70 -54.60 -1.65 +4.92 - 7.91 Japan Nikkei 225 16861.26 -40.41 - 14 -1095 -14.42 Hong Kong Hang Sang 17097.51 + 1.63 + .01 + 80 + .47 Singapore Straits Times 2147.77 - 17.57 - .81 -13.38 -16.16 New Zealand Top 40 2093.42 - - 5.13 -22.36 Taiwari Tainn Stock Mkt 7616.98 +73+02 + .97 -9.85 - 8.91 Korea Composite 698.62 -30.31 -4.22 33.02 -31.07

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Stock Price Chg Murata MFG CO. 16330 110 NEC Corporation 3050 10 Nomura Secur 2495 + 105 Nippon Tale 1270000 NTT Docomo Inc 2820000 -50000 Rohm Company Ltd 30350 -800 7 11 Japan 6850 -210 Softbank corp. 14090 +1280 Sony 11900 +370 Sumitomo Bk 1320 - 20 Takeda chemical 6310 90 Tokyo Elec 2385 35 Toshiba 1049 41 Toyota Motor 4640 + 40 MEXICO (Mexican pesos) Grupo Financiero 47.05 +1.80 Carsa Global Tel 23.75 +0.25 Cemex SA 43.40 +0.70 Fomento Econ 41.65 +0.55 Grupo Carso 32.70 -0.25 Grupo Financiero 34.80 +2.30 Grupo Televise 29 75 -0 10 Savia SA 4190 -060 Telef Mexico L 2510 +050 Walmart De Mexic 21.00 + 0.30 NETHERLANDS (Euros) ABN Armo Hldg 28.00 +0.04 Aegon 43.90 -0.44 Ahold 31.82 +0.65 ASM Lithography 42.53 -0.32 Heineken NV 57.20 -2.65 Intl Nederland 75.40 +0.17 RoyaIPTT 30.01 +1.10 Philips 54.80 +1.60 Royal Dutch Pe 68.50 -0.86 Unilever Cert 53.30 -0.65 NEW ZEALAND (N.Z. $) Natural Gas Corp 1.50 -0.06 Auckland Intema 2.96 Carter Holt ord 1.84 -0.01 Contact Energy L 2.58 +0.03 Fletcher Energy 8.95 +0.20 Indep Newspap 3.95 +0.05 Natural Gas Corp 1.50 -0.06 Sky Network Tele 3.83 +006 Telecom NZ 6.51 nt UnitedNetworks L 6.72 nt Warehouse Group 5.94 nt Sky Network Tele 3.83 nt NORWAY (Norwegian krones) Christiania Bank 47.60 Den Norske Bank4l.20 +1.20 Netcom ASA 46600 Norsk Hydro A/S 390 00 -1 Nycomed 81.50 Opticorn ASA 1953.50 +33900 Orkla, A 161.50 -0.50 Petri Gec, 173.00 +1.50 UniStorebrand A 64.50 Tomra Systems A/ 270.00 +9.00 Stock Price Chg SINGAPORE (Singapore $) Chartered Semico l4.40 -0.60 DBS Bank Ltd 20.80 -0.30 Oversea-Chin Blk 11.90 -0.20 Overseas Union B 8.70 +0.05 Pacific Century 23.30 +0.30 Singapore Air 16.60 -0.10 Singap Press F 27.70 -0.20 Singapore Tale 2.84 -0.02 Singapore Tech E 2.32 -0.01 United Oversea B 13.50 +0.20 SPAIN (Euros) Amadeus Global T 11.50 +0.40 Banco Bilbao R 16.71 -0.11 Banco Popular 33.45 -0.80 Ban Santander 12.10 +0.01 Endesa 2195 -0.34 Gas Natural 1825 0.25 Iberdrola 12.95 -0.05 Rapsol 22.30 -0.12 Telefon Espana 21.60 -0.03 Terra Networks S5300 +5.00 SWEDEN (Swedish kronas) ABB Ltd 1058.00 -1500 Zeneca Group 424.00 +1.50 Ericsson B Fr 190.50 +6.00 ForeningsSparban 140.50 -1.00 Hennes & Mauri-B 165.50 -6.50 Nordic Baltic 65.50 +1.00 Securitas AB 210.00 -2.50 SE Banken 113.00 - 1.50 Skandia Forsakri 191.00 + .00 Svens Han A Fr 156.00 SWITZERLAND (Swiss francs) ABE Ltd 195.00 -0.75 Adecco SA 1335.00 -5.00 CS Holdings B 364.00 -9.50 Nestle R 3754.00 +20.00 Novartis Reg 2634.00 +2.00 Roche Holding AS 15600.0 -40.00 Schv, Ruckvr B3576.00 -1.00 Swisscorn AG 494.00 LISS AG 253.50 +1.50 Zurich Ver B 897.00 +5.00 VENEZUELA (Ven. bolivars) Banco Provincal 495.00 Vencemca 1 235.00 Vencemos, 1 230.00 +4.00 Elec, Caracas 302.00 +0.50 Fwdo de Values 18.00 +2.00 Manufactures DE 26.50 +0.50 Mavesa 46.00 -0.50 Mercantil Servic 643.05 Sivenw 2100 Telefon Venez 2415.00 - 25 hol - market closed for holiday. nt - Did not trade. Source Bloomberg

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Financial Markets INDEX OPTIONS THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 SA P. 100 (CBOE) Close: 827.41 Strike - Calls - - Puts - Price Sep Oct Nov Sep Oct Nov 765 r S S 0.63 3.75 s 770 r T S 0.81 4.13 7.50 775 r S S 1.00 5.25 a 780 r 60.75 r 119 5.88 r 785 r S S 138 6.00 s 790 4325 r s 1 A 738 s 795 4100 s S 2.44 800 a 800 3250 r r 300 9.63 12.75 805 31.75 41.50 s 3.63 9.50s 810 26.50 r S 4.75 11.88 S 815 19.75 r a 5.75 r S 820 17.25 31.13 r 7.25 15.75 r 825 14.25 r S 9.13 17.00 s 830 10.50 24.50 r 11.50 18.75 r 835 8.50 21.63 s 12.63 21.25 s 840 6.00 18.13 r 17.00 23.13 r 845 4.25 r r r S S 850 3.00 13.75 21.00 24.25 r S 855 2.00 r r 28.00 r S a 0 1.25 10.25 r r S S 865 0.88 9.00 s r S S 870 s 7.00 13.00 s S S 875 0.50 5.75 s r S 8 880 0.25 5.00 r s 52.25 s 890 0.06 H8 s s S S Prev call vol. 14.069 Call open int 83.448 Prev put vol. 20.833 Put open int 10.188 SA P. 500 (CSOE) Close: 1517.68 Strike - Calls - - Puts - Price Sep Oct Nov Sep Oct Nov 1375 r r r 0.50 4.00 r 1400 r r 150.00 0.88 5.63 10.50 1420 s S S 1.25 s a 1425 99.50 r S 163 7.75 13.13 1440 r S S 2.00 s 1450 80.50 r s 2.75 12.25 16.63 1460 59.00 s 5 3.13 s S 1465 r S S 3.63 s $ 1470 r S S 5.50 s S 1475 50.63 71.00 r 5.50 16.00 r 1480 r S S 5.50 a S 1485 48.25 s s 7.00 s S 1490 4350 s S 6.75 s S 1500 32.00 57.75 68.00 10.50 94.00 29.75 505 S s 12.00 s a 510 26r75 s s 12.00 s S 1515 2000 s a 15.50 s 8 1520 2000 s s 1700 s S 1525 39.50 5575 19.00 33.50 37.50 1530 15.38 s s 19.63 s 8 1550 650 24.75 3450 3438 r r 1575 2.00 16.88 31.25 53.00 58.50 s 1600 050 9.50 2025 7700 r S 1625 0.13 5.75 r r $ 1650 r 3.00 7.50 r S S Prev call vol.40,251 Call open int. 882,244 Prev put vol. 46,901 Put open int. 870,267 Nasdaq 100 (CBOE) Close: 4077.59 Strike - Calls - - Puts - Price Sep Oct Nov Sep Oct Nov 3400 3.13 3600 7.00 3650 r S S 10.00 S 8 3675 t S s 13.50 s S 3700 363.00 r s 14.50 r S 3725 r S S 19.38 S 8 3750340.00 s S 18.88 S 8 3800 r r r 23.00 128.00 s 3W S r 120.00 s 3875 r 49.00 134.00 S 3900225.00 s r 45.00 150.00 r 3950 r 8 s 70.00 s S 3975 173.88 s s 70.00 s $ 4020 138.50 s S 90.00 S S 4025 s 246.00 s s 191.00s 4050 r r s 100.00 211,00s 4075 109.00 s S r S a 4175 49.88 s S S S S 4200 56.00 150.00 s 177.38 s S 4225 40.25 s S S S S 4400 11.50 r r r 4450 8.00 s s s 4500 3.00 64.00 s r S S 4525 2.25 s 8 S S $ 4550 2.13 s 8 8 S S Pw call vol 940 Call open int 24,469 Prev put vol 894 Put open int 30,811 DJ Inds (1/100) (CBOE) Close: 112.15 Strike - Calls - - Puts - Price Sep Oct Dec Sep Oct Dec 80 r S 34.00 r S r 90 r S f r r 0.19 92 r 51 r r 0.25 96 r s 17.00 r 0.13 r 97 S S r S S 0.31 100 1300 1250 r r 0.19 0.69 102 r S S 0.06 s S 104 r r 10.00 r 0.31 1.13 106 7.25 s S 0.13 r S 108 5.13 r 825 0.19 r f 110 3.25 r 663 0.44 1.31 2.38 Ill 2.88 s 1 0.63 s 112 2.00 2.88 r 1.06 1.94 3.00 113 0.94 s S 1.25 s 8 114 0.88 2.38 s 2.00 2.75 s 115 0.63 s r 2.50 s r 116 163 r 4.38 r 4.50 120 0.06 r T 7.00 6.81. Prev call vol . 773 Call open int. 1689 Prov put vol 3.103 Put open int.

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239,674 Japan Index (A) Close: 176.43 Strike - Calls - Puts Price Sep Oct Nov Sep Oct Nov 170 r 1038 s r r 8 175 r r S 2.13 s S 180 2.50 4.75 s r S S 185 1.13 s 4.50 s 8 S 190 r S S r 15.13 s Prev call vol . 233 Call open int 9,350 Prev put vol 12 Put open int . 1,358 FOREIGN EXCHANGE THURSDAY AUGUST 31, 2000 Foreign Currency Dollars in in Dollars Foreign Currency Currency Thu. Wed. Thu. Wed. f-Argent (Peso) 1.0002 1.0002 .9998 .9998 Australia (Dollar) .5762 .5746 1.7355 1.7403 Austria (Schilling) .0649 0649 15.404 15.413 c-Belgium (Franc) .0220 .0221 45.44 45.22 Brazil (Real) .5476 5472 1.8260 1.8275 Britain (Pound) 1.4503 1.4582 .6895 .6858 30-day fwd 1.4474 14561 .6909 .6868 60-day fwd 1.4460 1.4547 .6916 .6874 90-day fwd 1.4449 14536 .6921 .6879 Canada (Dollar) .6795 .6772 1.4716 1.4767 30-day fwd .6787 6765 1.4734 1.4781 60-day fwd .6782 6760 1.4744 1.4792 90-day fwd .6778 6756 1.4754 1.4802 y-Chile (Peso) .001777 .001791 562.75 558.45 China (Yuan) .1208 .1208 82788 8.2799 Colombia (Peso) .000452 r000453 2213.00 2209.00 c-CzwhRep (Koruna) .0252 0254 39.62 39.42 Denmark (Krone) .1196 .1197 83640 8.3510 Dominican (Peso) .0695 0695 14.39 14.39 z-Ecudr (Sucre) .000040 00G40 25000.00 25.00 d-Egypt (Pound) .2854 .2854 15033 3.5033 Europe (Euro) .88780 89240 1.1264 1.1206 3G-day fwd .89210 .89620 1.1210 1.1158 9G-day fd .89580 .89970 1.1163 1.1115 Finland (Mark) .1502 .1502 6.6559 6.6600 France (Franc) .1353 .1361 7.3899 7.3497 Germany (Mark) .4538 .4563 2.2034 2.1914 Greece (Drachma) .002629 .002642 380.33 378.43 Hong Kong (Dollar) .1282 .1282 73990 7.7999 Hungary (Forint) .0034 .0034 292.41 292.56 y-India (Rupee) 0219 .0218 45.740 45.780 Indnaia (Rupiah) .000121 .000120 8270.00 8365.00 Ireland IPunt) 1.1343 1.1335 .8816 .8822 Israel (Shekel) .2496 .2483 4.0060 4.0280 Italy (Lira) .000458 .000461 2181.34 2169.49 Japan (Yen) .009370 009392 106.72 106.47 30-day fwd .009423 .009439 106.12 05.94 60-day fwd .009462 .009478 105.69 105.51 Foreign Currency Dollars in in Dollars Foreign Currency Currency Thu. Wed. Thu. Wed. 90-day fwd .009508 .009525 105.17 104.99 Jordan (Dinar) 1.4065 1.4065 .71098 71098 Lebanon (Pound) 000661 .000661 1513.50 1513.50 Malaysia (Ringgit) .2632 .2632 3.7995 3.7995 z-Mexico (Peso) 108743 .108790 9.1960 9.1920 Nethrlnd (Guilder) .4029 .4048 24821 2.4701 N. Zealand (Dollar) .4273 .4260 2.3403 2.3474 Norway (Krone) .1103 IID5 9.G670 9.0530 Pakistan (Rupee) .0183 .0183 54.68 54.70 y-Peru (New Sol) .2879 .2879 3.473 3.474 z-Philpins (Peso) .0223 0223 44.87 44.87 Poland (Zloty) .2288 .2283 4.37 4.38 Portugal (Escudo) 004456 .004453 224.43 224.57 a-Russia (Ruble) .0360 .0360 27.7600 27.7500 SDR (SDR) 1.30480 1.30220 17664 .7679 Saudi Arab (Riyal) .2666 .2666 3.7506 3.7506 Singapore (Dollar) .5811 5809 1.7208 1.7216 SlovakRelp (Koruna) .0210 0210 47.71 47.73 So Africa (Rand) .1434 143B 6.9735 6.9525 So Korea (Won) .000902 .000902 1108.70 1108.50 Spain (Peseta) .005355 .005366 186.75 18670 Sweden (Krona) 1059 .1059 9.4388 9.4451 Switzerland (Franc) .5741 5769

337 / C12 Day

1.7419 1.7335 30-day fwd .5759 5784 1.7365 1.7290 60-day fwd .5771 5796 1.7327 17252 90-day fwd .5786 .5811 1.7284 1.72 09 Taiwan (Dollar) .0322 .0322 31.07 31.07 Thailand (Baht) .02443 .02 1 40.94 40.96 Turkey (Lira) 000002 .000002 652050 652870 UA.E. (Ditham) .2723 .2723 3.6728 3.6728 fUruguay (New Peso) .0809 0809 12.360012.363 Venzuel (Bolivar) .0015 0015 698.0000688.2500 a-Russian Central Bank rate. c-commercial rate, d-free market rate, municipal rate, y-official rate, z-floating rate. Prices as of 3:00 p.m, Eastern Time from Dow Jones Telerate and other sources. EXPLANATIONS Next to the name of each futures contract and option in the table is an abbreviation of the exchange on which it is traded. Also listed are the minimum size of the futures contract or option and the monetary units represented by the figures in the table, Open interest is the number of contracts outstanding. The total open interest figure for each commodity or option includes contracts nor listed because they failed to trade or had relatively low open interest. Key to the exchanges A American Stock Exchange CSCE New York Coffee, Sugar and r Not Traded CBOE Chicago Board Options Exchange Cocoa Exchange S No option offered CTN New York Cotton Exchange New contract high. COT Chicago Board of Trade KC Kansas City Board of Trade CME Chicago Mercantile Exchange NYM New York Mercantile Exchange New contract low. CMX Comex division of NYM NYFE New York Futures Exchange New contract high & low. FUTURES THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 FINANCIAL Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int 3-MO EURODOLLARS DEPOSITS (CME) $1 million-pts of 100 pct. 92.49 91.52 Mar 00 92.45 395 95.60 92.00 Jun 00 92.42 142 95.48 91.43 Sep 00 93.31 93.33 93.30 93.32 + .01545,604 93.20 92.48 Oct 00 93.16 93.19 93.16 93.19 + .03 14.002 93.19 92.50-Nov 00 93.18 93.19 93.18 93.19 + .04 3.956 95.81 92.30 Dec 00 93.13 93.19 93.12 93.18 + .05 548.949 93. 7 93.02 Jan 01 93.26 93.27 93.26 93.27 + .05 743 at Vol 427.520: prev vol 302,909: open int 3,236,421: +2,913,282 5 YR. TREASURY (CBT) $100,000 prin-pts & 32nds & a half 32nd 19W5 96145 Sep 00 99-205 100-00 99-18 99-30 + 105161,669 ION45 98-05-Dec 00 9924 100-045 99-225 1ON25 + 11243,986 Est 133,000: prev vol 158,725: open int 396,415: -9,247 10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) $100,000 prin-pts & 32nds & a half 32nd 100-13 94-22 Sep 00 99-195 100-08 99-18 100-05 + 18291,114 100-10 96-08 Dec 00 99-18 100-06 99-16 100-M + 195292,280 Est vol 280,000: prev vol 335.126: open int 569.251: -14,276 US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) (8 pct-$100,000-pts & 32nds of 100 pct) 10024 88-16 Sep 00 99-24 100-17 99-17 100-12 + 22 212.525 Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int 100 25 W31 Dec 00 99-26 100-19 99-18 100-16 + 25 238,246 100-21 88-06 Mar 01 100-14 101116 100-14 100-16 + 23 1,186 Est vol 360,000: prev vol 324,198: open int 441,022: -11,060 S&P COMP. INDEX (CNIE)

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250 x index 1592.50 1096.50 Sep 00 1505.10 1529.50 150160 152120 +17.60 322,226 159750 1291.50 Dec 00 1531.00 1551.80 1531.00 1544.10 +17.90 81,766 1593.20 1386.20 Mar 011573.00,1576.00 1567.90 1567,90 +17.80 1,577 1602.00 1394.50 Jun 01 1591.50 1598.00 1591.50 1592.00 +17.90 1,323 Est vol 101,573: prev vol 103,419: open int 407,050: +2,904 DJ Inds (CBT) $10 x Dow Jones Industrial Average 12126 9995 Sep 00 11140 11335 11135 11260 + 139 14,257 12180 8100 Dec 00 11290 11477 11290 11409 + 141 2,318 Est vol 15,000: prev vol 11,347: open int 16,900: +309 NASDAQ 100 INDEX (CME) $100 x index 540.03 2975.00 Sep 00 3975.50 4089.00 3967.00 4094.00 + 118.50 31,627 335.03 3360.50 Dec 00 4065.00 4159.00 4065.00 4159.00 + 1200 2,538 Est vol 16,729: prev vol 13,220: open int 34,189: +391 AGRICULTURAL Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int CORN (CBT) 00 bu minimum- cents per bushel 61/2 174 Sep 00 180314 1841/4 180314 1833/4 + 21/4 48,166 12 82 Nov 00 1891/2 193 1891/2 1923/4 + 31/4 1,947 2 P2 451/2 Dec 00 1931/2 1963/4 1931/2 1961/2 + 23/4 216,570 2793/4 1981/2 Mar 01 205 208114 205 208 + 21/4 56,191 282112 2061/2 May 01 213 215 2123/4 2143/4 + 13/4 15 240 ‘2 2131/4 Jul 01 220 222 2193/4 221314 + 11/2 23 057 276112 219314 Sep 01 226112 2271/2 2261/4 227112 + 11/4 2346 Est vol 70,000: prev vol 121,655: open int 360,156: -1 685 SOYBEANS(CBT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 587112 4363/4 Sep 00 4811/2 495 4811/4 4943/4+13 6.426 633 4451/2 Nov 00 492 505112 4911/2 505 +123/4 83,768 600 456 Jan 01 5013/4 5151/2 5013/4 515 +121/4 13,903 6041/2 467 Mar 01 519 5241/2 517 523314 +111/2 10,034 604 474112 May 01 527112 531 524 530314 +111/4 6994 609 484 Jul 01 532 5391/2 532 5383/4 +111/2 8:270 605 493 Nov 01 540 545 539 5441/2 +11 2,091 Est vol 60,000: prev vol 57,577: open int 131,882: +178 SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 100 tons dollars per ton 18800 132.00 Sep 00 170.80 +4.20 13,225 18780 131.50 Oct 00 164.00 169.80 164.00 169.20 +5.40 16440 18960 135,50 Dec 00 166.00 171.50 164.50 170.90 +5.80 44,920 189.50 146.70 Jan 01 16780 172.20 167.80 171.60 +5.90 9 530 139.50 148.10 Mar 01 170.50 173.00 169.20 173.00 +5.90 7,678 189.50 150.00 May 01 171.00 174.40 170.30 174.40 +6.10 4 , 523 Est vol 28,000: prev vol 29,326 open int 96,654: -2,481 SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 60,000 lbs- cents per lb 20.65 15.01 Sep 00 18.60 15.77 15.51 15.75+ .218,444 22.25 15.23 Oct 00 15.89+ .17 23,694 . 2 15.60 Dec 00 16.12 16.33 16.07 16.28+ .16 62,063 2010 15.88 Jan 01 16.57 16.57 16.42 16.57 + .15 16,691 20.38 16.30 Mar 01 16.95 16.98 16.77 16.94 + .15 9,113 20.68 16.65 May 01 17.15 17.30 17.15 17.30+ .16 7,368 20.95 17.00 Jul 01 17.55 17.65 17.55 17,65+ .16 5,426 Est vol 30,000: prev vol 34,457: open int 139,187: +827 WHEAT (CBT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 335 232 Sep 00 248 251 247 2503/4 + 41/2 10 639 345 2501/2 Dec 00

339 / C12 Day

264114 2681/2 2641/4 2681/4 + 4 92578 327 268 Mar 01 281 286 281 2851/4 + 41/4 22 578 326 279 May 01 2913/4 2951/4 2911/2 2951/4 + 31/ 1419 353 288 Jul 01 302 304 300 304 + 331 500 343 307 Dec 01 318 3203/4 318 3201/2 + 31/2 554 Est vol 27,000: prev vol 47,144: open int 136,054: -1,259 LIVE CATTLE (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 7137 65.52 Aug 00 66.00 66.25 65.90 66.22 + .30 753 73. 30 66.77 Oct 00 67.10 67.32 66.77 66.97 - .13 59,299 74.45 68.80 Dec 00 69.05 69.15 68.80 69.02 30,479 7550 70.50, Feb 01 70.70 70.77 70.50 70.70- .02 15220 750 72 52 Apr 01 72.72 72.75 72.52 72.72- .08 86.35 75.55 70.32 Jun 01 70.45 70 50 70.32 70.42- .03 3,518 74 17 70.25 Aug 01 70.40 70A2 70.30 70.30- .02 2,702 Esi vol 11,858, prev vol 10,313: open int 120,606: +1,596 FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 50,000 lbs, cents per lb. .40 79.25 Aug 00 86.70 86.77 86.67 86.72+ .10 2215 .50 83.50 Sep 00 84.85 84.90 84.40 94.62 3,350 8.90 84.35 Oct 00 85.05 85.20 84.50 84.92 .03 6 , 835 89.45 85.35 Nov 00 85.75 85.90 85.35 85.52- .15 3,539 89.90 85.95 Jan 01 B6.30 86.35 85.95 86.22 .08 2,589 89.60 86.00 Mar 0 1 86.20 86.30 86.00 86.30+ .10 1,212 Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int 89.60 85.95 May 01 86.10 86.15 86.00 86.05 - .05 739 Est vol 2,464: prev vol 3,337: open int 20,801: -74 HOGS-Lean (CME) 40,000 lbs. cents per lb. 62.35 49.75 Oct 00 52.50 53.00 52.25 52,92 + .65 19,244 59.70 48.70 Dec 00 50.00 50.37 49.77 50.30 + .30 11,688 59.50 50.05 Feb 01 51.02 51.35 50.75 51.32 + .30 3,672 58.65 48.85 Apr 0 1 49.30 49.70 49.30 49.60 + .30 1,663 65.30 55.47 Jun 01 55.70 56.06 55.70 55.95 + .18651 Est vol 4,566: prev vol 5,699: open int 37,208: -642 PORK BELLIES (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 80.00 61.42 Feb 01 63.35 64.50 63.30 63.87 + .07 1,746 78.65 62.00 Mar 01 63.30 64.20 63.30 63.70 27 Est vol 553: prev vol 611: open int 1,783: +98 COCOA (CSCE) 10 metric tons- $ per ton 1494 735 Sep 00 760 760 745 745 - 15 48 1336 776 Dec 00 800 812 794 795 - 6 53,343 1393 810 Mar 01 832 845 826 827 - 7 18,251 1415 835 May 01 859 866 850 851 - 5 8,398 1245 857 Jul 01 885 885 873 873 - 6 7,987 1246 887 Sep 01 898 898 898 898 - 5 7,103 1125 922 Dec 01 932 932 932 932 - 6 8,557 Est vol 7,602: prev 5,765: open int 119,010: -1,894 COFFEE(CSCE) 37,500 lbs.- cents per lb. 148.50 73.50, Sep 00 73.50 75.20 73.50 74.50+ .60 460 150.50 78.75 Dec 00 79.75 80.75 79.20 7970 + .15 29,271 153.95 83.85 Mar 01 84.50 95.50 94.30 84.60+ .30 5,347 150.85 87.00 May 01 87.75 88.00 87.25 87.25+ .20 1,747 127.00 89.60 Jul 01 90.50 90.50 90.00 90.00+ .35 707 127.75 92.00 Sep 01 93.00 93.00 92.25 92.75+ .20 1,326 Est vol 3,971: prev vol 4,579: open int 38,976: -230 SUGAR-WORLD (CSCE) 11 2,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 11.15 5.60 Oct 00 10.70 10.72 10.52 10.56 - .20 74,397 10.81 5.95 Mar 01 10.40 10.42 10.25 10.32 - .13 49,554 10.54 6.03 May 01 10.04 10.04 9.92 9.98- .11 12,735 10.12 6.03 Jul 01 9.53 9.55 9.41 9.47- .11 13,529 9.88 6.27 Oct 01 9.20 9.20 9.09 9.15- .12 10,927 9.60 6.65 Mar 02 9.00 9.008.93 ‘ 8.93- .14 5,249 Est vol 23,240: prev vol 13,305: open int 166,361: 107

Day C12 / 340

COTTON (CTN) 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 72.10 53.18 Oct 00 64.20 64.50 63.30 63.37 -1.38 4,606 67.50 53.75 Dec 00 66.31 66.60 65.30 65,35-1.28 44,695 68.70 55.10 Mar 01 67.40 67.94 66.60 66.73 -1.26 10,874 69.05 56.20 May 01 67.80 68.25 67.00 67.22 -1.18 7,285 69.65 56.50 Jul 01 68.45 68.90 67.80 67.83 -1.02 2,417 66.85 60.25 Oct 01 65.70 65.70 65.00 65.00 - .70 585 67 70 57 10 Dec 01 65.95 66.20 65.50 65.60.60 3,338 Est vol 8,000: prev vol 6,289: open int 73,857: +824 ORANGE JUICE (CTN) 15,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 102.95 71.50 Sep 00 75.00 75.05 73.75 73.75-1.20 1,437 103.95 72.70 Nov 00 73.50 73.50 72.75 72.90- .60 16,822 99.40 74.70 Jan 01 75.20 75.20 74.70 74.75 - .45 4,459 97.85 76,70 Mar 01 77.40 77.40 76.90 76.90- .30 4,392 95.20 78.50 May 01 78.60 78.75 78.60 78.65- .15 641 Est vol 3,500: prev vol 3,864: open int 28,440: -83 METALS AND ENERGY Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int GOLD (CMX) 100 troy oz. dollars per troy oz. 290,40 272.50 Sep 00 27480 27830 274,80 278.30 +4.40 2 329,00 262.10 Oct 00 276.50 280.00 276.30 279 60 +4.208134 474 SO 261.70 Dec 00278.50 282.70 278.40 282.10 +3.90 79:492 33300 265.40 Feb 01 282.00 285.00 282.00 284.70 +3.90 11764 30830 280.80 Apr 01 285.50 287.30 285.50 287.20 +3.90 3:832 328.50 290.00 Aug 01 293.00 293.00 292.20 292.20 + 3.90 2,845 Est vol : prov vol 8,050: open int 123,704: -639 SILVER (CMX) 5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz. 580.0 477.5 Sep 00 492.0 504.5 492.0 500.3+ 7.3 9,234 504.6 493.0 Oct 00 499.9 + 6.0 5 685.0 485.0 Dec 00 498.5 508.5 498.0 504.5+ 6.0 61263 542.0 490.0 Mar 01 506.0 511.5 506.0 509.4+ 5.7 2543 528.0 507,0 Sep 01 514.0 517.2 514.0 517.2 + 5.7 2,509 680.0 486.3 Dec 01 513.0 523.0 513.0 519.7 + 5.7 1,309 613.0 487.0 Dec 02 525.0 527,5 525.0 527.5+ 5.7 1,504 Est yet : prev yet 38,069: open int 79,641: -5,017 PLATINUM (NYM) 50 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. 5116.00 394.90 Oct 00 589.00 592.00 594.50 586.70 -4.70 9,110 572.00 400.80 Jan 01 575.00 575.00 570.00 572.70 -4.20 1,037 Est vol 1,016: prev yet 1,016: open int 9,992: -89 HI GRADE COPPER (CMX) 25,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 96.90 66.95 Sep 00 88.50 88.80 88.00 88.50 14,000 97.10 67.00 Oct 00 88.80 89.10 88.40 88.90- .10 4,565 90.10 67.35 Nov 00 89.30 89.40 89.20 89.20.10 2,032 97.55 67.09 Dec 00 89.70 90.10 88.90 89.50- .20 47,510 90.00 68.75 Jan 01 89.60 89.60 89.50 89.50- 05 974 9090 6909 Feb 01 8950 8950 89.40 89.50+ .10 621 89.65 70.20 01 88.90 89.65 88.90 89.45+ .25 5,579 Est vol: prey yet 22,530: open int 73,914: +3,232 Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYM) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. 74.75 14.22 Oct 00 33.26 33.70 32.97 33.12 - .20121,359 32.80 15,12ANov 00 32.51 32.80 32.10 32.21 - .21 50,491 53.50 13.80 Dec 00 31.70 32.15 31.50

