ar-navfac-exwc-ci-1401 january 2014 annual technology transition

Loading...

ANNUAL REPORT AR-NAVFAC-EXWC-CI-1401 JANUARY 2014 ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION REPORT FISCAL YEARS 2012 AND 2013

Technology Governance Board

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Printed on recycled paper

FORM APPROVED OMB NO. 0704-0188

REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE

Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS.

1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY)

2. REPORT TYPE

31-01-2014

3. DATES COVERED (From – To)

Annual Report

FY2012-2013

4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE

5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION REPORT

NA 5b. GRANT NUMBER

FISCAL YEARS 2012 AND 2013

5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

NA NA

6. AUTHOR(S)

5d. PROJECT NUMBER

Technology Governance Board

NA 5e. TASK NUMBER

NA 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

NA 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES)

8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

NAVFAC EXWC 1100 23rd Avenue Port Hueneme, CA 93043

AR-NAVFAC-EXWC-CI-1401

9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES)

10. SPONSOR / MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S)

Various 11. SPONSOR / MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S)

12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

14. ABSTRACT This Annual Technology Transition Report is the year-end, after-action report for NAVFAC EXWC research and development products transitioned in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013. This report highlights improvements in; supporting operations and training of new airframe weapons platforms, enhanced concrete mixtures for waterfront facilities, rapid response techniques for monitoring natural resource systems, new applications for energy savings from renewable ocean technologies and processes that will reduce petroleum consumption by our expeditionary forces.

15. SUBJECT TERMS

Technology; Research; Airfield Pavements; Concrete; Expeditionary ; Environmental 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF:

a. REPORT

U

17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

18. NUMBER OF PAGES

b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE

U

U

19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

Robert Wood 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code)

SAR

110

805-982-1219 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18

iii

This page is intentionally left blank.

iv

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The National Security Strategy highlights dramatic changes in the security needs of our nation, and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) continues to transform to meet the challenges it will face in the 21st century. NAVFAC supports the Department of the Navy and other DoD agencies by constructing and maintaining sustainable facilities, delivering utilities and base services, and providing Navy expeditionary combat force material capabilities to the fleet. The Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) conducts research to support NAVFAC’s mission to meet its readiness, p erformance, and sustainability goals and to respond to changes in security needs by developing new technologies and applications. These efforts improve the Navy’s ability to protect, project, and sustain forces from the United States in the defense of the nation. NAVFAC EXWC scientists and engineers conduct research and development (R&D) in support of forces in the theater of operations, to sustain and improve infrastructure, and to act as good stewards of the environment. This Annual Technology Transition Report is the year-end, after-action report for NAVFAC EXWC research and development products transitioned in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013. Among other accomplishments, this report highlights improvements in: supporting operations and training of new airframe weapons platforms; enhanced concrete mixtures for waterfront facilities; rapid response techniques for monitoring natural resource systems; and new applications for energy savings from renewable ocean technologies and processes that will reduce petroleum consumption by expeditionary forces. The Navy’s readiness is enhanced by NAVFAC EXWC’s ability to reduce time and cost of operations to deploy and maintain relevant competencies; performance is increased by rapidly transitioning technology and moving it to warfighter usage; and sustainability is improved by targeting prioritized shore infrastructure needs and reducing total ownership costs for the Navy. The work discussed here covers all stages of R&D from basic research, through technology transition, to full production and fielding. Research and development is complete when a technology has met all key performance parameters and has been fully vetted by field assessments. NAVFAC EXWC’s contributions are listed in five categories and/or transition p athways describing their respective maturity and associated funding program. All technologies discussed in this report are captured separately in Appendices as technology d ata s heets (TDS). This FY12-13 Annual Technology Transition Report will be located on the NAVFAC portal on the Chief Technology Officer’s (CTO) web page, with interim announcements and data sheets appearing on the NAVFAC EXWC portal page.

M. K. EDELSON

v

This page is intentionally left blank.

vi

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ACB ACBL ACS ACTD AT/FP ATTIR BIM BMP BPSID CAD CDD CDPH CERCLA CESE CLU CPD CNO COCOMS COTS CWP DoD DoE DoN

Amphibious Construction Battalion Amphibious Cargo Beaching Lighter Aggregate Chip Spreader Advanced Concept Technology Development Antiterrorism Force Protection Annual Technology Transition and Implementation Report Building Information Management Best Management Practice Background Perchlorate Source Identification Computer Assisted Design Cooling Degree Day California Department of Public Health Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Civil Engineer Support Equipment Container Living Units Capability Planning Document Chief of Naval Operations Combatant Commanders Commercial Off the Shelf Coalition Warfare Program Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of the Navy

DUSD(AS&C)

Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Advanced Systems and Concepts

EPA ECM ECM ESA ESTCP ETL FNC FTX GCS GTMO HVAC HLZ HPAP HA/DR HYEX INPMP

Environmental Protection Agency Electronically Commutated Motors Earth Covered Magazine Endangered Species Act Environmental Security Technology Certification Program Engineering Technical Letter Future Naval Capabilities Program Field Training Exercises Grade Control System Guantanamo Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning Helicopter Landing Zone High Performance Airfield Pavements Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief Hydraulic Excavators Integrated Natural Resource Management Plan

vii

IR&D JACTD JCTD JMLS JSF KPPs KSAs Led LMR MARFORPAC MCL MCRD MEC MiDAS MMPA MPRSA MSR NAVFAC NAVFAC EXWC NAVSUP NBVC NCF NCG

Independent Research and Development Joint Advanced Concept Technology Development Joint Concept Technology Demonstration Joint Modular Lighterage System Joint Strike Fighter Key Performance Parameters Key System Attributes Light Emitting Diode Large Marine Resources Marine Forces Pacific Maximum Contaminant Level Marine Corps Recruit Depot MARFORPAC Experimentation Center Miniature Deployable Assistance Marine Mammal Protection Act Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act Main Supple Routes Naval Facilities Engineering Command Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Naval Supply System Command Naval Base Ventura County Naval Construction Force Naval Construction Group

NECC NEPA NEPO NESDI NIST NMCB NSCPO NSF NSPH ONR OPNAV OTA PEO

Naval Expeditionary Combat Command National Environmental Policy Act NAVFAC Expeditionary Program Office Navy Environmental Sustainability Development and National Institute of Standards and Technology Navy Mobile Construction Battalion Navy Seafloor Cable Protection Office National Science Foundation Naval Station Pearl Harbor Office of Naval Research Office of the Chief of Naval Operations; also Navy Other Transactions Agreements Program Executive Office

PHG PoR PM

Public Health Goal Program of Record; evidenced by a Program Element Program Manager; An office that executes a block of annual funding whose constituents change periodically Permanent Split Capacitor Physical Security Equipment

PSC PSE

viii

PSEAG QA/QC RDT&E RIF ROI RPM RTS S2T2 SABS SBIR SED SERDP SIR SPAWAR SRM SSL STADIUM SuperCLU SWAC SYSCOM TARDEC TCA TCP TFE

Physical Security Equipment (PSE) Research, Action Group Quality Assurance/Quality Control Research Development Test & Evaluation Rapid Innovation Fund Return on Investment Remedial Project Managers Readiness-To-Serve Speech Translation Tool SAEBI Alternate Building System Small Business Innovation Research Systems Experimentation Division Strategic Environmental Research and Development Savings to Investment Ratio Space and Warfare System Command Sustainment, Restoration, Modernization ; NAVFAC Repair And Maintenance Program Skid Steer Loader Software for Transport and Degradation in Unsaturated High Energy Efficient Containerized Living Units Seawater Air Conditioning System Command Tank Automotive Research, development and Engineering 1,1,1-trichloroethane 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Task Force Energy

ix

This page is intentionally left blank.

x

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0  1.1 

INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................1  NAVFAC EXWC RDT&E PROGRAM Sponsorship ........................................................ 1 

2.0 

TRANSITION CATEGORIES .............................................................................................4 

3.0 

TRANSITION FRAMEWORK PRACTICES AT EXWC ..................................................5 

4.0  4.1  4.2  4.3  4.4  4.5 

PROJECT LIST BY TRANSITION CATEGORIES ...........................................................6  Category 1 ............................................................................................................................ 7  Category 2 ............................................................................................................................ 7  Category 3 ............................................................................................................................ 7  Category 4 ............................................................................................................................ 7  Category 5 ............................................................................................................................ 9 

5.0 

CONCLUSIONS...................................................................................................................9 

LIST OF APPENDICES APPENDIX A TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 1 .............................................. A-1  APPENDIX B TECHNOGY TRANSISTION CATEGORY 2 ..................................................B-1  APPENDIX C TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 3 ...............................................C-1  APPENDIX D TECHNOCOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 4.............................................. D-1  APPENDIX E TECHNOLOGY TRANSISTION CATEGORY 5 ............................................. E-1 

LIST OF TABLES Table 2-1. The NAVFAC Technology Usability Model: Five Transition Categories ................... 5 

xi

This page is intentionally left blank.

xii

1.0

INTRODUCTION

The Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) supports combatant capabilities and sustainable facilities through specialized engineering, technology development, and life cycle logistics services. For the past sixty years of predecessor Command’s NAVFAC EXWC has helped preserve and improve the Navy's physical shore facilities, its underwater engineering assets and environmental stewardship both around local communities and around the globe. NAVFAC EXWC is the principle full-spectrum research and development, test and evaluation, specialized engineering, and Fleet support organization for the Navy's shore based assets. 1.1

NAVFAC EXWC RDT&E Program Sponsorship

The NAVFAC EXWC Research Programs are resourced from a multiplicity of sources. The primary ones are NAVFAC, the Office of Naval Research, OPNAV codes and various DoD offices. 1.1.1

Discovery and Invention

The core research programs at the ONR that support basic and applied investigations in science and engineering. The Basic Research focuses on scientific study and experimentation directed towards increasing knowledge and understanding in broad fields directly related to long-term Department of the Navy (DoN) Needs. The Applied Research efforts solve specific naval problems, short of major development projects. These efforts transition to more specific engineered solutions generally programmed under the Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) Programs. 1.1.2

Future Naval Capabilities

This ONR Program builds on the Discovery and Invention Programs by concentrating research in developing identified warfighting gap or warfighting capability. It aims to deliver distinct, measurable improvements that contribute to closing the corresponding warfighting gaps. Two star panels representing the Navy and Marine Corps' requirements/resource communities, systems commands, the fleet and the force review, evaluate and prioritize Future Naval Capabilities. 1.1.3

DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program

This is a multi-service Research Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Program that addresses corrosion by developing new materials and processes that prevent or reduce corrosion, develop improved methods of detection of corrosive pathways, increases sophistication of corrosion prediction techniques and provides tools for facilitating maintenance and materials decisions to increase the life of naval infrastructure and assets. 1.1.4

Physical Security Equipment (PSE) Research, Action Group (PESAG)

The Department of Defense (DoD) Physical Security Equipment (PSE) Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Program responds to the material needs expressed by the Services

1

and the Combatant Commanders (COCOMs). The COCOMs and Services identify physical security equipment capabilities. The individual services manage components of the PESAG Program by reviewing, selecting and implementing conventional security related research and development efforts. 1.1.5

Navy Environmental Sustainability Development and Integration Program

The Navy Environmental Sustainability Development and Integration Program (NESDI) program supports the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) N45’s focus on addressing the environmental technology requirements of Navy shore and range operations and improving management processes for achieving and maintaining the environmental readiness of the fleet. The research aims are to invest in innovative and cost-effective technologies, processes, materials, and knowledge that enhance Fleet readiness and weapons system acquisition programs, and support Fleet readiness by minimizing operational risk, constraints, and costs. 1.1.6

Facilities Improvement

The Facilities Improvement Program provides the Navy with new engineering capabilities that are required to overcome specific performance limitations of naval shore facilities while reducing the cost of sustaining the Naval shore infrastructure. The program focuses available RDT&E resources on satisfying facility requirements where the Navy is a major stakeholder or where there are no test-validated Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) solutions available, and a timely solution will not emerge without a Navy sponsored demonstration and validation. The program completes the development and validation of facility technologies originating in Navy science and technology programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research Program (SBIR) plus other sources, which include the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). 1.1.7

Force Protection Ashore

Protection of Navy Installations against terrorist activities requires deployment of advanced technology for force protection capabilities. This antiterrorism and force protection (AT/FP) ashore project develops, demonstrates and validate technologies. Important areas: access control and integrated perimeter security surveillance sensors and intelligent electronic security systems for automated intruder detection; perimeter security; waterside protection against craft and swimmer intrusion; secure and efficient operations centers and emergency management centers including human and information support systems (i.e., Command and Control). 1.1.8

Small Business Innovation Research Program

The SBIR Program initiated in 1983 harnesses the innovative talents present in small technology companies for the benefit of the DoD and its components (i.e., the Navy). Since the Program’s inception, large Navy acquisition programs and System Commands with limited R&D funding have benefited from SBIR developed technology. The Naval Facilities Engineering command (NAVFAC) funds its SBIR projects by means of a uniform, three-phase process. Selections factors are scientific and technical merit, Proposal Team Members and the potential for commercialization for both the military and public market. Proposals are submitted to a broadly announced annual DoD solicitation.

2

1.1.9

Directed Energy

This Energy RDT&E Project will test, evaluate, and validate components as well as demonstrate cost-effective and technical viability of energy efficiency and renewable energy prototypes. All efforts will be coordinated across DoD and with other agencies as appropriate. Specifically, this project aims to pursue development, testing and evaluation over the following four main Thrust areas: (1) Renewable Energy; (2) Energy Security; (3) Energy Storage; and (4) Transport and Fuels. 1.1.10

Technology Insertion Program for Savings

This ONR program rapidly transitions applicable COTS solutions and late-stage development technologies from any source to meet an immediate need. The Technology Insertion Program for Savings (TIPS) provides execution year funding for a rapid start, bridging the gap until the program of record can fund the completion of the technology insertion. 1.1.11

Rapid Innovation Funds

The Office of Naval Research’s Rapid Innovation Funds (RIF) funds projects that have already been through the early stages of R&D (primarily through SBIR or Independent Research and Development IR&D funding). The proposed RIF’s effort must advance the technology by validating and demonstrating the capability in a realistic environment. The evaluation focuses on advanced component development and testing of prototypes. 1.1.12

Environmental Security Technology Certification Program

The Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) is the DoD’s environmental technology demonstration and validation program. The Program promotes the transfer of innovative technologies that have successfully established proof of concept to field or production use. The Program demonstrations collect cost and performance data to overcome the barriers to employ an innovative technology. 1.1.13

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program

The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is the DoD’s environmental science and technology program, planned and executed in partnership with the Department of Energy (DoE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with participation by numerous other federal and non-federal organizations. The Program invests across a broad spectrum of basic and applied research, as well as advanced development. 1.1.14

Live Marine Resources Program

The Live Marine Resources (LMR) program develops, demonstrates, and assesses information and technology solutions to protect living marine resources by minimizing the environmental risks of Navy at-sea training and testing activities while preserving core Navy readiness capabilities.