341 / C12 Day

31.58- 24 46,463 274.19 14.20- Jan 01 31.17 31.50 30.95 30.99 - .26 22,967 47.15 14.25 Feb 01 30.70 30.92 30.43 30,43- .28 12,707 31 00 14.44 Mar 01 30.22 30.35 29.93 29.93- .29 12,003 29.81 15.58AApr 01 29.81 29.81 29.45 29.45- .30 6,359 Est yet 151,032: prev yet 155,767: open int 406,980: +1,655 UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYM) 42,000 gal, cents per gal 103.50 57.65ASep 00 100.45 103.50 99.00 101.14 +1.15 11,105 96.75 60.48-Oct 00 93.50 96.75 93.10 94.56 +1.27 29,422 91.70 59.28 No, 00 90.10 91.70 90.10 90.75 + .61 9,031 89.00 58.58ADec 00 87.50 89.00 87.50 88.00+ .06 6,687 87.25 58,38AJan 01 87,00 87.25 86.30 86.30 - .24 2,696 96.80 63.68AFeb 01 86.80 86.80 85.50 85,50- .59 2,376 86.40 65.28-Mar 01 86.40 86.40 85.15 85.15- .79 1738 Est yet 43,969: prev yet 44,108: open int 70,978: -650,207 HEATING OIL (NYM) 42,000 gal, cents per gal 101.50 41.94 Sep 00 99.30 99.50 97.90 98.42- .83 10,077 100.50 46.49 Oct 00 99.15 100.00 98.35 98.70- .62 46,310 98.80 47.45 Nov 00 97.90 98.70 97.20 97.75 - .42 23,426 97.30 47.67ADec 00 96.90 97.30 96.30 96.65 - .42 29,515 9590 52.44 A Jan 01 95.10 96.90 94.90 95.15 - .22 20,224 92.70 53.OOAFeb 01 92.00 92.70 91.70 92.06- .17 15,656 94.32 51.60 Mar 01 86.30 86.75 86.10 86.25 - 32 10,511 Est yet 53,823: prey yet 54,397: open int 174,916: +1,792 NATURAL GAS (NYM) 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per rnm btu 4.865 2.100AOCt 00 4.811 4.965 4.740 4.782 -.019 48,372 4.915 2.048 A Nov 00 4.865 4.915 4310 4.940-010 23,292 5.000 2.380ADoc 00 5.000 5.000 4.860 4310-010 34,779 4,930 2.259AJan 01 4.860 4.930 4.810 4.850-011 29,026 4Z50 2.305 Feb 01 4,630 4.650 4.580 4.580 -.01G 18,875 4.370 2,210Mar 01 4.360 4.370 4.320 4.315 -.008 21,779 4.105 2.120AApr 01 4.090 4.105 4.070 4.055-.003 13,166 Est yet 65,630: prev yet 67,777: open int 338,989: 10,836 OTHER FUTURES Net Lifetime Open Vol. High Low Settle Chg. High Low Int LIBOR 1-MONTH (CME) $3 million- pts of 100 pct. Sep 00 2313 93.39 93.38 93.38 93.93 92.80 14920 30-DAY FED. FUNDS (CBT) $5 million- pts. of 100 pct. Aug 00 93.50 93.50 93.50 93.73 93.12 10182 MUNICIPAL BONDS (CST) $1000x index-pts & 32nds Sep 00 100-02 99-11 99-29 + 16 100-05 90-07 17651 US DOLLAR INDEX (CTN) 1000 x index Sep 00 1600 112.88 111.80 112.57 + .49 112.88 95.64 5056 CRB INDEX X 500 INYFE) 500 x index Nov 00 190 226.00 225.10 225.60 + 1.00 227.10 212.20 571 GSCI (Goldman S. Index) (CME) $250 X Nearby Index Sep 00 156 246.55 244.00 244.35 - .45 246.55 2000 34167 SUGAR-DOMESTIC (CSCE) 112,000 lbs.- cents per. Nov 00 67 18.85 18.50 18.60 - .25 22.35 17.10 2140 OATS (CBT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 00 98 96 98 + 1112 132 1/2 96 2401 WINTER WHEAT (KC) 5,000 bu minimum cents per bushel Sep 00 70B6 293 2873/4 2923/4 + 4 346 271 3826 ROUGH RICE (CBT) 2,000 CWR- dollars per CWT Sep 00 6,460 6.270 6,270 - .230 7.060 5.750 1093 LUMBER (CME) 80,000 bd. ft $ per 1,000 bd. ft. Sep 00 432 224.6 218.1 221.8 + 2.6 339.9 213.2 1279 PALLADIUM (NYM) 100 troy oz- dollars per oz Sep

Day C12 / 342

00 12 716.75 710.00 716.75 + 4.70 8590 563 00 128 BRITISH POUND (CME) 62,500 pounds, $ per pound Sep 00 1.4602 1.4460 1.4510 -.0082 1.6558 1,4428 43406 CANADIAN DOLLAR (CME) 100,000 dollars, $ per Cdn. dir Sep GO .6800 .6770 .6799 +.0023 .7014 .6623 52696 JAPANESE YEN (CME) 12.5 million yen, $ per 100 yen Sep 00 .9438 .9385 .9396 -.0036 1.0313 9175 73362 SWISS FRANC (CME) 125,000 francs, $ per franc Sep 00 .5798.5724 .5748 -.0031 .6865 .5724 52397 Lifetime Open High Low Date Open High Low Settle Chg Int LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYM) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. 74.75 14.22 Oct 00 33.26 33.70 32.97 33.12 - .20121,359 32.80 15,12 A NOV 00 32.51 32.80 32.10 32.21 - .21 50,491 53.50 13.80 Dec 00 31.70 32.15 31.50 31.58- 24 46,463 274.19 14.20- Jan 01 31.17 31.50 30.95 30.99 - .26 22,967 47.15 14.25 Feb 01 30.70 30.92 30.43 30.43- .28 12,707 31 00 14.44 Mar 01 30.22 30.35 29.93 29.93- .29 12,003 29.81 15.58AApr 01 29.81 29.81 29.45 29.45- .30 6,359 Est Vol 151,032: prev Vol 155,767: open int 406,980: +1,655 UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYM) 42,000 gal, cents per gal 103.50 57.65ASep 00 100.45 103.50 99.00 101.14 +1.15 11,105 96.75 60.48-Oct 00 93.50 96.75 93.10 94.56 +1.27 29,422 91.70 59.28 No, 00 90.10 91.70 90.10 90.75 + .61 9,031 89.00 58.58ADec 00 87.50 89.00 87.50 88.00+ .06 6,687 87.25 58,38AJan 01 87,00 87.25 86.30 86.30 - .24 2,696 96.80 63.68AFeb 01 86.80 86.80 85.50 85.50- .59 2,376 86.40 65.28-Mar 01 86.40 86.40 85.15 85.15- .79 17.38 Est Vol 43,969: prev Vol 44,108: open int 70,978: -650,207 HEATING OIL (NYM) 42,000 gal, cents per gal 101.50 41.94 Sep 00 99.30 99.50 97.90 98.42- .83 10,077 100.50 46.49 Oct 00 99.15 100.00 98.35 98.70- .62 46,310 98.80 47.45 Nov 00 97.90 98.70 97.20 97.75 - .42 23,426 97.30 47.67ADec 00 96.90 97.30 96.30 96.65 - .42 29,515 9590 52.44 A Jan 01 95.10 96.90 94.90 95.15 - .22 20,224 92.70 53.OOAFeb 01 92.00 92.70 91.70 92.06- .17 15,656 94.32 51.60 Mar 01 86.30 86.75 86.10 86.25 - .32 10,511 Est Vol 53,823: prev Vol 54,397: open int 174,916: +1,792 NATURAL GAS (NYM) 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu 4.865 2.100ADCt 00 4.811 4.965 4.740 4.782 -.019 48,372 4.915 2.048 A Nov 00 4.865 4.915 4310 4.940-010 23,292 5.000 2.380 500 00 5.000 5.000 4.860 4.910-010 34,779 4,930 2.259AJan 01 4.860 4.930 4.810 4.850-011 29,026 4Z50 2.305 Feb 01 4,630 4.650 4.580 4.580 -.011 18,875 4.370 2.210Mar 01 4.360 4.370 4.320 4.315 -.008 21,779 4.105 2.120AApr 01 4.090 4.105 4.070 4.055-.003 13,166 Est Vol 65,630: prev Vol 67,777: open int 338,989: 10,836 WORLD GOLD Hong Kong late 274.05 up 1.30 London morning fixing 274.95 up 2.15 London afternoon fixing 277.00 up 4.20 London late fixing 276.70 up 3.90 Paris afternoon fixing 271.47 off 0.09 Zurich late afternoon bid 276.40 up 365 NY Handy & Harman 277.00 up 3.70 NY Engelhardt 278.12 up 3.71 NY Marc. spot month 278.30 up 4.40 HSBC Bank USA 277.70 up 4.50 Gold Coins American Eagle, 1 troy oz. 288.08 up 3.25 American Eagle, .50 oz. 146.81 up

343 / C12 Day

1.96 American Eagle, .25 oz. 75.14 up 1.01 American Eagle, .10 oz. 31.02 up 0.41 Austla. Kangaroo, 1 troy oz. 288.08 up 3.25 Aus. Philharmonic, 1 troy oz. 288.08 up 3.25 Maple Leaf, 1 troy oz. 288.08 up 3.25 China Panda 1992, 1 troy oz. 290.85 up 3.88 Krugerrand, 1 troy oz. 280.00 up 3.70 U.S. Silver Coins $1000 face value pre 1965 circulation 3653.70 up 1430 U.S. Silver Eagle, I troy oz. 6.91 up 0.02 U.S. Platinum Eagle, 1 troy oz. 615.93 Off 10.48 Source: MTB Bank CASH PRICES Thu. Wed. Broilers dressed lb. .5548 .5527 Eggs large white NY Doz. .691/2 .71112 Flour hard winter KC cwt 8.95 9.10 Cheddar cheese blocks 40 lb. CIVE 1.30 1.30 Coffee parana ex-dock NY per In. .773/4 0.773/4 Coffee Medlin ex-dock NY per lb. .87314 .873/4 Cocoa beans Ivory Coast $ metric ton 980 986 Cocoa butter African styl $ met ton 2041 2056 Sugar No. 11 cents per b 10.87 11.16 Hogs Sioux Falls 47-50 pct 220-270 lb 40.50 41.50 Feeder cattle 500-600 lb Oki av c.t 96.88 96.88 Pork bellies 12-14 lb Midwest av cwt 49.00 49M GRAINS Corn No. 2 yellow Chi processor bid 1.76314 1.733/4 Soybeans No. 1 yellow 4.89 4,761 A Soybean Meal Can lll 48pct protein-ton 174.50 170.00 Wheat No. 2 Chi soft 2,253/4 2.211/4 Wheat 3.37 3.25 Wheat No. 2 hard KC. 2.563/4 2.58314 Oats No. 2 heavy n.c. ri.q. FATS & OILS Coconut oil N. Orleans lb, .181/2 .18112 Corn oil crude wet/dry mill Chi. lb. .12114 .125/B Soybean oil crude Decatur lb. .14 1/2 .14 3/o METALS Aluminum cents per lb 71.1 70.9 Antimony US producer per lb. 0.97112 0.97112 Copper Cathode full plate 93.0 92.0 Gold Handy & Harman 277.00 273.30 Silver Handy & Harman 4.980 4.925 Thu. Wed. Lead per lb. .30 30 Pig Iron fob fdry buff gross ton 167.00 167.00 Platinum per troy oz. NY (contract) 568.00 568,00 Platinum Merc spot per troy oz 586.70 591 40 Mercury per flask of 76 lbs. 150.00 150.00 Steel scrap No. 1 heavy gross ton 91.50 .91.50 Zinc (HG) delivered In. .5961 .5909 TEXTILES & FIBERS Cotton 1-1-16 in. strict low middling 61,79 6225 Wool fine staple torr Boston lb. 1.07 107 MISCELLANEOUS Rubber No. 1 NY smoked sheets lb. .38 .38 Hides heavy native steer In. .82 82 PETROLEUM - REFINED PRODUCTS Fuel oil No. 2 NY hbr bg gi fob .9618 Gasoline uni prem RVP NY hbr bg 1.0177 .9898 Gasoline unl RVP NY hbr bg gi fob .9627 .9083 PETROLEUM - CRUDE PRODUCTS Saudi Arabian light Asia $ per bbl fob 30.28 30.07 North Sea Brent $ per Libi fob 34.83 33.94 West Texas Intermed $ per bbi fob 33.13 33.33 Light LA Sweet $ per bbl fob 33.45 33.70 Alaska No. Slope del. West Coast 31.37 31.54 RAW PRODUCTS Natural Gas Henry Hub, $ per mmbtu 4.74 4,59 a-asked r-revised b-bid n.q.-not quoted n-Nominal n.a.-not available

Day C13 / 344

THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 I C13 NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 39.19 16.13 NwstAirt 10 2745 31.63 31.06 31.31+0.31 g.00 6.13 NwstBcp .16 1.9 15 671 8.56 8.06 8.50+0.31 17.13 11.13 NwtPipe - 6 16 12.63 12.63 12.63 g2.19 9.00 NovaMs n 28 14.00 13.50 13.88-0.13 27.63 7.50 Novadig 98 1092 10.94 10.38 10.81+0.06 18.75 3.25 NovaMed 18 526 4.19 4.00 4.09+0.03 1163 7.81 Novmr 9 6 20 10.25 10.25 10.25-0.19 8.50 3.00 Novmtx 15 97 6.19 606 6.13-0.13 2.56 0.75 Nvmt wtB 24 1.25 1.13 1.25 1150 1.19 Novatel 63 4.59 4.50 4.56 8.75 2.75 NovelDH 433 8.63 7.94 7.94-0.81 44.66 7.81 Novell 26 133M 12.63 11.63 12.25+0.81 71.44 17.2S Novlus 9 4231707 62.00 59.00 61 +288 38.00 6.00ANoven 679562 42.25 37.06 42.00+5.00 18.00 8.00 NoOgen 13 12.00 11.19 11.19-0.19 61.50 9.63 Novoste dd 2366 54.88 53.94 54.00-0.13 34.00 6.50 NuHofiz .38 t 18 1962 27.88 26.00 26.25+0.1 17.75 5.00 NuCo2 n dd 61 7.63 7.25 7.38+0.38 82.00 24.50 NuanceC n 1769 134+38 126 63 131.63+4.75 36.00 18.63 Nucenbx 14 26.13 25.63 26.13 17.00 313 Numerex .20 1.5 167 13.13 12.63 13.00+0.1 67.31 22.00 NurnTch n 1432 41.00 381 3 39.13+0.38 21.00 7.13 NurMacro 18 2766 14.13 13. 3 13.38-0.63 6.38 2.44 M-dr-a fl 6 290 3.00 2.63 2.69-0.06 14.75 11.31 nutrisys n 2 11.75 88.00 8.38 Nvidia a 92 16047 82.50 78.13 79.38+0.88 44.38 8.25 Nyfix a cc 687 38.25 37.38 37.50 0 25 16.00 Micro n 6248 25.50 22.60 25.60+2.98 -22.00 11.77 Owireln n 11449 23.50 21.25 21.75+0.75 w 12.75 2.50 OAO Tc n 33 546 4.97 4.75 4.94+0.03 16.75 10.00 OChadeys 12 218 12.94 12.75 12.75-0.06 A.69 3.13 01 Corp 13 280 3.44 3.31 3.44+0.13 16.38 2.00 ON Tech dd 405 2.56 2.50 2.56+0.03 142.00 71.94 ONI Sys n 9881 96.88 92.75 95.31 + 1. 7.94 2.38 OPTI a 6 1084 4.13 3.88 3.88 - 2438 8.25 OReillyA s 15 779 15.56 15.19 15.25-0.31 48.50 4.06 OClSIPhrm dd 4260 51.38 47 25 49.98+2.48 28.44 2.94 OSlSys cc 5782 14-50 13.19 13.44-1.13 61.44 13.00 OTO Sft n 612 25.25 22.38 22.38-3.06 26.25 10.00 OYO Geo dd 165 19.56 19.50 19.50-0.06 18.13 11.94 OakHillFn .40 2.5 21 4 16.13 16.13 16.13 29.31 4.19A OakToch dd 17515 29.50 26.44 29.13+2.69 41.94 7.25 ObMed 1.08t 33 240 9.00 8.44 8.63+0.19 24.00 2.06 Objsys dd M 11.50 13.44+2.00 21.75 11.63 Oce NV .49 a 3.3 23 14.88 14.69 14.88+0.25 20.88 14.56 OceanF .76 3.7 14 500 20.88 20.63 20.63-0.13 23+44 9.00 OculrSci 6 1066 11.00 10.63 10.75+0.13 29.63 10.00 OdeticsB dd 1 14.75 14.75 14.75 29.44 8.88 0detlcsA 11 637 15.06 13.50 14.13-1.00 9.50 4.31 Odwalla 26 60 7.00 6.41 6.75-0.25 57.38 3.81 OffPaym n dd 3654 10.72 9.94 10.31+0.31 18.19 7.94 OffsLog 38 1354 17.88 16.75 17.38+0.56 27.13 17.63 Oglebay .80 3.2 9 105 25.25 25.25 25.25-0.06 18.31 6.50 OhioCas .48 6.5 dd 3156 7.88 7.31 7.38+0.06 11.50 6.25 011gear .28 3.5 12 29 9.31 8.00 8.00-1.44 14.88 8.75 OldDom 5 217 9.56 9.25 9.25-025 35.00 23.06 OldNBap BB b 2.4 20 545 28.06 28.00 28.06+0.06 30.38 20.56 OldSecBc .60 2.6 57 24.00 23.25 23.25 6.38 3.25 OlympSt 23 106 3.63 3.38 3.38-0.13 33.00 20.56 OmegFn 1.04 f 3.7 16 23 27.75 27.75 27.75-0.06 10.38 2.38 OmegRs dd 283 3.13 2.94 3.00 6.00 2.25 OmgaWw 16 12 2.63 2.38 Z63-0.13 3.75 0.31 OmniEnr dd891 0.88 0.75 H8+0.13 8.88 1.13 Omn Nutr dd 1223 2.94 2.56 2.88+0.25 60.00 20.75 Omm Vis n 1729 46.00 42.00 45.00+3.00 5.63 0.81 Orntool dd 1244 2.75 1.81 2.25+0.50 34.94 11.38 OrA In s 42 336 30.00 28.38 29.88+1.25 22.00 9.50 OnComm dd 47

345 / C13 Day

13.50 13.25 13.25-0.25 27.75 16.25 OnSmnd n 1280 17.50 16.88 17.00-0.38 3.00 0.25 OnPointT 756 0.42 0.38 0.41-0.03 4.69 1.50 OnePrice 4 93 1.88 1.81 1.88 23.19 4.25 1 800Flows dd 478 5.31 5.13 5.25 38.75 10.63AJ-800CWt 3 65 1824 40.75 38.00 40.19+2.19 24.00 4.50 OneMain dd 254 10.00 9.63 9.86+0.17 15.13 5.25 OmSrce dd 1698 12.00 11.25 11.88+0.44 14.06 1.69 OnHealth dd 1229 3.34 3.13 3.16+0.03 24.50 4.13 OnlRes n dd 47 6.13 5.94 600-0.06 13.75 4.00 OntrDta 22 214 12.63 11.69 11.69-0.69 78.00 4.13 Omecm n 70.00 7.38 6.63 7.00+0.38 9.25 3.31 InZcc 3 92 3.88 3.75 3.75 36.50 6.94 On dd 4526 27.50 26.06 26.50-0.31 44.00 6.50 OnyxSft a - 6764 23.50 17.69 22.69+4.63 6.00 6.00 OpenMkt dd 14302 9.60 8.25 8.44-1.06 60+63 9.50 OpenTxt g 2775 25.88 24.00 26.19-0.56 245.75 36.13 GpenTV n 19394 59.63 50.00 65.60+5.25 30.2S 16.27 OpntTdi n 1556 30.U 26.75 30.00+1.81 3.69 2.03 Opta cc 67 2.31 2.26 2.31+013 45.63 5.19 Optibase 28 1604 20.00 19.n 19.bi 67.38 9.13 OptCable cc 43M 45.00 37.47 39.38+2.88 404 3.25 Opbka dd 742 4.50 4 00 4.13-0.06 49.00 13.63 OptRobt 444 33.88 33 00 33.38-0.06 29.25 2.50 OptioSft n 39 4254 3.9r 2.56 3.13-0.75 8.75 2.63 OptnCr 13 80 6.63 6.38 6.63 15.78 2.31 Opus360 n 1949 4.44 3.97 3.97-0.09 90A 17.75AOracle cc 185983 91.06 88.44 90.94+2.69 36.88 5.02 OraPher n 1879 11.44 9.91 11.38+1.44 50.00 19.13 OratcInt n 2063 38.94 35A 35.56-0.69 14.19 1.56 OrbitFR dd 27 2.75 2.63 2.63+0.09 11594 34.63 Orbotch s 33 1020 98.00 96.13 96.81 + 61.00 9.60 Ordidillo n 21.66 45.75 42.75 44.94+1.94 40.75 6.63 OrdUtCm s dd 1.68 3.70 10.09 8.00 9.88+1.81 12.13 8.50 OregnTrl .32 2.9 15 22 1 11.00 11.13+0.06 60.00 7.00 Organic n dd 870 7.56 7.06 7.19-0.25 8.25 5.75 Oroamer 12 397 7.44 7.25 7.44+0.19 19.25 4.69 OrphanM dd 252 11.75 11.00 1138+0.25 9.31 5.00 OrthAll 9 413 7.19 7.06 7.19+0.19 21.00 10.88 Orthfx 6216 19.38 19.13 19.13 8.31 2.25 Orthlog 64 2470 3.25 3.06 3.19-0.06 7.00 5.63 Ortho ta n 75 7.38 6.88 6.88 18.88 11.00 OscaInc n 454 16.00 15.69 15.88+0.13 22.75 12.00 OshKBA .20 1.4 7 140 14.44 14.22 14.25+0.25 40.00 21.63 OshkTrk .35 1.0 12 1412 35.63 34.81 35.50+0.69 149.75 7.19 Osicom dd 2048 60.63 58.06 59.00-0.50 22.25 6.60 Osteotch 1356 12.00 11.31 11.98+0.75 956 0.94 Ostex dd 1023 2.50 2.19 2.44+0.25 20.88 13.00AOttawFn .48 b 2.3 15 664 21.00 20.13 21.00+0.50 2750 17.75 OttffTP s 1.02 4.9 11 141 20.94 20.81 20.88-0.06 6.56 3.63 OutlkGrp 13 128 5.94 5.69 5.94-0.06 18.00 4.63 OvrIndD 55578 10.75 9.94 10.38+0.13 5M 1.63 Owosso .24 13.7 51 2.06 1.75 1.75-0.25 33.25 9.75 OxfordHit 7 12310 31.75 30.00 30.50+0.50 28.75 7.94 Oxigene dd 548 11.25 10.50 11.13+0.88 1000 0.31 Oxis dd 554 1.44 1.25 138+0.06 P 13.00 5.94 P&F 6 207 7S4 7.19 7.38-0.13 2850 4.16 P-Com dd 3643 6.44 6.09 6.25-0.06 12.88 8.00 PAM 926 10.50 10.13 10.50+0.25 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 10.13 7.50 PBOG Hld 3 106 7.75 7.50 7.63 62.00 8.25-PC Cnnct s 55 3481 67.25 60.44 64.75+4.38 98.00 21.63 PC-Tel n 61 1612 29.13 27.94 28.00-1.06 10.50 3.00 PCD 80 94 8.13 7.75 8.00 12.00 5.88 REC Sol n 35 6.94 6.88 6.880.06 34.75 19.WPECO 11 n 12057 39.75 34.00 39.00+5.69 39.31 18.13 PF Chng 40 1577 30.38 28.75 29.94 23.75 12.25 PFFBcp .24 1.2 9 549 20.06 19.81 20.00+0.19 10.63 7.25 PHS Bnc .36 3.6 12 20 10.06 10.06 10.06 23.00 9.75 PICO Hld dd 198 1381 1356 13.81+0.25 21.63 6.75 PJ Amer 8 219 7.38 6.94 6.94-0.09 51.25 13.75 PLX Tch dd 1072 32.81 31.00 31.31-0.75 20M 15.50 PMA Cap .42 f 2.5 14 82 17.56 16.81 16.88-0.63 255.50 38.38 PIVIC Sra s cc 19238

Day C13 / 346

239.75 232.31 2300 - 1.00 6.00 1.13 PMR Cp s 1.50 p dd 32 2.44 2.25 2.44 20.13 1.09 PNV Inc n dd 498 1.72 1.50 1.50-0.06 7.50 2.75 PPT Vis dd 34 6.00 5.88 5.88-0.13 94.50 28.13 PRI Auto cc 3835 55.13 51.63 51.63-2.00 22.00 5.00 PRWW Ltd 22 137 13.73 13.13 13.13+0.13 14.00 10.19 PS FInol .60 5.4 11 2 11.06 11.06 11.06 6.50 4.00 PSB Bn 8 36 4.31 4.31 4.31 1000 3.13 PSC 18 707 4.06 3.81 4.06+0.31 27.63 10.06 PSI Tech n 93 19.00 17.25 19.00+0.88 1 .00 PSINet s dd 20920 18.13 17.13 17.56-0.38 63 5.09 PSS Wrld 25 2574 6.50 6.25 6.25-0.13 75 2.63 PTEK Hld 45 1677 3.72 3.50 3.56+0.06 7.06 3.75 PVC .32 67 cc 20 4.75 4.75 4.75+0.50 22.13 2.50 PW Eagle 5 902 18.75 16.88 11.13-0.81 41.75 12.00 PacWest n 19 1960 14.19 12.811 14.13+0.63 59.50 39.06 Paccar 1.20 2.8 5 3793 42.81 41.44 42.44+0.44 5.63 0.47 PacA&E dd 5516 1.28 1.13 1.16-003 2.44 0.19 PcA&E wt 203 0.53 0.47 0.47-0.06 38.00 21.38 PacCap .88t 3.3 13 181 26.88 26.63 26.81+0.19 10.88 8.88 PacCntl n 19 9.50 9.50 9.50+0.50 15.38 10.00 PacCrst .28 2.2 7 59 12M 12.25 12.63+0.13 6.38 2.84 PacDunI .24e6.9 292 3.63 3.44 3.50-0. 9 25.75 2.13 PacGate n.14 6.2 dd 1232 2.34 2.25 2.25 79.00 12. 1 9 Pacintmet 19.43 15.63 12.75 1141.63+11.50 8.50 5.88 PacMerc n 139 7.75 7.63 7.69+0.13 39.00 11.63 PacSun 12 3.0 6.60 14.00 12.88 13.31-1.56 9.25 7.50 PacUnion n 465 8.94 8.88 8.88-0.06 31.50 5.00 PacrfNet s 16 4 9.88 9.38 9.88 7231 31.13 PacifC 8 3724 54.88 50.56 53.94+34.00 8 75 PckrdBio n 5088 20.50 19.38 19.88-0.38 77.50 10.50 Packetr dd 857 50.13 47.75 48.13-1.00 26.38 14.00 PainTher n 59 19.63 19.25 19.25 20.00 12.00 PaJmHHm 10 18 14.63 14.44 14.63+0.69 166.00 19.88 Palm n 112963 44.88 42.50 44.00-1-2.06 23.25 18.50 Pamrapo 1.38 6.8 12 20 20.25 7.56 2.94 PanASlv 3381 4.00 3.75 3.77+0.14 74.25 28.25 PanAmSat 27 2200 33.50 32.13 32.44+0.33 17.25 6.13 Panera 28 875 16.63 15.88 16.00-0.63 46.00 7.50 Panja dd 280B 11.94 9.63 11.75+2.00 16.31 7.00 Pantry 13 63 13.00 12.50 1300+0.50 44.88 19.00 PapJohn 13 1850 23.13 22+31 22.63+0.19 22.00 7.00 PrdgmGn n 549 16.63 15.88 16.50 + 0.50 10.13 4.00 ParGeo g cc 119 600 5.88 5.94 - 0.19 53.00 172Paradyne 63 6752 59.63 21.25 2144-0.69 5.94 1.38 ParPet dd 898 3.66 3.47 3.53-0.03 35.94 7.38 ParmTc cc 21591 13.75 13+31 13.38-0.19 4.06 1.88 Paravant 27 328 2.94 2.84 2.92+0.05 15.44 7.63 Parexel 45 521 10.00 9.75 9V + 0.22 16.50 11.63 ParkBno .48 3.6 9 586 13.44 13.38 1338 16.63 6.63 Park0h 31 687 10.38 9.38 10.311+11.00 52 88 18 .50 Parkrvsn did 409 42.50 38.88 42.50+3.38 20+75 15.00 ParkvFn .72 4.1 8 107 17.56 17. -0.19 46.13 14.13 Parlex 30 743 38.25 37.00 38.13+0.13 4.63 1.72 Parlux 10 101 2.69 2.50 2.69+0.19 41.00 17.88-Parthus n 1922 47.38 45.00 46.50+5.50 26.13 6.25 PrtnrCrn n 3839 9.50 9.00 9.50+0.16 1438 3.68 PrisBase n 1353 4.13 3.09 4.00+0.31 43.13 5.00 PasifSat 169 15.25 13.00 15.00-0.50 38.50 14.00 PathoG dd 3500 38.38 38.19 38.25+0.09 4.81 0.28 Patinfo dd 51 0.56 0.50 0.56 14.13 6.00 PatrkInd .16 2.4 dd 17 6.72 6.63 6.72+0.13 15.25 6.13 PatnotB .37 f 5.6 17 23 6.56 6.50 6.56+0.06 26.88 14.25 PatrTms 15 1 17.38 17.38 17.38+0.06 28.13 16.25 PattDml 9 24 4SU 23.75 22.50 23 75+1 19 32.69 9.88 PattEng cc 2137 31.38 30.50 31.38+0.69 5.38 0.38 PHarris dd 2026 1.56 1.19 8.56 1.66 PaulSon dd 88 2.25 2.00 225+025 47.63 17.25 Paychex s .24 0.5 88 21632 45.19 43.63 44+0.69 74.75 4.44 pcOrder dd 832 5.38 5.13 5.28-0.02 14.63 6.13 Peaklml n 13 352 8.88 8.56 B.69-0.22 16.38 1.50 Peapod dd 191 2.06 1.88 1.88-0.13 20.00 9.25 PeerMf .50 2.6 14 150 19.25 18.50 19.00 15.50 1.22 PrissSys n dd 696 1.44 1.28 1.31-0.06 77.50 20.75 PegaCm s dd 3270 51.13 48.75 49.75-0.25 54.38 9.94 PeWus s dd 2290 19.88 19.31 19.88+0.63 26.06 3.88 Pegasys dd 485 4.44 4.38 4.38 17.50 11.22-Pemstar n 6718 20.26 17.81 18.56+11.22 22.13 13.13

347 / C13 Day

Penford .24 1.3 14 382 18.25 17.38 18 19+11.44 15.75 6.81 PenNGam 15 303 14.00 13.50 14 .00+0.13 1625 10.63 PennFed .16 1.2 9 269 13.50 12.94 13.000.38 16.56 15.634PennRck n 6.78 16.63 16.50 16.50 20.00 5.00 Penwest dd 148 13.00 12.44 12.81+038 10.38 6 03 PeoplePC n 6735 8.63 7.26 8.63+1 25 18.13 12 88 Peop8cp .56 f 3.8 10 22 14.88 14.88 14.88 25.50 13.00 PeBcOH 560.7 9 50 15.25 15.00 15.25+016 17.13 11.63 PeopBNC .40 b 3+1 8 2 12.88 12.63 12.88+0.38 21.38 13.75 PBshBrc .84 5.8 5 183 15.00 14.130 14.50-0.31 27.13 16.38 PeDpBkCT 1.20 5.7 12 610 21.75 21.00 21.13-0.31 12.94 9.50 PplsCom n 14 11.94 11.63 11.63 11.25 6.75 PplsSid .28 3.9 17 16 7.25 7.25 7.25 29.39 12.00APeoplesoft cc 106278 32.44 28.52 32.25+331 13.50 3.88 PrSeTch dd 1090 12.06 11.81 11.94-0.19 7.50 3.00 Percptr 14 166 3.50 3.25 3.25 80.63 15.75 Peregme s dd 16523 33.50 29.25 31.94 + 6i 19.00 PerFood 23 554 37.13 36.56 37.13+0.56 FS 8.06 PrfTech 25 511 14.00 13.13 13.88+0.69 81.88 12.75 Pericorn 68 630 74.13 72.50 74.00+1.13 9.44 5.00 Perrigo 34 5545 7.69 7.41 7.41-0.22 13.00 7.16 PerryEllis 5 65 8.94 8.56 8.84+0.28 29.25 8.19 PersSft dd 3094 17.50 15.94 17.00+11.00 38+00 2.38 PervSft dd 562 3.44 3.19 3.28-0.03 21+19 UlVetcoAn 19 2765 21.25 21.00 2100-0.13 4.06 1.25 Ptrglyph dd 4 2.63 2.63 2.63-0.09 6.25 3.50 PetDv 10 816 5 75 5.31 5.44-0.25 4.00 1.81 Petromt 6 3.44 3.44 3.44+0.19 3.81 1.28APtroqstE n 36 555 4.25 3.50 3.63 14.00 UPets.cm n 3769 1.03 0.47 0.97+0.6 6.88 2.25 PetsMart dd 7767 4.72 4.50 4.63+0.03 52.69 1.88 PFSweb n dd 2 28 3.31 2.59 2.75-0.41 5.75 0.97 PharMor dd 161 1.38 1.31 1.38 2900 8.56 PharmPdt 18 1679 22.13 20.00 21.94+1.13 1 00 969 Pharcop cc 3950 45.50 40.69 41.94+2.19 86 i 27 .75 Phmcyc dd 1347 52.50 48.50 50.13 +1.88 2163 4.38 Pharmnet dd 446 20.50 19.50 20.50+0.63 5 63 1.47 PharChem 10 107 4.00 3.63 4.00+0.03 1031 7.25-Pharsght n 1621 10.38 9.50 9.63+0.44 19.38 10.81 PhilCons .18p 15 170 16.50 16.44 16.50 7.00 4.50 PhilipM n 5 594 5.19 5.19-0.44 7.00 2.25 PhilRH 19 1252 6.88 6.81 6.88+0.06 30.25 8.63 PhnxTc 72 2706 17.94 17.00 17.25+0.44 208.00 10.00 Phne.cm dd 30429 94.88 86.98 92. +5.98 94.38 16.38 Photon 52 4719 53.75 46.98 46.94-6.56 8.63 2.00 PhtoWrks dd 406 3.28 3.06 3.06-06646.50 17.50 PhotfIn cc 4201 30.00 28.75 29.31+0.31 29.00 17.13 Physmt n dd 1197 23.25 22.38 23.13+0.69 16.50 1.88 PicTel dd 24402 9.88 8.75 9.72+0.97 21.50 8.00 PiercPag 14 140 21.31 21.31 21.31 55.13 8.13 PilotNet dd 5017 14.13 12.94 13.25-04i 6.00 2.88 PinnGlb dd 393 5.63 5.38 5 63+0 38 80.50 20.50 PncleHld 8394 40.50 39.75 4025+0.25 36.38 7.00 PinnSyst 9013984 12.63 11.81 12.63+1.06 43.56 10.00 PionGp dd 5277 43.69 43.38 43.63+0 - 06 18.75 11.38 PionStd .12 0.9 10 465 13.75 13.56 13.69+0.06 13.47 8.00 PittsbgFn .36 4.4 7 2 8.25 8.25 8.25 75.98 15.88 PivotalCp dd 2997 46.06 44.75 45.00-0.88 50.38 31.31 Pixw 22 2009 3325 32.00 33.00+1.00 4538 10.38 Pxlwrks n 2077 27.13 26.13 27.13 + 0.81 11+63 1.50 PixTech dd 1992 1.78 1.63 1.69 20.88 5.00 PlanarSy 18.88 17.94 18.50+0.63 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 36.50 0.50 PlnetRx n dd 6564 1.00 0.72 0.78+0.06 15.00 4.38 PlatoLm 6 653 14.25 13.50 14.26+0.75 7.75 0.97 PlayBy dd 91 1.25 1.16 1.19 15498 24.44 Plexus 94 2823 156.81 148.56 154.75+4.94 15650 15.00 PlugPwr n did 918 45.31 44.00 44.75+0.25 7.81 5.25 PocaBn .26 3.4 12 457 7.69 7.56 7.56-0.03 19.86 228 PointWest 2 436 2.69 2.44 2.69+0.25 31.00 9.63 PtofSale n cc 41 25.30 24.94 24.94-0.31 10.75 7.00 Pointel .20 2.2 14 3 9.25 9.25 9.25+0.19 133.00 34.81 Polycom cc 3476 114.44 107.81 112.38+6.44 62.00 14.69 Polymed 24 2567 36.13 35.50 35.50-0.06 24.50 9.56 Pomeroy 10 1477 24.00 21.00

Day C13 / 348

23.25+0.63 10.25 8.94 Pontotoc n 19 118 9.75 9.19 9.69-0.13 32.38 1813 Popular .64 3.1 11 1072 21.00 20.13 20.63+0.19 16.75 10.50 PorlFncl n 362 16.56 1644 16 56+019 86.00 19.13 PortlSft 27253 56.00 48.75 55.25+41.38 14.88 5.63 Possis dd 1151 9.00 825 8 38-0 50 10.88 4.63 Powell 16 74 9.88 9.38 9.50-0 38 68.00 14.75 PowrIntg s 20 8910 17.31 16.50 17.00-0.m 176.63 9.75 Pwr-One s cc 11109 168.06 157.19 158.44-6. 10.38 0.63 PowrCrv dd 126 1.22 1.06 1.22+0.16 105.00 34.81 Powertel did 2088 78.81 77.00 78.00 74.00 13.50 Powrarv a 85 175M 48.94 44.00 48.13+4.13 45.00 10.06 PraecisP n 2093 44.00 42.63 43.81+1.56 32.88 18.44 PrecSft n 324 27.25 24.63 27.00+2.63 89.00 16.00 PrdctvSy cc 1449 20.88 19.88 19.88-0.89 12.75 5.44 PremFIn .15i 10 133 6.00 5.88 6.00 19.13 12.69 PresU .40 f 2.6 10 1105 15.25 14.75 15 28.75 5.50 Prestek did 712 17.00 16.52 16.94-019 94.00 8.38 PrevSys n dd 780 8.78 8.50 8.69+E03 1375 3.44 Previo Inc did 102 6.69 6.25 6.50-0.19 838 6.06 PriceEnt 88 6 6.16 6.16 6.16 41.00 25.88 PriceTR .52 1.1 21 5689 45.44 43.63 45.25+1.38 49.21 12.69 Prm 2 37.50 37.50 31.50+0.03 10125 22.63 Pricline n ddd 34259 28.50 25.94 2719-0.56 56.75 13.75 Primall a 27 372 45.00 42.66 44 88 +194 50.19 1934 17.06 16.00 156-0 25 10.63 6.63 PrmeMd 11 183 9.60 9.00 9.08-0.11 37.00 3.25 PrmRsp n 617 6.06 5.94 6.00 8.00 4.00 PdmeSrc .19 4.6 5 341 4.94 4.13 4.13-0.69 30.44 18.00 Primex .30 1.2 13 2 24.44 24.25 24.25+0.19 14.88 1.94 PrimixS did 323 2.75 2.69 2.75+0.03 137.25 19.00 PrmsKn did 457 25.31 23.31 23.56-R69 52.25 PrimusT dd 5679 16.25 15.06 15.94+11.06 14.38 9.75 PrincNtl .38 3.0 6 1 12.75 12.75 12.75+0.13 1450 388 PrinceVid did 220 4.25 4.06 4.19+0.06 13.94 5.25 Printrak 18 2836 11.81 11.75 11.75 24.75 9.69 Prtronx 83 11.50 11.38 11.41-0.09 4.88 1.88 Prntwre 29 166 2.69 2.50 2.63+0.25 75.38 19.13 Priffithic 51 1024 58.69 55.88 57.75+2.38 18.25 10.00 PrvtBn .10 0.7 26 3 13.63 13.63 13.63 13.00 3.88 PrvlMed a 77 436 7.88 7.00 7.69+0.81 39.00 17.25 ProBusn dd 1781 22.00 20.50 22.00+11.113 89.75 6.13 ProcmT dd 947 48.50 46.44 48.25+1.56 36.88 6.38 Prodigy dd 1460 7.94 7.53 7.53-0.34 48.63 18.00 ProD ng 40 738 48.13 45.06 48.13+3. 8.63 3 .50 ProfStaff 11 907 5.50 5.19 5.25 27.00 12.63 ProfGrP 2.64t 9 665 22.88 22.50 22.88 47.60 7.98 ProfRec 14 6431 10.25 00 9.03-1.03 96.00 9.50 ProgPh ec 2706 35.00 29.00 29.50-4.44 10.75 2.94 ProgPar dd 322 3.75 3.31 3.63 14.38 9.75 ProgFn .24 12.1 8 250 11.56 11.19 11.56+0.25 30.75 10.94 PrgSoft a 14 5182 13.69 13.50 13.69+0.13 97.38 11.31 Project a 43 1700 1850 17.25 18.00+0.38 4.22 0.41 ProMdCo 2 1207 1.19 1.16 1.16 35.00 3.25 Promtns n dd 1409 4.00 3.50 3.88+0.38 25.00 5.25 Proph2l 55 131 17.25 17.00 17.00-0.31 29.88 2.63 Prosoft dd 1224 13.75 12.00 13.38+0.63 17.88 12.88 ProepBc .36 2.2 12 547 16.63 16.44 16.44-0.06 169.00 12.88 PrtDsg a 37700 93.00 73.97 76.00-10.38 14.00 0.81 Provalis 1258 2.81 2.53 263+003 26.13 2.88 Provant 85 2094 7.50 6.63 E81 +O.06 23.38 13.00 PrvBksh .70 14.9 9 857 14.38 14.13 14.25+0.06 4394 23 44 ProvFncl .96 3.6 9 2290 26.44 25.56 26.31+0.56 R25 12.56 ProvFinl 9 4 18.00 17.63 18.00+0.13 46 25 1050 ProvHlth 43 1461 46.13 41.38 44.88+2.75 67 50 19 50 Proxlcm a cc 21660 24.50 22.25 24.19+11.56 88.00 17.38 Proxim a cc 9575 68.75 57.50 60.06+1.06 15.88 1.06 Proxymc dd 1444 1.41 1.31 1.34-0.03 14.75 2.38 Publcard dd 138 2.72 2.56 2.63-0.13 14+00 9.50 PulaskiB .36 a 2.7 34 36 13.44 13.00 13.44+0. 102.50 3.00 PumaT a dd 2109 25.50 23.63 24.311.1 175.00 14.63 PrchPro 8 dd 43515 63.38 57.02 57.78-1.41 7.50 2.13 PureNd dd b 2.0 4.3 15.00 7.94 PurMills n 389 11.38 10.75 10.75 2.38 1.31 PyramidB .16 6.9 dd 70 2.38 225 2 31 QR

349 / C13 Day

18.00 2.88 QAD Inc dd 337 3.63 3.38 3.50+0.09 794 5 50 QEP Co s 6 208 6.75 6.25 6.31-0.19 5850 9 25 QUAGEN 3238 48.25 45.88 47.75+1.38 5.75 31.88 OLT a 135 7T81 71.88 74.06+2.13 119.56 13.88 QRSCp dd 13572 19.63 16.88 18.311+11.50 3525 15.75 QS Com n 6 18.81 18.81 18.81+0.06 117.38 3.63 QXL.cm a 9441 5.00 4.11 4.56+0.75 70.00 2.63 Qlaolng n 3261207 24.50 11.63 20.50+8.56 20325 32.50 Glogic a cc 2W 115.3 106.75 113.50+8.13 18.25 12.38 QuakCty 8 210 18.00 17.13 17.25-0.19 6.00 3.00 QuakFab 11 1827 5.44 5.00 5.06+0.16 200.00 38.13 Qualcom a 68 186399 62.06 58.00 59.88+1.56 4.13 1.81 QualDin dd 170 263 P56 216-00A 18.75 5.63 QualSy 24 213 9.13 8.75 9.13+0.50 12.13 6.75 Quslstsr n 2730 14.00 12-06 13-50+1.56 a2.88 17.25 QueenCB 1.00 3.8 15 659 26.50 26.13 26.38+0.13 14.50 3.50 Quentra dd 2193 5.63 4.00 4.44+0.31 16.00 0.78 quepasa 623 1.19 1.03 1.19+0.19 98.13 17.38 QuestSft s did 6516 52.50 51.00 61.63+0.50 6.88 0.53 Questm wt 242 1.81 1.69 1.81+0.09 13.63 2.75 Questron 12 468 5.25 4.94 5.19+0.13 44.75 11.00 QckLogic n 67 2226 23.06 21.38 22.75+0.75 11.00 3.16 Quidel dd 482 6.50 6.00 6.50+0.38 5.00 1.00 Quigley did 17 1.53 1.50 1.50-0.03 8.00 6.25 QuintInx n 95 7.25 6.88 7.13+0.38 1.50 0.50 QntInx wt 103 0.75 0.63 0.75 20.00 1.50 Quintet 11 1799 4.56 3.81 4.38+0.59 38.88 12.00 Quintiles 5 8950 14.19 13.58 13.940.38 59.25 6.88 Qui tus n dd 1507 13.63 12.52 13.06+0.38 24.25 14.13 Quip 10 19 23.60 22.75 23.50+0.56 1 6.13 10.50AQuiXte .30 f 1.9 14 427 16.25 15.81 16.00+0.06 18.75 2.75 Quokka dd 18977.38 6.81 6.98 18.75 2.75 Quokka dd 1897 7.38 6.81 6.88 14.56 6.00 QluormH 18 3186 12.94 11.98 12.U+0.80 13.00 163 Quotesmth dd 137 2.19 2.13 2.13 16.50 6.50 RG Find .2112.0 9 20 10.38 10.38 10.38 8.63 2.25 R&B Inc dd 150 2.75 2.63 2.66-0.09 19.13 4.69 RCM 7 132 4.88 4.75 4.75 74.88 18.50 RCN Cp dd 3448 24.63 23.75 24.25+0.56 92.25 19.88 RF WD s cc 78247 47.50 44.00 44.63-1.94 28.63 5.19 RIF Mono dd 166 8.50 7.50 8.50+0.50 23.13 15.81 RGC Resc 1.10 5.9 12 19 19.00 18.50 18.50 1750 11.00 RHBT Fn n 14 25 14.50 14.25 14.25 263 2.50 RIT Tch n dd 469 13.48 12.50 13.13+0.50 23.38 2.69-RMH Tel 00 1162 24.38 22.00 24.00+11.38 13.50 2.06 RMI.net dd 868 2.50 2.31 2.50+0.19 6.22 1.63 ROHN 15 1126 4.22 4.03 4.13-0.09 93.06 22.06 RSA Sec 16 3289 59.75 57.88 59.06+0.81 32.50 3.03 RSL Cm dd 6633 4.13 3.88 4.06+0.06 6.25 3.25 RTW Inc 6 21 3.41 3.38 3.44-0.06 11.00 3.22 RWD Tech cc 319 8.06 7.75 8.06+0.38 4.19 1.03 RadaElc dd 1142 1.28 1.22 1.25 20.50 3.63 Radcom dd 10.00 8.88 9.119+1.19 65.75 24.13 RadiSys a 38 3951 56.06 54.34 58.94+1.44 16.69 4.25 Radiance dd 573 14.56 13.50 13.81-0.69 RdntSys S 39 988 17.63 16.78 17.1 + .5 11.13 2.63 RadicaG dd 2 2.94 2.81 2.81+ .1 3250 13.19 RdioOne s cc 11315 21.56 20.50 21 -28.00 15.75 ROneD n 4384 19.00 17.19 17. -1. 33.13 3.69 RdjoUnc n dd 372 7.50 7.00 7.31 -0 1 10.25 6.25 RadView n 5433 8.81 7.63 8.81+1.25 65.00 16.13 RadVisn n 2507 33.06 30.63 32.06-1.06 87.00 15.00 Radware n cc 896 32.94 32.13 32.56-0.38 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 2800 115 Radyne wt 108 650 625 638-0 R13 7 88 AadyneC n 23 848 d06 1238 12 44+019 10 38 4E RailArn 11 836 6.63 6.44 6.44-0.06 12.63 7.50 Railwrks 6 47 9.00 8.75 8.75-0.38 14.00 7.00 RnbwRent 14 12 12.88 12.63 56 396 63 1.3 52.00 11.75 RainbwTe 39 4857 41.88 39. 50 6.75 1.81 RainfCafe old 482 2.81 2.19 2.44-0.31 29.25 1.50 Rainmkr n old 681 2.38 213 2.19-0.19 127.00 14.63 Rambus 9 dd 4178 82.13 73.88 81.69+5.50 27.69 4.00 RmpNtw 1790 5.44 4.98 5.13 4.44 0.81 Ramsay 9 53 1.53 1.38 1.38-0.06 35.75 14.75

Day C13 / 350

RareHosp 20 97 28.13 27.38 28.13+0.38 94.75 7.63 RareMed dd 15965 10.75 9.75 1000-0.31 118.00 26.88 RatnSft cc 17396 129.50 117.75 128.69+10.81 18.00 11.13 Raven .72 4.8 9 35 15.13 15.00 15.13+0.13 15.00 10.38 Ravnswd 12 274 14.25 13.94 14.13+0.13 52.00 3.94 Ravisent do 15M 4.50 4.13 4.38 10.63 4.13 Rawlings old 268 6.19 6.00 6.06+0.06 4.25 0.53 Raytel dd 61 0.88 0.84 0.84 56.94 10.13 Rzrfish a dd 22248 13.38 12.13 0.13 8.50 1.84-ReadRt dd 70653 9.38 8.44 9.03+0.66 7.31 3.16 ReadgE dd 30 5.00 5.00 5.00 96 00 29 63 RealNwk s dd 19641 49.50 47M 48.69-0 63 413 1 .58.Realco dd 111 1.78 1.25 1.78+022 1.00 0.06 Realco wt 681 0.38 0.19 0.38+0.31 1 5.13 5.44 Recoton dd 333 14.19 13.69 14.19-0.06 151.00 15.00 Redl dd 40729 27.13 25.00 25.13-0.31 198.50 47.13 Redback s dd 43902 150.50 140.69 38 3.75 1.16 RedhkAle dd 326 1.75 1.72 1.75-0.13 27.63 7.00 Rdiff.cm n 1604 11.50 10.36-0.14 23.94 14.26 RedEmp .60 2.9 14 129 22.63 20.88 21.00-1.75 17.00 8.81 RegnTch n 6044 14.56 13.2S 14A L19 57.38 6.50 Regenrn dd 1960 36.25 33.88 35.44 +1.69 14.75 4.50 RgntCm n dd 1376 8.81 7.38 8.75+1.31 36.94 1 8.31 ReglonsFn 1.08 5.0 9 2473 21.94 21.31 21.75+0.38 23.50 1 0.50 Regis Cp .12 0.8 13 x6930 1 6.98 14.63 15.81+11.113 116.00 1 2.00 Regisw n 10026 14.50 12.75 14.00+11.113 4.59 1.94 Rehabiller 7 482 2.75 2.69 2.69-0.06 9.38 2.25 Reliabil dd 64 3.63 3.44 3.44 3.25 0.75 Reliv do 30 1.88 1.75 1.81+0.06 9.19 1.56 RelmWre do 643 2.19 1.88 2.06+0-19 38.13 6.13 Remec a 2611 29.75 28.19 28.50-0.25 68.38 18.38 Remedy 23 5008 24.00 23.00 23.38-0.06 23.50 10.00 RernTp 7 258 12.25 11.75 12.06-0.06 8.50 21PRemiOG 13 5716 9.06 7.63 9.06+11.19 14.94 7.38 RenaCap 2.91 a 12.7 q 9 13.50 13.06 13.06-0.31 9.75 1.25 RenaisW dd 1909 1.63 1.50 1.56-0.09 29.44 14.25 RenalCre 17 5084 20.56 20.00 20.25-0.06 32.88 13.63HentACtr 1371 33.25 31.50 32.94+1.06 7.41 3.00 Rntrak 40 85 3.75 3.63 3.630.13 19.69 KSO ReptTch n 5981 19.69 16.00 17.31-1.20 18.00 2.50 RepIgn dd 1789 7.94 7.38 7.56+0.19 15.13 4.25 Reptrn 22 299 14.50 14.25 14.31-0.06 1 5.00 7.00 RepBcp .34 b 3.8 9 257 8.88 8.63 8.88 11.00 515 RepBnep.14 2.0 9 78 ON 6.63 8.84+0D9 16.00 9.00 RepubBsh 16 307 12.13 12.00 12.13 8.13 3.88 RepFBcp 8 61 4.50 4.44 4.44-0.19 9.81 188 RepSec .24 5.6 8 726 4.38 4.19 4.31+0.06 20.13 3.69 ResCare 7 479 4.94 4.81 4.84+0.03 40.00 8.50 RschFmt dd 450 19.13 18.56 19.13 175.75 23.25 RachMot 9932 76.13 71.75 75.56+4.19 SOM 33.75 Resonate n 5229 44.25 38.60 44.06+5.63 10.63 6.25 RescArn .13 1.5 50 2805 8.56 8.44 8.44-0.13 6.50 3.00 RscBncM .44 8.5 dd 1937 5.31 5.00 5.190.06 28.00 1.19 ReSrcPh n do 1242 2.19 1.81 1.88-0.38 19.13 7.50 Respirn 100 1181 19M 18.63 18.94+0 19 3.50 0.38 RespOnc old 121 1.13 1 M 1.13+0 09 12.25 3.63 Restfird dd 405 5.75 5.63 5.75+0.13 122.81 15.00 Ratak n dd 3184 34.50 31.75 34.44+0.44 57.3 50.25 Reutrurp 1.55 a 1.3 2267 120.81 118.31 120A + 3.63 1.75 1.13 RevPrp g .12 - 41.50 1.44 1.50+0.13 11.75 4.38 Rexhall .54 t 4 2 5.06 5.06 5.06-0.06 50.00 8m50 RythNet n dd 19933 9.69 8.97 9.000.25 71.88 4.81 Riborym dd 2246 28.88 26.69 28.88+1.75 19.38 6.31 RichEl .16 1.1 15 800 15.44 14.75 15.22+0.34 20.19 16.00 RichCty .64 f 3.2 15 668 20.63 20.00 20.13 14.75 4.88 RdgwdF .16 1.1 274 14.38 14.25 14.31+0.06 19.38 9.19 RgsNt .20 1.7 9 1502 12.31 11.69 11.94-025 14.50 8.50 RghtMg 7 TO 9.75 9.56 9.56-0.06 1.75 1.25 d 431 3.56 2.75 3.19-0.38 Rim d 22.00 9.76A 26 5703 23.66 20.19 23+3.38 10.13 RitaMed n 826 11.00 10.50 10.88+5-13 75 Rvrdp n 852 23.00 20.00 22.94+2.94 -7.88 RvrvBn .40 f 4.6 12 1 8.75 8.75 8.75+0.38 20 50 1500 RivianaF .56 3.3 10 23 17.13 16.63 1713+0.63 6A 2 63 AdhseGr 10154 3.88 3.56 3.75-0.22 25.38 16.63 RoadwyEx .20 0.9 9 296 23.25 22.88 23.00 -0.38 17.50 11.00 RoanEl A 3.3 7 230 12.13 11.63 12.00 21.00 3.88 RobNug 1929