3

1.1.15

Operational Energy Capabilities Improvement Fund

This program funds the startup of comprehensive efforts to improve the DoD’s operational energy performance on specific topics, particularly by involving small businesses and nontraditional defense contractors in meeting the DoD’s operational energy challenges. This Program also encourages innovative business methods, including, but not limited to, the use of consortia or similar organizations and the use of Section 845 Other Transactions Agreements (OTA) for Prototypes. 1.1.16

DoN Coalition Warfare Program

The Coalition Warfare Program (CWP) provides funds on a competitive basis to DoD Labs and Warfare Centers for projects that conduct collaborative RDT&E projects with foreign partners. 1.1.17

Advanced Concept Technology Development

Advanced Concept Technology Development (ACTD) enables the evaluation of mature advanced technology for use by the United States Military. The ACTD allows technology evaluation earlier and cheaper than would be possible through the formal acquisition of new production capabilities. ACTDs must be sponsored by an operational user with approval and oversight from the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Advanced Systems and Concepts (DUSD(AS&C)). No ACTDs were initiated after 2006, when the DUSD(AS&C) initiated the follow-on Joint Concept Technology Demonstration (JCTD) program to emphasize multiservice technology development and improved planning for transition to operations.

2.0

TRANSITION CATEGORIES

Transition is defined when a project, whether a technical idea, a material or a process has completed development at one level and then is selected by another program that furthers its engineering maturation. The ideal transition end point is where the project gets fielded by units of the naval community. Fieldable transition can be hardware with its complement of sustainable packages; it can be the incorporation of information into a criteria Package such as the Unified Facility Criteria (UFC) or adoption of the practice by the industrial community. In this document NAVFAC EXWC uses a model described in Table 2-1 to document the various transition categories.

4

Table 2-1. The NAVFAC Technology Usability Model: Five Transition Categories Knowledge products which provide specifications, documentation and acquisition 1 packages for NAVFAC, SYSCOMs, other SYSCOM PEOs/PMs, and services (e.g., criteria, guide specifications, performance specifications, etc.) Research and Maturation – a formal promotion into the next higher research or development category (e.g., SYSCOM’s Advanced Development Programs , ONR’s 2 Future Naval capabilities FNC Program , DoD’s Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration ACTD, Joint Concept Technology Demonstration, and experimentation) Technology incorporation by an acquisition Program of Record (PoR ) such as 3 NAVFAC’s SRM, or Table of Allowance (TOA) for Expeditionary Forces Technology improvements or capability enhancements to the industrial base; or to provide 4 Government the knowledge base or information to make decisions. This transition category may be reflected in local documents 5 Warfighter support in-theater (i.e., Limited Military Utility Assessment, rapid prototyping)

3.0

TRANSITION FRAMEWORK PRACTICES AT NAVFAC EXWC

The result of a research and development project is to field a system or process, or to increase the knowledge basis for the Navy. The first category is self-explanatory. The second category may lead to discoveries and uses not anticipated at the start of the project. The successful conclusion of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) project produced Specification Documents that described the concrete pavement design needed to mitigate the high temperature exhaust’s effects on concrete landing surfaces. In addressing the problem of high temperature exhausts from the short take-off and landing variant of the JSF, NAVFAC EXWC relied on 30 years of in-house technical capability since the first studies on aircraft exhaust damage by the F18 fighter jet variants. The failure mechanism of the JSF was much higher than that from previous platforms. The studies successfully transitioned into publication United Facilities Guide Specifications (UFGS 32 13 99) and an Engineering Technical Letter (ETL 10-4). Frequently a project cycles through various cycles of transition categories. ONR’s FNC Program initially funded the JSF effort. Concurrently, NAVFAC’s Shore Facilities Improvement Program provided matching funding. In 2009, NAVFAC EXWC supported the design for the KILO Wharf in Guam. Besides Subject Matter Expertise Consultation, NAVFAC EXWC oversaw the use of the STADIUM concrete model in predicting the long-term viability of the concrete mixes proposed for the facility. Originally developed under the SBIR Program in 2000, it continued development by ONR’s Discovery and Invention Programs and then ONR’s FNC Program. These efforts expanded on the initial two-dimensional one contaminant model to a fuller model describing multicontaminant pathways affecting the integrity and corrosion susceptibility of concrete mixtures. NAVFAC’s Shore Facilities Improvement Program validated the model by taking multi-core

5

samples from old waterfront structures and comparing the tested values against predictions produced by the computer model. The Guy Corrosion Inspection and Assessment System Project developed three concepts in 2007 under the SBIR Program. Two concepts were selected for further testing under both the SBIR Program and the DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program. The ONR RIF Program selected the project from a Navy wide competition to validate the non-destructive testing tool at a communications center. The MARFORPAC Experimentation Center (MEC) staffed by NAVFAC Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center‘s (EXWC) Systems Experimentation Division (SED) is a unique experimentation unit that executes operational tests, demonstrations, experiments, and Military Utility Assessments. It provides support and JCTD Assessments for ONR, Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy office, Marine Corps Systems Command and a wide spectrum of DoD agencies and offices. The SED performed an assessment of Speech to Speech Translation Tool (S2T2) for Eng-Thai and Eng-Khmer capability for the ONR Tech Solutions Program. This ONR Program provides Sailors and Marines with a web-based tool for bringing technology needs to the Naval Research Enterprise for rapid response and delivery to the fleet. ONR funds these for a period of nine month. Focus is on quick completion and delivery of a product to the fleet. EXWC’s SED also supported the assessment of the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Miniature Deployable Assistance (MiDAS) Kits. MiDAS provides power, water, communications, and situational awareness support to US military and other Humanitarian Assistance/ Disaster Relief (HA/DR) mission organizations. The assessment concluded that MIDAS provides a cost effective prepositioned stock of tools. EXWC’s SED has provided project support for NAVFAC’s Super CLU Containerized Living Spaces Units and study and analysis support for the SAEBI Alternative Building System (SABS) which is an energy efficient simple to build shelter that requires minimal material and manpower to construct. The Joint Modular Lighterage System (JMLS) project also cycled through various transitions before finally influencing the design choices for the Improved Navy Lighterage inventories. In 1989, ONR’s Discovery and Invention Program successfully developed concepts for both rigid and flexible Sea State3 capable connectors for The Amphibious Cargo Beaching Lighter (ACBL). The project transitioned to Naval Supply System Command’s (NAVSUP) Advanced Logistics Development program where preliminary structural concepts for 24-foot wide ACBL modules were successfully completed. In cooperation with the Army, the project transitioned to a DoD’s Joint Advanced Concept Technology Development (JACTD) Program. Half scale modules were successfully tested, but the Army’s requirements for the system added additional weight, which exceeded the lift capacity of a single crane. The unsuccessful conclusion of the project; however, added considerable knowledge both to the industrial base and to the Navy procurers of the new improved lighterage program. Extensive documentation of each stage of the ACBL and the JLMS programs provides the information on the performance parameters required to pass successfully each phase of the research and development effort.

4.0

PROJECT LIST BY TRANSITION CATEGORIES

The following list identifies project completions as they transition from one category to the next. Technical Data Sheets for each of these entries are provided in the Appendices.

6

4.1

Category 1

The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

4.2



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1401 New Earth Covered Magazine (ECM) Design



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1402 High Performance Airfield Pavements (HPAP)



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1403 Mitigating Concrete Damage Caused by Engine Exhaust Surface Temperature below 500ºF



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1407 Quality Assurance of New Concrete Construction



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1408 Enhanced Guidelines for Marine Concrete Repair



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1409 High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Navy Structures



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1410 Floating Double Deck Pier(Modular Hybrid Pier)



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1401 Alterations for Expeditionary Facilities



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1403 Aggregate Chip Spreader CPD



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1407 Skid Steer Loader CPD Capability Production Doc Category 2

The transition of NAVFAC Research products moving upwards along a progression in maturity and Technology Readiness Level as well as budget activity (6.1–6.7); the maturation process may start as early as a concept, transition to a proof of concept under varied testing phases, then into a larger scaled rigorous pilot plant testing phase before continuing onto further maturation phases in answering the critical and technical questions at each level. There are no entries for this category for this reporting period. 4.3

Category 3

The transition of NAVFAC Research products that specifically provides for documentation and design packages for an acquisition Program of Record (PoR). There are no entries for this category for this reporting period. 4.4

Category 4

The transition of NAVFAC Research products to a non-Government-owned industrial base or academia for incorporation in a current technology or the development of a new technology

7

process. It can also transfer to Government bodies to provide background and knowledge base to support decisions in a specific technical area or to spin off or develop expanded areas for governmental or academic research. 

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1404 Building Information Model (BIM) Management For Standardized Energy & Environmental Parameters



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1405 Corrosion Inhibitors for Concrete Repairs



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1406 Methods For Preventing Overheating Of The BAMS UAV



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CIOF-1401 Seawater Air Conditioning (SWAC)



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CIOF-1402 3D Ships Graphics



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1401 Forensic Approaches to Address Background Perchlorate Source Identification and Characterization at Navy Facilities and Ranges



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1402 Green & Sustainable Remediation – Site Wise TM 3.0



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1403 Long Term Disposition of Seafloor Cables



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1404 Modeling Tool for Navy Facilities to Quantify Sources, Loads, and Mitigation Actions of Metals in Storm water Discharges



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1405 Rapid Response: Automated Long-Term Monitoring System for Natural Resource Management



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1406 Tertiary Treatment and Recycling of Wastewater



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1407 Zero-Valent Zinc to Treat 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP)



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1408 Super Containerized Living Units



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1402 Automated Blade Control for Navy Construction Equipment



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1404 Expeditionary Facilities Energy Consumption Baseline



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1405 Hydraulic Excavator (HYEX) Test and Evaluation



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1406 Oxygen- Acetylene Tank Pallet Racks



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1401 Induction Lighting



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1402 Sand Filters

8



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1403 Electronically Commutated Motors



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1404 Aerosol Duct Sealing



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1405 Parking Lot LED



TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1406 Building Integrated Photovoltaic (PV) Roofs for Sustainability & Energy Efficiency

4.5

Category 5

The transition of NAVFAC research products that directly support warfighting capabilities across the global theater of operations. 

5.0

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EX-1408 Water Well Drilling Operations

CONCLUSIONS

This report presents thirty-four successfully completed transition products completed by NAVFAC EXWC under various R&D Programs for FY12 and FY13.

9

This page is intentionally left blank.

10

APPENDIX A TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 1

A-1

This page is intentionally left blank.

A-2

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1401

New Earth Covered Magazine (ECM) Design

December 2013

Technology Description The U.S. Navy Physical Security Enterprise and Analysis Group (NPSEAG) tasked the Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (EXWC) to develop new designs for a family of four modular earth-covered magazines. The requirements for this effort are supported by the Naval Ordnance Safety and Security Agency (NOSSA) and the Navy Munitions Command (NMC). 1 The new Modular Earth Covered Magazine (ECM) designs are constructed from a combined system of pre-cast concrete panels and cast-in-place concrete. Each of the four Modular ECMs may be described as a reinforced concrete box structure with rear, side and front walls. The maximum interior dimensions of this Modular ECM are 80 feet long by 27 feet wide by 14.66 feet tall. Based on user requirements, the magazine may be built in 20-foot, 40-foot 60-foot or 80-foot lengths. Soil cover includes roof soil and sloped earth berms extending from the side and rear walls of the magazine

Value to the Warfighter The new Modular ECM designs satisfies conventional design codes, protective construction design criteria, ordnance-handling requirements, and enhanced physical security protection criteria. The design objective is to take advantage of modularity to fit the mission, rather than constructing an assortment of large Earth Covered Magazines (ECMs). Subdividing the total explosives weight among smaller Modular ECMs allows a significant reduction in land encumbered by the explosives safety quantity distances. The new door and locking system provides a level which meets and can exceed the required access delay for high threats as defined in DoD 5100.76M. Integrated sensors provide intrusion detection and situational awareness in the magazine area. 1

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback To support P-220 MILCON, NOSSA and NMC conducted an initial assessment of the Standard Modular ECM to brief CNO and ASN (I&E) on the use of this ECM design. Based on thel assessment, the new Standard Modular ECM, with a reduced design explosive weight for each single facility, allows the land encumbered by ordnance storage facilities and their required explosives safety quatity distances to be reduced by up to 80%. State of the art pre-cast, improved strength concrete combined with cast in-place concrete allows for rapid, economic construction of multiple smaller facilities, offering a potential savings of 25-50% . The objective is to build two Standard Modular ECM for the cost of one Navy Type C ECM.

Technology Transition Documentation NAVFAC Atlantic and NAVFAC EXWC obtained initial DOD Explosives Safety Board approval for the Navy Standard Modular Earth Covered Magazine (ECM) design drawings on 23 Jan 2013. These drawings are supporting the P-220 and P-425 MILCON projects. NAVFAC EXWC has published a technical report which: (1) identifies policy and technology gaps for AA&E storage logistics, (2) defines the physical security, seismic, operational safety, and explosives safety standards, and (3) recommending the design path forward for a final, standardized, DDESBapproved design.