351 / C13 Day

17.00 16.75 16.94-0.06 2 .44 3.38 RobotVs 45 5149 12.88 12.25 12.69+0.13 12.50 5.88 RochMed old 293 6.09 5.88 5.94-0.09 9.50 3.94 RockAgs 14 8 5.63 5.50 5.50 13.25 3.50 Rockfon 1 676 6.38 6.19 6.38+0.06 2.13 0.44 Rockshox dd 366 0.84 0.81 0.81 6.13 3.38 RkMCh 8 32 4.00 3.81 3.81 -R06 8.13 3.69 FlockySh do 60 5.31 5.25 5m25+0.13 31.25 6.00 RofinSinar 30 836 15.25 14.50 15.00+0.63 12.88 3.00 RogWve dd 458 7.06 6.75 6.75-0.19 8.50 6.00 RomeBn n 21 2.5 4 8.50 8.50 8.50 31.13 14.75ARosefta -89.03 35.38 29.63 35.38+5.38 20.44 14.94 RoslynB .62 f 3.1 13 2293 19.94 19.50 19.81+0.25 24.31 11.63 Ross8trs s .15 1.0 9 5549 15.44 14.94 15.13-0.38 3 81 0.91 RossSy old 2486 1.25 1.13 1.25 5356 3.00 RoweCrn do 1952 6.75 5.63 6.00-0.53 17.00 10.88 RyBPA .84 b 4.8 1476 17.44 16.25 17.44+1.19 6.13 2.50 RoyGld .05 p 17 493 3.75 3.25 375+050 5.00 1.88 RoylOly 234 3.25 3.13 3.16+0.16 .49 1.63 RoyaleE 20 300 4.13 4.00 406-0 06 6.00 4.47 RoyceFoc .15p q 27 5.69 5.66 5 66 11.44 8.06 RoyceMC .27 p q 74 11.00 10.92 11.00+0.13 11.50 5.69 RbiosRst 22 221 6.75 6.44 6 50 59.44 20.00 Rudolph n m. 170 41.00 39.00 40 00+016 100.00 30.38 RuralCel dd 89 76.50 72.50 76.00+2.81 17.25 4.75 RushEnt 4 87 6.88 6.38 6.63 47.00 19.50 Ryarair s 179 37.25 36.63 36.75-0 75 10.63 7.72 RyanF 7 14758.75 8.00 8.13-0.44 S 9.00 5.63 S&K 8 228 7.88 7.75 7.75-0.13 24.63 16.56 S&T Bcp .84 f 4.3 12 84 19.75 19.25 19.73+0.80 142.25 14.20 S1 Corp dd 9612 18.06 17.00 17.44+0.06 24.88 7.63 S3 Inc 3 6953 12.81 11.69 11+81-0.25 9.50 4.13 SAES Got .20 a 2.3 208 9.13 8.88 8.88-0.25 57.00 9.44 SBA Corn - dd 2129 44.88 43.88 44.63+0.13 26.38 3.50 SBE 16 461 16.25 14.75 15.50-0.75 77.13 32.31 SBS Bdc old 960 43.63 41.75 43.50+1.50 55.75 19.25 SIBS Tech 39 730 51.69 50.63 51.56+0.31 17.00 4.00 SCC Com old 194 6.13 5.88 6.06+0.06 130.50 37.25 SCM Mic 59 434 55.00 52.19 54.44+2.38 30.63 14.63 SCPPool a 20 731 29.69 28.94 29.31+0.31 460.50 37.50 SIDL Inc dd 15491 398.75 384.00 397.31 +14 31 5.25 1.50 SED Intl 8 152 3.44 3.19 3.25 67.75 25.75 SEI Inv a .16 0.3 46 15468 66.94 56.81 63.50-2.38 14.25 4.63 SEMX Cp 10 147 5.88 5.50 5.75+0.19 37.00 25.88 SJNB .64 2.1 16 117 31.13 30.66 31.13+0.56 28.00 13.25 SKF .44 a 3.0 98 14.75 14.50 14.56+0.44 5.25 2.694MC Cp dd 4 3.00 2.56 2.56-0.19 25.50 16.00 SMTC gn 9333 25.50 20.13 24.00+4.13 S 18.50 11.00 N13 Bnc .28 2.2 13 1 13.00 13.00 13.00-0.50 7.00 2.00 SOS Stf 11 576 2.97 2.66 2.75 34.88 14.38 SPSS 17 589 28.56 27.63 2788+0.06 47.00 2.94 SRS Lbs old 353 9.19 8.31 888-0.19 7.69 4.00 SSC Tch dd 704 6.75 5.50 6.38+0.31 19.13 2.00 SSETl dd 1193 4.63 4.00 4.00-0.38 63.63 18.00 ST Asm n 238 22.63 22.13 22.63+0.75 15.00 2.50 STMwire 46 979 6.38 6.00 6.38+0.19 9.50 6.00 STV 5 8 7.88 7.88 7.88 9.38 7.00 SVB Fnc .46 t 19 5 8.63 8.63 8.63+0.38 41.00 13.25 SabaStt n 1157 29.25 28.06 28.63 37.06 18.00 Safeco 1.48 5.6 27 5719 26.50 25.44 26.31+0.88 47.00 7.50 SageInc n dd 1864 9.50 8.75 9.00 45.38 5.94 SagentT n cc 6385 11.06 10.00 10.63-0.25 23.00 12.63 StFncis .36 2.4 15 343 15.06 15.00 15.00 43.25 20.25 StMary .20 0.5 29 671 42.25 41.13 41.38-0.69 31.13 6.13 SalemC. dd 410 13.63 11.63 11.63-1.88 16.50 5.06 Salient 3 old 17 13.81 13.81 13.81 10.06 1.06 Salon.cm old 242 1.97 1.88 1.97+0.03 7.56 3.75 Samsnte dd 95 4.31 4.25 4.31+0.06 59.56 13.75 SanchezC dd 769 21.88 21.25 21.38-0.38 1 2.00 3.28 SandTc 128 4.22 4.16 4.22-0.03 11+25 5.94 SandFm dd 1.51 6.38 6.25 6.38+0.13 16963 18.88 SanDisk a 23 15235 85.00 82.13 83.50+1.88 3.50 0.97 SwdsReg 8 4 2.69 2.69 2.69-0.06 35.25 19.00 SndySpr .80 3.7 12 25 21.75 21.13 21.75+0.63 5.13 2.25 Sanfilp 5 128 3.75 3.69 3.75 48.63 5.88-SangBio n 1864

Day C13 / 352

49.63 48.00 49.25+1. 48.13 14.63 Sangstat dd 1364 21.00 19.13 20.25-1.50 112.19 36.75ASonmina a cc 41336 119.50 105.25 118.00+13.75 36.88 3.06 SantCrz dd 12 9 4.75 3.59 4.63+1.00 22.00 5.06 Sapiens n 68 667 6.84 6.63 6.75+0.25 75.59 17.19 Sapient a cc 44023 54.00 44.75 7.28 Satcon dd 1277 36.13 32.26 34.63+1.63 113.00 7.50 Satyami a 10862 1611 14.94 15.25+0.38 19.75 8.88 Saucon 7 22 10.31 10.00 10.00-0.13 19.75 8.00 Saucony B 6 6 9.63 H3 9.63+0.19 28.00 7.50 SavisCm n 2800 9.13 8.63 8.81-0.19 6.13 4.00 Sawako .14e 3.5 1 4.00 4.00 4.00 93.50 29.69 Sawtelk 4718979 51.44 46.50 50.44+4.94 5.00 0.19 ScanOp dd 158 0.94 0.84 0.84-0.03 61.0023.75 ScanSrce 26 2350 59.94 55.63 59.94+3.56 15.38 1.25 ScanSoft dd 30782.50 2.19 2.44+0.25 5.13 3.31ScheidV cc 148 3.56 3.25 3.25-0.25 4.88 2.38 SchrHI 10 21 4.44 4.44 4.44+0.06 9.56 3.38 Schltzk 594 3.94 3.72 3.84-0.03 4.00 1.94 Schmitt 30 149 2.41 2.38 2.41-0.03 20.56 13.25 Schnitzr .20 1.4 11 48 14.81 14.75 14.75+0.38 70.75 39.00 ScholCp 22 682 65A 63.00 64.19-0.88 23.50 11.88 SchoolSp 17 197 18.50 17.94 18.06-0.56 7.88 5.25 Schuler 4193 7.88 7.44 7+53+0.28 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 19.00 10.63 Schulmn .54 4.5 8 345 12.63 12.00 12.06-0.06 16.13 9.88 Schultz .36 3.4 8 83 10.63 10.50 10.50-0.06 22.75 1.47 SciClone dd 1200 11.94 11.69 11.81+0.25 133.75 28.28 ScientCp s dd 31705 28.38 25.03 27.06-3.60 41.00 4.72 SciLrnCp dd 496 7.25 6.94 7.13+0.D6 8.88 3.44 SciTch .20 2.6 15 45 7.84 7.50 7.69 10.98 3.38 Scios dd 5962 10.19 9.16 110.13+11.88 91.63 6.63 SciOst n dd 8958 10.25 9.00 9.63+0.25 18.75 9.13 Scitex 4 2318 12.63 12.06 1244+0.31 111.50 12.13 Scoot.com 49 37.25 X50 37.25+1.25 21.63 15.88 ScottT 17 134 19.13 18.63 18+94-0.06 10.25 5.88 ScottAnn n .20 2.2 23 267 9.25 9.13 9.13 15.75 9.94 ScrmMd n 1914 12.19 11.00 11.56-0.25 76.00 8.63 So&Chng s cc 3644 31.88 28.38 30.00+1.38 30.56 24.25 SeacBk 1+04 4.0 11 17 27.00 26.25 26.25 11.38 8.50 SeacstFn .28 f 2.8 10 378 10.13 9.88 10.13+0.19 27.63 12.25 SecndB .64 4.4 10 45 14.56 14.13 14.56+0.06 29.63 2.50 SecComp n dd 3820 25.06 24.13 24.94+0.94 16.50 3.00 S c dd 13 4.69 463 4.69-0.03 26.25 6.44 SegueSoft dd 1181 8.25 7.88 8.19+0.19 3.88 0.53 Seibel dd 93 0.94 0.88 0.94 8.38 2.22SelCmfrt dd 2923 2.50 2.00 2.13-0.34 30.13 Selectica n dd 2501 48.76 41.50 47.69+2.13 8 14.63 Selctin 60 3.3 19 253 18.00 17.69 17+94-0.06 .1 26.0 SemaGp n 711 37.75 35.88 36.88-0.63 10.25 1.38 Seminis dd 2526 1.75 1.56 1.63+0.06 26.63 400 Semitool s 22 1388 12.88 12.38 12.56-0.25 1919 29.75 SeMtech s 100 3980 120.11 115.44 11844 +2+31 4.88 10.50 SenecaB 31 17 1325 13.00 13.00 1400 10.69 SenacaA 43 21 13.25 13.00 13.00-0.38 140.00 33.50 Se pracor dddd 940731 112.25 10725 110.00 +0.38 191.25 17.00 Sequenm 2 31.60 28.75 30.13+1.38 21+75 5.63 SquoiaSft n 1918 11.94 10.50 11.25+031 12.25 6.50 SeraNova n 2201 8.97 8.06 8.56-0.41 51.00 8.75 SerenaSf s 83 324T 48.88 42.31 44.00-0.69 12.50 3.22 Serolog dd 735 8.75 7.81 7.94+0.13 10.50 7.53 SNWare n 5147 8.91 7.56 8.31+0.56 240.00 28.25 724 Sol n 4525 49.81 45.75 46+56-0.31 11.88 8.00 SevnEnv .14 b 13 10 35 10.88 10.88 10.88 23.50 8.69 Shrplm 17 5149 21.13 19.75 20.00+1.13 8.63 3.88Sheldl dd 1811 4.06 3.16 3.31-0.69 4.25 1.13 ShilsBea n dd 115 1.44 1.38 1. +0.06 12.38 5.50 Shiloh 6 32 8.00 7.38 7.38-0.63 70 00 23.75 ShlrePh 1839 58.13 56.44 56.50-3.50 13. 54.81 ShoeCarn 4.74 7.13 6.94 13.94 4.25 1.50 ShoePav 11 146 3.38 3.13 3.25+025 6.00 3.00 Sholodge dd 10 4.66 4.66 4.66-0.34 14.75 3.16 ShopHm n dd 3036 3.88 3.56 3.69-0.19 9.13 6.81 ShoreFn .08f 1.1 11 28 7.19 7+13 719+0.06 21.38 11.25 Shorlinel .60 b 4.5 12 52 13.63 13.44 13.44-0.06 11.50 2.94 ShowCse dd

353 / C13 Day

240 7.25 6.94 7.25+0.50 17.60 6.56 ShufMst 22 1335 17+25 16.50 17.25+0.75 13.00 3.69 Sicor 48 9415 10.50 9.56 9.69-0. 194.0 31.88 SebeSys s cc 43223 198.50 185.56 197.81 + 25 22.94 6.81 SiabartFn .16 1.8 28 375 9.81 8.63 9.06 + 0.13 82.00 26.50 SieffaWr n 453 68.25 64.31 64.63-0.44 24.25 1.88 SierraCts 50 875 3.06 2.88 3.00-0+03 4.69 0.31 SightRes dd 266 0.59 0+44 0.44-0.16 14.25 3.50 SigmDg 41 981 4.25 4.03 4.13 36.25 20.19 SigmAl .31 1.1 7 2930 30.06 28.75 29.06-0.38 8.75 2.38 Sigmatr 11 6 2.88 2.81 2.818 29.81 4.00 SgnITech 39 217 19.00 18.88 19.00 40.50 20.50 4.13 0.28 SignEye dd 158 2.06 2.00 200-0. 3450 21.00 SignetGp .77 a 3.3 43 23.50 23.13 23.50 +0.25 66.00 10.88 Silonling a dd 15135 37.63 34.81 36.75+1.94 10575 45+31 SilcnLab n 2706 61.75 59.63 60.38-0.63 38.i8 4.00 SST s cc 50353 33.50 30.50 32.81+0.06 58.94 22 7334 59.19 56.09 57.63+1.56 33.75 9.38 SilicnVl 31 4236 28.75 27.13 27.88-0.63 166.00 13.38 Siliconix s 17 958 61.47 55.88 S5.88-3.63 10.50 6.88 SlcnwrA n 18792 7+38 7.13 7.25+0.25 1.69 0.75 SilverD dd 377 1.09 1.00 1.030.09 132.90 22.38 SliverStr dd 2373 36.50 32.63 34.75+3.38 31.63 13.50 SimnFst .80 f 3.8 9 102 21.38 20.88 20.88-0.13 7.38 4.44 SimonT n dd 195 6.38 6.13 6.38 12.63 7.00 Simpind .40 4.1 8 130 9.75 9.50 9.75-0.13 58.56 16.69 Sina.com n 1539 23.00 20.63 21.50+0.63 19.50 6.98 Sinclair dd 3383 12.13 11.50 12.06+0.13 46+31 9.00 SipexCp cc 2011 43.13 41.38 43.06+1.31 69.44 23.13 SiriusS 4754 52.88 50.38 51.50+1.13 33.50 8.56 SklSoft n dd 102 17.75 16.75 117.75+11.13 25.13 13.75 SkyFncl .80b 4.6 18 1399 17.88 17.13 17.50+0.44 1419 2.00 SkyMall dd 1101 3.75 3.03 3.50+0.56 51.25 19.63 SkyWest .16 0.3 21 1782 49.75 47.31 49.69+2.31 30.50 7.25 SkyePh 736 12.50 12.00 12.38+0.19 19.81 5.50 Smallw wd cc 251 19.75 19.63 19.69+0.06 60.98 14.56 SmrtForce dd 3537 54.13 51.98 52.00-0.88 67.50 12.56 SmrtDsk n cc 532 24.00 23.00 23.31-0.63 17.13 1.03 SmrtKds n dd 2263 1.91 1.60 1.50-0.31 87.00 27.13 SmrtSrv n 4265 36.94 29.44 36.81+7.25 37.50 9.69 SmrtSrv wt 1193 16.38 12.75 116.25+41.00 32.00 0.63 SmithMic n dd 487 4.88 4.38 4.75+0.31 23.98 3.63 SmthGrd 27 88 4.25 4.00 4.00-0.25 9.44 1.63 SmithMo 12 174 2.81 2.50 2.69-0.19 25.63 10.88 SmurfStne 8 12542 13.13 12.58 1313+0150 20.00 1.97 Snowball n 265 2.69 2.56 2.69+003 53.38 14.50 SEC B 11 22.00 22.00 22.00+0.50 17.75 9.13 Socket 4300 17.56 16.31 7.44 5.53 0.63 Softech dd 450 0.75 0.63 0.63-006 50.25 4.56 SoftNet dd 2043 7.50 6.88 694-025 38.88 7.00 SoftSpc dd 23 13.00 12.63 3.00 + 0.38 34.88 15.31 SftwreTc n 1647 20.50 19.44 1950-0.31 162.25 39.88 Sftwr.cm dd 8901 148.75 134.97 145.56+10.56 13.78 4.75 Sohu.cm n 2662 8.13 6.50 7.63+1.19 20.00 8.06 SomeraC n .13 1459 13.50 12.81 13.31 24.38 16.63 SomrG .22 f 0.9 17 10 24.38 24.38 24.38 6.50 1.25 SomnsM dd 510 2.06 1.97 2.00 93.13 25.19 Sonars n .12 p 1988 34.19 33.25 33.81+0.56 10.13 6.38 Sonesta .20 17 10.25 9.75 9.75-0.25 34.94 22.81 SonicCorp 21 1698 34.50 32.44 32.63-1.69 65.00 4.25 SonicFdy a do 2011 975 8.81 9+31-0.25 25.00 10.6 SonicInn n 5044 11.69 10.00 10+38-063 12.50 1.69 SonicSol dd 307 3.13 2.88 2.88-0.06 133.38 22.63 SncWaIl n cc 3590 78.25 75.00 76 1 3 - 1 11 37.75 18.63 SonoSite n dd 7603 33.50 32.00 33 4 0 44 8.00 4.63 SonomaW dd 15 6.00 6.00 6.00 11 100 32.00 SomsNet n 10578 172.00 160.00 166.38 +0.94 11.25 2.06 SonusPh 7 580 3.88 3.31 3.75-0.13 14.09 10.59 SouMoBc .50 3.9 13 30 12.75 12.75 12.75 12.75 6.38 Souncl 5 580 9.00 7.75 8.25-1.25 9.88 8.25 SndFedB .28 3.0 20 365 9.25 9.13 9.25+0.06 24.00 7.36 SrceInf 16 750 10.31 10.06 10.13-0.06 21.94 3.50 SceMed n dd 1653 6.13 5.75 6.13+0.47 22.00 10.75 SouthFncl 3.1 22 823 13.06 12.81 13.00-0+06 7.50 6.13 SouthStFn .40 6.1 66.56 6.56 6.56 14.00 6.88 SsdTX s.20 2.6 6 06 7.75 7.69

Day C13 / 354

7.75-0.25 41.81 20.88 Southtrst 1.00 3.5 10 8749 28.75 27.56 28.19+0.63 23.25 13.63 .44 2.8 7 141 15.75 15.13 15.50+0.25 30.00 14.88 SwBcpTX 23 1801 29.06 28.38 29.06+0.25 18.63 10.38 SwWatr a .28f 2.0 15 80 14.00 1138 13.810.06 11.50 5.53 SovBcp .10 1.2 21 29484 8.88 8.50 8.50-0.25 57.50 43.25 SovBcp un 3.75 7.1 500 53.19 53.00 53.19+0.19 20.75 8.44 SpaceLb dd 141 9.25 8.88 9.06+0.31 738 3.88 Spachb n dd 41 5.44 5.31 5.31-0.13 4E 2.88 SpanAm .12 3.0 13 21 4.00 4.00 4.00-0.13 42.00 8.63 SpanBdc dd 40D6 1038 10.00 10.06 6.13 2.44 SpartMot .07 a 2.6 dd 405 2.72 2.63 2.66-0.06 11.81 7.50SprtnStr n 1408 7.88 7.25 7.38-0.63 6.00 2.00 SpecCata 58 345 2.56 2.31 2.31-0.19 10438 8.00 SpeoPhLas dd 301 70.94 67.75 69.38-0.69 3225 4.13 SpecLink 32 1452 13.13 13.00 1300-0.13 8.31 3.00 Spectra dd 488 4.31 4.19 4.28-0.03 30.38 7.38 SpecSite dd 5793 23.63 23.25 23.44-0.13 36.63 12.00 Spectrian dd 2107 17.00 16.D6 16.50+0.13 20.75 6.31 SpecCtl 32 1529 17.69 17.13 7.63+0.25 9.44 1.69 SpctSig 1613 3.25 2.88 3.00+0.06 19.25 8.00 Spectm dd 43 8.75 8.44 8.63+0.25 44.98 SpeechWk n 6897 76.69 66.88 76.63+12.63 29.88 9.56 SFIPEC n dd 939 18.81 18.25 18.63-0.25 24.75 3.13 SpeedUs 6 973 3.63 3.50 3.53-0.03 5.97 2.50 Speizmn 27 92 2.75 2.69 2.69-0.13 15.13 6.00 Spiegel .16 2.3 7 3821 7.44 6.81 6.81-0.69 14.50 2.72 Spire 3 122 6.25 5.38 6.25+0.88 16.63 6.88ASpirosDv n 28 16.81 16.50 16.75+0.50 19.00 5.38 SplashT 22 44086 9.81 7.03 9.03+11.97 6.75 3.75 SptChalt 6 55 6.25 5.50 5.630.50 5.50 2.88 SprtHaley dd 96 3.25 3.25 3.25-0.06 83.25 9.63 SportaLn dd 4284 18.13 17.00 17.69-0.38 5.50 1.06 SprtGde 214 1.38 1.25 1.25-0.13 15.75 9.13AStoarSur 4982 16.75 15.00 116.69+11.56 12.50 3.00 Stafts 9 249 4.00 3.94 4.00 98.50 3.50 Stamps dd 37037 7.38 6.13 6.56+0.88 6.25 2.81Stcjmgt 5 1130 2.97 2.75 2.94 19.00 7.63 StdMic 25 433 19.00 18.50 19.00+0.31 54.31 13.75 StanfMic n 773 48.81 45.81 48.38+2.38 26.25 15.WStanlFrn 10 114 27.13 25.94 27.113+11.25 28 75 13.19 Staples 2348750 16.19 15.13 15.38-0.69 7.50 3.00 StarSci n 99 4.00 3.94 4.00+0.06 9.50 1.56 StarTele dd 1070 3.19 3.06 3.19 1713 1.19 Starbase dd 5981 6.94 6.69 6.75+0.03 45.25 20.44 Starbcks 56 11098 37.56 36.06 3663-0.06 61.00 7.25 StarMda dd 91.65 8.63 8.00 8.50+0.53 34.13 8.13 StartecG dd 1318 13.25 12.13 12.38+0.31 6.50 4.75 Startech n 9 4.88 4.63 4.88-0.13 1106 7.13 StatAutF l2f 1.0 10 231 12.81 12.56 12.56-0.13 17.13 8.50 StFncl .48 4.7 13 402 10.31 10.19 10.31+0.06 15.63 4.75 StatTrm .60 8.6 151 7.31 6.88 7.00 1v.LKJ 8.25 StlDyna 10 1898 12.63 12.06 12.13-0.16 15.25 6.00 SteelTch .12 1.8 5 443 7.13 6.69 6.81+0.06 13.50 4.00 SteinMrt 31 1163 12.31 11.63 11.75-0.69 28.63 12.75 Steinerl- 16 342 23.00 22.34 22.88+0.25 20.00 1.00 StemCells dd 20254 10.25 8.50 900-0.44 27.00 13.00 Stricycle 26 1359 23.56 21.94 22.50+0.13 14.25 8.50AStrlBnc .20 1.4 15 527 14.69 14.06 14 170.02 16.38 9.56 StrlFnWA 7 536 11.38 1.06 11.38+0.06 32.50 12.25 Stering 4.6 11 70 16.50 16.38 16.38+0.13 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 37.19 15.00 StetHellas 175 18.00 17.38 17.50-0.13 1781 8.75 StwStv .34 2.1 13 755 16.19 15.88 1613+038 6.72 1.97 StewEnt .08 2.5 4 6166 3.25 2.91 3.19+0.19 4.81 1.13 StirCB .12 5.6 dd 12 2.25 2.13 2.13+0.0 it 25 15.00 1713 4.69 Stockwlk n dd 1.77 5.63 5.38 5.50-006 22.06 11.63 StottNiel .25 a 11 22 12 22.00 20.31 22.00 16.63 9.41 StoltOffsh 93 13.94 13.75 1188+006 15.00 8.63 StoltOff n 114 12.50 11.75 12.50+0.50 25.44 14.38 StottNieIB .25 a 1. 1 22277 23.19 22.31 .-0.88 15425 82.00 StorNetw n 42.68 108.38 100 101.50 -3.25 1300 3.31 Stratasys 15 123 7.06 6.88 7.03+0.03 10.19 2.69StrtDiag 6 3481 3.19 2.63

355 / C13 Day

2.75-019 3.41 1.13 StrIgDist 2 77 2.06 1.88 1.94-0.13 56.13 26.00 Strfi.ght n 20470 47.38 43.88 47.00+2.81 39.50 31.00 Strattec 9 146 35.00 34.00 34.63 +UO 5.13 3.50 StratusP 7 48 4.66 4.63 4.66-003 31.63 12.88 Strayer .24 1.0 17 146 23.00 22.00 22.95+026 14.69 0.50 Strmline dd 1344 0.69 0.53 0.59-003 3.81 0.81 Strouds 52 108 1.03 0.94 1.03+0.09 19.00 8.131 StrucD 30 1166 16.25 15.75 16.13 29.50 2.88 StdntAdv dd 2062 9.38 7.7S 9.38+1.38 10.06 7.38Styledck 22.70 11.06 9.75 11.00+1.00 7+75 4.75 SubLdgs 17 131 7.28 7A9 7.190.06 14.00 9.00 SuccBnc 18 9 12.00 12.00 1200-025 3.13 1.31 Success dd 10 2.13 1.91 2.13 29.00 25.63 SuffolkBop.92 3.2 1267 28.75 28.50 28.50 16.00 8.50 Summa - 8 50 12+38 12.00 12.19+031 20.00 14.50 SmtBcTX .40 2.7 11 96 5.00 4.75 475-0.38 21.63 6.75 SumitTc dd 62 19.00 18.13 18.94-0.06 16.25 5.50 SunBcpNJ .34 t 9 426 7.50 6.75 7.50 + O.50 2400 12.63 SunBcPA .60 m 4.5 15 45 13.25 13.00 13.25+.02 SunCmn dd 88 7.75 7.38 7.50-0.31 12863 37.50 SunMic a cc 80841 12813 126.06 126.94 - 0 19 24.50 3.13 SndyCom n 501 4.25 3.75 4.13+0.38 14.00 5.75 Sunglss 13 5712 7.38 7.00 7.25+019 17.00 6.88 Sunquest 14 109 13.19 13.06 13.13-006 28.50 9.25 SunrAssist 27 634 20.00 19.50 19.88+0.13 17.50 3.28 SunriseT dd 1223 6.88 6.44 6.56-0.06 62.31 31.00 SnrTlcm n 2904 45.25 42.25 44.94+319 11500 2.69 SupTech dd 1589 22.94 21.50 22.13 77.31 19.00 SuperGn n dd 45M 22.06 19.60 19.69-8.00 24.06 2.38 SupConsl dd 1048 4.19 2.88 2.94-019 12.50 5.25 SupEnrgy 61 1229 11.00 10.88 11.00+006 12.50 7.94 SupFncl n 551 10.94 10.81 10+94+0.13 54.63 11.75 Suprtex 56 1118 47.63 44.50 46.34+1.84 39.1922.63 Support n 876 32.50 29.81 31.02-1.48 13.88 7.13 SupSpcI 7 559 8.25 7.88 8.00-13M 50.50 13.50 SurModics cc 486 45.63 43.63 45.50+1.50 18.50 11+25 SusqBnc.68 4.8 12 272 14.44 13.88 14.31-0.13 41.00 27.63 SdMtch 1.37 a 4.3 - 26 32.50 32.00 32.00+013 23.38 11.81 SwiftTrn 17 617 17.13 16.81 17.06+025 9.63 4.00 SwissArm 12 1 4.47 4.47 4.47+0.22 49.25 6.69 Swtchbrd n 996 9.25 8.75 9.06+025 31.00 10.19 Sybase 38 13038 27.94 26.63 27.44+0.69 19950 47.25 Sycamre s 57283 140.50 134.50 137.50 - 2.06 52.25 11.69 SykesEn 8 3838 14+31 13.81 14M 2094 1063 SylvnLrn dd 1432 14.56 14.38 14.44+0.06 81.63 28.63 Symntc 17 8671 4994 48.63 48.81+0.38 3275 7 00 Symix dd 333 8.38 7.03 7.13-1.13 17.38 4.38 Symetric s 65 6103 15.81 15A 15.50+0+63 8+38 2.75 SympDv did 5133 7.31 4.38 516+0.09 80.00 18.00 SymyxT n dd 5050 38.88 37.00 37.13-025 9+13 6.25 Synaloy 10 3.0 9 75 7.00 6.63 6.63-0.25 17.88 4.00 SynapPhm dd 2480 5.138 5.75 5.88+0.13 12.50 7.81 Syna nt m 3979 9.63 8.06 9.19+0.25 dd 59 3.03 2.94 3.00 6.25 1.63 SyncRes dd 324 4.88 3.88 4.38-0.25 50.00 10.75 Syncor a 43 1544 40.13 38.00 40.00+2.31 75.63 22.00 Synopsy 16 7278 37.38 36.31 37.06+0.13 7.28 6.WSynOuest n 5272 8.00 7.00 7.84+0.84 10.38 1.31 Synsorb gn dd 2103 3.06 2.75 2.75 20.94 7.88 Syntel 49 387 9.56 9.31 9.38-013 9.63 1.31 SyntIct 27 3303 9.50 8.81 9.19+0.31 6.88 2.13 Synthe 31 574 2.94 2.75 2.78-006 27.06 5.88 SyntroCp n dd 825 17.13 15.88 17.00+11.75 1163 8+50 Sypris 13 10 9.50 9.38 9.38-013 2838 10+00 SystCpt 48 1720 18.13 17.38 17.94-0.13 T 9.63 325 TNetix dd 114 3.94 3.69 369-013 5.75 156 TBA Entr 53 145 4.22 3.63 4.22+031 7.63 4.25 TBC 6 402 5.63 5.50 556+0.06 1925 13.88 TCPpLn 80 9.9 336 18.25 17.69 18.25+0.50 12.88 2.88 TClInt 34 28 8.94 8.50 8.94+019 4.20 0.28 TCP1 Inc dd 1089 0.59 056 0.59 9.00 1.22 TCS1 Cp dd 1863 1 .94 1.66 1.81+0.13 3888 14.25 TESSCO 19 10 25.75 24.75 2475-0.81 1806 12.00 TF Fincl .52 3.6 9 5 14.25 14.25 14.25+019 4.50 1.50 TFC Ent 4 247 1+03 1.56 1.63

Day C13 / 356

3400 2.13 THCG dd 119 4.03 4.00 4.03+0A 39.25 7.63 THO a 29 1147 21.63 21.19 2138-0.13 4.19 1.00 TII Inds did 96 244 216 2.44+0.06 3215 5.00 TLC Laser dd 1010 5.50 5.25 525-006 14.75 5.25 TIMER Sh dd 14 14.50 1413 14130.38 94.69 24.88 TMP Ww a cc 6241 72.00 69+13 6919-281 28.44 5.94 TR Sys n 69 4573 16.94 14.06 16.60+2-501 9.00 3.88TRM Corp dd 7 3.50 3.50 3.50-038 8.88 3.56 TSR 6 245 5.31 5.25 531+006 51.50 8.94 TTI Tm 44 378 29.13 27.75 28.75-038 11.75 8.WTVIA Inc n 9971 12.63 11.31 12.50 9.75 4.22 TacoCab 5 460 4.50 4.38 4.44+006 8.66 1.31 Taitron 18 881 5.06 4.56 456-0 19 18.94 8.00 TakeTwo 16 2128 14.00 13.13 13.86+005 27.00 11.50 Talarlan 26.56 18.69 14.81 18.38+3.25 29.00 1.22 TalkCity dd 2429 1.69 1.41 1.56+0 13 26.00 4.25 Talk.com 19 56423 7.38 5.06 7.19+2.00 21.88 7.25 TalxCp 31 257 17.44 16.50 17.00 15.00 6.00 TandyBr 5 112 7.38 7.13 7.13 71.13 11.38 TanTech n - 1107 18.69 16.31 16.31-2.06 54.31 24.75 TanoxInc n 737 46.75 44.38 46.50+1.50 28.00 1.25 TargGene dd 1328 14.00 13.25 13.50+0.06 19.00 7.31 TaroPh 30 4113 18.81 16.50 18.75+2.38 6.50 9.69 Tarragon .42 3.9 dd 42 10.75 10.75 10.75 1 7.25 5.38 Tarrant 19 194 7.94 7.69 7.69-025 2.50 0.56 Taseko 15M 1.00 0.94 1.00 19.50 4.06 TeamCm 32 146 7.25 6.56 7.25 11.25 7.25 TeamFnc .20 2.4 1 8.38 8.38 8.38+0.13 18.00 sTechData 21 6991 52.19 48.25 5163+1.88 1.59 .81 30.00 Techne 76 1420 96.56 91.50 95.50+3.63 7.00 238 Techsrce 18 38 3.31 3.25 3.31 +0.02 1013 OS3 TechSol s dd 4954 3.25 3.00 3.09-009 50.25 12.81 Tecnmtx cc 1082 15.00 1488 15.00+.0 13 5575 34.75 Tec B 1.28 3.3 8 452 40.50 37.00 38.75-1.13 62.06 34.63 TecurnA 1.28 3.2 7 1053 41.06 39.00 39.75-106 1338 2.00 Tegal dd 10204.78 4.50 4.63-0 13 54.38 11.88 Tekelec cc 9137 41.25 39.50 39.50-100 120.25 12.94 TelaxisC n dd 1294 16.00 14.94 15.13 29.00 17.13 TlCmSys n 2020 30.00 28.00 2869+0.38 46.98 7.88 TelCSm 20 8916 17.98 16.2S 17. +0.81 26.02 8.98 TelelEur n 432 12.38 11.88 12.2S+1.19 1069 1 13 TeleSpec dd 4857 1.81 1+50 175+038 55.00 261 TCp PCS n dd 814 35.75 34.13 35+25+025 21.38 1.63 Telemate n dd 1089 3.00 2.38 2.94+050 3288 363 Telescan 7 1947 5.19 4.75 4.81 51.00 15.50 Telesys g 9B4 18.31 17.63 18.19+M0 43.69 10.13 TeleTech 48 2174 33.13 32.50 32.63+0.06 90.00 21.00 Telewest 286 2S.25 MIS 24.38+2+13 100.00 12.75 Tellgent dd 9613 17.44 16.31 17.06+0.94 9.63 6.94-Telikho n 1496 10.63 9.81 10.19+0.69 77.88 41.81 Tellabs 37 53501 56.75 54.25 56.19+1 19 16.00 2.50 Telocity n 1652 5.50 5.00 5.44+019 23.00 3.13 Telscape dd 1255 4.13 3.56 4.00+0.25 32 00 100 Telular dd 1770 19.39 18.06 18.63+0.75 2825 7.56 Telxon .01 0.1 1 1246 20.25 18+94 19.75+0.31 76 88 650 TenFold n dd 1464 7.13 6.63 6.75 44.13 28.25 Tennwt .80f 1.8 18 28 44.00 42.88 43+88+0.88 6.88 1.72 Teal n 1 2.11 1.94 1.94-013 12.63 16.63 11.92 57.00 Tenls 66.50+2-63 146.25 28.00 TerraNtw n 24864 41.2S 39.50 40.13+2.00 10.88 4.16 TescoCp 172 10.81 10.63 1063-0.13 20.75 11.25 Tesma g .64 48 18.00 18.00 18.00 28.25 10.50 TetraTc 32 3946 27.56 2625 27.13+0.25 68.69 23.38 Te a s .20 e 0 3 74 5219 62.00 60+25 60.63-088 29.50 21.81 TexRegl .56 2.2 11 123 25.63 24.88 25.50+050 27.25 4.00 ThStfeet dd 1563 8.88 8.06 8.88+038 17.13 1.06 theglobe dd 1285 1.47 1.31 1.39+0.02 49.50 14.69 ThrmWv dd 722 27.50 27.00 27.13+0.13 12.25 6.25 ThomasG 15 98 7.63 7.44 7.44-006 21.63 4.88 Thorate dd 777 18.63 16.94 18.63+1.56 21.75 4.38 9 MO 17.00 16.38 1663+0.13 21.88 4.00 3D Sys 65 499 20.66 19.00 20.00+0.94 17.13 4.78 3.00 Co cc 10037 9.75 8.97 9.19+0.56 12.00 6.56 ThrRiv n 48 6+0 3.62 8.13 8.00 8.00 16.63 6.38 REC 79 558 16.50 15.50 16.50+0.44 30.75 17.53A3-DimPh n 1653 39.31 29.75 38.88+8.98 14.50 4.31 3DfxInt dd 7041 4.63 4.44 4.56+0.06 10.50 2.38 3Dlabs dd 1332 2.50 2.38 2.44 20.00 13.63 360 5994 17.94 17.00

357 / C13 Day

17.81+0.81 147.00 8.63 TibcoSft s dd 11508 10400 97.13 10194+306 47.38 13.88 Tcktrns 8 dd 4846 24.25 22.38 24.06+1.06 32.00 1.31 Tkts.cm n dd 2346 1.88 1.50 153-0.19 12.63 1.50 TidelTch 18 3406 8.31 7.75 7.94+006 1388 4.00 TierTech 46 519 6.72 6.47 6.50+0.03 12.81 9.06 TmbrlndB .40 f 3.3 8 30 12.25 12.19 12.25+006 15.63 5.50 TimberSf s .16 2.6 11 141 6.25 6.19 6.25+006 93.00 19.88 TW Tele 5676 66.00 64.75 64.94-0+05 20.25 5.00 TlogaT n 5328 7.81 6.U 7.81+0.81 78.75 15.75 TlVoinc n dd 3381 24.38 22.69 24.13+1.44 67.00 45.00 TokioF .39 e 0.8 238 51.75 50.88 51.63-H3 168.88 10.50 Tollgrde s 75 2567 114.63 109.00 111.19+1 13 25.60 10.25 Toolintl 14 13.00 13.00 13.00-0.75 2000 2.94 Topjobs 2.63 3+44 3.13 3.38+0.22 13.38 6.81 Topps 5 38.44 8.31 T98 7.88025 10.00 3.13 TorRes 34 69 5.75 5.41 5.75+0 13 3.00 1.00 TotlEntr 10 12 2.25 2.22 2.25+006 7.94 2+38 TotalRs 22 326 3.84 3+56 3.75 Continued on Next Page ACTIVE BOND ISSUES Moody’s S&P Yld. to Issues Rating Bid Asked mat. Chg. Utility Bonds Appalachian Pwr 6.6 s 098aal/BBB+ 93.38 93.68 7.63 -0.09 Duke Power Co 5.875 s 03 Aa3/AA- 96.87 97.09 723 -008 Southern Cal Ed 5.625 s 02 Al/A+ 96.9197.09 7.21 -0.08 Corporate Bonds Alcoa Inc 7.25 s 05 Al/A+ 101.18 101.84 6.88 -0.09 Disney (Waft) Go 5.125 s 03 A2/A 94A394.70 7.01 -0.09 Itorn Corp 5.375 s 09 Al/A+ 89.28 89.95 7.03 0.08 Intermediate Bonds General Motors 6.375 s 08 A2/A 93.26 93.54 7.52 -0.09 Procter & Gamble 6.875 s 09 Aa2/AA 98.67 99.32 7.03 -0.08 Wal-Mart Stores 6.15 s 01 Aa2/AA 99.24 99.336.95 -0.02 High Yield Bonds Clear Channel 7.875 s 05 Baa3/BBB- 101.82 02.22 7.36 -0.09 News Amer Hldgs 9.25 s 13 Baa3/BBB- 108.32 3J3 8.14 - OA T- Inc 6.625 s 04 Baal/BBB 95.99 96.66 7.77 -0.09 Source Bloomberg Financial Markets AGENCIES AND ZEROES Coupon Maturity Bid Ask Yield Chg Federal National Mortgage Association 4.625 Oct. 01 97-23 97-27 6.70 0.02 6.625 Jan. 02 99-27 99-28 6.74 0.02 5.75 Apr 03 97-23 97-24 6.71 0.09 5.125 Feb. 04 95-01 95-04 6.75 -0.09 7.125 Feb. 05 101-12 101-15 6.75 -0.09 5.75 Jun. 05 95-29 96-01 6.75 -0.09 6.00 May OB 94-28 94-30 6.86 - 0.09 5.25 Jan. 09 89-18 89-22 6.90 -0.08 Federal Home Loan Bank 5.375 Mar. 01 99-09 9913 6.76 - 0.02 5.875 Sep. 01 99-06 SU7 6.68 -0.02 4.975 Jan. 02 97-17 97-19 6.75 -0.02 5125 Feb. 02 97-23 97-25 6.75 -0.02 5.25 Apr 02 97-24 97-27 6.68 - 0.08 5.125 Sep. 03 95-21 95-23 6.72 -0.09 7.25 May. 05 101-26 101-30 6.78 -0.09 6875 Aug. 05 100-08 100-12 6.80 -0.09 Federal Home Loan Mort Corp. 5.00 Feb. 01 98f 99-10 6.72 -006 4.75 Dec. 01 97-20 97-22 6.68 -003 5.50 May. 02 98-03 98-05 6.68 -08 5.75 Jul. 03 97-15 97-17 6.72 -0.08 6.25 Jul. 04 98-09 98-12 6.75 -0.09 6.875 Jan. 05 100-13 100-16 6.75 -0.09 5.75 Apr. 08 9313 93-17 6.87 -0.09 5.75 Mar. 09 92-21 92-25 6.89 -0.09

Day C13 / 358

Treasury Zeroes 0 Nov. 03 82-26 82-28 5.96 -0.08 0 Feb. 15 42-18 42-23 5.99 -0.06 0 Feb. 20 31-27 32-01 5.96 -0.06 0 Nov 24 24-21 24-28 5.85 - 0.07 Source Bloomberg Financial Markets *Callable MONEY Federal funds market rate High 6 11/16 Low 6 5/8 Last 6 5/8 Broker call loan rate 8.25 Primary Offerings by N.Y.C. Banks 30 day 4.79 90 day 5.67 180 day 5.88 Bankers Acceptances 30 day 6.45 90 day 6.46 180 day 6.55 Certificates of Deposit Secondary Market 30 day 6.48 90 day 6.52 180 day 6.66 Source Dow Jones Markets Eurodollar Time Deposits Overnight 6.63 30 day 6.53 90 day 6.60 180 day 6.73 London Interbank Offered Rate 90 day 6.75 180 day 6.81 Dealer Placed Commercial Paper 30 day 1 6.48 Financial Co. Commercial Paper 15 day 6.48 30 day 6.49 60 day 6.45 *Discount Rate TREASURY INFLATION BOND Month Rate Par Bid Ask Chg Yield Jul 02 3.625 1075.43 99-19 99.21 3.82 Jan 07 3.375 1087.10 96-13 96.15 +0.03 4.01 Jan 08 3625 1066.11 97-14 97-16 +0.03 4.02 Jan 09 3.875 1050.22 98-29 98-31 +0 03 4 02 Jan 10 4.250 1023.72 101-31 102-31 +0 04 3 89 Apr 28 3.625 1064.89 95-13 95-15 -0.05 3.89 Apr 29 3.875 1047.70 99.22 99.24 -0.05 3.89 TREASURY BILLS BONDS AND NOTES PRICES IN 32ND OF A POINT BILL YIELDS IN BASIS POINTS. THURSDAY AUGUST 31 2000 TREASURY BILLS Date Bid Ask Chg Yield Sep 07 00 5.88 5.86 -0.16 5.94 Sep 14 00 6.29 6.27 +0.05 6.37 Sep 21 00 6.36 6.34 + US 6.45 Sep 28 00 5.99 5.97 - US 6.08 Oct 05 00 6.15 6.13 6.25 Oct 12 00 6.16 6.14 +0.03 6.26 Oct 19 00 6.11 6.09 +0.04 6.22 Oct 26 00 6.12 6.10 +0.04 6.24 Nov 01 00 6.13 6.11 6.26 Nov 09 00 6.12 6.10 6.25 Nov 16 00 6.13 6.11 6.27 Nov 24 00 6.13 6.11 -0.01 6.28 Nov 30 00 6.12 6.10 -0.01 6.28 Dec 07 00 6.12 6.10 -0.02 6.28 Dec 14 00 6.10 6.08 6.27 Dec 21 00 6.09 6.07 6.27 Dec 28 00 6.06 6.04 -0.01 6.24 Jan 04 01 6.08 6.06 -0.0 6.27 Jan 11 01 6.08 6.06 0.02 6.28 Jan 18 01 6.08 6.06 -0.02 6.29 Jan 25 01 6.08 6.06 -0.02 6.30 Feb 01 01 6.09 6.07 -0.01 6.31 Feb 08 01 6.09 6.07 -0.02 6.32 Feb 15 01 6.09 6.07 0.01 6.33 Feb 22 01 6.09 6.07 -0.01 6.34 Mar 01 01 6.09 6.07 -0.01 6.34 May 31 01 5.96 5.94 -0.01 6.24 Aug 30 01 5.85 5.83 -0.03 6.18 BOND TABLES EXPLAINED

359 / C13 Day

Bonds are interest-bearing debt certificates. Their value is usually quoted as a percentage with 100 equaling par or face value. This table shows the issuing company then the original coupon rate (interest rate) and the last two digits of the maturity year. Current yield represents the annual percentage return to the purchaser at the current price The Price column refers to the bond s closing price and Chg is the difference between the day s closing price and the previous daily closing price. A majority of bonds and all municipal or tax-exempt bonds are not listed on excl rather they are traded over the counter Other footnotes cv Bond is convertible into stock r Registered under specified conditions rp Reduced principal cid Called sit Stamped dc Selling at a discounted price t Floating rate f Dealt in flat - traded without accrued interest x Ex interest It Treasury bond non resident vI in bankruptcy or receivership aliens exempt from witholding or being reorganized under tax the Bankruptcy Act or in Matured bonds securities assumed by such na No accrual of interest companies p Treasury note non-resident wd When distributed aliens exempt from withoding wl When issued tax zr Zero coupon issue

Day C14 / 360

C14 L THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000 MUTUAL FUNDS Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Ret. AAL A Balanced m 12.85 +05+ 35 Bond m 9.50 + O.3 + 14 Capor.- m 40.75 +0.6+ 3.1 m 15.63 +05+ 59 HiYld rn 7.24 + 83 -1.5 Intnl m 13.93 +0.5 - 6.8 MidCap m 19.54 +1.7+25.0 MuniBond m 10.80 +0.1 + 7.8 SMCapStk m 16.25 +03 +21.9 AALCapQrB rn 39.66 +0.6 + 2.3 AAL Instl Bondi 9.50 +0.3+ 5.6 CapG. 40.78 +0.6+ 3.0 AARP Investment SalAARP 21.65 + 0.8 N CapGrow 78.27 + 0.9+ 7.9 DivrGrow 19.65 +0.6 + 4.0 PiwincGr 16.18 +0.4+ 4.8 NA 1 4.58 +0.3 + 5.8 GloGrow 21.86 + 2.0 Groinc 27.84 +0.9 NA income 12.26 + 0.1 NA Intl 57.75 -0.4 NA 8.77 . NA 10.39 + 0.1 NA SmCpStk 18.87 + 0.8 + 4.9 USStkIdx 28.85 + 1.0 + 3.8 AON AMRO AsiaTigCm 8.96 - 0.6-18.9 Be Comm x 175 +0.6+ 2.4 FixnComm 1 9 68 +0.3 + 5.4 Gro.Gomm 19 58 +0.8 +13.9 intlEqCm 21.53 -12.8 SmGapCm 15.41 +0.9 +17.8 Aecornrn 11.81 +0.9+ 0.2 AMA Sal 13.50 +0.7+ 7.5 DivrEq 23.02 +1.0 + 7.5 FullMatFl 9.81 +0.4+ 6.8 LtdMatFl 10.15 +0.1 + 4.3 AIM A AdAntlVa m 19.09 -0.2- 4.2 AggGrow m 20.63 +1.8+31.8 AsianGrow m 13.07 0.2- 1.1 Sal rn 34.61 + .O +17.0 BasicValu m 26.37 + - 1 + 06 BlueCh nn 56.82 + 1.4+ 9.0 CapDev m 23.30 + 1.7 +21.5 Charter m 20.20 + 1.6 + 9.3 Constell m 49.44 + 1.6+22.0 DernoTrend M 17.84 +2.4 +15.5 DevMkt m 10.53 +0.1 -14.8 EmergGr m 12 98 +2.3 NA EurGrow m 20.38 +1.2+ 3.8 26.47 +0.8+11.4 GiAgg m 30.72 +1.8+ 7.2 GiGrow rn 28.86 +1.6+ 1.2 GiInc m 9.13 +0.1 - 0.5 GlUtil m 27.53 + 1.5+ 6.0 HiIncMu m 8.60 - + 1.8 HiYld m 6+84 - 8.5 HiYldll nn 9.95 +0.2 - 5.1 income m 7.16 +0.2 - 0.9 IntGot m 8+82 +0.1 + 4.6 InflEq m 25.28 +0.7 9.1 JaparGrw rn 13.32 -0.4-35.2 LatAmGrow rn 18.26 +0.6 - 1.1 LrgCap m 20.52 +2.2 +48.2 LfgCapOpp rn 14.45 +1.5 +44.5 LtdMatRet m 9.98 +0.1 + 38 MidCapEq m 28.37 +1.6 +2.08 VKtCapGr m 16.74 + 1.8 +21.8 MdCapOp m 24.79 + 1.1 +21.6 MuniBd m 7.89 +0.1 + 5.5 SelGro m 33.63 +2.4 +27.8 3mCapGr m 41.74 + 1.1 +31.0 5nnCapDpp nn 28 19 +0.9 +36.4 Strinc m 9.62 +0.4 - 1.2 TaxEBdCT m 10.65 +0.1 + 5.4 TaxAnt 1 10.89 +0.1 + 5.0 Value m 50.29 +1.2+ 3.0 Weingart m 34.44 +2.3 +14.4 AIM B AggGro m 20.34 + 1.8 +31.1 AswGro. m 12.85 -0.1 - 1.6 Sal m 34+48 + 1.0+ 6.5 BasicValu m 25.59 + 1.1 +10.2 BlueCh m 55+48 + 1.4 + 8.5 CapDev m 22.65 +1.7 +20.9 Charter m 19+83 + 1.5 + 8.B Constell m 48.11 +1.6+21.4 DennoTrend rn 17 70 +2.4 +14.9 DevMkt m 10.43 +0.1 -15.2 tmergGrB rn 12.95 +2.3 NA FurGrow m 19.56 + 1.2 + 33 EuroDev m 25.96 +0.8+10.9 GlAgg m 29.69 + 1.7 + 6.8 GlGrow m 27.89 +1.6+ 0.8 GlInc m 9.13 +0.1 - 0.7 GUN nn 27.42 +1.5+ 5.5 HYld m 6.85 - 9.0 HiYld m 9.93 +0.2 5.6 Income m 7.17 +0.3- 1.2 IntGovt rn 8.84 +0.2 + 4.0 NtlEq m 24.38 +0.7 - 9.5 JapanGrow m 12 67 -0.4 -35A LatAmGrm rr 1803 +0.6 - 1.5 LrgGapOpp m 1442 +1.6 NA MidCapEq m 26.72 +1.6 +20.3 MjdCapGr m 16.61 +1.8 +21.2 MuniBd m 7.90 +0.1 + 4 9 SelGro. m 31.25 +2.4+27 2 m 40.30 + 1.1 +30 3 SmCapopp m 27.75 + 0.8+35 8 Strinc nn 9.63 + 0.3 - 1.7 Value m 48.36 +1.2+ 2.5 Weingart m 32.84 +2.3 +13.8 AIM C AdvFlex m 17.17 +06 - 13 AcMntIVa m 18.87 - O.2 - 4.7 AggrGr nn 20.33 +1.8+31.1 Sal m 34.52 +1.0+ 6.5 SlueCh m 55.47 +1.4+ 8.5 CapDev rn 22.64 + 1.7 +20.9 Charter 19.88 +1.5+ 8.8 Constell m 48.09 +1.6+21.4 DernoTrend rn 17.69 +2.3+14.9 EuroDev m 25.98 +0.8 +10.9 GlAgg rn 29.70 +1.7 + 6.9 GlGrow m 27.90 + 1.6+ 0.8 HiYId m 6.84 +0.2 - 8.9 IntGovt r 8.82 +0.2+ 4.1 InttEq m 24.39 +0.7 - 9.6 MidCapOp m 24.66 + 1.1 +21.0 SelGrow m 31.21 +2.4+27.1 SffCapGr rn 40.28 + 1.2 +30.3 SmCapOpp rn 27.77 + 0.8 +35.7

361 / C14 Day

Value m 48.38 + 1.2 + 2.5 Weingart m 32.86 + 2.2 +13.8 AJMSuml 1 26.03 + 1.9 +15.8 AIM Global Theme PonsProdA m 3034 +1.2- 0.1 ConsProdB rn 29.25 +1.20.4 Fvd8A rn 24.50 +2.0 +22.2 FtmlSvB rn 23.82 +2.1 +21.8 GlTeiffecA rn 38.91 +2.5+ 9.8 CATelTecB m 37.11 +2.5+ 9.4 GlTerre m 37.10 +2.5+ 9.4 HlthCrA rn 28.42 +1.6 +26.4 HlthCrB m 26.94 +1.6+25.9 4nfraB rn 20.27 +2.6+14.3 Accessor Growth 36.42 + 12 + 3.9 11.36 + 0 5+ 5.0 IntlEq 17.20 - 0.3 -13.9 MtgSec x 12.17 + 0.3+ 5.8 Shortint x 11.79 +0.3 + 3.7 SmMidCap 25.58 + 1.2 + 2.1 Value 21.08 + .5 + 3.6 Accessor Inv Growth b 36.02 + 1.2 + 35 IntlEq b 16.97 - 0.4-14.2 SmtoMdCp b 25.22 +1.2 + 1.6 Achievement Bal is 15.20 +0-7 + 5.9 Equityls 20.83 +1.0 + 7.1 IntTmis 10.11 +0.3+ 4.9 MuniBdis 9.71 +0.2 + 7.4 Acorn Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret % Ret. Acorn 18.55 + 0.8 + 62 Foreign 20.08 +12 + 15 Intl 33.14 + fi -19 Twenty 14.30 +1.9 +11.4 USA 14.50 -0.2-11.4 Active GrowthA b 12.18 +0.9+ 7.0 IntmdBdA b 9 98 +0.4+ 5.2 nImatIA b 12.36 +0.7 -130 ValueA b 7.09 + 0+7 + 7s2l Advance Capital IMrced b 18.31 +0.7+ 9.4 Bond b 9.46 +0.4+ 3.1 Comer b 13.97 +1.1 + 3.1 EqGrow b 34.19 +1.4+29.4 RetInc b 9.47 +0.4+ 3.0 Advantus ComrstA m 15.40 +1.0 - 1.0 EnterprA m 22.28 +2.1 + 4.8 HorizonA m 34.33 +2.1 + 8.7 IntlBaIA m 12.05 -0.2+ 0.7 MtgSecA m 10.32 +0.3+ 7.1 SpectrmA m 21.09 +1.4+ 9.2 VentureA m 12.64 +1.4 +18.9 AmeTrAll 27.92 +1.7+20.2 Aetna A Bal m 14.75 +0.8+ 7.1 Grinc m 15.33 +1.3+ 2.9 Grow m 25.97 +2 1 +14 5 UxPiLgCp rn 20.06 + .2 + 53 Intl m 15.62 + 1.1 - 2.4 smComp rn 16.43 + 1.6 +203 Aetna B PrinPrl 10.82 +1.0 NA PrinPro m 10.86 +0.9- 0.8 PrinProll m 1 0.23 +0.9- 0.4 Aetna C IdxPlLgCp m 20.01 +1.2 + 5.0 Aetna I Ascent 12.77 +1.5+ 5.3 Ball 14.77 +0.8+ 7.3 Bond x 9.92 +0.3+ 41.6 Crossrds 12.28 +1.3 + 4.8 Grow 2652 +2.1 +14 7 Growinc 15A1 +1.3+ 3 1 d PlLgCp 20.22 +1.2+ 55 nil 15.69 + 2- 2.2 SmComp 16.93 + 1.6 +20.9 Alger Group A CapApr 1 16.33 +1.9+ 2.4 Grow f 16.25 +1.2+ 8.6 MidCapG 111.05 +1.3 + 31.1 SmCap 1 10.05 +1.7- 5.9 Alger Group B Bal m 22.49 +0.8+ 8.0 CapAppr m 15.82 +1.9+ 1.9 Grow m 15.67 +1.2+ 8.1 MidCapGr rn 10.66 +1.3+30.5 SmCap m 9.73 + 1.9 - 6.4 Alw Retire CaPAPPr 21.93 +2+2+ 4.6 Grow 19.82 +1.5+10.6 MidCapGr 18.74 +1+0+32.4 SmCap 26.67 +1.8- 1.1 Allegheny BldntDv 12.33 -0.2 -10.7 CTBal b 14.27 +1.1 + 8.3 CTBond b 9.73 +0.3+ 5.5 CTBondl 9.73 +0.3 NA CTGrIncl 31.08 +1.6 NA CTGrowInc b 31.07 + 1.6 + 9.4 CTmCpVal b 1077 +03 +12.1 MCBaIN b 19.01 +0.3- 1.9 MCGowN b 32.20 +0.2- 7.0 VerAggrGr b 23.43 +01 +19.7 Alliance Capitall A AggStr m 15.12 +0.5+ 2.2 Alliance m 7.05 +1.1 - 5.5 BalShr m 16.31 +1.0+10.9 BdCorpBd m 12.21 +0.6+ 4.9 BdUSGovt m NA NA NA GloDollr m 7.06 +0.6 + 16.5 GloSmCap m 16.17 +1.3+ 7.8 GloStrinc m NA NA NA Grow m 56.37 + 1.5 Growinc m 4.07 + 1.2 +13.7 HiYld m 8.10 -0.2- 2.1 Hithrare m 12.85 +1.4+24.9 Intl m 18.39 -0.69.2 IntlPreGr m 12.99 -0.1 -9.0 LtdMatGv m 8.97 +0.2+ 3.6 MtgSec m 8.19 +0.4+ 6.0 MulrCA rn 10.89 +0.3+ 8.7 MuInlAZ m 10.54 +0.1 + 7.9 MuInIIFL m 9.80 +0.1 + 7.2 MuInlIMA m 10.70 +0.1 + 8.3 MuInlINJ m 10.02 +0.2+ 8.9 MuInIkH m 9.83 +0.2+ 7.1 MuInIlPA m 9.99 +0.2+ 8.2 MuInllVA m 10.43 +0.1 + 7.5 MuInNY m 9.74 +0.2+ 80 MuInNatl m 10.15 +0.2+ 75 MuInsCA rn 13.64 +0.2+ 8.8 MuInsNat m 9.61 +0.1 + 8.1 MultiStr m 6.09 +0.2+ 1.9 NAmGovt m 7.68 +0.7+14.3 NewEur m 21.01 +0.21- 56 PremGr m 39.87 +1.3 + 9.2 Quasar m 31.58 +1.8+11.8 SelPrem m 1746 +2.0+ 9.3 SelTech 10.18 +3.0 NA Tech m 155.16 +2.9+20.8 Utilinc m 17.74 +0.8+ 7.5 WorldPri m 13.12 +0.4-12.0 Alliance Capital Adv Grow 57.15 +1.5+ 0.2 GrowInc 4.08 +1.2+13.8 PremGr 40.48 +1.3+ 9.5 PremGrlsl