Specific Applications The Type C and Type D ECMs provide excellent service for the majority of Navy ordnance storage requirements, the Navy and Marine Corps need a less expensive large sliding door RC Box ECM that would permit the construction of 2 or more 7 bar rated RC Box ECM for the cost of Type C or D ECMs. The driver for this requirement is the need to break required ordnance load into multiple smaller loads to reduce the maximum creditable event (MCE) to 45,000 class/division (C/D) per magazine with a resulting minimum inhabited building distance (IBD) of 1250 feet. Contact:

Kevin Hager (805) 982-1382 [email protected] Edward O’Neill (805) 982-4253 ed.o’[email protected] Scott Smaby (805) 982-6953 [email protected]

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1402

December 2013

High Performance Airfield Pavements (HPAP) Technology Description The F-35B is the Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). It has been shown that its exhaust has a 50 percent probability of spalling standard airfield concrete pavement during a single Vertical Landing (VL) operation. While the spall depth is limited, it represents the potential of generating foreign object debris (FOD), which can damage the aircraft. The Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) was asked by the Office of Naval Research and the Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency to address alternate pavement solutions for JSF VL pads. The effort was conducted in conjunction with Lockheed Martin® (LM) and the F35-B landing on a high temperature VL pad JSF Program Office. NAVFAC EXWC developed and transitioned a concrete mix design that is capable of performing under the extremely elevated temperatures and pressures generated during a JSF VL. In addition, Alkali-Silica Reactivity (ASR) mitigation was studied on a fundamental level. ASR can also cause FOD damage and dramatically reduce the service life of concrte airfield pavements. The failure mechanism for the JSF issue is spalling due to the super heating of water in the concrete. When the heat and pressure from the downward facing nozzle hits the concrete surface it vaporizes the water in the concrete exposing the material to stresses higher than it can handle. The solution developed at NAVFAC EXWC was to create a concrete mix that could be produced by conventional equipment and methods that has three unique properties; 1. All of the aggregate used must be formed at a temperature higher than 1700ºF. This includes igneous traprock, expanded shale and expanded slate. Expanded clays were not used due to their lower strength. 2. Multifilament polypropylene fibers at a dosage of 3lbs/ cubic yard of concrete are batched into the mix. The purpose of the fibers is to melt away leaving behind small voids that act as vents to relieve stress when steam is formed. 3. Topical applications of sodium silicate are made after the concrete has cured. The sodium silicate seals the concrete to minimize the amount of water that is absorbed into the concrete. Construction of a VL pad

The high temperature concrete mixes are made with manufactured fine aggregate which reduces mixture workability due to increased surface area and angularity. The absorptive nature of the expanded aggregates, up to 20 percent for some products, further complicates mixture designs. Other lessons learned during the construction of the vertical landing pads are documented in the High Temperature Concrete Engineering

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Technical Letter. A continuous reinforced concrete pavement design in two directions was implemented because there is currently no joint sealant that can withstand constant exposure to vertical landings. Value to the Warfighter The developed concrete material was tested at the NAVFAC EXWC Aircraft Engine Simulation Facility (AESF) to 500 cycles. Each cycle simulated 1 vertical landing. The material samples were tested in the same spot for all cycles at a temperature higher than what the aircraft will produce in order to add factors of safety to the testing. NAVFAC EXWC has also collaborated with other government agencies and universities, to further understand the mechanisms behind ASR in order to develop criteria to mitigate its devastating effects. The value to the warfighter is increased readiness by having a land based platform for the JSF aircraft and technology to extend airfield life through ASR mitigation. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The ROI for a single JSF high temperature concrete VL pad was calculated to be 8.15. Expanding value to the ten vertical landing pads that have already been built increases the ROI to 49.96. These numbers take into account the extra initial investment to build and maintain the pads for 30 years compared to having to constantly replace the pads if conventional concrete is used. The ROI for the ASR part of the project is 36 based on the extension of an airfield pavement life from 12 years to more than 60 years. Technology Transition Documentation 1. SSR-3608-SHR - HIGH TEMPERATURE CONCRETE FOR JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER VERTICAL LANDING PADS TRANSITION TO EGLIN AFB 2. TR-2355-SHR- EFFECTS OF REPEATED SIMULATED F-35B IPP CYCLES ON EXPEDITIONARY AIRFIELD MATS 3. TR-NAVFAC ESC-CI-1224 - PAVEMENT MATERIALS SUBJECTED TO SIMULATED JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER VERTICAL LANDING EXHAUST Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report 4. Unified Facilities Guide Specifications – UFGS 32 13 99 (Draft) 5. Engineering Technical Letter – ETL 10-4 (Draft) Site Implementation and Specific Applications Thus far a total of ten high temperature VL pads have been built at Eglin AFB, Duke Field, MCAS Yuma, and MCAS Beaufort with another being planned at MCAS Iwakuni. Simulated carrier decks have been built at Duke Field and MCAS Yuma with another being planned at MCAS Beaufort. ASR mitigation techniques are being implemented on all Navy concrete jobs. As of now the concrete mixes have performed well under laboratory testing. A limited number of vertical landings have occurred on some of the high temperature concrete VL pads and there still has not been damage caused by the JSF. Please contact NAVFAC EXWC with any questions, comments, or concerns related to this topic.

Contact: Mr. Victor Cervantes, NAVFAC EXWC CI9, [email protected] (805) 982-3590

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1403

December 2013

Mitigating Concrete Damage Caused by Engine Exhaust Surface Temperature below 500ºF Supersedes TDS-2058-SHR Technology Description MV-22, AV-8B, and F/A-18 aircraft can damage your concrete pavements! Portland cement concrete pavements at locations where these aircraft are based are either already damaged or can be damaged. The damage occurs in the form of “scaling'' of the top 1 to 2 inch of the pavement surface. Pavement fragments from these surface scales have the potential to produce foreign object damage (FOD) to aircraft engines. The elevated temperature exhaust gases from these aircraft coupled with spilled fluids damage ordinary Portland cement concrete airfield pavements. The damage occurs progressively to the pavement surface due to repeated thermal cycling and chemical reaction of the spilled aircraft fluids with the cement paste. Pavement damage from these aircraft has been observed in various locations. The Office of Naval Research and the Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency sponsored an experimental investigation by the Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) to develop candidate pavement systems that would be resistant to the thermal/blast effects from the exhaust MV-22 Landing and the spilled liquids from these aircraft. Simulated high temperature exposure tests were conducted on candidate pavement systems at the NAVFAC EXWC Aircraft Engine Simulation Facility (AESF). This facility, which operates with natural gas, is capable of simulating the heat flux of various jet engine exhausts, from the F/A- 18 APU to the V-22, AV-8B and JSF F-35 aircraft main engines. Three factors are considered to be the major contributing causes of the pavement failure. These factors are thermal fatigue, vapor pressure, and chemical degradation. Thermal fatigue is evidenced by the fact that failures have occurred without the presence of oils or fuels and that scaling failure planes have been observed to fracture aggregates. Vapor pressure could be detrimental in the case of saturated or partially saturated pores where the water vapor pressure cannot be relieved fast enough during the heating phase. Chemical degradation results in a significant loss of strength, up to 50% in some cases, which accelerates the failure. Chemical degradation by itself could result in raveling of the concrete but would not produce scaling. Chemical degradation alone could not reproduce the observed failures. In the experimental investigation, accurate simulation of the thermal fatigue was considered essential for proper reproduction of the failure mechanism. The experimental and numerical analyses were therefore focused on investigating thermal fatigue as a primary cause of failure. Engine oil was applied to the samples to evaluate the resulting strength degradation. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Cyclic exposure tests of the specimens were conducted in the AESF. The simulated jet was calibrated to replicate the heat flux from the MV-22 main engine exhaust on ordinary concrete pavements. That heat flux produces a concrete surface temperature of 450°F - 500ºF after ten minutes of exposure. The thermal gradients present during the pavement heating are enhanced if the initial pavement temperature is lower. To recreate the most conservative scenario, the test slabs were cooled down to just above freezing (38°F) before each exposure cycle. The results of the experiments showed;

Field damage from an MV-22

1. Sodium silicate application dramatically improves a concrete pavements ability to resist damage from exhaust temperatures below 500ºF. Appling sodium silicate is the most affordable way to mitigate damage as it does not require reconstruction. It only requires the surface to be cleaned and proper sodium silicate application 2. A high temperature aggregate like an igneous traprock, expanded shale, or expanded slate should be used as coarse aggregate in new concrete mix designs. Unlike a concrete mix for a JSF, the fine aggregate can be a natural sand. However, sodium silicate must be applied. This option is intended when new construction is planned. 3. Multifilament polypropylene fibers at a dosage of 3lbs/ cubic yard of concrete add an extra layer of protection against damage when it is financially feasible to do so.

Value to the Warfighter The value to the warfighter is increased readiness by having a land based platform for the MV-22. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The use of sodium silicate, high temperature aggregate, and fibers will add to the initial cost of the concrete pavement. When the potential for FOD is considered these options become more attractive. The ROI will depend on the specific projects. For example, the ROI for a project that only involves cleaning a concrete pavement surface and adding sodium silicate will be much higher than a complete reconstruction project that includes bringing in special aggregate from hundreds of miles away. Technology Transition Documentation 1. Pavement Materials Subjected to Simulated Aircraft Engine Exhaust - Final Report – (Draft) Site Implementation and Specific Applications Thus far MCAS Miramar and MCAS New River have used this guidance to build MV-22 parking aprons. The concrete mixes have performed well under laboratory testing and there have been no reports of damage. Please contact NAVFAC EXWC with any questions, comments, or concerns related to this topic.

Contact: Mr. Victor Cervantes, NAVFAC EXWC CI9, [email protected] (805) 982-3590

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1407

TechData Sheet December 2013

Quality Assurance of New Concrete Construction Technology Description The NAVFAC methodology to enhance quality assurance for new concrete construction is a requirement of the Uniform Facilities Guide Specification (UFGS), section 03 31 29, Marine Concrete. It is expected that military construction will incorporate it to achieve more sustainable reinforced concrete structures. The corner stone of the approach employs a validated software program, STADIUM®, which allows users to predict the service life of the concrete under different types of environmental exposure conditions. Owners and engineers can now have a tool that quantifies the beneficial effects of various chemical compositions provided by specific types and blends of cements, fly ash, silica fume, and blast furnace slag. A goal of the UFGS section, 03 31 29, Marine Concrete is to delineate the use of quantifiable metrics to evaluate and predict the service life of specific concrete mixtures in a specific marine environment. Doing so will allow the Navy to benefit from a performance-based specifications when used to supplement prescriptive requirements to achieve a specific service life. The development efforts to accomplish this goal have been motivated by the desire to avoid problems associated with premature concrete distress in future military construction by optimizing the material design and strengthening the quality assurance program. STADIUM® predicts the movement of ions in and out of Portland cement-based concrete is based on ionic transport modeling in saturated and unsaturated concrete and numerical solutions. The STADIUM® model accounts for the complex interactions between the contaminants penetrating the porous network of concrete and the hydrated phases of the cement paste and allows engineers to quantify the effects of various chemical compositions provided by specific local types and blends of cements, fly ash, silica fume, and blast furnace slag when used with specific aggregates. The model accounts for temperature and moisture variations and how these environmental exposure conditions influence the rate of contaminant ingress. It is thus possible to provide STADIUM® with time-dependent environmental conditions and to simulate the effect of wetting and drying cycles on the chloride penetration rate. The description of the environmental exposures provides a realistic estimate of the extent of chloride ingress, as well as concrete chemical degradations, in a structure during its service life. The methodology for quality assurance of new concrete construction set forward in UFGS 03 31 29 is structured as a three-part process: Part 1: Theoretical Simulations of Candidate Mixtures. Review the materials, mixture design, exposure ®

conditions, and cover expectations to assess the likely performance of the mixture. STADIUM contains a concrete mixture database on which theoretical simulations could be based on. Part 2: Mixture Durability Evaluation. The concrete producer makes test cylinders from candidate concrete mixes. Lab tests for porosity, migration, and drying are performed at 28 days; at 90 days, migration and porosity tests are repeated. Part 3: Quality Assurance During Production. During construction, the same three laboratory tests used for certification of the mixture are required to test and document the uniformity of the hardened concrete transport properties as delivered to the construction site. Each time the concrete is sampled; six

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

cylinders are prepared for testing. Test results verify if the concrete delivered to the site is being produced uniformly and within the allowable criteria.

Value to the Warfighter A service life of 75 years for conventional single-deck pile supported piers, wharves, and bridges can reasonably be accomplished when using this quality assurance methodology. In the Marine Concrete UFGS, service life is defined as the number of years before major restoration, with minimal maintenance. Major restoration is defined as repairs requiring jack hammering or other destructive means of concrete repair preparation. By extending the service life of Navy concrete structures, the structures will have increased readiness and availability to support operations.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The average military construction expenditure for US Navy projects that could benefit from the methodology is $671 million per year for 2012 through 2015. The benefit to each individual project will vary. A conservative estimate of cost avoidance as a result of implementing the methodology for U.S. Navy construction is $167 million annually. This estimate is based on the expectations that the concrete structure will have a longer life and require fewer repairs and a reduced carbon footprint. Use of this approach by the other military services will have similar benefits.

Technology Transition Documentation The methodology for quality assurance of new concrete construction including STADIUM® modeling was included in the August 2012 revision of UFGS 03 31 29 Marine Concrete which is available on the Whole Building Design Guide website. Additional guidance for all users on how to implement the methodology correctly and effectively is provided in TR-NAVFAC ESC-CI-1215, A Navy User’s Guide for Quality Assurance of New Concrete Construction, available on the NAVFAC portal or from NAVFAC EXWC by request.

Site Implementation The methodology for quality assurance of new concrete construction has been used successfully on many different projects in the Navy. Projects include:  Modular Hybrid Pier Test Bed, San Diego, CA  Fuel Pier D, Craney Island, Norfolk, VA  Kilo Wharf, Guam  Wharves Uniform and Tango, Guam  Pier 31, Groton, CT  Pier 12, Naval Station, San Diego, CA  Pier 5, Norfolk, VA The methodology and tools used for new construction have also been used to predict the remaining service life of numerous existing Navy structures.

Specific Applications Multi-mechanistic service life modeling is applicable for all concrete construction including plain reinforced concrete and pre-stressed or post-tensioned concrete. When applied to plain reinforced concrete structures, current modeling results are only valid when cracks with widths greater than 0.5 millimeter (0.02 inches) (a credit card is typically 0.5 to 0.75 mm thick [.02 to .03 inches) are repaired or sealed. The model accounts for the presence of concrete micro cracking through the measured ion transport properties of concrete samples. Modeling results are valid for all pre-stressed or post-tensioned elements, or concrete elements in compression, as macro-cracks will be closed. The methodology is applicable to design-build and design-bid-build contracts. To date, it has been used for the design and construction of several Navy piers and wharfs. It has also been adopted for several public projects including the new locks currently under construction for the Panama Canal, U.S. Embassies, and highway bridge projects, collectively valued at several billion dollars.

Contact: Mr. Justin Foster, EXWC CI10, [email protected] 805-982-3766

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1408

December 2013

Enhanced Guidelines for Marine Concrete Repair Technology Description Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) develop a repair specification based on enhanced guidelines for marine concrete repair and document a full-scale concrete repair project accomplished using these enhanced specifications. The completed project serves to demonstrate the practicality of the specification and act as a prototype for Architectural and Engineering firms who are responsible for future concrete repairs Navy wide. The enhanced specification includes three primary advancements:   

enhanced quality control/quality assurance embedded galvanic anodes form and pressure pump repair methods

Improved quality control/quality assurance practices including the use of bond strength pull-off testing were specified.

The full-scale demonstration project at Fueling Pier H, Pearl Harbor, HI successfully demonstrated the enhanced repair guidelines in a real-world application. Laboratory testing confirmed the durability of the concrete mix and pull-off tests validated field procedures for surface preparation of repair areas by ensuring that adequate bonding was achieved between the repair material and existing substrate concrete. The use of embedded galvanic anodes demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing them in a large number of repairs and the need for supplemental instruction on anode placement and tying locations beyond what is in current Navy practice. Form and pressure pump repair locations demonstrated proper formwork design and the procedures necessary to ensure that the repair material inside the forms is sufficiently pressurized. Enhanced quality assurance was provided by utilizing the Engineer of Record for onThe enhanced marine concrete repair specification was successfully used at Pier H, site Title II oversight of the Pearl Harbor, HI project.