Day C14 / 362

20.18 +1.2+10.6 Quasar 31.88 +1.8+12.0 Tech 157.15 +2.9 +21.0 Alliance Capital 8 AllAsia m 11.22 -1.1 -16.0 Alliance m 6.32 +1.3 - 6.0 BalShr m 15.70 +1.0+10.4 BdCorplEld rn 12.22 +0.6 + 4.4 BdUSGovt m NA NA NA Consvinv m 11.80 +0.3 + 3.5 GloDollr m 7.14 +0.6+15.8 GloSmCap m 14.51 +1.3 + 7.2 GloStrInc m NA NA NA Grow m 42.52 +1.5- 0.5 GrowInc m 4.01 +1.0+12.9 Growinv m 15.23 +0.5+ 1.7 HiYld m 810 -0.2- 2.5 HlthCare m 12.76 +1.4+24.4 Infl m 16.97 -0.6- 9.7 IntlPreGr m 12.77 -0.1 -9.4 MUTUAL FUND SPOTLIGHT: LONG-TERM MUNICIPAL BOND FUTURES Largest Funds Assets RETURNS (mil. $) Name Type YTD 1yr. 3yr.* 12,785 Franklin A CA TaxF Income +9.0%+ 6.5% + 4.8 6,329 Franklin A Federal TaxF Inc MIL + 6.7 + 5.2 + 4.5 4,931 Franklin A High-Yld TaxF Inc MIL + 4.6 + 1+9 + 3.5 4.218 Fidelity Spartan Muni Inc MIL + 7.5 + 6.8 + 5.0 3,374 Oppenheimer/Roch Fund Muni A + 8.3 + 5.1 + 4.3 2,926 Vanguard Muni HighYield MIL + 7.2 + 5.6 + 4.7 2,576 Dreyfus Municipal Bond ML + 7.9 + 5.3 + 3.6 2,531 Putnam A CA TaxE Income + 8.9 + 6.9 + 4.8 2,524 Nuveen R Interm Dur Muni Bd ML + 7.1 + 5.6 + 4.5 2,490 Kemper A Municipal Bond ML + 7.2 + 6.1 + 4.4 Leaders Over One Year Assets RETURNS (mil. $) Name Type YTD 1yr. 3yr.* 1,598 Vanguard CA Insured Long Tm + 10.3%+9.1%+ 5.9 128 Northern CA Tax-Exempt + 93 + 8.7 + 5.5 191 Liberty A CA Tax-E + 10+3 + 8.5 + 5.5 88 SAFECO CA Tax Free Inc + 12.9 + 8.3 + 4.7 94 Prudential A CA Muni CA + 9.1 + 8.3 + 5.2 48 Wells Fargo Inst CA Tx-Free + 9.6 + 8.2 NA 632 Smith Barney A CA Munis + 10+7 + 8.1 + 5.0 1,086 Dreyfus CA Tax-Exempt Bond + 10.0 + 8.1 + 5.1 189 Calif Invest TaxF Income + 8.9 + 8.1 + 5.2 757 Kemper A State TaxF Inc CA + 9.3 + 8.0+ 5.1 Laggard Over One Year Assets RETURNS (mil. $) Name Type YTD 1yr. 3yr.* 43 AIM A High Income Muni ML + 1.8%- 4.2% NA 441 Strong High-Yield Muni Ed Iv ML + 1.1 - 2.9 + 2.0 197 Eaton Vance B High-Yield Mu ML + 3.1 - 1.3 + 1.5 90 Liberty B Hi-Yield Muni ML + 3.5 - 0.6 + 2.1 70 Federated B Municipal Opport ML + 4.0 + 0.5 + 1.7 35 Delaware A MN High-YId SL + 5.5 + 0.5 + 3.4 35 Oppenheimer B NJ Municipal SL + 5.2 + 0.6 + 1.9 52 Van Kampen C Tax Free HiInc ML + 3.0 + 0.6 + 2.0 115 Evergreen B FL High-income SL + 3.7 + 0.8 + 2.6 61 PaineWebber A Muni High-Inc ML + 3.5 + 0.9 + 3.1 Average performance for all such funds + 7.2 % + 5.2 % + 4.0 Number of funds for period 564 563 543 ML-Muni National Long. SL-Muni Single St. Long. NA-Not Available, Fund spotlight tables rotate on a three-week basis, Limited to Nasdaq funds with at least $30 million YTD-Year to date. *Annualized. Source: Morningstar Inc. MuInCA m 10.89 +0.3+ 8.2 MuInllAZ m 10.53 +0.1 + 7.4 MuInllFL m 9.81 +0.2+ 6.7 MuInllMA m 10.69 +0.2+ 7.8 MuInllNJ m 10.02 +0.2+ 8.3 MuInllOH m 9.83 +0.2+ 6.6 MuInIIPA m 9.99 +0.2+ 7.6 MuInllVA m 1042 +0.2+ 7.0 MuInNY m 9 + 74 +0.1 + 7.4 MuInNatl m 1014 + 02 + 7.0 NAmGovt m 7 71 +0.7+13.9 NewEur m 19.45 +0.2- 6.1 PremGr m 37.56 +1,3+ 8.7 Quasar m 28.04 +1.8+11.2 RealEst m 10.84 -0.2+20.0 SeProm m 17.18 +2.1 + 8.9 Seffech 1014 +3.0 NA

363 / C14 Day

Tech m 146 0 +2.9+20.2 WHIM m 17.58 +0.8 + 7.0 WorldPri m 12.61 +0.4-12.4 Alliance Capital C BalShr m 15.75 +1.0+10.4 BdCgpBd m 12.22 +0.6+ 4.4 BdUSGovt m NA NA NA GloDollar m 7.15 +0.6+15.8 GloStrinc m NA NA NA Grow m 42.55 +1.5- 0.5 Growim m 4.02 +1.3+13.2 HiYld m 8.10 -0.2- 2.5 HlthCare m 12.77 +1.4+24.3 IntlPreGr 12.77 -0.1 - 9.3 MuInCA m 10.89 +0.3 + 8.2 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Nwe NAV % Ret. % Ret. MuInllFL rn 9.81 +0.2+ 6.7 MuInMA rn 10.69 +0.2+ 7.8 Mu n NJ rn 0.02 +0.2+ 8.3 MuInNY rn 9.74 +0.1 + 7.4 MuInNall rn 10.14 +0.2+ 7.0 NAmGovt m 7.71 +0.7+13.7 NeEur nn 19.47 +0.2- 6.1 PrernGr m 37.62 +1.3 + 8.8 Quasar m 28.07 + 1.8 +11.3 RealEst m 10.85 -0.2 +20.0 SelPrem rn 17.18 +2.1 + 8.8 Seffech 10.13 +3.1 NA Tech m 146.05 +2.9 +20.2 WorldPri rn 12.60 +0.4 -12.4 AlpIntlRE 13.49 + 1.4 AmSouth A8B EqincA f 16.02 +1.3 +13.1 LgCapA 1 27.62 +0.5 + 4.7 ValueA 1 20.89 +0.4 + 1.5 AmSouth TrustBe 12.94 +0.4+ 5.0 Bond 10.61 +0.4+ 6.8 CapGro 15.40 +0.6 +10.9 EnhMkt 15.58 +1.0+ 5.0 Eqinc. 16.03 +1.2 +13.2 FLTaxEx 10.24 +0.1 + 5.6 GovtInc 9.70 +0.4+ 5.9 GrowbInc 10.27 +0.4+ 4.9 Intleqty 12.36 -0.4 - 6.8 LgCap 27.63 +0.5+ 4.8 LtdBond 10.16 +0.1 + 4.5 LtdUSGov 9.92 +0.1 + 4.1 MidCap 18.72 +1.5+ 7.8 MunZd 9.85 5.7 SmCap 13.75 +25 6 TNTaxEx 9.81 +0.1 + 14 Value 20.88 +0.5+ 1.6 MontOppGr NA NA NA American A Amcap rn 19.67 +0.5+10.6 Bal m 14.85 +0.4+ 6.0 BondArner rn 12.85 +0.3 + 4.1 CapIncBu rn 43.46 +0.2+ 5.2 CapWbBd rn 14.17 -0.2 - 3.3 CapWldGrl rn 30. 77 +0.3+ 5.0 EurPacGr rn 40.33 -0.1 - 5.5 Fundminv rn 34.86 +0.3+ 97 GroAmer rn 35.91 +0.6 +23.2 HiInc. m 13.23 +0.2 + 1.8 HHncMu rn 14.99 + 5.8 IncAmer rn 15.94 +0.3+ 4.0 IntBdArn rn 13.08 +0.2+ 5.1 InvCoAm rn 33.60 +0.4+ 5.6 LtdTmTxE rn 14.55 +0.1 + 4.7 Mutual rn 23.84 +0.5+ 1.7 NeEcon rn 29.73 +0.3 - 0.3 NewPersp rn 30.56 +0.2 + 3.8 NwWrld m 26.37 -0.1 - 6.8 SmCpWd rn 41.90 + 1.3 + 7.1 TaxEBdArn m 11.81 +0.2+ 6.4 TaxECA m 16.00 +0.1 + 7.9 TaxEMD m 15.25 +0.1 + 5.2 TaxEVA rn 15.72 +0.1 + 6.4 USGovSec m 12.76 +0.4+ 6.5 WAMutInv rn 29.49 +0.7 + 0.8 American B EurPacGr 40.20 -0.1 NA InvCoAm 33.52 +0.3 NA NeEcon 29.63 +0.3 NA NewPersp 30.45 +0.2 NA WAMutInv 29.43 +0.7 NA American AAdv IntleqAMR b 19.27 -0.3 - 2.1 LgCVlAMR b 15.21 +0.5+ 3.5 American AAdv Inst Bal 12.02 +0.5+ 4.3 IntBd 9.71 +0.3+ 7.2 Intleq 19.16 -0.3 - 2.2 SPIdx 20.74 +1.0+ 4.0 AmAdvIEqP 18.92 -0.3- 2.4 American Century Adv EqGrow b 27.26 + 1.2 + 5.2 ImGr b 34.40 +1.2+ 1.4 IntlGr b 14.19 +0.6- 5.1 Ultra b 46.93 +1.4 + 2.9 Value b 5.61 +0.5+ 2.9 American Cent Inst EmgMkt 6.30 -0.2 NA EqGrow 27.29 +1.2+ 5.5 EqIndex 6.07 +1.0+ 3.9 IncGr 34.43 + 1.1 + 1.5 IntlDis d 18.41 +1.6+ 7.5 IntlGr 14.26 +0.6 - 4.7 Select 56.79 + 1.1 + 7.6 Ultra 47.35 +1.4+ 3.0 Value 5.62 +0.5+ 3.2 American Cent Inv AZIntMu 10.46 +0.1 + 5.9 Bal 17.97 +0.8+ 5.6 Bond 9.03 +0.4+ 4.5 CAHYldMu 9.44 +0.2 + 8.5 CAlnsTxF 10.13 +0.2 + 9.0 CAlntTxF 11.08 +0.2 + 6.9 CALgTxF 11.11 +0.2 + 9.6 CALtdTxF 10.40 +0.1 + 4.9 EmgMkt d 6.29 -10.0 EqGrow 27.27 +1.2+ 5.3 EqIndex 6.07 +1.0+ 3.9 IncGr 34.43 + 1.1 + 1.5 IntlDis d 18.41 +1.6 + 7.5 IntlGr 14.26 +0.6- 4.7 Select 56.79 + 1.1 + 7.6 Ultra 47.35 +1.4 + 3.0 Value 5.62 +0.5+ 3.2 American Cent Inv AZIntMu 10.46 +0.1 + 5.9 Bat 17.97 +0.8+ 5.6 Bond 9.03 +0.4+ 4.5 CAHYldMu 9.44 +0.2+ 8.6 CAlnsTxF 10.13 +0.2+ 9.0 CAIntTxF 11.08 +0.2+ 6.9 CALgTxF 11.11 +0.2+ 9.6 CALtdTxF 10.40 +0.1 + 4+9 EmgMkt d 6.29 -10.0 EqGrow 27.27 +1.2+ 5.3 EqIdx 6.06 +1.0+ 3.6 Eqinc 5.86 +0.3+ 64 FUntMu 10.41 +0.1 + 5.8 GNMA 10.26 +0.2+ 5.5 Gift 51.51 +3.3+35.8 GlGold d 4.20 + 1.2 -201 GlGrowth d 10.32 + 1.1 + 6.0 GiNatRes 13.44 -0.5 + 4.8 Gro.th 36.00 +1.3 +11.5 Herit 20.23 +1.7 +29.3 HiYld 804 +0.3-

Day C14 / 364

2.5 IncGr 34.42 + 1.1 + 1.7 IntTaxF 10.28 +0.1 + 6.1 IntTrs 10.19 +0.4+ 6.2 IntIBd 9.56 -0.3 - 7.8 IntlDis d 18.37 +1.7 + 7.4 IntlGr d 14.23 +0.6 - 4.8 LgTmTr 10.05 +0.7 +12.9 LgTmTxF 10.15 +0.2 + 8.2 LtdTmTmF 10.05 +0.1 + 4.2 NewOpp d 18.43 +3.3 +36.6 Prem8d 9.69 +0.3 + 5.4 RealEst 13.45 -0.4+17.5 Select 56.63 + 1.1 + 7.5 ShTrnGovt 9.24 +0.1 + 4.0 ShTmTrs 9.68 +0.1 + 3.9 StrAlAgg 8.99 +1.0 + 7.2 StrAlCon 5.88 +0.5+ 4.4 StrAlMod 7.56 +0.8+ 5.4 TarMat00 100.43 + 3.6 TarMatO5 76.49 +0.4+ 6.8 TarMat10 60.21 +0.7 +12.4 TarMatl5 b 48.99 +1.0 +17.7 TarMat20 35.92 +1.0 +22.1 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Ret. TarMat25 30.80 +1.4+24.8 TxMgdVal d 5 28 +0.4+ 3.9 Ultra 47.15 +1.4+ 3.0 Util 16.17 +1.0+ 4.0 Value 5.62 +0+7+ 3.3 Veedot d 6.84 +2.1 +15.5 Vista 26.80 + 2.O +20.7 American Expr A BlChip m 12.97 +1.4+ 4.4 Bond . 4.70 +0.2+ 3.3 CATaxE rn 5.16 +0.2 + 9.0 Discover rn 11.26 + 1.3 + 3.3 DivrEqInc rn 9.00 +0.60.2 ErngMkt rn 5.76 -12.7 EqSelect rn 20.74 +2.1 +138 EqValue rn 11.05 +0.8+ 0.6 ExtraInc rn 3.41 - 3.3 FedInc rn 4.67 + 2.1 GloBal m 6.64 + 0.3 - 2.8 GloBond m 5.50 - 1.9 GloGrow rn 9.93 + 1.1 - 4.3 Growth m 59.27 +2.0+16.3 HiYldTxE m 4.38 +0.2 + 6.2 Innovat m 6.27 +3.6 NA InsTaxE rn 5.38 +0.2+ 7.9 IntTaxE rn 5.04 + 3.0 Intl m 12.44 +0.3 -12.5 MATaxE rn 5.20 +0.2 + 6.4 MITaxE m 5.17 + 5.7 MNTaxE rn 5.09 +0.2 + 6.8 MgdAlloc rn 10.90 +0.8+ 4.3 Mutual rn 12.87 +1.0+ 2.7 NYTaxE m 5.01 + 7.0 Ne.Dirnen rn 38.85 +1.0+ 8.6 OHTaxE m 5.21 +0.2 + 6.7 PrecMet m 5.00 + 1.4-12.7 Progress m 8.53 +1.4+ 1 3.3 ResOpp rn 8.27 +1.7 + 3.1 Select rn 8.54 +0.4+ 5.1 SrnCoIdx rn 7.33 +1.0+12.8 WpAdvan m 6.34 + 1.1 +12.2 Stock rn 28.52 +0.9+ 3.5 StratAgg rn 36.83 +2.8 +16.1 TaxEBc1 rn 3.93 +0.3+ 7.7 UtilInc rn 10.01 +0.9+ 8.5 American Expr B BIChip rn 12.73 +1.4+ 3.9 Bond rn 4.70 +0.2+ 2.8 Discover m 10.77 +1.3+ 2.9 DivrEqInc rn 8.99 +0.6- 1.1 ErngMkt rn 5.60 -0.2-13.3 EqSelect rn 20.05 +2.1 +13.2 EqValue rn 11.03 +0.8 Extralm m 3.41 - 3.7 Fedinc. rn 4.67 + 1.6 GloBal rn 6.58 +0.3- 3.2 GloBond rn 5.49 - 2.5 GloGrow m 9.71 + 1.1 - 4.8 Growth rn 56.68 +2.0 +15.7 HiYldTxE rn 4.38 +0.2 + 5.7 Innovat rn 5.69 +3.6 NA InsTaxE m 5.38 + 7.4 Intl rn 12.31 +0.3-12.9 MNTaxE m 5.09 + 6.3 MgdAlloc rn 10.112 + O.9 + 3.8 Mutual rn 12.75 + 1.0+ 2.1 NewDirnen m 37.72 +1.0+ 8.0 Progress m 8.36 +1.5+12.7 ResOpp rn 7.99 +1.8+ 2.7 Select m 8.54 +0.4+ 4.6 SmCo dx m 7. 10 +1.0+12.2 SmCpAdvan rn 6.28 +1.1 +11.7 Stock m 28.25 +0.9 + 3.0 StratAgg rn 34.75 +2.8+15.6 TaxEBd rn 3.93 +0.3+ 7.2 UtilInc m 10.00 +0.9+ 8.0 American Expr Y BlChip 1100 +1.4+ 4.6 Bond 4.70 +0.2+ 3.4 Discover b 11.31 + 1.3 + 3.5 FedInc 4.67 + 2.2 Growth 59.71 +2.0+16.4 Intl 12.46 +0.3-12.4 MgdAlloc 10.91 +0.9+ 4.5 Mutual 12.87 +1.0+ 2.8 NewDirnen 38.93 +1.0+ 8.7 Select 8.54 +0.3+ 5.2 Stock 28.53 +0.9 + 3.6 Amex Strategist GrowTren rn NA NA NA Growth rn NA NA NA AmerGroD f 10.45 +2.6+ 1.6 Americanindependence IntBdlsSv xb 9.78 + 0.7 + 45 IntlMMSv b 13.56 - 0.3 - 24 KSTxEls5v xb 10.37 + H + 6.1 ShTmBdsS xb 9.92 +0.6+ 4.6 StockIsSv b 10.49 + H +10.2 American Performance Bal rn 13.136 +0.9+ 4.8 Bond xrn 9.17 +0.2+ 5A Equity m 17.48 + 1.1 + 4 6 GrowEq rn 16.57 + 1.1 + 18 IntrmBd xrn 10.08 +0.2+ 4 7 ShTmInc xm 9.93 +0.1 + 4.8 Am Skandis Adv ACStrBal m 13.80 +0.9+ 4.6 AllGrinc m 13.58 +1.0+ 4.3 AllGrow m 18.39 +1.5+14.3 FdIntSCp m 18.76 +1.0 - 2.8 FedHiYld m 8.58 +0.1 - 2.0 InvEqinc m 14.77 +0.4+ 8.5 JanCapGr m 22.97 +2.1 - 3.8 JanOvers m 19.66 +1.4- 2.2 JanSmCap m 21.39 +2.1 -12.7 MarCapGr m 17.72 +0.9- 1.7 NBMdCpGr m 2674 +2.7 +21.8 NBMdCpVlm 14.16 +0.9+16.3 TRo.SmCo m 1066 +0.8+19.1 TotRetBd m 10.11 +0.5+ 5.3 Am Skandia Adv C ACStrBal m 13.79 +0.8+ 4.6 AllGdnc m

365 / C14 Day

13.57 +1.0+ 4.3 InvEqinc m 14.76 +0.4+ 8.5 JanCapGr m 22.93 +2.1 - 3.8 JanOvers m 19.69 + 1.3 - 2.3 JanSmCap m 21.40 +2.1 -12.8 MarCapGr m 17.69 +0.9- 1.8 NBMdCpG. b 26 75 +2.7 +21.8 Am Skandia Adv X InvEqinc m 14.75 +0.4+ 8.5 Fund Family Diy YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Reto JwCapGr m 23.00 +2.1 - 3.8 Jan0v8s rn 19.66 +1.4 - 2.2 JanSmCap m 21.40 +2.1 -12.8 MarCapGr m 17.68 +0.9- 1.8 AmerIDdoD rn 28.12 +1.4-15.2 AmerlstMF 37.42 +0.3+ 6.6 Aon AstAlc 17.66 +0.5+ 7.0 GovSec x 9.75 +0.3+ 6.3 Aquila ChTxFKYA rn 10.29 + 55 HIWA rn 11.09 +0.2+ 62 NanraInsA rn 10.11 +0.1 + 72 TaxFAZA rn 10.33 +0.1 + 59 TaxFCOA rn 10.17 + 5.2 TaxFORA rn 10.38 +6.1 + 6.4 TaxFUTA rn 9.53 +0.1 + 7.3 Aquinas EcuttyGr 22.42 + 1.1 +15.1 EcuityInc 11.17 +0.4- 0.5 FixIn x 9.57 +0.3 + 5.3 Ariel Apprec b 32.78 +0.7 + 58 Anel b 35.16 +0.1 + 13 0 PrernBcIs 9.87 +0.3 + 5.4 Aristata Equity 9.77 +0.7 + 8.3 QualBond 9.46 + 0.2 + 4.5 Ark BaIA rn 17.61 + 1.0+10.2 BICpEcA rn 24.79 + .1 +0.4 BICpEcIs 24.82 + 1.1 +10.5 CapGrA rn 27.37 +1.5+17.0 CapGrls 27.63 +1.5+17.0 EqIncls x 12.77 +0.7 +13.3 EqIndexls 15.54 +1.0+ 4.1 GroIncls b 17.68 +1.0+10.3 Inc Is 9.66 +0.2+ 4.6 IntFIxlls 9.55 +0.2 + 3.6 MDTaxFIs 9.74 +0.1 + 5.8 MidCapls 2013 + 1.9 +27 0 PATaxFls b 9.70 +0.1 + 6.3 ShTmBdis 9.73 +0. + 2.5 SmCapEqls 23.28 +2.5- 1.5 StTmTrsis 9.94 +0.1 + 3.7 USGovBdls 9.42 + 0.3+ 3.6 ValEqls b 14.72 +1.0+ 8.4 Armada BalAlcls b 10.82 +0.6+ 2.5 Bond 1 9.58 +0.4+ 4.1 GoreEcls b 16.00 + 1.1 + 6.4 EqGrow I b 31.22 +1.0+ 5.8 EcGrow R m 31.06 +1.0 + 5.7 EqIdx1 b 13.09 +1.0+ 3.9 EqInA rn 15.55 +0.5- 0.5 EqInc I b 15.58 +0.5- 0.3 GNMA I b 9.95 +0.3+ 5.5 GovtIncIs 8.97 +0.3+ 5.4 IntBd I b 10.07 +0.2+ 3.6 IntlEqI b 14.25 +0.2 - 7.9 LarCapUll 22.38 +1.5+10.5 LtdMatBdl b 9.82 +0.2+ 3.6 MidCapGrA m 16.96 +2.2 +18.6 NficCapGrI 17.31 +2.2+18.7 NatlTxEI b 9.81 + OA + 5.3 OHTxE I b 10.83 +0.1 + 5.3 PAMund b 10.18 +0.1 + 5.1 SmCApGrA m 15.46 +1.4 + 6.3 SmCapGrl b 15.57 +1.3+ 6.3 SmCpVall b 16.36 +0.9 +17.7 ToRtAdvI b 9.75 +0.4+ 6.6 TWgdEclb 15.13 +1.0+ 6.8 Artisan Intl 28.87 +0.1 + 1.3 MidCap 31.47 +1.8+45.1 SmCap 14.59 + O.3 + 9.7 SmCapVal 11.17 +0.4+ 9.9 Asset Management AdjRtMtg xb 9.93 + 4.2 IntMtg xb 9.29 +0.2+ 4.9 ShUSGovt xb 10.31 +0.1 + 4.2 USGoMg xb 10.23 +0.3 + 5.6 Atlas Bal A b 13.33 +1.2+ 4.1 CAMuni A b 11.03 +0.3+ 8.7 GlobGr A b 21.66 +0.4+12.3 GrowIn A b 30.43 +1.4+14.8 NatMuBdA b 10.89 +0.2 + 7.2 StrGro A b 26.50 + 1.7 +29.1 Strinc A b 4.55 +0.5+ 3.2 USGovt A b 9.70 +0.3+ 5.3 BB8K Diverse 13.09 +1.0+ 1.8 IntlBond 7.33 -0.1 - 2.1 IntlEq 7.14 +0.3 - 8.9 BB8T Bal Tr x 13.43 +0.5+ 3.0 CpMgCnGTr 10.99 +0.6+ 4.9 GrIncStA xrn 18.62 +0.9+ 3.7 GrIncStB xrn 18.52 +0.9+ 3.2 GrIncStTr x 18.65 +09+ 38 IntC.BTr xb 9.95 + 0:4 + 50 IntGovBdT x 9.7 +0.4+ 62 IntlTr 13.50 - 9.9 LgCoGrTr 16.21 +1.3 + 9.8 NCIntTFTr x 10.06 +01.1 + 5.8 SiGovInTr x 9.60 +0 .2 + 4.0 SlGovInTr x 9.60 + 0.2 + 4.0 SmCoGrTr 36.61 + 2.8 + 7.9 VAInTFrBd x 11.05 + 0.1 + 6.3 ONY Hamilton Inst EqInc 18.06 +0.4+14.0 9.50 +0.2 + 5.1 ntlyGrad 9.88 +0.2 + 4.3 IntNYTXE 10.36 + 5.1 IntTxE 9.811 + 53 IntlEq 14.65 + 6.i -15.4 LgCapGr 18.98 +0.8+19.2 SmCapGr 25.78 +1.7 + 1 T5 BNYEqInIv b 18.01 +0.3+13.8 Babson Bond L 1.50 +0.7 + 5.5 Enterp 14.54 + 0.5 +20.4 Enterpil 27.38 + 0.3 + 1 6.6 Growth 21.9 +0 1 + 1 5 7 ShadStk 12.69 +0 6 +16 0 StlvoInfl 23.28 +0 6 -5.9 Value 41.93 + 1.3 BkBay TRtA 9.41 +0.3+ 4.0 Barclays Glob Inv AssetAlc x 13.43 +1.0+ 8.6 BondIndx x 9.29 +0.3+ 6.4 Life2010 14.06 +0.5+ 3.5 Life2020 17.15 +0.6+ 3.3 Life2030 19.19 +0.8+ 3.9 Life2040 22.31 +0.9+ 3.2 LifePinc 11.55 +0.3+ 4.3 SP500Stk 27.91 +1.0+ 3.9 Baron Asset b 62.86 +0.6+ 7.0 Growth b 33.73 +0.7 + 0.1

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Fund Family Diy YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Reto SmCap b 17.48 + H - 2.9Opportun m 9.32 +1.0 NA Barr Rosenberg IntlSmis 11.92 -0.6+ 9.7 USSmCap 10.07 + 4.1 VMktNtds 7.28 -1.0-11.2 Bartlett BasicVal m 14.34 +0.3+ 6.7 EuOAm 25.02 +1.2- 7.7 Valintl nq 13.71 -0.1 - 5.1 Bear Stearns S8PStwA m 38.65 + 1.4 +23.4 S8PStarB m 37.95 +1.4+23.0 S8PStarC m 37.94 +1.4 +23.0 Berger BIAMIntl b 14.45 -0.3 - 4.2 BIAMIntlC 15.65 -0.4- 3.6 Bal b 20.32 +0.4+10.8 GrowInc b 22.39 +1.0+ 1 6.1 GroMh b 22.24 +2.1 +20.0 IPTGdnc 30.50 +1.0 NA PTSmCoGr 28.29 + 1.2 NA InfoTecls d 131.47 +2.7 +16.0 InfoTecN m 130.96 +2.7 +15.8 MicCapGr b 43.43 +2.8+17.7 NewGen b 40.26 +2.7 +15.8 Sal b 26.40 +0.6+ 5.6 SmCapVals 25.31 +0.9+16.8 SmCapValv b 25.22 +0.9 +16.5 SmCoGrow b 7.74 +1.2 +20.7 BerkFocus 65.92 +2.3+65.5 Bernstein CAMum 13.88 +0.1 + 5.9 DivrMuni 13.57 +0.1 + 5.1 EmgMkt d 11.13 +0.2-15.7 2.46 +0.1 + 4.0 IntDur 12.50 +0.3 + 4.5 IntlVaill 21.28 -0.6+ 0.1 NYMuni 13.45 +0.1 + 5.2 ShDurCA 12.52 + 33 ShDurDivr 12.46 +0.1 + 3.1 ShDurNY 12.32 + 2.9 ShDurPlu 12.22 +0.1 + 3.6 TxMint 21.34 -0.6 -0.9 BerwynInc 10.10 +0.5+ 5.3 Bishop Street Eqls A b 18.93 +1.3+ 5.9 HiMunilsA b 10.44 +0.1 + 7.8 HiGrinIsA b 9.67 +0.2+ 6.2 BlurMicro b 47.87 +1.9+57.8 SlackRock Inst Bal 21.28 +0.9+ 3.5 Cona8d 9.33 +0.2+ 6.6 Conefcift 9.33 +0.2+ 6.7 DETaxF 9.77 +0.1 + 7.2 GNMA 9.66 +0.3+ 6.2 HiYldBd 9.16 +0.1 + 0.7 IndexEq 29.18 +10+ 40 IntGod 9.86 + O.2 + 13 IntlBond 10.66 + 6.0 IntlEmg 6.90 -14.8 InflEq 14.73 -0.1 - 1 1.6 InfiSmCap 23.54 +1.2+10.3 IntmBd 9.08 +0.2+ 6.1 IntmBdBik 9.08 +0.2+ 6.3 KYTaxF 9.66 +0.1 + 5.4 LoDur 9.79 +0.2+ 4.5 LowDurBlk 9.78 +0.1 + 4.1 LrgGrEq 26.22 +1.8 + 6.8 LrqValEq 15.16 +0.9+ 1.8 MgdInc 9.88 +0.3+ 6.3 McCpEq 45.55 +2.4+20.6 MjdCapGr 26.53 +3.0+18.4 MidCapVal 12.68 +0.8+ 7.3 NJTaxF 11.41 +0.1 + 6.3 OHTaxFIn 10.32 +0.1 + 7.3 PATaxF 10.65 +0.1 + 7.0 SelectEq 22.40 +1.2+ 1.4 SmCapGr 37.13 +2.7+ 3.3 SmCapVal 16.98 +1.2+ 2.3 TFInc 11.02 +0.2+ 7.3 SlackRock Inv A Bal m 21.23 +1.0+ 3.2 IndexEq m 29.07 +1.0+ 3.5 14.57 -0.1 11.9 IntlSCEq m 23.34 +1.2 + 9.9 LrgGrEq m 25.85 +1.8+ 6.4 LrgValEq m 15.13 +0.9+ 1.4 MicCpEq m 4508 +2.4+20.2 SelEq m 22.30 +1.2 + 1.0 SmCapGr m 35.83 +2.6 +12.8 BlackRock Inv B8C Bal B m 21.05 +1.0+ 2.7 HiYldB m 916 +0.1 28.70 +1.0+ 31 +1.2 + 94 LdlSCEqC m 23.07 +1.2 + 9.4 LrgGrEqB m 24.72 +1.8 + 5.9 MidCpEqB m 44.33 +2.4+19.6 MidCpEqC m 44.32 +2.4+19.6 MidCpGrB m 25.09 +3.0+17.5 MidCpGrC m 25.03 +3.0+17.5 MidCpValC m 25.89 +3.0 +18.0 SelectEq b 22.34 +1.2 + 1.2 SmCapGr b 36.26 +2.6 +13.1 SmCapVal b 16.94 +1.2+12.1 BostonBal 29.36 + 2.7 + 1.7 Boston Partners LrgValls 12.82 +0.7 + 8.3 MidCapVls 11.66 +0.3+ 1 0.5 BramwelGr b 32.43 +1.4+ 1 2.1 Brandesin 22.89 1.0+ 2.2 BrandywWne Blue 40.46 +1.7+11.6 Brandywi 49.43 +1.5+15.3 Brazos JMlCMicro 26.79 +2.2+28.4 JMlCRealE 9.48 -0.3+18.0 JMlCSrnGr 23.85 +1.5+ 9.8 MicCpGrY 13.47 +0.7 +34.7 MultiCpGr 20.42 +0.7+31.4 Bremer Bond b 9.73 +0.3 + 4.5 GrowStk b 19.18 +0.8+ 1.9 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Rot, 20.28 +0.8+ 5.6 Bridgesin 44.25 + 1.0- 2.3 Bridgeway AggrGro 57.28 + 1.3 +41.7 UltraSmCo 23.51 - +119 Brinson GlobBondl 8.72 3.6 GlobEql 12.41 +0.63.0 GlobExEqi 13.10 -0.3- 7.2 Globall 11.34 +0.5+ 1.5 HiYldl b 9.40 +0.2+ 0.4 10.22 +0.3+ 5.6 USEq1 17.16 +1.8+ 2.0 USSmCapl 17.56 +2.8+40.8 BrwnSmCol 3215 +0.7+18.1 Brundage Sto Rose Equity b 2471 +1.1 + 9.2 Shortint b 10.34 + U + 4.3 Buffalo Equity 22.85 +1.1 +19.1 HighYld 10.26 +0.5+ 4.6 SmallCap 16.90 +1.3+32.4 USAGlob 25.30 +0.6+18.1 CuhamA m 50+55 +11.3+21.3 CapApp b

367 / C14 Day

20.94 +1.0+ 0.5 CCBEquIty 22.56 +0.7+10.5 CDC MPrAggrEqls d 11.18 +0.6+ 3.1 Gloincils d 11.08 +0.3+ 5.4 HSCaEqls d 11.59 +1.0+ 5.8 CG Capital Markets Bal 11.18 +0.8+ 6.7 EmgMktEq 7.35 -12.3 HighYldlv 5.87 - 1.9 IntFixIn 7.83 +0.3 + 5.0 IntlEq 13.50 +0.1 - 8.7 IntlFixin 7.24 -0.3 - 6.4 LgCepGro 29.33 + 1.7 + 9.0 LgCapVal 11.93 +0.8+ 1.7 LgTmBd 7.85 +0.8+10.9 MItSMNuIv 8.85 +0.2+ 7.3 MtgBacked 7.84 +0.4+ 5.9 Munil3d 8.40 + 0 1 + 8 9 S&P500Inv 9.41 + 1 0 + 3 2 SmCapGro 24.36 +1.5+ 7.8 SmCapVal 10.72 +0.6+ 8.5 COM CapDev 25.59 +0.623 Focus 10.84 -0.4+ 32 Mutual 24.82 +0.2- 7.5 Realty 13.12 +0.2+21.5 CLSAdOAm p 16.98 NA + 3.9 CRAReinst d 9.71 _ 0.5+20.6 CRMSmCplv 18.08 +0.3+14.7 Calamos ConGrIncA m 29.52 +2.1 +12.4 Convert A m 23.64 +1.5+ 9.4 Convertl NA NA NA Grow A m 53.17 +2.4+48.9 CakKrkM d 19.99 +0.3+ 8.5 Calif Investment MidCpIdx 20.75 +1.4+24.0 SP5001dx 30.84 +1.0+ 4.1 TaxFInc x 12.75 +0.1 + 8.9 Calvert CapAcemc m 36.47 +1.0 +24.1 Income m 16.53 +0.4 + 315 NatMuIntA m 10.41 +0.1 + 16 NmVisSmA m 19.06 + 1.1 + I 4 SocImtOdA m 15.20 +0.4+ 3.0 SoclrwEqA m 34.13 +0.2 + 1 4.2 SoclvBalA m 34.06 +1.0+ 6.7 TaxFLongA m 1598 +0.1 + 7.4 TaxFLtdA 1 10.65 + 2.6 TaxFVTA 1 15.35 +0.2+ 5.8 WdVaIntiA m 22.86 +0.4 - 9.8 CapstorAr to 19.38 +1.2+ 4.0 Capstone SERV BondC 23.85 +0.4+ 6.5 IntlC 28. 17 +0.1 - 8.0 LrgCpEqC 36.53 + 1.1 + 3.3 SmCpEqC 35.61 + 1.0 +13.2 Centura GoAncC x 9.77 +0.2 + 4.1 LgCapC x 16.18 +0.9+ 4.1 MidCapC x 16.12 +2.1 +23.3 NCTaxFC x 10.18 +0.1 + 5.1 QualincC x 9.73 +0.8+ 5.4 CenturySh 40.06 +1.5+17.4 Chsocnino b 12.46 +0.6+ 1.0 Chose BaPr 40.54 +0.7 + 6.6 03reEqPr 34.14 +1.0+ 6.9 EqGrowPr 72.19 +1.4+ 60 EqincPr 52.30 +0.7 + 5.3 IncPr NA NA NA IntTmldPr 12.23 +0.3+ 5.6 ShIntUSPr 12.13 +0.3 + 4.5 SmCapPr 26.84 +0.8+18.8 Chase Vista A Balanced m 16.16 +0.7+ 5.6 CapGro nn 49.33 +1.3+17.6 Equityinc m 20.80 +0.7+ 5.2 European m 19.98 +0.5- 5.3 Growinc. m 41.84 +0.8+ 6.3 Gro.WA m 26.41 +1.3 8.3 IntlEq m 14.75 +0.3-102 LgCapEq m .20 +0.8+ 65 NYTaxF xm 11.39 +0.3 + 7.3 SmCapEq m 28.73 +0.8+20.7 SmCapOpp m 26.54 +1.9+34.4 TaxFInc xm 12.28 +0.2+ 7.6 USTreas xm 10.77 +0.4+ 7.2 Chase Vista 8 CapGro m 47.60 +1.3+17.2 Focus m 12.36 +1.6+ 8.6 GrowInc m 41.22 +0.8+ 5.9 S.CapEq m 27+57 +0.8+20.1 SnCapOpp m 25.94 +1.9 +33.8 Chase Vista Inst LrgCapEq 17.29 +0.8+ 6.8 SlrnGapEq 29.35 +0.8+21.1 USGovt x 9.71 +0.4+ 6.6 Chose Vista Select Balanced x 35.03 +0.7+ 5.7 Bond x 37.96 +0.3+ 4.7 EquityInc x 26.81 +0.7+ 6.5 IntBond x 9.63 +0.3+ 4.5 IntTxFInc x 10.46 + 5.2 IntlEq 35.20 + O.5 - 8.8 LrgCapEq 39.57 +1.0+ 5.7 LrgCapGr 51.64 +1.4+ 4.9 NJTaxFInc x 9.73 +0.1 + 6.7 NYTaxFlrc x 7.01 +0.2 + 6.1 NewGrOpp 39.02 +1.4+18.2 SmCapVal 52.83 +0.7 +18.3 TaxFInc x 6.25 +0.2 + 7.2 Chesapeake Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Ret AggrGrow 126.52 +2.1 +14.1 GrowA m 34.33 +2.1 +38.3 Growls 35.03 +2.1 +38.6 GrowSupls 35.28 +2.1 +38.7 Chestnut 433.00 +0.8+17.3 ChoiceFoc b 15.55 +0.8+32.1 CitiFundsBalA m 13.25 +0.6+ 4.3 IntIncA m 9.30 +0.3+ 4.5 LgCapGrA m 24.52 +1.2 + 4.9 NYTxFIncA rn 11.18 +0.1 + 7.0 NatlTxFIA rn 10.97 +0.1 + 7.3 Citiselect Folio200A rn 10.44 +0.4+ 3.2 Folio300A m 1073 +0.5+ 4.6 Folio0A m 11.16 +0.5+ 5.6 Fo1io500A m 12.12 +0.6+ 6.5 Citizens Funds EmgGrow b 34.77 + 1.9 +213.1 GloEq b 31.25 +1.4+ 1.4 Income xb 10.33 +0.3+ 5 3 Index b 33.51 +1.0+ 1 9 Index Is 27.36 +1.0+ 24 Clipper 73.36 +0.3+12.4 Clover EqVal 14.04 +0.5+ 5.0 Fixinc 9.64 +0.3+ 6.8 Smval 16.79 +1.0+10.0 Cohen 8 Stem EqIncA m 1042 -0.4+19.6 Realty 41.92 -0.5+16.4 RealtyIns 29.27 -0.5 NA SpecEq d 25.50 + 0.8 - 4A COBdShrs 1 9.38 + 5.3 Columbia Bal 26.75 +0.8+ 9.6

Day C14 / 368

CMCHiYld 8.50 +0.1 + 3.2 CMCIntStk 17.98 +0.8-15.6 CMCShTmBd 11.69 +0.2 + 5.0 CMCSrnCap 20.67 +0.3+21.1 ComStk 32.43 +1.1 +12.2 FixinSec 12.60 +0.4+ 5.6 Growth 58.06 +1.3+18.7 HiYld 9.19 + 3.9 IntlStk 19.73 +0.8 -13.5 ORMuniBd 11.92 +0.1 + 6.6 RealEsEq 16.96 -0.5+19.1 SmCap 33.20 +0.5+21.8 Special 39.93 +1.7+33.4 USGovSec 8.22 +0.1 + 3.4 Commerce Balls 27.61 +1.2 + 9.7 Bondis 18.34 +0.3+ 4.9 Growthls 43.14 +1.2 +10.6 IntlEqls 29.47 +0.1 - 5.2 MOTaxf 18.55 +0.1 + 6.1 MidCapGr 46.80 +1.6+ 1 7.7 NatlTaxF 18.72 +0.1 + 6.0 ShGoAs 18.03 +0.2+ 4.5 Valuels 24.83 + 1.1 + 1 4.8 Concert Alloc Bal rn 12.75 +0.5+ 5.6 Conserv m 11.70 +0.3+ 4.7 Growth m 15.57 +0.9+ 3.6 HighGrow m 17.89 + 11 + 5.3 Concert Alloc B Bal m 12.81 +0.5+ 5.1 Conserv m 11.73 +0.3 + 4.4 Growth m 15.62 +1.0+ 3.2 HighGrow m 17.78 + 1.1 + 4.8 Concert Alloc L Bm 12.81 +0.5+ 5.1 Growth m 15.62 +1.0+ 3.1 HighGrow m 17.79 + 1.1 + 4.8 Concert Invest A Grow m 28.63 +0.9 +11.0 Growinc m 19.92 + 1.1 + 2.3 IntlEq rn 49.79 +2.7+ 1.1 MuniBond rn 13.35 +0.2+ 7.9 PeachGro m 19.68 +1.7 + 5.5 SmCap m 23.69 + 1.1 -3.5 SocAwane rn 26.62 +0.7 + 6.5 Concert Invest B Grow m 28.02 +0.9+10.4 Growinc. m 19.60 +1.1 + 1.8 IntlEq m 47.80 +2.7+ 0.6 MidCap m 18.12 +1.8+29.4 PeachGro m 18.95 +1.6+ 5.0 SmCap m 22.42 +1.1 - 4.0 SocAware rn 26.62 +0.7 + 5.9 Concert Invest I Govt f 9.73 +0.3 + 6.2 Grow f 28.73 +0.9+11.3 GrowInc f 19.93 +1.1 + 2.4 MuniBond 113.35 +0.2 + 8.1 Conseco 20A m 27.76 +3.6+34.2 20B m 27.29 +3.6+33.8 20C m 27+37 +3.6+33.8 20Y 27.59 + 16 +34.7 BalarcKtA m 16.54 +1.6+23.4 ConvSecsB m 1634 +1.2 +14.7 ComSecsY 16.92 + 1.2 +15.5 EquityA m 21.94 +2.4+34.8 EquityY 22.29 +2.4+35.3 HiYldA m 9.12 +0.2- 3.4 HiYldB m 9.08 +0.2 - 3.8 Copley 36.40 +0.6+ 5.5 CounDvnEq 13.66 +0.3+ 3.7 Credit Suisse HiYld NA NA NA IntlEq 20.56 + 0.1 103 IntlGr 23.60 +0.1 8.7 SmCoGr 26.06 +2.0+ 7.8 USCoreEq NA NA NA USGoreFl 14.95 +0.4+ 4.5 9.90 +0.1 + 3.9 CutierCor 15.94 +0.8- 0.1 DEMEqtyls b 33.55 + 1.1 + 68 DFA 1YrFiyJn 10.18 - + 4.2 5YearGov 10.14 + 4.2 5YrGlobFl 10.41 +0.1 + 3.7 ContSmCo 13.17 -0.1 + 4.3 EmgMkt 11.69 -17.4 EmgMktVl 11.26 +0.1 -19.7 EnhUSLrg 1 3.87 +1.2+ 3.5 IntGovFl 10.89 +0.4+ 6.0 IntlSmCap 8.44 -0.1 + 1.2 IntlSmCo 9.34 + 2.1 IntlValu 13.13 -0.8- 1.7 IntlVaIu2 12.58 -0.8 -7 IntlValu3 13.66 -0.8 - 1.6 IntlValu4 11.31 -0.8- 1.4 JapnSmCo 11.18 -0.5+10.9 LgCapIntl 9.24 -0.3- 7.5 PacRimSm 8.96 -10.6 RIEst 13.38 -0.4+19.3 TMIntlVal 10.46 -0.8- 2.3 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. %Rat. TMMttVal2 11.00 +0.6+ 3.8 TMUS5-10V 13.19 + O.9 +12.7 TMUS6-10V 15.33 +1.2 +12.7 TaxMgdUS 11.09 +0.6 + 3.8 UKSrnCo 21.17 + 1.1 - 3.4 U5610Sm 16.77 +1.2 +12.9 US6-10VII 17.52 + 1.1 +13.4 US6-1 OVal 21.04 + 1.1 +13.3 US9-10 Srn 14.76 +1.3 +17.0 USLgcap 18.66 +0.3+ 2.0 USLgCap2 6.84 +0.3 + 1.9 USLgCap3 i 6.38 +0.3+ 2.1 USLgCo 44.65 +1.0+ 3.9 DLB DiscGr b 20.25 +2.1 +17.8 Entill b 10.78 +0.6 + 4.7 Growth b 16.05 +0.9+15.8 SmCoOppor b 12.97 +0.9 +34.5 StewlvInt b 11.34 +0.6- 3.1 StwlvErnqM b 1132 +0.1 - 36 Value b 13.37 + 1.1 + 1.7 DU CoreEqA rn 24.17 +1.0+11.0 FixinA M 9.77 +0.2 + 4.1 FbdnD 9.77 +0.2+ 4. 1 GrowInA rn 23.66 +0.3 GrowInD 23.68 +0.3 + 0.2 IntlEqA rn 13.16 +0.1 - 7.0 SmCoValA nn 22.43 +0.4+15.6 Davis A ConvSecs m 27.74 +0.4+11.7 Fincl rn 36.70 +1.6+26.2 Growinc rn 11.63 +0.9+ 8.3 GTow0pp nn 25.44 +2.4+ 1 4.7 NYVentur rn 32.78 +0.9 + 4.0 Realtst rn 21.02 +0.1 +17.4 Davis B ConvSecs rn 27.43 +0.4+11.0 Fincl rn 35.42 + 1.6+25.6 GrowOpp rn 23.91 +2.4+14.1 NYVent rn 31.91 +0.9+ 3.4 ReaJEst rn 20.92 +0.1 +16.8 Davis MY ConvSecsY 27.94 +0.4 +11.9 FinclC rn 35.94 +1.7 +25.5 NYVent C rn 32.08 +0.9 +13.4 NYVent Y 33.13 +0.9+14.2 ResEstC rn 21.07 +0.1 +16.8 RealEstY

369 / C14 Day

21.16 +0.1 +17.7 Delafield b 15.28 + 1.1 + 8.6 Delaware A AnnerGovt rn 7.24 +0.4 + 6.6 Be] M 19.53 +1.2 + 4.2 DecEqinc rn 16.47 +0.9+ 0.4 Delchest rn 4.30 +0.1 - 9.0 Devon m 1970 +1.0+ 0.1 GrInc rn +0.9- 0.2 GrowOpp rn 39.49 +1.3+17.8 GrowStk rn 24.91 +0.5+ 5.7 Intleq rn 16.18 -1.0- 3.9 LtdTmGov rn 8.23 +0.3 + 4.2 MNHiYld rn 9.65 +0.2 + 5.5 MNIns rn 10.48 +0.1 + 6.3 Natlift rn 9.95 +0.1 + 4.5 REIT m 13.52 -0.4+20.6 SeIGr rn 42.44 +1.6 + 9.9 SmCapVal rn 26.51 +0.6+ 7.4 SDcAwwe rn 14.18 +1.2 + 3.4 TaxFCO rn 10.63 +0.2 + 7.5 TaxFIA rn 9.75 +0.1 + 7.2 TaxFID rn 10.73 +0.2 + 6.6 TaxFIns m 10.39 +0.1 + 7.2 TaxFMN rn 12.12 +0.2+ 7.2 TaxFPA rn 7.72 +0.1 + 6.6 TaxFUSA m 10.83 +0.1 + 6.9 TechInnv m 11.41 +2.9+33.9 Trend rn 28.35 +1.0+26.9 TxFAZIns rn 11.04 +0.1 + 7.9 TxFFUns rn 10.77 +0.1 + 6.2 TxFMNInt rn 10.35 +0.1 + 4.5 TxFMOIns rn 10.34 + 01 + 6.5 USGovt rn 10.26 +0.2 + 6.5 Delaware B Bal rn 19.50 + 1.1 + 3.7 BlChip rn 13.80 +1.2 + 3.9 DecEqinc rn 16.39 + 02 - 0.1 Delchest rn 4.30 +0.1 - 9.4 Devon m 19.42 +1.0- 0.4 GrInc m 15.34 +0.9- 0.7 GrowOpp rn 36.99 +1.3 +17.2 IntlEci rn 16.08 -1.0- 4.3 SelGr rn 40.43 +1.6 + 9.4 SmCapVal rn 26.08 +0.6 + 6.8 SocAwwe rn 13.81 +1.2+ 2.9 TaxFPA rn 7.72 +0.1 + 6.0 TechInnv m 11.36 +2.8+33.3 Trend m 26.53 + 1.1 +26.3 USGrowth m 20.85 +1.3 +18.2 Delaware C Delchost m 4.30 +0.1 - 9.4 SelGr m 40.00 +1.6+ 9.4 Trend m 26.99 + 1.0 +261 Delaware Inst ArnerGovt 7.24 +0.4+ 6.8 Bal 19.55 + 1.1 + 4.3 CorpBond 5.10 +0.4+ 2.3 DecEqinc 16.46 +0.9+ 0.5 DeCap 41.19 +1.3+18.0 Fund Family Dy YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Pet ExtDurBd 4.94 +0.6+ 3.3 Gdnc 15.39 16.23 -1.0- 3.7 SelGr 42.84 +1.6+10.1 Trend 29.28 +1.0+27.1 USGrowth 22.84 +1.3+19.0 Delaware Pooled Tr Sal 8.00 +0.8+ 27 EmgMkts d 8.26 +0.5- 8.0 EqInc 7.82 +1.0+ 0.9 GloFixIn 9.25 - 5.2 IntlEq 18.51 -0.8- 1.4 IntlFixin 8.52 -0.1 - 7.6 LaborIntl 14.52 -1.0+ 0.1 LgCpValEq 1438 + 1.1 + 0.8 DessGloEq m 22.81 +0.4+22.0 Deutsche Assetill Inst EmgMktDeb 7.27 +1.0+19.2 EmgMktEq 7.62 -0.3-12.3 EqAppr 23.40 +2.0+256 EuroEq 31.40 +0A +109.9 FixInc 10.23 +0.3+ 6.3 HiYld b INA INA NA IntlEq 1 16.18 +0.1 7.8 Int16.24 +0.1 7.9 InFixin 8.74 -0.2- 6.5 IntlSelEq 24.46 +0.8+ 2.6 MuniBd 10.80 + 5.2 PlPlus d 10.00 + 3.9 PlPlus Svc d 10.00 + 3.8 ShTmFiAn 9.94 + 4.4 ShTmMuni 10.17 -0. 3+ 3.5 Deutsche Assetill Inv Eq5001dx 189.28 +1.0+ 3.9 IntlEq 29.37 +0.1 - 8.1 LfcyLong 12.61 +0.6+ 4.7 LfcyMid 10.84 +0.4+ 4.5 MidCap 18.60 +2.1 +25.2 Pplus d 10-00 + 3.8 SmCap 26.95 +1.2+11.4 Deutsche AssetM PrMY AstMPrem 13.03 +0.5+ 4.9 EAFE Idx 13.46 -7.7 Eq500Idx 190.42 +1.0+ 4.0 IntlSelEq 24.43 +0.8 NA USBnd Wx 9.96 +0.3+ 6.4 Diversified Inv AggEq b 25.02 +2.2+19.4 Bat b 16.95 +0.9+ 4.9 CopeBond b 12.15 +0.3+ 4.7 EqGrow b 31.42 +1.2+ 2.3 Growinc b 30.73 +1.4+ 3.5 HiQualBd b 11.39 +0.1 + 4.2 HiYldBd In 10.07 +0.3+ 0.8 IntGovt b 10.87 +0.2+ 4.7 IntlEq b 19.51 -0.1 5.3 IntmLgStr 13.85 +0.7+ 2.8 IntmStr 12.83 +0.6+ 2.9 LongHorlz 12.56 +1.0+ 22 Short3tr 10.69 +0.3 + 3.6 SpecEq b 26.20 +1.4+ 70 StkIdx b 11.88 +1.0+ 3.6 ValueInc b 21.48 +0.8- 0.3 Dodge 8 Cox Bat 65.77 +06+ 54 income 11.68 +03+ 59 Stock 99.08 + 0.6 + 4.6 Domini Social Invnits InstSocEq 23.97 +0.6- 0.9 SocEq b 41.38 +0.7- 1.2 Dresdner RCM BiotechN b 41.61 + 4.2 +1073 EuropeN In 16.78 +2.0+ 4.2 GiblTechN b 81.88 +3.0+38.5 Globl b 24.96 82.11 +3.0+38.7 IntlGrEql 18.85 +0.6-15.6 Dreyfus ABdPlus 13.67 +0.2+ 5.8 AggGrow d 15.80 +1.3+10.0 AggValue d 28.81 +22+201 Apprecia 47.54 +03+ 49 Bat 16.42 +0.6+ 5.2 BasSP500 31.75 +1.0+ 4.0 BwtcGNMA 14.56 +0.2+ 5.7 BaaicInt 13.04 +0.2+ 7.1 BasiclMu 13.11 +0.2+ 9.3 BondIdxIn b 9.61 +0.4+ 5.7 CAIntMu 13.72 +0.2+ 6.8 CATaxEBd d 14.46 +0.2+10.0 CTIntMu d 13.56 +0.1 + 4.7 DiscintRt 11.85 +0.3+