Value to the Warfighter By accomplishing high-quality marine concrete repairs that have an expected service life double that of repairs performed using conventional practices, the time before subsequent major concrete repairs are required is increased. This minimizes facility down-time associated with construction activities resulting in increased readiness of the structure.

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback Concrete repairs are one of the leading maintenance costs associated with U.S. Navy piers and waterfront structures. By using enhanced repair procedures such as proper substrate surface preparation, embedded galvanic anodes, form and pressure pump concrete placement, and improved quality control practices, the service life of concrete repairs is expected to double. Since the service life of concrete repairs using conventional repair methods is often observed to only be approximately 7 years, the repairs accomplished using the enhanced methods are expected to last 14 years. If these methods are used on just one pier a year for 5 years with an average repair cost of $1M, then the ROI for this $260K effort is 10.5.

Technology Transition Documentation The final report, TR-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1304 Enhanced Guidelines for Marine Concrete Repair, is available on the NAVFAC portal Waterfront Community page and was submitted to the OSD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program. The report contains the enhanced repair specification, guidelines for its use, and lessons learned at the Pier H project.

Site Implementation The enhanced specification was utilized for a $5M concrete repair project at Pier H, Pearl Harbor, HI. This facility provides fueling facilities for tanker vessels (AOE & TAO) and barges at Naval Station Pearl Harbor. The facility also provides berthing and moorings for large vessels such as amphibious assault ships (LHA and LHD) and aircraft carriers (CVN) for mooring service Type I (mild weather) mooring conditions.

Embedded galvanic zinc anodes were attached to the steel reinforcement to prevent corrosion around the repair perimeter

Specific Applications The enhanced guidelines for marine concrete repair can be applied to any concrete repairs performed on facilities exposed to the marine environment. The improvements made to quality control/quality assurance requirements can be of value to any concrete repair project regardless of its environmental exposure conditions.

Contact: Mr. Justin Foster, EXWC CI10, [email protected] 805-982-3766

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1409

TechData Sheet December 2013

High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Navy Structures Technology Description Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC) engineers demonstrated and evaluated the usage of high volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete mixtures under full-scale production processes containing 50% less Portland cement while achieving increased durability and maintaining strength properties. By replacing 50% of the Portland cement with Class F fly ash, reduced cracking, decreased permeability, and increased electrical resistivity of the concrete can be achieved. All of these properties lead to a more durable material and a decrease in corrosion related deterioration while maintaining compressive strength properties. HVFA mixtures are placed using the same tools and procedures as those used in conventional concrete construction. Additionally, by replacing half of the Portland cement with fly ash, there is a large reduction in the amount of CO2 emissions associated with the material.

Value to the Warfighter Concretes made with HVFA mixtures have been shown to have increased durability and longer expected service life. Increased electrical resistivity and decreased permeability of the material both lead to a reduction in corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement. The frequent need for corrosion related repairs of Navy concrete structures contributes to down time and adversely effects the operations and mission of the Navy. A pier in disrepair is a safety hazard to our personnel due to spalling of the concrete. Moreover, as maintenance is deferred the rate of corrosion in the affected steel reinforcing increases as more of it becomes exposed to the environment due to cracking and spalling of the concrete. All of this is directly related to the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Utilizing high volume fly ash concrete will slow the ingress of chloride ions and propagation of reinforcement corrosion, thereby extending the service life of reinforced concrete facilities and resulting in less downtime for concrete repairs and premature facility replacement.

Economics of the Technology Since HVFA replaces 50% of the Portland cement with fly ash, and industrial waste by-product of coal burning power plants, there can be an initial savings in material costs. This savings varies depending on location and availability of suitable fly ash. The largest cost savings results from the increased durability and electrical resistivity of the concrete. Corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement is a leading cause of concrete deterioration in U.S. Navy waterfront structures. By significantly reducing the occurrences of reinforcement corrosion, HVFA concretes greatly reduce life-cycle maintenance costs of a structure.

Technology Transition Documentation Use of high volume fly ash concrete mixtures has been incorporated into the August 2012 revision of the Unified Facilities Guide Specification (UFGS) 03 31 29 Marine Concrete. Its use is highly encouraged as a way to meet performance based requirements of the specification. NAVFAC EXWC has prepared two reports that cover the advancements in HVFA concrete. SSR-3648-SHR Demonstration of High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete, was submitted to the OSD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program and contains lessons learned during the 2009 HVFA Test Beam placements in Bremerton, WA. TRNAVFAC EXWC-CI-1314, High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Navy Structures – An Environmentally Friendly

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Solution for U.S. Navy Infrastructure Needs, includes additional work and findings since the OSD report and is available for public release. NAVFAC EXWC also presented an overview of previous and on-going work with HVFA concrete at the 2013 DoD Corrosion Conference.

Site Implementation NAVFAC EXWC demonstrated the placement of HVFA concrete at placements in Bremerton, WA and Port Hueneme, CA. A series of Test Beams designed to mimic pile caps found on Navy piers were cast in December 2009 in Bremerton and transported to Port Hueneme for long-term exposure testing and monitoring. To date these beams have shown no signs of cracking and there have been no measureable corrosion rate readings from the embedded monitoring instrumentation. HVFA concrete was also used to construct a 78-foot by 50-foot concrete slab for a biodiesel plant at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, CA. This placement was successfully accomplished by a local contractor who did not have any previous experience working with 50% fly ash mixtures. The contractor was very pleased with the ease of placing and finishing the material and plans to use it on future projects.

Finishing the surface of the high volume fly ash concrete Test Beams poured in Bremerton, WA

Specific Applications High volume fly ash concrete can be used in virtually any U.S. Navy structure constructed using concrete. It is especially beneficial for structures exposed to the harsh marine environment or structures that contain large (greater than 3 feet thick) mass concrete elements. High volume fly ash concretes also provide a method for engineers to achieve the longer service lives commonly being specified in performance based specifications such as UFGS 03 31 29 Marine Concrete. Due to the improved transport properties of the HVFA concrete material, STADIUM® modeling results have shown increased service life for HVFA concrete when compared to conventional Portland cement mixtures.

Contact: Mr. Justin Foster, EXWC CI10, [email protected] 805-982-3766

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1410

December 2013

Floating Double-Deck Pier Technology Description Naval Facilities Engineering Aerial view of Floating Double-Deck Pier (FDDP) Command (NAVFAC) has developed the Floating Double-Deck Pier (FDDP), a new generation of berthing pier that offers a costeffective and sustainable alternative to traditional pile supported piers. The design uses standardized modules manufactured at one location to create an easily reconfigurable and re-locatable pier that provides the lowest life-cycle cost for Navy piers. The FDDP is ideal for all legacy and envisioned classes of U.S. Navy ships except CVN’s and submarines. The FDDP is designed using high strength light weight concrete that has been validated through service life modeling to provide 100-years of service life with no major structural repairs. Value to the Warfighter Maintaining constant tidal level with respect to a berthed ship, the top deck of this floating pier serves as a convenient extension of the ship’s decks for exclusive operations by the ship’s crew. All hospital service equipment and utility hardware are located in the lower deck of the pier, where shore personnel can easily reconfigure it for any unplanned service without encumbering critical operations on the top deck.

Cut-away view of the FDDP, showing interior utilities deck and founding shaft.

A constant tidal level greatly simplifies cargo and supply transfer, mooring line handling, vessel fendering, and cable/hose routing between pier and ship. No dockside labor is needed for tending brows, mooring lines, and utility cables after berthing, as required for traditional piers. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Economics of the Technology The FDDP provides $48M in cost avoidance compared to a single deck fixed pier and $51.4M in cost avoidance when compared to a double deck fixed pier. These values are based on a life-cycle cost analysis for 100-year total facility ownership cost of a FDDP as compared to both a single deck fixed pier and a double deck fixed pier for Naval Base San Diego. A modular floating design with long service life for the FDDP, also assures that the FDDP can be economically relocated to accommodate changing fleet needs and ship-basing options. Technology Transition Documentation The final Report for the Floating Double-Deck Pier (TR-NAVFAC ESC-CI-1223) is available on the NAVFAC portal. Basic MILCON documents at the 35% design level are available from NAVFAC EXWC. As part of the larger Modular Hybrid Pier (MHP) research project, advancements in high strength light weight concrete and the methodology for concrete service life modeling were integrated into Unified Facilities Guide Specification (UFGS) section 03 31 29 for marine concrete. Site Implementation In 2004, a large-scale Test Bed structure was built for the MHP research project with key characteristics of the fullscale FDDP. It was fabricated in a graving dry-dock in Tacoma WA and then open-ocean towed over 1,200 miles to Naval Base San Diego, CA. The Test Bed project successfully validated key design and construction capabilities. For example, the top deck of the Test Bed was load tested with a very large load to simulate a worst case crane outrigger loading scenario. The deck behaved safely and in a linear manner up to the maximum test load of 500 kips. Specific Applications The FDDP could be remotely constructed and quickly deployed to virtually any location in the world. The FDDP concept offers distinct advantages for locations with deep water, poor soils, large tides, earthquake activity, cyclonic storms, sea-level change, environmental sensitivity, and short construction windows. When deciding on pier concepts for your next waterfront MILCON, consideration should be given to initial cost, life cycle cost, design/build time, and service life expectations. The FDDP gives U.S. Navy regions latitude to build the type of pier that best meets their specific operational and local needs, while assuring that facility investments can be economically reused for changing DOD operations and global needs.

Contact: Dr. Robert Zueck, EXWC CI10, [email protected] 805-982-1210

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1401

February 2013

Alterations for Expeditionary Facilities Technology Description EXWC EX320 provided engineering change alterations to Expeditionary TRICON Facilities that were not in compliance with the National Electric Code and which posed a potential safety risk to personnel and equipment. EXWC conducted a visual inspection and functional assessment of the Expeditionary Self-Serve Laundry, Expeditionary Batch Laundry, Expeditionary Shower, and Expeditionary Latrine. EXWC visually examined conductors, piping and associated ancillary equipment, noted deficiencies and documented results. Subsequently, EXWC powered up the respective units, assessed whether equipment functioned properly without any adverse conditions being observed, and documented results. Each unit was setup in accordance with the Operating Instructions provided by the manufacturer. Power and water were provided using cables and hoses provided with the units. In addition, overall power used by each facility was measured in order to ensure the appropriate size generator was specified to adequately power the facility. Expeditionary Self Service Laundry During Testing

EXWC found deficient conditions on all the equipment and prepared Alteration Packages for each. These included technical instructions on how to repair the unit, a Bill of Materials to implement the change, and a cost estimate to complete the repairs.

Value to the Warfighter EXWC was able to provide the warfighter with improved personal hygiene facilities at field locations that function in accordance with applicable codes and safety requirements.

Technology Transition Documentation Transition Category 1 – Knowledge Products: System Alteration Records for the units have been provided to the Program Office.

Site Implementation Throughout TOAs Contact: Mr. Tim McEntee, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1551 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1403

February 2013

Aggregate Chip Spreader CPD Development Technology Description The Aggregate Chip Spreader (ACS) is a self-propelled, diesel-engine driven machine with a minimum ten-foot (10’) basic paving width. The aggregate chip spreader is durable and capable of spreading an even coating of aggregate one layer thick over an asphalt emulsion sprayed surface. Multiple layers of various aggregate types may be placed on various binders to address specific distress types and surface conditions for improving wear surface conditions of Main Supply Routes (MSRs) and other related horizontal construction missions. EXWC developed Capability Planning Document (CPD) for the Aggregate Chip Spreader.

Value to the Warfighter The aggregate chip spreader’s capability to expediently build MSRs and other horizontal structures to support multiple missions drives the need for it to be one of the initial pieces of equipment in theater. The aggregate chip spreader provides essential and immediate capabilities required for building and repairing roads, MSRs, airfields, parking areas and other expedient horizontal infrastructure within the theater of operations to support the mission.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The ACS is a mature, commercially based non-developmental item that is fully adaptable for military use with minor modifications ready for full rate production. It provides expedient yet inexpensive resurfacing methods associated with humanitarian / civic assistance missions and construction projects during deployments. It is capable to operate on JP-8 or high sulfur diesel fuels and utilize locally procured or NCF developed aggregates.

Technology Transition Documentation This Transition Category 1 (Knowledge Products) of the NAVFAC Technology Usability Model is based on existing commercial of-the-shelf (COTS) products and outlines the Key Performance parameters (KPPs), Key System Attributes (KSAs) and other system attributes into the CPD that would meet the capability requirements, which would further translate into specifications, documentation and acquisition packages for NAVFAC, SYSCOMs, PEOs/DRPMs/PMs, and NEPO. The Capability Planning Document (CPD) for the Aggregate Chip Spreader (ACS) has been coordinated with all stakeholders such as NECC, various EXWC depts., and NEPO) and was forwarded to OPNAV N957 Expeditionary Combat Branch for review and approval.

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

Site Implementation The Aggregate Chip Spreader (ACS) is part of the future buy-plan for NECC units. NECC will be fielding and allocating these assets across the naval Construction Force. EXWC is providing technical expertise and the specifications for the acquisition process.

Specific Applications The Aggregate Chip Spreader (ACS) will be used for expediently building MSRs and other horizontal structures; to support multiple missions associated with humanitarian civic assistance and construction projects during a contingency or deployments. Contact: Mr. Joseph M Salonga, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1683

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1407

February 2013

Skid Steer Loader CPD Capability Production Document Technology Description The Skid Steer Loader (SSL) will provide an intermediate and highly versatile capability in areas too small for other Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE) to operate and too labor intensive for the troops to do manually. The SSL is a smaller yet versatile, multi-functional platform that employs different attachments capable of complementing the capabilities of other CESE. It is a lift and load system that could employ multiple attachments capable of executing a wide range of mobility, general engineering and force protection / survivability missions. Engineers at the NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (EXWC) developed the Skid Steer Loader Capability Production Document (CPD).

Value to the Warfighter The current SSLs in the inventory were found to be lacking in performance and durability while in the uparmored configuration. There is a need to have two versions of the SSL: Type I for the light, highly maneuverable wheeled SSL currently in use and Type II for the larger tracked SSL that will have greater lifting capacity and the armor solution best suited for survivability and expeditionary logistics support in more rugged terrain. Both SSL versions complement the capabilities in a more energy efficient manner than other Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE) assigned to Tables Of Allowance (TOAs) within Navy Construction Forces, and are required to provide an essential, flexible capability to the expeditionary force. These SSLs will provide a range of lifting capability and with the Type II armor solution will enable NCF units to complete many tasks more efficiently in contingency environments that are now performed by the hydraulic excavator and the bulldozer. This frees up the excavator and the bulldozer to perform higher priority operations that require selfdeployability, larger excavation or heavier lift capability not found in the SSL.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The SSL resolves capability gaps throughout the entire range of military operations and provides increased functionality, facilitating labor intensive tasks, which include: construction and repair of airfields, landing strips, and roads; debris removal; construction operations in restricted terrain; construction of individual fighting and critical asset survivability positions; lifting and loading support for force protection equipment and barrier materials; obstacle emplacement and obstacle marking in a timely manner.

Technology Transition Documentation This Transition Category 1 (knowledge product) of the NAVFAC Technology Usability Model is based on existing commercial of-the-shelf (COTS) products but outlines the Key Performance parameters (KPPs), Key System Attributes (KSAs) and other system attributes into the CPD that would meet the capability requirements, which would further translate into specifications, documentation and acquisition packages for NAVFAC, SYSCOMs, PEOs/DRPMs/PMs, and NEPO. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  The Capability Production Document for the two variants of the Skid Steer Loader has been coordinated with all stakeholders (such as NECC, various EXWC depts., and NEPO) and was approved by OPNAV N957 Expeditionary Combat Branch on 01 July 2013. The CPD documents are available from EXWC upon request.

Site Implementation These new variants of the SSL are part of the future buy plan for NECC units. NECC will be fielding and allocating these assets across the naval Construction Force both in the West and East coast. EXWC is providing technical expertise and the specifications for the acquisition process.

Specific Applications The SSLs will be authorized in general construction and earthmoving operations within the expeditionary and construction units. The SSL will have a smaller profile/footprint and a tighter turning radius than other CESE, greatly improving maneuverability, especially in urban environments. The SSL is aimed at meeting the mission needs of NCF units.

Point of Contact: Mr. Joseph M Salonga, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1683

APPENDIX B TECHNOGY TRANSISTION CATEGORY 2

B-1

This page is intentionally left blank.

B-2

There are no entries for this category for this reporting period.

B-3

B-4

APPENDIX C TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 3

C-1

This page is intentionally left blank.

C-2

There are no entries for this category for this reporting period.

C-3

C-4

APPENDIX D TECHNOCOGY TRANSITION CATEGORY 4

D-1

This page is intentionally left blank.

D-2

         

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1404

December 2013

BUILDING INFORMATION MODEL (BIM) MANAGEMENT FOR  STANDARDIZED ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS   

Technology Description  Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare  Center  (NAVFAC  EXWC)  is  tasked  to  create,  demonstrate,  and  validate  a  standard  Building  Information Modeling (BIM) object class data exchange  library for select standardized designs/facility types that  specifically  address  critical  building  envelope  object‐ based  parametric  modeling.  The  project  team  used  an  existing  office  building  (NBVC  PH1100)  and  barracks  (Bldg  KJ  Intrepid  Hall)  to  evaluate  BIM’s  potential  to  support DoD energy savings goals. The team’s goal is to  develop  and  analyze  parameters  for  energy  analysis,  demonstrate  BIM’s  potential  to  attain  sustainability  objectives  that  may  assist  with  energy  action  choices,  and to identify consistency in recording and reporting of  become  interoperable  with  Maximo  and  other  existing  energy and environmental data.  Navy enterprise authoritative database systems.   The  team  chose  off‐the‐shelf  BIM  software  to    determine  modeling  value  and  practical  use.  Richly attributed data about building assets that are  Preliminary  findings  indicate  that  the  Navy  would  gain  developed in BIM during the building design and  the  most  value  from  BIM  by  specifying  design  and  construction phases can be pushed directly into  constructability  models  to  contain  key  performance  Maximo during commissioning or at building handover.  attributes.  More  specifically,  the  thermal  properties  The integration requires Maximo version 7.x or later  found  under  type  properties  in  family  objects  are  licenses.  critical building attributes within the model required to  utilize  BIM  for  building  level  reporting  of  Certified  Value to the Warfighter Facility  Managers  (CFMs).  Once  created  within  the  as‐ In an environment of diminishing resources, providing  built  model,  these  new  attributes  are  then  compared  minimum building performance requirements and  with  definitions  for  Energy  Conservation  Measures  reducing life cycle costs will enhance DoD mission  (ECMs) on counting for EISA 432 CTS reporting. Building  capability.   Building Information Modeling (BIM)  level  data  within  a  BIM  platform  may  eventually  software is used to create building systems, mechanical  Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 

 

.

  zones, and attributes used to analyze energy  performance. 

NAVFAC’s authoritative system for building information  must be Maximo version 7.x or later compatible. 

Technology Transition Documentation

Specific Applications

Transition Category 4 ‐ to provide the Government the  knowledge base or information to make decisions.  The  report TR‐NAVFAC EXWC CI‐1401 'BUILDING  INFORMATION MODEL (BIM) MANAGEMENT FOR  STANDARDIZED ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL  PARAMETERS’ provides conclusions on the importance  of key performance parameters of thermal properties,  mechanical BIM Level of Detail (LOD), minimum  hardware support requirements for BIM, and the  importance of energy model calibration.  It will be  available shortly on the Defense Technical Information  Center, www.dtic.mil. 

This study concluded that building energy simulation is  a convenient and efficient method to evaluate energy  consumption. Specific applications using three‐ dimensional building components enriches a facility  BIM model by providing comprehensive visualization of  the facility’s architectural and mechanical systems. This  is made further evident with the use of all the different  combination of angles, views and levels of detail which  come together to provide a real‐space three‐ dimensional simulation experience and excellent spatial  perception and facility referencing. All of these features  available for modeling can be especially helpful for a  designer, engineer, or facility manager when sizing and  selecting new equipment and components or analyzing  building performance. The facility’s BIM model also  benefits as a reference tool for material properties and  information that accompany these components.   

Site Implementation It is essential that the transfer of models and  information within the models from the front‐end BIM  authoring tools to energy analysis software become  more uniform, seamless, and accessible in exporting 3D  data with integrated energy data. Additionally, 

Contact: Mr. Brian Ballweg, EXWC CI9, [email protected] 805-982-1250

 

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1405

Corrosion Inhibitors for Concrete Repairs

December 2013

Technology Description Despite the advances in corrosion control technology, corrosion of reinforcing steel is still the primary cause of deterioration of concrete waterfront structures. Inorganic compounds have been added to concrete for a number of years with the belief that they increase concrete life by inhibiting corrosion. These same compounds are now being employed in repair overlays and patches with the intent of improving the repairs, which typically last only a couple of years in marine environments. While accelerated tests have shown some benefit to the use of these compounds, the results in actual structures have not been as favorable. New organic (ester-amines and alcoholamines) are being introduced as alternatives to the previously employed inorganic compounds. Laboratory and field studies by the Federal Highway Administration and various DOT’s indicated mixed results with the use of corrosion inhibiting admixtures in new construction. Information on the use of inhibitors (especially the organic type) as admixtures or topically applied in repairs is limited, but studies by at least one state DOT recommends against their use in patches and overlay applications made to chloride contaminated concrete. Since the vast majority of waterfront concrete structure deterioration is the direct result of

Repair pour

corrosion induced by the ingress of chlorides from seawater, the viability of corrosion inhibitor use in their repairs was investigated by EXWC. Inhibitor evaluation was integrated into an ongoing repair project of the main berthing wharf at Naval Station Pearl Harbor. The investigation included all known commercially “available” types employed as admixtures or applied topically. A control mix that did not include any inhibitors or additives (water reducers, etc.), and the standard contractor repair mix, specified for repair of the wharf, was also included in the test matrix.

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

Value to the Warfighter Repair of concrete represents a major expenditure on the waterfront infrastructure. Spalling continues to reoccur subsequent to patching, overlaying, and rehabilitation despite the routine use of corrosion inhibiting admixtures. While the cost of these inhibitors is low, reliance on them for prolonged integrity in a major rehabilitation project negates the benefit of the entire project expenditure if the repairs are short lived due to resumption of corrosion.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback No benefit of using of corrosion inhibiting admixtures in concrete repair patches has been demonstrated by this investigation. Differences in the patch material and the existing concrete material, which are responsible for the initiation of corrosion cells, have not been shown to be altered sufficiently to cause a reduction in activity over the test period. Subsequent corrosion (around the patch) with the inhibitors would be expected to be as large or greater with respect to macrocell corrosion. Corrosion within the patch itself may be reduced to some degree by some of the inhibitors either inherently on the micro-cell level, or by behaving cathodically in the macrocell, however, uninhibited repair material of good quality would be expected to outlast the existing base material. Deck Monitoring

Technology Transition Documentation Transition Category 4 - to provide the Government the knowledge base or information to make decisions The Technical Report TR-NAVFAC ESC-CI-1220 Corrosion Inhibitor Evaluation for Concrete Repairs February 2012.

Site Implementation In 2013 the repairs were re-examined and additional measurements were made for assessment of corrosion activity. Reinforcement within the patch areas remains relatively cathodic to reinforcement of adjacent concrete with some corrosion visible at interfaces. To date no benefit of using of corrosion inhibiting admixtures in concrete repair patches has been demonstrated. Recommend re-examination of repairs, and additional measurements for re-assessment of corrosion activity at future dates. In addition, concrete chemistry analysis (including chloride profile measurements) may be of benefit in determination of the subject inhibitors influence on behavior in new construction Contact: Mr. Daniel Polly, NAVFAC EXWC CI60, [email protected] 805-982-1058.

         

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CI-1406

December 2013

METHODS FOR PREVENTING OVERHEATING OF THE BAMS UAV   

Technology Description The Global Hawk, the Preproduction Broad Area  Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  (UAV) and by extension related UAVs can suffer from  limitations due to excessive heat loading during ground  support activities.  These heat problems are caused by  the UAV using the fuel (via heat exchanger) as a heat  sink to cool the avionics.  The aircraft flags an overheat  condition if the fuel temperature exceeds 105 °F.  The  overheat flag is a cause to abort launch, however it is  possible to override this until the fuel reaches 135 °F.   These aircraft operate at very high altitude with  ambient temperatures that cause JP‐8 to gel;  transferring the heat from avionics to the fuel, heats  the fuel and prevents gelling with minimal use of fuel  heaters.      This tasking was to determine a cost effective solution  so the fuel system does not overheat during ground  operations.  It was found that when the aircraft is  operated by motivated trained personnel that minimize  the time the UAV is exposed to direct sunlight the fuel  system does not overheat     To prevent excessive heat loading, whenever practical  the BAMS UAV should be based in locations with a  minimal number of days with a daytime high  temperature over 100 °F.  Where this is not practical,  the recommendation that additional training to enable  ground crews to minimize the time that the UAV is  exposed to direct sun is the most cost effective method  to eliminate ground overheat issues.  The goal of this    

USAF RQ-4 Global Hawk. This type of aircraft’s literature was studied during preproduction of the BAMS for analysis of potential overheating issues.

training is to reduce the quantity of time required to  safely move the aircraft from the hangar to the flight  line and launch the aircraft.  Under conditions where  the first two approaches are not acceptable solutions  the most energy efficient method with the lowest cost  for design and assembly is to provide a portable shade  structure that covers only the wings during run up with  an available high‐pressure water misting system for  times with extreme heat. 

Value to the Warfighter This study concluded that expensive and heavily energy‐ consuming air conditioned hangars are not necessary  for operation of the BAMS UAV.  This greatly expands  the number of existing facilities that can be used for the 

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 

 

  operation of the BAMS as well as reducing the energy  consumption of the required hangar space.    Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback  Multiple air‐conditioned hangars were not built at  potential cost of 50 to 75 million dollars per facility;  however later revisions of the aircraft were reported to  be more heat tolerant by design also mitigating this  need.   

Technology Transition Documentation Transition Category 4 ‐ to provide the Government the  knowledge base or information to make decisions  TR‐NAVFAC ESC CI‐1226 “Methods for Preventing  Overheating of the BAMS UAV” is available upon  request.   

Site Implementation More advanced versions of BAMS UAV, now called  TRITON, are reported to be more heat tolerant, largely  mitigating need for expensive efforts to reduce heat  loads.   

Specific Applications This report provided specific inputs regarding facility  requirements during preproduction of an aircraft.  The  conclusion stated that costly facilities could be avoided  by basing the aircraft in locations with a minimal  number of days with a daytime high temperature over  100 °F. Where this is not practical, and it frequently is  not, the most cost effective method to avoid aircraft  overheat during ground operation is to reduce time on  ground during run up operations.    

Contact: Mr. Nathan Finch, EXWC CI10, [email protected] 805-982-6630

 

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CIOFP 1401

December 2013

Sea Water Air Conditioning Technology Description Sea Water Air Conditioning (SWAC) is an alternative cooling system that uses the deep cold seawater as the chilling agent for a closed-loop fresh water distributed cooling system. Once installed, SWAC systems typically operate at approximately 15% of the power consumption of conventional chillers. A SWAC system basically consists of deep seawater intake and return pipelines, titanium heat exchangers, seawater and freshwater pumps, and a distribution system for the chilled fresh water. All of these components are commercially available, and have proven track records.