Day C14 / 370

5.0 D8SmcpS b 19.63 +0.1 + 2.7 DiscStkR b 45.86 + 1.1 + 7.3 Dreyfus 13.43 +0.9+ 2.5 EmgLead d 40.61 +1.0 +10.6 EmgMkts d 14.31 +0.1 - 7.7 FUntMu d 13.05 +0.1 + 4.8 GNMA b 14.03 +0.2+ 5.2 GlobGrow 39.63 +0.7 - 7.1 GrowInc 20.04 +0.8+ 4.3 GrowOpp 11.58 +1.0+ 0.1 Income R 13.49 +0.4+ 4.1 InsMuBd b 17.49 +0.2+ 8.4 IntMuBd 13.37 +0.1 + 5.4 IntTmInc 12.60 +0.3+ 7.7 IntlGrow m 17.42 +0.3- 8.9 IntlStklx d 15.33 - 0.1 - 8.4 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Ret IntlVal d 21 -0.7 - 4.8 LifeGr R 8.29 +0.7+ 2.4 LifeGrIlv 18. 08 +05+ 3.1 LifeGdR 17.32 +0.5 + 3.3 LrgCoVal d 22.43 +0.9+ 4.7 MAIntmu 13.36 +0.1 + 5.7 MATaxEBd d 16.03 +0.2+ 7.5 MidCapWx d 26.8B + 1.4+22.5 MidCapVW d 28.11 +0.7 +31.0 MuniBd 11.68 +0.2 + 7.9 NJIntMuBd d 13.52 +0.1 + 4.6 NiMuniBd m 12.59 +0.2 + 7.3 NYTaxEBd d 14.63 +0.2 + 7.2 NYTxEInt rn 17.90 +0.1 + 6.2 Newlead d 57.98 +1.8+20.1 PAIntMuBd d 13.14 +0.1 + 7.1 SP5001cix d 44.51 +1.0+ 3.7 ShintGov 10.47 +0.2+ 5.1 ShInlTxE m 12.87 + 3.1 ShTmHiYld 9.47 0.2- 0.2 ShTmInc 11.72 +0.1 + 5.0 SmCapIdx d 15.84 +1.0+13.2 SmCoVal d 25.14 + 03 +12.0 TaxSmtGr m 17.68 +0.3 + 5.5 USTrsInt 11.94 +0.4 + 7.1 USTrsLgT 14.8-4 +0.8+10.0 USTrsShT 14.28 +0.2+ 4.8 Dreyfus Founden BalF b 11.14 +1.5+ 7.1 DiscvB rn 48.09 +1.6 +17.6 DiscvF b 48.30 +1.6+ 8.2 GdrvcF b 7.74 +1.6 + 1.7 GrowthF b 24.86 +2.0+ 4.1 IntleqF b 18.87 +0.4- 5.0 MidCapGrF b 9.55 +1.3+10.0 PassportA f 21.16 +1.0 - 7.7 PmportB m 21A +1.0- 8.0 Passportl b 21.15 +1.0 - 7.8 WorldGrol b 24 41 +0.9- 3.0 Dreyfus General CAMuBd rn 12.87 +0.2+10.3 MuniBd m 13.50 +0.2+ 7.5 NYMuBd rn 19.26 +0.2 + 7.8 Dreyfus Premier AggGrowA f 12.99 + 12 + 9.3 Bal A rn 15.57 +0.7 + 1.9 Bal 8 rn 15.54 +0.7 + 1.3 Bal R 15.57 +0.6+ 2.0 CAMuni f 11 98 +0.3 + 9.7 CeBondA f 14.39 +0.2 + 5.4 CoreValA rn 31.86 +1.0+ 61 CoreValls b 31.85 + 1.1 + 6.3 GNMA A f 14.38 +0.3 + 4.9 GrovAncB m 22.23 +0.8+ 3.5 HiYieldA rn 9.57 -0.3 - 8.3 IntlGr A 1 19.36 +0.3- 6.8 LrgCoStkA rn 27.73 + 1.1 + 7.3 LrgCoStkB m 27.30 + 1.1 + 6.8 LrgCoStkC m 27.31 + 1 1 + 6.8 LrgCoStkR 27.79 + 1.1 + 7.5 LtdHiIncA m 9.78 0.1 LtdHiIncB rn 9.78 0.4 LtdHiIncC rn 9.78 0.5 Ltdinc R 10.61 +0.3+ 5S LtdMAMuR 12.09 +0.1 + 5.8 LtdMuniR 12.12 +0.1 + 5.9 Mgdinc A m 10.01 +0.3+ 4.4 MidcpStkA m 21.21 +1.4 +17.6 MidcpStkB m 20.78 + 1A +17.0 MidcpStkR 21.36 +1.4+17.8 MuniBd A f 13.06 +0.2 + 5.8 MunIBd B m 13.06 +0.2+ 5.5 MuNCT A f 11.56 +0.2+ 7.3 MuniCT B rn 11.55 +0.2+ 6.9 MuniFL A f 13.32 +0.2 + 7.1 MuniMA A f 11.03 +0.2 + 7.7 MuniMD A f 12.02 +0.2+ 6.2 MuniMD B m 12.02 +0.2+ 5.8 MuniMl A f 14.75 +0.1 + 7.0 MuniMN A f 14.52 +0.2+ 7.0 MuniNC A f 13.17 +0.2+ 7.5 MuniOH A f 12.18 +0.1 + 6.8 MuniOH B m 12.19 +0.2+ 6.5 MuniPA A f 15.48 +0.1 + 8.1 MuNPA 8 m 15.47 +0.2+ 7.8 MuniTX A f 19+94 +0.2+ 7.6 MuNVA A f 16+34 +0.2+ 71 NYMuni A f 14.34 +0.2+ 7.9 NYMuni B rn 14.34 +0.2+ 7.6 NexTechA 16.11 +2.4 NA NexTechB 16.09 +2.4 NA NexTechC 16.09 +2.4 NA SmCoStkR 21.78 +1.3 + 16.2 TaxMgdGrA m 19.30 +0.4 + 6.2 TuMgdGrB m 1892 +0.4 + 5.6 TaxMgclGrC m 18.91 +0.4+ 5.6 TechGrA f 67.51 +2.9 +26.8 TechGrB 66.81 +2.9+26.1 TechGrC 66.75 +2.9+26.1 TechGrR 67.69 +2.9+27.0 ThrdCenR 15.55 +1.2+ 6.9 ThrdCenZ 15.55 +1.2+ 6.9 Value A f 21.77 +0.9+ 4.8 WldwdeGrA f 39.96 +0.3+ 4.7 NdwdeGrB m 3B.55 +0.3+ 4.2 MdwdeGrC m 3822 +0.3+ 4.2 Driehaus EuroOppor d 32.13 +0.9 +19.0 IntlDisc d 30.22 +0.7+ 7.0 IntlGr d 18.55 +0.7 - 1 2.2 DunHInGrl 17.80 + 1.1 - 5.2 Dupree +0.2+ 4.7 5.14 + 3.1 TNTxFlm 10.53 +0.2+ 5.6 ETRADE ECommIdx d 16.77 +2.1 + 8.6 SP500Idx x 12.22 + 1.0+ 3.9 Techindex d 16.15 +2.0+13.7 EliRityls 9.70 -0.5+19.4 Eaton Vance A Balanred pf 8.15 NA + 5.3 CapExch 619.34 +1.3+10.5 FLLtdMu m 9.85

371 / C14 Day

+0.1 + 5.8 GovObl rn 9.64 + 4.6 Gdnc prn 14.22 NA + 5.7 GroMh rn 10.36 +1.2+ 0.9 GtrChim rn 14.19 + 0.1 HiYldMu rn 9.93 +0.1 + 3.6 InBos m 8.00 +0.3+ 2.9 InfoAge m 21.94 +0.9- 25 MALtdMu m 9.85 + 5.6 MuniBd m 9.10 +0.3+10.1 MuniBdl 9.93 +0.3 +10.1 NJLtdMat m NA NA NA NYLtdMat m NA NA NA NatlMuni m 10.35 +0.1 + 8.1 PALtdMu m 10.04 +0.1 + 5.7 Fund Family Dly YTD Fund Name NAV % Ret. % Ret. SpecEq rn 9.63 + 1.0 +1.2 TaxMgdEGr rn 18.55 + 1.1 + 1 313 TaxMgdGr f 2509 + 1.3 +IU TaxMgdlGr rn 13 30 + 0.5 - 4.1 UN rn 11.52 +1.6+ 5.4 WINHeal rn 37.00 +2.0+84.7 Eaton Vance B - ALMunts rn 10.35 +0.2+ 1.6 ARMunis rn 10.21 +0.1 + 6.0 AZMunis rn 10.68 +0.2+ 8d Balanced prn 13.86 NA + 4.8 CAMunis rn 9.64 +0.3+ U CTMunis rn 10.22 +0.2+ 7.q FLMunis rn 10.40 +0.2+ 7.3 GAMunis rn 9.63 +0.2+ 8.2 GovtObl rn 8.30 +2.1 GtrChina rn 12.71 +0.1 0.2 Hincome rn 6.85 + 0.3 - DA HiYldMu rn 9.89 + 3.1 InfoAge b 22.38 +0.9- 2.9 KYMunis rn 9.87 +0.2+ 4.5 MAMunis rn 10AB +0.1 + 7.5. MDMunis rn 10.00 +0.2+ 6.6 MIMunis rn 10.27 +0.3+ 8.6 MNMunis rn 9.87 +0.1 MOMunis rn 10.55 +0.1 + 6.9 NCMunis rn 9.97 +0+1 + 7A NJMunis rn 10.32 +0.3+ 7.7 NYMunis rn 10.88 +0.2 +2.1 NaflMuni pro 9.66 NA + 7.6 OHMunis rn 10.20 +0.2+ 64. ORMunis rn 10.25 +0.2 +7.7 PAMunis rn 9.93 +0.1 + 5.8 RIMunis rn 9.47 +0.1 + 8.7 SCMunia rn 9.76 +0.2+ 6.5 StratInc rnp 8.40 + 2.6. TNMunis rn 10.32 +0.2+ TO TaxMgErnGr m 1815 + 1.1 +1.2 TaxMgdGr rn 24.35 + 1.3 + 9.7 TaxMgdlGr rn 13.11 + 0. 5 - 4.6. Util rn 13.63 +1.6+0 VAMunis rn 10.20 +0.2+ 7.0 WldwHeal m 27.33 +2.0+819 Eaton Vance C InfoAge rn 21.60 +0.8- 3.0 NatlMuni rn 9.21 +0.1 + 7.3 Stratine mp 10.60+ 2.5 TaxMgdG rn 23.38 + 1.3 + 9.7 TxMgdEGr rn 1808 + 1.2 +12.8 TxMgdIntG m 13.08 +0.5-4.6 OdwHeal rn 23.05 + 1.9 +114 0 EstVSTTrl 73.14 + 3.6 Eclipse Bal W 19 +1.0+ 4+9 MidCapVal 16.83 +1.4+ 4.8 SmCapVal 11.94 +1.2+ 1.6 18.38 FixInc 9.72 +0.3+ 5.4 IntlEq 15.74 -0.3- 6.1 EllteGrin 27.23 + 0.9 +1.2 EmHoPAQrA rn 15.17 + 0.7 Empire Bulkier TaxFBld 17.14 + 0+ 1 + 63 TaxFPr 17.14 +0 +1 Endowments Bond 16.01 + 0.3 GrowthInc 12.12 +0.1 + 4.0 N Enterprise A CapApr rn 40.86 +1.0+ 11.4 EqInc rn 26.40 +0.5 -0.3 GovtSec rn 11.75 + 0.3 + 5L Grow rn 22.06 + 0.2 GroWnc rn 44.23 +1.2 +1.4 HiYldBd rn 10.55 +0.2+ 2.0 Internet rn 31.82 + 2.9 + 0.0 IntlGro rn 20.78 + 0.4 -2.9 Managed rn 8.36 + 0.8 + VS MultiCp rn 13.46 + 1.6 SmCoGr rn 36.33 +2.2+9.1 SmCoVal rn 9.28 +1.0+10.7 Enterprise 9 CapApr rn 38.88 + 1.0 Eqinc rn 26.00 +0.5 -6.7 GovtSec rn 11.74 +0.2+ 6.1 Grow rn 21.33 +0.2- 7.4 GrowInc rn 43.67 +1.2+14.3 HiYldBd rn 10.54 +0.1 + 1.5 Internet rn 31.67 +3.0+ 0.3 Managed rn 8.23 +0.7 + 1.2 MultiCp rn 13.38 +1.72.3 SmCoG m 35.54 +2.2+.9.7 SmCoV4rn 8.96 + 0.9 +IR3 Enterprise C Grow rn 21.61 +0.2- 7.4 Internet rn 31.64 +3.0+ 0.2 MultiCp rn 13.37 +1.6- 2.4 SmCoVal rn 9.16 +1.0+10.3 Enterprise Grow 22.61 +0.2- 6.8 Managed 8.37 +0.8+ 1.7 EquiTrust Series BlChip rn 49.29 + 0.5 Managed m 10.60 +0.6+1 ValGrow rn 8.91 +0.7 + Eureka Eq Tr x 12.15 +1.0+ 2.6 GloAst Tr 12.73 +0.5+ InvGrBdTr x 9.49 +0.3 + 61 EAISOI 12.03 +1.0+ 8.1 Evergreen EqIdxA xrn 57.12 +1.0+ 3.7 Evergreen A AggGrow rn 38.83 +1.3+26.1 Bal rn 11.13 +0.7+ 5.1 BlChip rn 36.94 +1.0+ 2.4 CapGro f 27.94 +0.8 +10r.1 DiwBd rn 14.41 +0.3+ 4.1 EqInc rn 21.98 +0.5+ 2.1 Evergr rn 17.67 + 1.1 + 0.4 FLHilm rn 10.24 + 4.2 FLMuni rn 9.24 + 5.2 Found rn 20.76 +0.9+ 3.0 GloLead M 19.70 + 0.8 - -Z.0 GloOpp rn 31.94 + 1.2 + IA GrowInc rn 32.76 + 1.0 + 14 Growth f 26.01 + 17 +30 HiGrMuni rn 10.44 +0.1 + 74 HiYldBd rn 3.65 + 0.3 IntTrmBd m 8.40 + 0.3 + 50 IntlGr m 9.18 +0.1 - 51.1 LrgCoGrA m 13.52 +0.7 +11.6 Masters to 13.87 +1.2 MuniBd m 6.98 +0.2+

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61 Omega m 40.37 + 1.1 +M.3. Continued on Next Page MUTUAL FUNDS EXPLAINED Mutual fund groups are shown in bold type. Funds in each group are indented under the group name, funds not in groups are not indented. The table lists only Nasdaq funds with assets of at least $30 million. All return figures are for the period ended yesterday. NAV: Net asset value of the shares, as reported by the fund through Nasdaq. Shares are sold to the public at NAV, plus any sales charge, and are redeemed at NAV, less any redemption charges. Daily % Ret: One-day total return, including reinvested dividends, if any. YTD % Ret: Total return, year to date (since Dec. 31). Calculations of total return assume reinvestment of all distributions. Figures do not include sales charges, redemption charges or taxes. In cases where net asset value was not a variable for the week’s final trading day, long-term returns are throughout the prior day. For bond funds that declare daily dividends, estimates are made by Morningstar Inc. Footnotes: b Fee covering marketing costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or a redemption fee. f Front load (sales charge). m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or a redemption fee. NA Not available. p Previous day’s net asset value. s Fund split its shares yesterday. x Fund paid a distribution yesterday. NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET CONSOLIDATED TRADING/THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2000 Continued From Preceding Page 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg 15 B8 6.00 Totaffel dd 2 8.88 8.88 8.88+0.13 43,50 7.25 TowerS dd 1051 29.69 29.13 29.38+0.19 5.13 0.59 TownSrv dd 324 0.97 0.75-0.19 tO.38 2.06 Toymax dd 1 3.00 3.00 3.00-0.06 12.25 0.94 TrackDt a dd 33676 2.09 1.75 1.91+0.19 23.00 12.00 Sup 6 37 13.00 12.63 13.00-0.06 3.88 0.69 TdBrdge dd 44 2.13 2.09 2.13+0.03 T3.13 9.00 TmWrnt 6 542 9.81 9.44 9.69 8.50 3.03 TranIn 50 10 3.50 3.50 3.50 11.50 5.25 TransAct dd 64 7.59 7.50 7.56 48.13 11.38 TmSyA 44 1053 19.13 18.25 18.38-0.50 39.94 7.13 Tmsgen dd 39 17.88 16.19 17.75+0.63 30.02 15.75 Trnsgnmc 16.13 21.88 20.00 21.00+0.19 97.00 22.50 Tmskry dd 39119 46.00 38.06 43.38+5.88 17.19 4.75 TmspArn 14 219 8.25 7.50 7.50-0.63 67.25 12.38 TmSWIc a CC 18029 60.88 58.88 60.19+0.13 5.88 3.69 TmzRajl .24e 51 5 34 4.88 4.75 415-0.13 51.88 1038 Twlcity n 291 14.13 13.75 13.75-0.31 13.63 3.50.T-Bt 4 41 3.69 2.69 3.69+0.06 7.44 2.09 Treev dd 4180 6.88 6.72 6.75-0.06 14.75 0.97 TregaBio dd 3122 4.00 3.69 3.72+0.03 32.25 7.13 TrendMc a 315 16+00 15.38 15.75+0.06 28.13 15.94 TmdwRs 9 57 1950 18.94 19.13+0.09 91.25 6.50 TnZetto n dd 1394 10.31 1000 10.25-0.13 28.25 14.88 TnadGty 11 85 25.411 24.56 24.56+0.13 28.25 9.25ATriadH dd 9171 28.94 27.75 28.98+1.13 27.25 4.88 TnglePh dd 2332 9.06 8.75 9.00+0.13 20.63 14.75 TiCoBcsh .80 4.7 10 66 17.00 16.69 16.94+0.44 14.94 5.06 TricoMr dd 1995 14.69 13.88 14.50+0.06 16.44 6.88 TrldMk 3 6198 12.06 10.56 11.69+1.00 2B.56 10.25 Tch n 4547 24.00 21.81 23.06-0.63 63.25 9.00 Tdmble 29 2606 42.25 40.00 41.56+1.06 7.38 1.56 Trimed dd 207 2.50 2.25 2.31 7563 15.19 Tnmeris dd 720 70.50 67.00 69.00+0.75 75.50 6.00 Trintech a

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dd 3815 27.44 26.50 27.00+11.25 14 13 3.50 TnPathl dd 3666 8.56 7.75 8.25+0.25 13.60 8.63 TripathT 28.97 12.63 11.63 12.00+0.75 33.00 7.00 TnpIeS 24 2.57 32.06 31.13 32.00+0.88 3900 6.00 Tripos dd 1.44 23.13 22.38 22.88+0.38 67.75 12.13 TdGuint a cc 33766 55.50 52.56 55.31+3.81 40.75 19.75 TnWtel n 741 26.69 25.38 26.13+0.41 47.75 14.19 TntonNt n 2369 19.13 17.75 18.81+0.25 12.00 31.00 TrftnPCS n 1237 66.88 52.00 55.38+3.31 24.50 10.13 TropSprt 12 64 18.50 17.91 18.06+0.06 11.50 8.69 TroyFncl .28 f 2.4 15 140 11.50 11.13 11.50+0.06 4300 6.38 TroyGrip 13 1196 8.94 8.00 8.69+0.63 16.00 250 TrueTrn n 327 4M 4.00 4.13 2313 14.50 TrustNi .56 3.4 11 60 16.88 16.50 16.50-0.13 1544 10.25 TrstNY a .60 b 4.7 18 267 13.00 12.63 12.88+0.13 23.50 15.25 Trustmk .50 2.7 13 770 M56 17.88 18.50+0+50 2675 7.98 TuesMrn 389 11.25 11.00 11.00-0.31 00 Tufco 1640 9.94 9.63 9.63-0.13 17.00 Tularik n dd 7265 33.60 31.56 33.38+11.88 f36 50 15.88 TumblwdC dd 11955 64.00 61.63 62.63-1.00 1025 2.28 TurboCf dd 344 3.75 3.44 3.75+0.25 10700 23.00 Turnstn a 7731 61.75 58.13 58.88+0.38 16 00 9.50 TuscIn .27 1.9 10 132 14.63 14.25 14.25-0.13 120.38 22.75 TutSys cid 6765 116.25 100.00 100.63-14.88 44.75 15.13 Tweeter a 43 317 37.88 35.75 35.94-2.06 6625 9.31 2417 Mad dd 3989 15.50 14.19 14.44 -0.19 8.25 2.88 Menl-lld 14 175 4.75 4.06 4.75+044 1050 4.44 Twinlab dd 16935.00 4.94 4.94+0.09 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E 100s High Low Last Chg U 30.75 17.38 UCBH Hd .20 0.7 13 457 30.38 29.88 30.25+0.44 4.25 2.00 UFP Tch 7 27 2.31 2.25 2.31+0.31 40.13 30.38 UMB Fn .90b 2.2 12209 36.19 35.31 36.06 20.13 12.13 UNB Cp n .48 3.8 10 108 12.94 12.69 12.75+0.06 8.94 5.88 US Cncrt 9 63 7.19 6.75 7.13+0.25 18.13 3.75 US Frch dd 254 4.44 4.38 4.380.06 92.00 7.8114S Intract cid 6349 8.38 7.38 7.81-0.81 48.00 9.31 US LEC 1055 10.56 9.91 10.50 11.25 3.03 US Oncol 6 13659 5.63 5.13 5.59+0 13.88 7.25 USPhys 16 42 12.94 12.88 12.88+0.13 16.50 3.00 US Plstc 24 2113 3.75 3.48 3.53 16 13.25 1.44 US Srch dd 606 1.75 1.63 1.72+0.03 13.38 9.50 US Timb 2.00 19.5 224 10.38 10.00 10.25 17.94 9.91 US Uwrd n 1931 15.06 14.50 14.940.13 5.00 1.50 US Visn dd 25 3.38 3.25 3.38+0.13 62.60 3.13 US WIGCP dd 2719 14.06 12.88 13.00-1.06 11.25 5.13 US Xprn 14 22 7.75 7.75 7.75 - 022 6.47 1.63 USA Det cc 86 3.53 3.41 3.53-0.03 29.13 16.88 USA Ntw a dd 16643 25.50 24+00 24.06-0.44 9.50 4.88 USA Trk 13 177 7.06 6.25 6.50-0.50 19.50 2.75 USABcSh dd 545 3.50 3.19 150+0.19 8.75 2.38 USANA HIt 10 41 3.34 3.31 3.34+0.13 20.00 3.13 USData dd 72 5.38 5+13 5.31+0.06 51.94 23.75 USFreight .37 1.2 8 1366 31.94 29.81 31.19+1.19 15.50 3.75 USOL HId dd 258 9.89 9.50 9.53+0.28 5.00 0.84 USOL M 294 2.69 2.56 2.56 93.50 16.75 UTShcm n 9009 24.00 21.60 23.88+2.25 11.75 1.53 Ubics 56 174 2.81 2.63 2.81+0.06 12.06 7.00 UbiquiTl n 1786 11.38 11.13 11.38 9.63 6.50 UgIyDuck 6 43 6N 6.88 6.94-0.06 62.00 14.38Ulticorn n 722 63.00 58.00 59.25+0.94 36.88 13.81 UREIct 37 1503 35.38 32.75 35.06+0.94 15.50 6.25 UftimSoft 66 348 9.94 9.56 9.88 14.50 4.50 Ultrak cc 228 7.88 7.25 7.50 + 0.66 16.31 3.50 Ultralife dd 63 12.56 12.31 12.31-0.06 19.56 11.00 UltraStp dd 1571 18.25 17.75 18.00+0.06 11.00 5.50 Umpqua n 16 2.0 12 19 7.81 7.75 7.81-0.06 9.13 1.00 UniCmp 23 120 1.38 1.25 1.38+0.13 9.25 4.50 UnicoA .15 m 2.2 15 28 6.94 6.75 6.88+0.13 1138 5.13 Unifab dd 273 11.31 11.13 11.13-0.13 200 0.50 Unimark dd 106 138 1.25 1.31+0.13 8.88 3.03 UnionA 5 134 6.56 6.38 650 12+50 8.88 UnionCo .58 f 4.7 14 20 12.44 12.31 12.44+0.19 12.50 5.06 UnionFnc n .40 5.3 10 7.50 7.50 7.50 1813 9.50 UnionBc

Day C14 / 374

.24 2.3 9 5 10.44 10.44 10.44+0.06 3650 4.38 UnirylTc s 8 536 17.38 16.75 16.88+0.06 2625 16.38 UBWV .84 4.2 12 248 20.06 19.88 19.88-0.19 11.13 5.50 UtdCmnty .30 a 4.8 37 198 6.47 6.31 6.31-0.16 24+00 15.50 UFireC .72 3.9 11 140 18.88 18.63 18.63-0.25 7.38 3.50 UtdInvR .86 15.6 dd 339 5.50 5.47 5.50 23.00 15.75 UNBNJ .80 b 4.6 11 42 17.50 17.19 17.50+0.31 1669 7.00 UntdNat dd 881 15.25 14.50 15.13+0.38 79.50 16.75 UtdPnEu a 4135 24.50 23.25 24.00+1.38 2.56 0.66 UtcIPnA dd 325 1.16 0.88 1.13-0.13 14.00 4.75 UtRetail 9 234 6.63 6.13 6.13 - 0.50 14.50 9.13 USecBcp 1.29 t 9 280 9.81 9.69 9.811+0.13 4.56 1.75 US Enr 2 143 2.25 2.03 2.25 + 0. 13 38.25 19.25 UStatn .10 0.3 13 616 33.44 32.13 32.421-0.31 144.94 103.06 UnTele .50 0.3 29 35 144.50 143.00 144.00+025 132.00 26.25 UtdThrp cid 3054 86.50 81.50 86.36+41.55 114.63 31.31 UtclGlbl a 23626 40.63 37.75 38.31-0.94 39.81 27.19 Unitrin 1.50 4.9 13 1352 30.44 29.63 30.44+044 9.25 3.25 UnityBcp dd 19 4.31 4.06 4.25 0.06 63.00 12.00 UnvAcc n 3040 17.13 14.25 15.81-0.44 52-Week Yld Sales High Low Stock Div % P/E100s High Low Last Chg 5.00 3.13 UnvAmr 8 121 4.13 4.00 4.06+0.06 11.38 2.69 UnivBrd n 1705 3.72 2.81 3.31+0.50 32.31 9.63 UnvElc a 37 844 24.13 21.94 23.70+0.70 17.25 9.94 UnivFor .08 0+6 8 154 12.56 12.06 12.56+0.44 7.75 3.25 UnvStain 11 371 7.00 6.94 7.00 35.00 4.88 Uproar n 6146.81 6.31 6.50+0.25 3106 8.25 UrbnOut 9 1398 8.69 8.56 8.56 8.31 2.75 UroCor 60 447 6.75 6.63 6.63 11.25 2.75 Urologix dd 318 8.75 8.38 8.50 24.06 2.75 UrsusTel dd 296 4.75 4.06 4.50+0.56 8.13 3.25 USBPa a .36 8.2 5 282 4.44 4.41 4.41 71.63 6.38 USintnw a dd 14475 10.50 10.13 10.31 8.19 6.13 UtahMed 9 89 7.91 7.81 7.91+0.03 8.44 2.44 Ublx 29 72 6.06 6.03 6.03-0.09 V 40.00 8.38 V3 Sernien dd 168 15.50 14.81 15.44+0.25 320.00 26.50 VA Lnx n cid 31166 55.25 51.75 S5.00+3.119 15.00 3.13 VDI MltMd 7 968 4.19 3.75 4.13 12.00 4.00 VI Tech dd 388 7.38 6.88 7.00 9.25 5.75 VIB Cp .42 t 10 21 6.06 6.00 6.06 7.69 4.69 VAB Bnc n .24 4.0 10 116 6.00 5.94 6.00 10.38 5.50 VSE Cp .16 2.8 5 1 5.75 5.75 5.75-0.50 10.88 8.75 VajlBks .16 1.7 71 9.63 9.63 9.63 40.38 4.13 ValTech dd 1812 17.00 5.94 16.94+0.81 20.13 3.38 Valentis dd 4749 10.569.75 10.31+0.38 16.88 8.88 VallCerl n 15 13.88 2.94 13.81+1.06 15.38 1.88 VllyMed dd 196 2.88 2.75 2.75 21.69 13.13 Valmnt .26 1.4 16 292 19.00 18.50 18.94-0.13 40.25 32.63 ValueLine 1.00 2.8 11 116 35.88 35.38 35.88+0.31 62.00 13.94 ValVis A 47 3472 29.81 26.16 29.31+2.91 24.00 ValCtick n 1268 12.00 11.13 11.50-0.50 17.63 9.94 Vans 18 331 15.63 15.00 15.63+0.44 15.00 1+00 VntgMed n dd 478 2.00 1.81 1.94+0.25 4.00 0.69 Vari-Lite dd 875 1.31 1.00 1.25+0.44 30.25 18.19 Variagen n 3300 29.38 27.63 28.25+0.25 66.13 14.69 Varian 42 3583 53.00 48.00 48.75-3.06 7325 18.88 VarianS 28 4966 58.63 5