Notional Seawater Air Conditioning System The fundamental process behind SWAC involves replacing the many chiller units found in conventional air conditioning with a freshwater district cooling system originating at one seawater heat exchanger. Cold seawater is pumped from its source (≈ 700m water depth) to a heat exchanger, where its low temperature is used to chill fresh water, for distribution to air handling units in buildings on base. Value to the Warfighter The value of SWAC is making use of a local, renewable resource to significantly reduce the fossil fuels required to operate a naval facility. At naval facilities where SWAC is viable, SWAC can reduce the air conditioning power requirements approximately 85%, which can lead to overall base energy savings of approximately 40%. This dramatically decreases the reliance on imported fossil fuels, and increases a base’s energy security situation. Also, by replacing 100’s of disparate HVAC chiller systems with a single Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

chilling station, maintenance and repair (in climates typically harsh on outside machinery) is reduced to only upkeep of a small number of water pumps. In addition, SWAC enables:  Elimination of chemicals needed for chiller machinery  Elimination of cooling tower water usage  Reduction in noise; and reduced need for on-site machinery space  Reduction in emissions, and greenhouse gases The disadvantages of SWAC are:  Relatively large capital costs  Greater environmental planning requirements  The offshore pipeline is single point of failure (earthquake?) o can mitigate with emergency standby chillers Economics of the Technology: Implementing SWAC requires a large capital cost, but the tremendous energy savings lead to large annual savings in base electricity usage costs, as well as reduced maintenance costs. The major factors which drive the economic viability of SWAC are:  Distance to cold water o long lengths of pipelines can be cost prohibitive  Size of cooling demand o cooling load must be substantial for efficiency/economy of scale  Concentration of cooling needed o centralized buildings require fewer distribution pipelines  Local electrical costs o electrical rates affect payback period The economic advantages of SWAC are:  Large energy savings (~85% reduction in HVAC chiller electricity usage)  Large life cycle cost savings (30+ year system life)  Stabilized future operating costs (very small effect from energy inflation)  Reduced operations and maintenance costs Shown in the table below are some basic parameters from five naval facilities studied for SWAC economic viability. A/C Elec. Saved Elec. Cost Pipeline Capital Simple/Discounted Load Length Cost Payback (yrs) (tons) (kWhr/yr) (/kWhr) Naval Facility: Diego Garcia

4,000 19.3M

$.501

2.2 miles

$158M

14 / 19

GTMO

6,100 27.5M

$.273

1.1 miles

$151M

16 / 21

NB Guam *

8,400 32.6M

$.272

2.5 miles

$168M

16 /

Andersen AFB * 12,000 46.6M JBPHH 28,600

$.272 $.238

1.9 miles 4.5 miles

$216M $360M

17 / 17 / 25

79.0M * From CH2MHill study Technology Transition Documentation This is a Transition 4 category; by improving technology capability and knowledge for Navy Energy Managers. Technology transfer documentation is available to DoD employees and their contractors. Site Implementation Site implementation will consist of converting most all of the disparate air conditioning systems on base into one district cooling system, with a centralized chilling station. A pipeline from shore out to deep water is installed for bringing in cold seawater; and a shorter offshore pipeline for returning the seawater. The chilling station is constructed which includes titanium heat exchangers, seawater pumps, and fresh water pumps. Specific Applications In certain locations around the world, it is possible to dramatically reduce the amount of energy required to run air conditioning chillers. Locations which are best suited for SWAC systems have close access to deep (cold) water, expensive electricity rates, a substantial amount of air conditioning, and a warm climate. The naval facilities with the most viability for implementing SWAC are listed in the table above. For additional information, contact: Mr. Nate Sinclair, EXWC CI-OFP, 805-982-1005, [email protected]

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-CIOFP 1402

December 2013

3D Ship Graphics Technology Description NAVFAC EXWC has created new unclassified 3D CAD models of U.S. Navy ships, and developed standards for creating future models that are used in the planning of weapons platform integration with shore-based infrastructure. EXWC began the process to collect, create, and standardize 3D ship models in FY10 and continued with Phase 2 in FY11 and Phase 3 in FY12. During that time, EXWC engineers have developed a 3D AutoCAD ship model standardization document, provided standardization of new NAVSEA ship models for facilities modeling, and produced 17 ship models to those standards.

3D CAD Model of LCS 2 A section located on the NAVFAC Portal, was created to house this library of ship models. Each ship class has a separate tab on the portal containing a 3D AutoCAD model, a 3D VRML model, 2D AutoCAD and PDF drawings (when available), source documentation for the models, the most recent Facilities Planning Criteria Document (when available), and a set of ship characteristics. The goal of the project was to provide all NAVFAC teams with access to these models and information through the NAVFAC portal, and to develop standardized procedures and requirements for 3D ship models for facilities planning use. The Ships Graphics project has:  Developed 3D CAD and VRML models of CVN 68, CVN 78, FFG 7, CG 47, DDG 51, DDG 1000, LCS 1, LCS 2, LHA 6, LPD 17, LHD 1, LHD 8, SSGN 726, SSN 688, SSN 774, SSN 21, and SSN 23  Provided models and standards to NAVSEA PEO Carriers, PEO LCS, PEO Subs, and PACFLT

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Provided a library of VRML models that will be used in a new collaborative 3D visualization tool for facilities planning (Spiders 3D) Simplified and modernized the development of ship berthing models used by facilities planners and Port Operations groups.

The challenges for the Ships Graphics project are:  3D modeling technologies change rapidly  Not all NMCI computers and software are capable of viewing these models effectively  The 3D ship models are only useful if a 3D model of the pier or wharf is also available

Value to the Warfighter The project supports identifying and planning appropriate homeports, safe berthing locations and mooring arrangements for weapons platforms and helps planners and Port Operations groups minimize or negate delays of weapons platforms delivery by avoiding unplanned critical support infrastructure modernization. For example, dry docking requirements for the newest aircraft carrier were defined and validated through use of 3D virtual environment review capturing infrastructure modifications that would have resulted in years of operational delay. Planners avoid repeated costly site visits saving funds that can be used for operational requirements.

Economics of the Technology: Developing the 3D CAD models was economically beneficial given the level of detail and the fast transition of the technology into a useful product. When developing facilities plans or berthing models, having these verified 3D ship models ready will save facilities engineers and Port Operations personnel up to three weeks of labor per model plus travel to visit the ships. The development of the 3D ship model standards document also saves considerable labor, as each new NAVSEA ship program will provide these models directly to NAVFAC.

Technology Transition Documentation This is a Transition 4 category; by improving technology capability and knowledge for NAVFAC. Technology transfer documentation is available to DoD employees and their contractors.

Site Implementation Site implementation consisted of posting the 3D ship models on the NAVFAC Portal, which allows all NAVFAC facilities planners to access the information.

NAVFAC Portal Website for Ships Graphics

Specific Applications The 3D ship models and information has already been used by NAVFAC Integrated Product Support and Port Operations, NAVSEA program offices and the Pacific Fleet, and NAVFAC EXWC moorings engineering group.

For additional information, contact: Mr. Gerritt Lang, NAVFAC EXWC CIOFP4, 202-433-5333, [email protected]

 

TechData Sheet

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1401  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2013

Forensic Approaches to Address Background Perchlorate Source Identification and Characterization at Navy Facilities and Ranges Technology Description Perchlorate is a naturally occurring substance. However, perchlorate is also manufactured for use in a variety of military/industrial applications such as fireworks, pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, explosives, rocket propellants, and munitions. Because both of these types of perchlorate can contribute to groundwater contamination, SPAWARSYSCEN PACIFIC developed an environmental forensics approach to simply and efficiently determine if a perchlorate signature is attributable to a naturally occurring source. SPAWARSYSCEN PACIFIC has prepared a technical guidance document for background perchlorate source identification (BPSID) with appropriate validated forensic approaches, tools, and methods to quantify and distinguish naturally occurring perchlorate from manufactured perchlorate. The technical guidance is particularly useful in cases where there is no current and historical use of perchlorate by Navy and defense contractors but perchlorate is observed in site groundwater and/or surface water. Value to the Warfighter Perchlorate evaluation is part of range condition assessments and monitoring strategies per current DOD policy, which have a direct impact on continued range use for training, testing, and operational readiness. Identifying natural sources of perchlorate will provide an appropriate baseline (background levels) for mitigating any potential cleanup efforts and costs. Without an understanding of the extent to which background perchlorate sources may be potentially impacting the site, inaccurate assessments and poor management decisions will result, ultimately leading to unnecessary cleanup actions at greater expense to the Navy. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback This is a Technology Transition Category 4 by providing technology improvements for internal use by the Navy. This study will result in cost avoidance. With potentially high costs related to perchlorate remediation, the ability to confirm the existence of a background perchlorate signature of natural origin would free site managers from having to perform a complete perchlorate background evaluation resulting in a significant cost savings for the Navy. Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

Technology Transition Documentation The results of this effort will be disseminated in the form of guidance documents which will be available January 2014. For a copy of the draft guidance contact Dr. Robert George (Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command) at [email protected] or (619) 553-2776. Site Implementation The environmental forensics approach of determining if a perchlorate signature is attributable to a naturally occurring source was put to the test during SPAWARSYSCEN PACIFIC’s validation and demonstration of the BPSID approach at Pinecastle Range, Florida. A persistent low-level perchlorate signature had been observed in the groundwater with no known identifiable anthropogenic source. The BPSID results indicated that perchlorate strongly correlated with nitrate levels, commensurate with similar correlations between perchlorate and nitrate across the region, which is consistent with perchlorate of natural origin. Specific Applications Contact: Robert George, Space and Naval warfare Systems Command, [email protected], (619) 553-2776 This project was executed by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, Pacific under the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program.

Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

   

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center

 

TechData Sheet December 2013

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1402

Green & Sustainable Remediation - SiteWiseTM 3.0 Technology Description

TM

GHG Emissions 600

Metric Tons

SiteWiseTM 3.0 is an Excel-based calculation tool designed to determine footprints of environmental restoration actions in terms of selected metrics such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy consumption, criteria air pollutant emissions, water consumption, and worker safety. The remedy footprints for these metrics provide a measure of the unintended impacts of remediation. The Navy remedial project managers (RPMs) use the footprint analysis results to reduce the remedy footprints by selecting green and sustainable remedies and by implementing best management practices.

400

200

0 Remedial Alternative 1

Remedial Alternative 3

Remedial Alternative 4

Remedial Alternative 5

Remedial Alternative 6

SiteWiseTM 3.0 output example - comparison of GHG footprint for remediation alternatives

SiteWise was developed jointly by the Navy, Army, Army Corps of Engineers, and Battelle Memorial Institute. In FY2013, EXWC completed a demonstration/validation (dem/val) project funded by the DoD Environmental Security Certification Program (ESTCP) that performed footprint analysis for selected DoD remediation sites. The project benchmarked results from SiteWiseTM against a commercially available dedicated Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) software and database package. From the comparison results, the project team identified gaps in the functionality for SiteWiseTM 2.0 and subsequently implemented recommended improvements. SiteWiseTM 3.0 improvements included both the calculation of footprints and the usability of the tool. As concluded from the ESTCP project, SiteWiseTM 3.0 provides the necessary information needed for comparing remedy alternatives and making remedy decisions.

  Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

Value to the Warfighter Remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil at Navy Environmental Restoration (ER) sites is required under various federal and State regulations. SiteWiseTM 3.0 enables the Navy to perform footprint analysis that help decision makers in selecting remediation technologies with smaller footprint (e.g., reduced energy consumption) for remediation systems. Reduced energy consumption by an installation results in a cost-savings that can be re-directed to the Warfighter. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback SiteWiseTM 3.0 has distinct economic advantages in comparison to applying the dedicated LCA software for footprint analysis. SiteWiseTM 3.0 is available to remedial project managers (RPMs) free of cost; whereas, the LCA software could cost up to $12K. In addition, SiteWiseTM 3.0 is Excel based and thus requires only minor training; however, the LCA software requires extensive training with potential training cost up to $8K. For a site application, SiteWiseTM 3.0 is expected to cost $3K - $10K; whereas, the LCA application is estimated at $5K - $15K for the same site. Technology Transition Documentation Technology Transition Category 4. SiteWiseTM 3.0 and the User Guide are available from the NAVFAC portal at: http://portal.navfac.navy.mil/portal/page/portal/centers/nfesc/erbsec/opt The final project report CR-NAVFAC-EXWC-EV-1303, July 2013 provides details about the ESTCP project. The report has been submitted to ESTCP for posting to the public web site. Site Implementation Remedy footprint analysis using SiteWiseTM is required by the DON Policy for Optimizing Remedial and Removal Actions at all DON Environmental Restoration Program Sites. RPMs are instructed to incorporate metrics from the SiteWiseTM analysis into the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedy Evaluation Criteria. SiteWiseTM has been applied to numerous sites within the Navy ER Program, as well as by other agencies, including the EPA, state agencies, and various other parties responsible for site cleanup. Remedy footprint analysis is routinely applied at the DON ER sites for comparing footprint of alternative environmental remedies. From a recent survey of 148 respondents, 80 (54%) had performed a GSR evaluation at a Navy site. With the recent availability of SiteWiseTM 3.0 and the User Guide, application of SiteWiseTM 3.0 is expected for all footprint analysis applications at ER sites.

Contact: Karla Harre, EXWC EV3, [email protected], 805-982-2636   Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

TechData Sheet

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1403 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2013

Long Term Disposition of Seafloor Cables Technology Description The Navy has a vast number of seafloor cables (estimates of installed cables exceed 40,000 nautical miles) providing numerous functions such as communications, at-sea training, and surveillance. These seafloor cables sometimes need to be repaired, replaced, upgraded and new cables need to be installed to meet the changing requirements of the Navy. Current Navy practice is to leave out-of-service cables in place. The potential environmental, financial and operational impact of removing these seafloor cables can be significant. It is vital that decisions to remove cables are based on substantial scientific evidence. This project is focused on providing the Navy and regulatory community with pertinent information to make scientifically-based decisions on the disposition of out-of-service seafloor cables, as well as the siting and installation of new seafloor project cables. Value to the Warfighter Having validated ecologic data during consultation with regulatory agencies aids the Navy Seafloor Cable Protection Office (NSCPO) in reducing permit requirements, which in turn reduces cable project costs. Status of products:    

Interim Report Complete 1-Year Post Inspection Completed, September 2012 2-Year Post Inspection Completed, September 2013 Final report Completed, December 2013

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback Total RDT&E investment cost of $260K to obtain scientifically valid data showing interrelationships between cable placement, sea floor ecological effects, and sea state conditions (e.g., wind, waves, current). Savings: At a typical site, savings are potentially over $1M for not having to remove a cable, but rather abandon it in place.

Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

Technology Transition Documentation This is a Technology Transition Category 4 by providing technology improvements for internal use by the Navy. The final product of this project is a report with hard scientific data to be used by stakeholders and end-users—such as the NSCPO assistant director and SPAWARSYSCEN PACIFIC—in negotiations with the various regulatory agencies involved in overseeing and permitting seafloor cable operations. Site Implementation Numerous regulations and regulatory organizations at the federal, state, and local level can potentially be involved in Navy seafloor cable installations, repairs, upgrades, and determination of final deposition. Depending upon the particular location of seafloor cable project, some of the pertinent regulations and associated regulatory bodies may include the National Environmental Policy Act, Marine Protection Research & Sanctuaries Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Endangered Species Act, coastal consistency determination, water quality certification dredge and fill projects, state lands department, tribes, local mariners, fishing groups, and environmental organizations. Specific Applications Contact: Mr. William Major, EXWC EV, [email protected], 805-982-1808 or Ms. Catherine Creese NAVFAC HQ, [email protected] This project was conducted under the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program.

Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

TechData Sheet

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1404 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2013

Modeling Tool for Navy Facilities to Quantify Sources, Loads, and Mitigation Actions of Metals in Storm water Discharges Technology Description Achieving industrial storm water permit limits as established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) for metal contaminants—particularly copper and zinc—in surface water can be challenging due to low allowable part-perbillion toxicity levels. Major sources of metal contaminants for naval facilities generally include automobile brake pad and tire wear; general atmospheric deposition; building materials such as galvanized fences and roofing; and the equipment and processes used for common operations such as ship depainting. These sources deposit copper and zinc onto impervious pavement where they can build up as residue. Effectively implementing best management practices (BMPs) is limited by the ability to quantify the relative magnitude of copper and zinc derived from these sources at DOD facilities. The objective of this project is to demonstrate and validate the Source Loading and Management Model for Windows (WinSLAMM) storm water management model allowing Navy facility managers to identify potential sources of metals—particularly copper and zinc— in storm water runoff. The validated model also helps managers decide where to apply, and which control practices may be applied to provide effective BMPs. Value to the Warfighter The proposed solution will provide Navy-wide facility environmental managers with a validated tool to aid in their decisions to implement BMPs to mitigate metals in storm water discharges. A validated tool will provide the Navy with a scientific basis needed in developing effective storm water management plans and addressing appropriate implementation schedules to meet their compliance requirements. A validated tool will provide managers a solid basis for regulatory negotiations and thereby reduce costs associated with overly restrictive or rapid permit implementation. The tool will provide managers with a quantifiable basis for choosing and applying BMPs that will work best for specific drainages, thus providing benefit in streamlining costs to meet compliance requirements and by avoiding costs (monetary and reputation) associated with notices of violation, abatement orders, or lawsuits.

Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The validated WinSlamm model was converted into a simplified spreadsheet tool that will make it available to Navy managers at no cost. The main payback expected is in the form of cost savings associated with making effective choices on where to apply BMPs. The model will aid decisions by providing the underlying data on relative sources and therefore the expected reductions before they are applied. Technology Transition Documentation This is a Technology Transition Category 4 in that it improves manager’s capability for implementing BMPs by using the validated model to decide where to apply and which control practices may be applied. The final report and guidance document will be available December 2013. Contact Dr. Chuck Katz, [email protected], (619) 553-5332 for additional information. Site Implementation Once the WinSLAMM model is validated for use, it can be used to identify the relative sources magnitudes of copper and zinc in Navy drainages and where BMPs are best implemented to achieve the highest success rate in reducing potential the level of metal contaminants levels from Navy facilities. Specific Applications Contact: Chuck Katz, SSC Pacific, [email protected], (619) 553-5332. This project was executed by Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, Pacific under the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program.

Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

  Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1405 

 

 

TechData Sheet

   

 

 

 

 

December 2013

Rapid Response: Automated Long-Term Monitoring System for Natural Resource Management Technology Description Long-term monitoring is the most vital, and yet the most lacking data requirement for effective natural resource management at Navy and Marine Corps installations. Longterm time series data supports and serves as a powerful backdrop to all other aspects of monitoring, research, and conceptual modeling about ecosystem structure, function, and interdependencies that take place. In this project, a commercially off the shelf (COTS) probe and telemetry system (Aqua Buoy from In-Situ Inc.) was deployed for five months at SSC-Pacific Pier 302 in San Diego Bay. This is a self-contained, battery-powered system with telemetry capacity. The deployment provided information on maintenance, recalibration, and costs requirements for the COTS systems. The COTS systems were intentionally allowed to fail to establish realistic maintenance schedules. This approach is similar to the “plug-and-play” mentality of deploying environmental sensors in coastal waters, neglecting maintenance and QA/QC of the data provided by the system. The information generated from this and previous efforts, suggests the minimal maintenance schedule, provides clues to understanding cues to equipment malfunctions, and potential erroneous data generation. This study establishes costs considerations to be contemplated when individuals use long-term environmental COTS sensors in coastal waters. Information on several manufacturers, antifouling options, maintenance schedule, calibration requirements, and costs are provided in the final report, and user guide. Correctly managed COTS coastal water long-term environmental monitoring systems will provide continuous long-term background environmental information for managing natural resources in coastal areas. This information is critical for development of Integrated Natural Resource Management Plans (INRMP), National Environmental Policy Act documents and other and other base compliance measures, as required under the Sikes Improvement Act, OPNAVINST5090.1B, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and for the evaluation of management strategies and military construction investments.   Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

Value to the Warfighter The use of automated environmental field sensors and monitoring systems can decrease the dependence on laboratory, field, or at-sea monitoring procedures, and will enhance the capabilities by maximizing training and testing requirements within environmental constraints. The use of automated monitoring systems supports the evaluation and minimization of environmental constraints on shore readiness, platform operation and force protection, and provides a cost-effective management of environmental regulatory requirements. Furthermore, long-term monitoring of critical environmental and ecological parameters supports the continued, or enhanced use of training ranges. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The use of COTS environmental sensors is driven by regulatory requirements, which negatively impact the continuity of the Navy’s shore side activities such as construction, industrial discharges, and training operations. The payback of using these COTS systems is assuring the steadiness of these activities. Technology Transition Documentation This is a Technology Transition Category 4 by providing technology improvements for internal use by the Navy. A user guide based on the final report will be provided that will focus on implementation of the system and any potential issues. For information contact Dr. Ignacio Rivera, SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific, [email protected], (619) 553-2373. Site Implementation The COTS Aqua Buoy environmental sensor system was deployed for five months at SSC-Pacific Pier 302 in San Diego Bay. A battery-powered system was used, as the buoy system was deployed pier-side, to allow ease of access. However, battery life for communication resulted in battery renewal every 10 days. Grab samples collected by the buoy where analyzed for dissolved oxygen following the Winkler titration method. An In-Situ Aqua Troll 3500 hand-held environmental sensor system was deployed several times by the buoy sensor for comparison of data. Biofouling was allowed to grow over the sensors in order to provide information on maintenance requirements. Specific Applications Buoy-based environmental sensors are the obvious option for long-term monitoring on coastal waters. The sensors can be deployed independently from pier-side structures. These COTS systems could be used in the determination of background levels of temperature, pH, primary productivity, particulates, noise levels, and a suite of environmental parameters that are used for the regulation of Navy shore-side activities. Contact: Dr. Ignacio Rivera, SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific, [email protected] (619) 553-2373. This project was executed by SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific under the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program.   Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1406

December 2013

Tertiary Treatment and Recycling of Wastewater Technology Description A constant and reliable supply of water is critical to mission success in every part of the world. However, in some parts of the western U.S., water supply is increasingly at risk. Underground aquifers—the largest ground water withdrawals—are not being replenished at rates that can support consumption. In addition, pumping water from aquifers is more costly than using surface water. If we continue to drain aquifers faster than they are replenished, they may become overdrawn and collapse, which permanently reduces their storage capacity. To address the problems associated with water availability and accessibility, water districts are increasingly emphasizing conservation and recycling. On-site treatment and recycling of gray and black water is an increasingly attractive option. The tertiary treatment and recycling of wastewater project will demonstrate and validate an innovative on-site tidal wetland-based wastewater treatment system that produces recyclable non-potable water from black water (includes gray water). The treated water can be used for sub-terrain irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial wash water, and groundwater recharge. Value to the Warfighter One of the primary benefits of on-site water treatment and reuse is a reduction in potable water consumption and energy use. This translates into cost and water savings which help facilities provide the training and support that are at the core of the DOD mission. Additional benefits of on-site water reclamation and reuse include: – Contribute to DOD compliance with federal water conservation directives (Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Order 13123). – Contributes to a more consistent and reliable water supply. Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

– Reduced discharge to the sewer is a de facto increase in sewage plant capacity, allowing for growth in DOD operations without incurring costly increases in sewage capacity. – Encourages comprehensive water planning that integrates water and wastewater management. – Reduced freshwater demand benefits ecosystems stressed by water withdrawals. – Supports sustainability at DOD facilities. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The capital cost of a basic system with a capacity of 10,000 gallons per day which would treat 3.5M gallons per year of black water is approximately $350,000. Based on the most recent Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) San Diego water and sewer costs, the annual cost savings (water and sewer) for this system would be $28,300 or a nominal payback of 12.5 years. This calculation assumed that operation and maintenance costs of the treatment system will be at least partially if not wholly offset by increases in water and sewer costs. Technology Transition Documentation This is a Technology Transition Category 4 by providing technology improvements for internal use by the Navy with emphasis for forward operating and remote bases. Site Implementation The tidal wetland-based system is installed and undergoing operational testing at MCRD San Diego, a facility that is almost entirely dependent on imported water. During the demonstration, long-term performance data will be generated based on data gathered by the system’s computer (including pH, oxygen, flow rates, and power consumption). Effluent discharge samples are collected and analyzed at 5 to 6 week intervals. Effluent water quality goals will meet California regulatory standards for effluent reuse for sub-surface irrigation. Specific Applications Contact: Sonny Maga, NAVFAC EXWC, [email protected], (805) 982-1340. This project was conducted under the Environmental Sustainability Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and under the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program.

 

  Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1407

 

TechData Sheet December 2013

Zero-Valent Zinc to Treat 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) Technology Description Recently concern has arisen regarding 1,2,3Trichloropropane (TCP) at DoD sites. The presence of TDP is most likely due to spills associated with its use as a solvent for paint and varnish removal and cleaning/degreasing activities. Because its toxicity to humans appears to be high relative to other chlorinated solvents, even low-level exposures to TCP could pose significant human health risk. TCP non-cancer endpoint data have led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to propose a reference dose of 4 µg/kg-day and place TCP on its drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL3). The California EPA, Department of Public Health (CDPH) has set a notification level of 0.005 parts per billion (ppb) for TCP in drinking water, which is much Test Columns: zinc (gray), iron (black) lower than the corresponding level for 1,1,1trichloroethane (TCA) or trichloroethene (TCE) and has established a public health goal (PHG) of 0.0007 ppb in drinking water. CDPH is currently developing a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for TCP, which is expected to be released for public comment in 2014. EXWC has demonstrated at pilot scale a promising ex situ technology capable of meeting healthprotective concentrations without compromising secondary water quality characteristics. Zero-Valent Zinc (ZVZ) reductively degrades TCP to innocuous non-chlorinated end products, similarly to zero-valent iron (ZVI) which is used to degrade TCE. Scale up information for ex situ application of this technology is included in the demonstration project’s final report.

  Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

Value to the Warfighter Use of ZVZ technology allows the continued use of existing, developed wellfields and precludes diversion of significant resources to connect to municipal water supplies. One southern California water supply would charge in excess of $140M in a one-time Readiness-To-Serve (RTS) fee, in addition to commodity and water delivery costs. Economics of the Technology:ROI or Payback Calculations in this section are based on ex situ treatment. The cost of full-scale wellhead treatment infrastructure sized for 1200 gallons per minute capacity is estimated at $1M. Material costs (zinc only) for treating this flowrate range from $0.05 to $0.12 per 100 cubic feet of water treated, or $4M to $10M per year. However, connection to a municipal water supply could cost approximately $146M in a one-time Readiness-To-Serve fee, plus approximately $2M in annual commodity costs and $20,000 in annual delivery costs. Technology Transition Documentation This is a Transition Category 4 for improving knowledge base for waste treatment operators in the Navy. Site Implementation An in situ application of the technology using a permeable reactive barrier is currently being installed in Area 22/23 at Camp Pendleton, CA to secure the drinking water supply. Specific Applications The Final report on the ex situ demonstration of this technology is available through Dr. Nancy Ruiz, This technology was developed under the OSD’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), project ER-1457, and pilot tested under the Navy’s Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) Program, project 434.

Contact: Dr. Nancy Ruiz, EXWC EV31, [email protected], 805-982-1155.

  Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-EV-1408 

 

TechData Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 2013

Super Containerized Living Units (CLU) Technology Description The SuperCLU program goals are to improve the energy efficiency of current containerized living units (CLUs) by demonstrating energy reducing technologies to the existing CLU design and developing a highly energy efficient CLU, called a SuperCLU. The optimal design of existing CLUs can be achieved by incorporating high energy efficient HVAC systems, high R-value insulation, reflective insulated exterior coatings, and well balanced interior air distribution.

Annual Gallons of Diesel  Used  2,000,000  1,500,000  1,000,000  500,000  ‐ Existing CLUs

Renovated CLUs

SuperCLU

The SuperCLU design will rethink the design of Annual Fuel Use — Comparison of Existing CLUs, CLUs from an energy efficiency perspective. The Renovated CLUs, and SuperCLUs design will include lessons learned from the CLU modifications: HVAC design, insulation, reflective exterior coatings, and air distribution. However, it will also take into consideration light weight building materials, better mobility, and maximizing interior space. Value to the Warfighter In addition to significant reduction in energy use, the SuperCLU will also increase the privacy of individuals, increase the space per individual, reduce noise, reduce shipping container size per usable footprint, and allow more people to be comfortably housed in a given unit than the current CLU configuration. Reduced energy consumption by an installation results in a cost-savings that can be redirected to the Warfighter. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The demonstration of technologies in renovated existing CLUs should improve energy efficiency by 54 percent in total energy reduction over existing CLUs. The annual reduction will be:  

855,360 gallons of fuel $2,138,000.00 ($3.50 per gallon)   Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

The design and demonstration of a SuperCLU should improve energy efficiency by 82 percent when compared to existing CLUs. The annual reduction will be:  

1,298880 gallons of fuel $3,247,000.00 ($3.50 per gallon)

Technology Transition Documentation Technology Transition Category 4. Site Implementation Three hundred split systems have been installed; 430 systems are currently being installed; and 250 systems are being procured for Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa. Djibouti is the primary base of operations for USAFRICOM, supporting over 4,200 personnel. Djibouti is generally arid. Many personnel live CLUs. Approximately 11,000 gallons/day of diesel fuel are required to supply the electricity needed for CLU heating, cooling, lighting, and other functions at monthly cost of $1,200,000 – $1,500,000. Contact: Dave Chavez, EXWC EV11, [email protected], 805-982-5314. This project was conducted under the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Operational Energy Capabilities Improvement Fund Program.

  Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited  

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1402

February 2013

Automated Blade Control for Navy Construction Equipment Technology Description The U.S. Navy and U.S. Army performed an evaluation to explore potential benefits that come from automated blade control technology on earthmoving equipment. The evaluation was conducted at Naval Base Ventura County in Port Hueneme, CA on November 9-10, 2011. This evaluation was performed using a U.S. Army conventional dozer and a diesel electric hybrid dozer. The hybrid dozer was equipped with an automated blade control system. Dozers were run in the following test sequence utilizing a single operator:   

Hybrid dozer w/ automated blade control Hybrid dozer without automated blade control Conventional dozer without automated blade control

Each machine completed a simulated Helicopter Landing Zone (HLZ) consisting of a 100ft x 100ft square pad. A 0% grade was maintained in the lateral direction and 1% downhill grade was maintained in the cutting direction. Areas of investigation were: (a) Time savings, (b) Manpower reduction, (c) Productivity and production, (d) Quality of work. In addition, the setup time was determined using Global Positioning System technology compared to conventional slope staking methods applied by surveyors.

Test Results: Time savings: The conventional survey took two personnel 67 min 45 seconds to establish four corners of the Helicopter Landing Zone (HLZ) pad and associated grade references. The GPS survey required 24 min 45 seconds for two personnel to establish a starting point for the HLZ with involved resulting in a time savings of 43 minutes. Manpower reduction: The hybrid dozer equipped with automated blade control required one operator with no surveyors compared to the conventional method that required two surveyors and one operator to determine excavation profiles and control points. Diesel Electric Hybrid Dozer with Automated Blade Control

Productivity and production: Results indicated that 7% lower fuel consumption could be achieved by the hybrid dozer with blade control when compared to the hybrid dozer without blade control. Additional analysis incorporating volume excavated compared with fuel consumption shows that the hybrid dozer with blade control was between 15% and 32% more efficient than the hybrid dozer without blade control. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  Quality of work: Compared to the conventional system, the hybrid dozer with automated blade control produced a more consistent profile with an overall dimension closer to the 100 ft x 100 ft target. Additional survey time and fuel consumption would be expected for the conventional machine to achieve the same pad quality as the machine with blade control.

Value to the Warfighter Automated blade control has the potential to achieve higher productivity, improved efficiency, lower operating cost, and increased quality when performing complex site designs and finish/fine grading activities. When comparing the hybrid dozer conventional to the hybrid dozer with blade control, the automated system provided noteworthy improvement in fuel consumption, task efficiency and manpower allocation for a 100 ft x 100 ft HLZ site survey and rough grading project.

Technology Transition Documentation This technology can be classified as transition in Category 4 – provide the Government the knowledge base or information to make decisions. A test report is available upon request. Participation in this comparison test enables the Navy to assess new, promising technologies to reduce the fuel consumption of expeditionary construction equipment used by the Seabees in deployment and training. Navy and Army engineers believe that automated blade control technology will ultimately result in a notable reduction in fuel consumption and lower overall operating costs. The project is the result of a partnering effort between the U.S. Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), the NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC), the First Naval Construction Division (1NCD), the 31st Seabee Readiness Group (SRG), and private industry.

Specific Applications     

Expeditionary Runways Paved/Unpaved Roadways Building Pad Foundations Parking Lots Helo Pads

Contact: Mr. Robert Sandoval, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1466

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1404

February 2013

Expeditionary Facilities Energy Consumption Baseline Technology Description The Expeditionary Facilities Tent Camp Energy Consumption Baseline measured the power (kilowatts) and energy (kilowatt-hours) produced and used by Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) forces while operating Table of Allowance (TOA) mobile power generation equipment during Field Training Exercises (FTX). Energy and power usage was logged by facility type (e.g. by the Combat Operations Center, Self Service Laundry), and data was categorized by how the energy and power were used (e.g. heating and cooling, lights and receptacles, and load banks). The data obtained was used by EXWC to baseline the energy and power needs of NECC forces during operational scenarios and determine if there are opportunities for improvement. The Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) has set five energy goals to reduce the Department of the Navy’s (DON’s) overall consumption of energy, decrease its reliance on petroleum, and significantly increase its use of alternative energy. In response, the Chief of Naval Operations Task Force Energy (TFE) Expeditionary Working Group has further refined guidance and established two energy reduction goals for Expeditionary Forces: • •

Reduce tactical petroleum consumption 15% by 2020 Increase tactical energy efficiency 15% by 2020 1

Expeditionary Power and Energy Dataloggers recording the loads supplied by a 60 KW Tactical Quiet Generator (TQG)

Value to the Warfighter By reducing the amount of petroleum consumed and increasing fuel efficiency, logistics support requirements are reduced. The reduced logistics burden decreases the number and amount of resupply convoys required when operating in forward locations while maintaining operational effectiveness. The reduced number of resupply convoys has an attendant reduction in exposure to hostile action. 2

1

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, A Navy Energy Vision for the 21th Century,(Washington D.C., October 2010), http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil/files/2010/10/Navy-Energy-Vision-Oct-2010.pdf, accessed Nov 18, 2013 2 Charles F. Wald and Tom Captain, Energy Security: America’s Best Defense, (Deloitte Development LLC, 2009), http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom- UnitedStates/Local%20Assets/Documents/AD/us_ad_EnergySecurity052010.pdf, accessed Nov 18, 2013

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The reduction in exposure to hostile action due to fewer resupply convoys does not have a direct monetary value associated. The specific monetary ROI will depend on the efficiency increase and fuel use reductions made as a result of the evaluation. The baseline assessment conducted on a Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) at Fort Hunter Liggett in May 2013 showed that about 50% of the energy produced was used to heat or cool shelters and 31% of the energy produced was not used at all but was dissipated in load banks to prevent generators from wet stacking while running under light loading. If shelter heating and cooling efficiencies can be increased and if wasted energy can be captured and used for more beneficial purposes (or not produced at all) the ROI could be quite substantial. Datalogger installed in trailer mounted Environmental Control Unit (ECU)

Technology Transition Documentation Transition Category 4 - to provide the Government the knowledge base or information to make decisions The Baseline Camp Power Test Event Report NMCB-3 Field Training Exercise May 2013 is in draft form and available upon request.

Site Implementation NAVFAC EXWC conducted a baseline power and energy study during NMCB-3 Field Training Exercise at Fort Hunter Liggett. EXWC is currently working with the NAVFAC Expeditionary Programs Office (NEPO) to determine the time and place for the next baseline assessment (tentatively scheduled for Spring 2014).

Specific Applications The Expeditionary Facilities Tent Camp Energy Consumption Baseline will provide the information needed by higher echelons to make informed decisions regarding any potential changes to doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel and facilities (DOTMLPF) to meet the Task Force Energy goals.

Dataloggers measuring conditions in a climate controlled tent Contact: Mr. Rob Johnston, EXWC EX320, [email protected] 805-982-1305

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1405

February 2013

Hydraulic Excavator (HYEX) Test and Evaluation Technology Description: Advanced hydraulics technologies have the potential to reduce fuel consumption in heavy construction equipment. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the ability of lower viscosity hydraulic fluids as well as an advanced hydraulic accumulator to improve productivity, reduce fuel consumption, and operate more efficiently over a duty cycle.

Benefits: savings.

Predicted fuel efficiency gains by 2% to 6% will yield an estimated $2M annual fuel

Test Evaluation The U.S. Navy and U.S. Army performed a test of hydraulic excavators (HYEX). The evaluation was done at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Port Hueneme’s Dozer Field June 3-7. Army and Navy excavators were each evaluated with different energy efficient technologies. The Navy HYEX was evaluated using a commercially available Energy-Efficient (EE) hydraulic fluid. Engine speeds, fuel flow rate, temperature and pressure were measured and compared to baseline test results. Commercial oil companies have recently released a number of EE hydraulic fluids that are projected to yield a 2% to 6% savings in fuel efficiency. Energy efficient fluids look to maximize overall efficiency by providing a stable viscosity across all operating temperatures.

Navy Hydraulic Excavator (HYEX) Test at Naval Base Ventura County

The Army HYEX evaluated a hybrid swing drive that recovers energy from boom and swing motions and reuses it, theoretically resulting in higher engine efficiency, improved fuel efficiency and cost savings. Performance requirements were measured and compared to baseline testing to determine overall hydraulic peak power reduction, fuel consumption reduction, and cost savings predictions.

Test Results • •

Test data supports commercial claims that EE fluids can provide a 2-6% improvement in fuel efficiency. Operators appeared to improve their efficiency supported by increased burn rate of 2% percent and large productivity gains of 19.4%. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Value to the Warfighter   

Reduced fuel logistics burden at deployed sites Reduced warfighter exposure during deployment Potential for significant cost savings

Benefits: ROI or Payback The outcome of follow-on testing will determine the suitability of these technologies for integration into the Naval Construction Force (NCF) tables of allowance (TOAs). Predicted fuel efficiency gains by 2% to 6% will yield an estimated $2M in annual savings.

Technology Transition Documentation This technology can be classified as transition per Category 4 - to provide the Government knowledge base or information to make decisions. A test report is available upon request. This project is the result of a partnering effort by the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC), the Naval Construction Group 1 (NCG 1) and the U.S. Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) to use the training facility at the Naval Base Ventura County, which offers a consistent climate favorable to the testing. The effort is supported by personnel from the NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (NAVFAC EXWC), the Naval Construction Group 1 (NCG 1), Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 (NMCB 3), and private industry.

Specific Applications     

Expeditionary Runways Paved/Unpaved Roadways Building Pad Foundations Parking Lots Helo Pads

Contact: Mr. Robert Sandoval, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1466

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1406

February 2013

Oxygen-Acetylene Tank Pallet Rack Development Technology Description The Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Rack is a materiel logistics solution specifically designed for Amphibious Construction Battalion TWO’s (ACB-2) capability and mission requirements in building Elevated Causeway System (ELCAS). This rack system enables them to transport Oxygen and Acetylene tanks safely and quickly to any theater of operations. The Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Racks will provide a safe and secure system of transporting/shipping these tanks separately in approved ISO shipping containers. Its design allows for loading and unloading of these pallet racks via small forklift. These pallet racks are also designed for quick, easy loading and ready access to the Oxygen and Acetylene tanks with minimum effort and manpower; which can also be used for general construction, steel fabrication projects and force protection / survivability missions.

Value to the Warfighter There is no current commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Rack system available to meet ACB-2’s specific requirements. The currently available systems were found to be lacking in mobility, safety and durability. This Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Rack system will provide a system to transport equipment quickly and respond rapidly in any contingency. The system provides a quick, safe storage solution that can withstand the wear and tear associated with transporting equipment under various expeditionary environments. This capability enhances mission readiness and response time.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Rack is a logistics solution that resolves the current capability gap in the storage and transport of Oxygen and Acetylene tanks throughout the naval construction force. The payback will be in the form of intangibles such as quicker response time, safety in transport, use and storage for the entire range of military engineering and construction operations. It provides increased functionality not only for it’s designed objective for the Elevated Causeway System, but also supports various construction support evolutions and force protection missions that involve oxy-acetylene welding and cutting operations.

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Technology Transition Documentation This Transition Category 1 (knowledge product) of the NAVFAC Technology Usability Model is a design based on the current mission requirements of ACB-2. The initial prototype configuration was built for initial testing by ACB-2 from Oct to Nov 2013. Design improvements are currently being incorporated into the fabrication drawings for the final end product and for full production.

Site Implementation Currently, ACB-2 is the only unit where this will be used in support of their Elevated Causeway System mission requirements. However, other NECC units may also benefit and may incorporate this capability across the Naval Construction Force as well. NAVFAC EXWC is providing the technical expertise and the specifications into the fabrication drawings.

Specific Applications The Oxygen-Acetylene tank Pallet Rack is primarily designed for the transport and storage of these gas cylinders, but can also be used for compressed gas cylinders of various types as well. It is designed to meet the mission needs and enhance operations capability of expeditionary and construction units within the Navy Expeditionary Combat Commands (NECC).

Point of Contact: Mr. Joseph M Salonga, EXWC EX320, [email protected], 805-982-1683

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1401

December 2013

Induction Lighting Technology Description Induction lamps, a form of electrodeless lamps, operate using the same principle as fluorescent lamp technology. Mercury vapor inside the lamp is excited to produce short-wave ultraviolet light, which then excites phosphors on the lamp surface to produce visible light. The difference is that an induction lamp does not use electrodes; rather electromagnet induction is used to excite the mercury vapor. A ballast drives the electromagnet. Induction lamps are available in round, rectangular, and olive shaped forms. The units tested used rectangular lamps with external inductors. Induction lamps offer some advantages over conventional light sources including long lifetime, robustness, and instant-on capability.

Value to the Warfighter The advantages of induction technology in outdoor lighting applications are:

New Induction Lighting Fixtures



Induction provides a longer lamp life (50,000 to 100,000 hours) than conventional high-pressure sodium (24,000 hours) and metal halide (7,500 to 24,000 hours). Ballast life for induction lighting is estimated at 60,000 hours.



Provides a whiter light than conventional high-pressure sodium.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback 

Induction equipment costs more than conventional high-pressure sodium or metal halide equipment (lamps and fixtures).



Induction lighting does not appear to provide clear power reduction potential compared to conventional high-pressure sodium on the basis of power (Wattage) required to achieve minimum design standard illumination (foot-candles). Although pole spacing could be the reason for this limitation.



There could be a potential payback if induction lighting is installed in hard to access applications where cost to replace shorter lived lighting is expensive. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Technology Transition Documentation Category 4. The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

Site Implementation The demonstrations were conducted at:

 

Commissary parking lot, Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, CA Parking lot A, Naval Station Pearl Harbor, HI

Specific Applications Contact: Mr. Paul Kistler, EXWC PW61, [email protected], 805-982-1387

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1402

December 2013

Sand Filters Technology Description Sand filters provide cleaner cooling tower water by removing suspended particles in the water including very fine contaminant particles down to 0.25 microns. The sand filter used in this demonstration is designed to remove particles down to 0.5 micron particles. This high efficiency filtration saves energy and reduces operating costs with cleaner chiller condenser heat transfer surfaces, lower microbiological growth, improved corrosion rates, and reduced chiller tube cleaning frequency.

Value to the Warfighter The advantages of this technology as tested are: 

Reduced electrical use by the chiller per ton of chilled water produced

Sand Filter at NAS Lemoore

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback The total installed cost of the sand filter at NAS Lemoore was $26,553. The total annual savings varies based on the chiller cleaning schedule used. The analysis of this system shows $11,466 average annual savings for an annual chiller cleaning schedule, $19,033 average annual savings for a two (2) year cleaning schedule, and $28,267 average annual savings for a three (3) year cleaning schedule.

Technology Transition Documentation Category 1. The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Site Implementation NAVFAC EXWC under the Techval program performed the evaluation at the Naval Air Station Lemoore, CA. The evaluation period of two years began with one year of sand filter operation. During the second year, the sand filter was removed from service to develop the baseline data.

Specific Applications Contact: Mr. Paul Kistler, EXWC C19, [email protected], 805-982-1387

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1403

December 2013

Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Technology Description Permanent-Split Capacitor (PSC) Motors have been the industry standard for the last 50 years. PSC motors utilize copper wound stators and rotors to generate the magnetic field required to operate the motor. These motors have moderate starting torque with low starting current. They typically range from 50 to 500 watts. Although they used to be the lowest cost motors available, Electronically Commutated Motors (ECM) described below have been found to actually be cheaper than PSC motors.

New ECM Green Motor Installed in Blower Prior to

PSC motors are considered an outdated Demonstration technology due to their inability to achieve higher levels of energy efficiency. Typically the maximum efficiency of standard PSC motors is 50%. PSC motors use high levels of copper and steel in the motor construction and do not have electronics to control motor operation in order to optimize their energy use. ECM products achieve energy efficiency levels that are 33% to 50% higher than standard PSC motors. ECM’s are up to 90% efficient and are designed to maintain high efficiency levels over a broad range of operating speeds. ECM’s include various intelligent functions that maximize energy savings and provide their users with features not available on PSC motors. Certain types of ECM’s include programs that automatically size their output (horsepower) to the equipment in which it is installed. This feature, called “Autosizing” gives technicians the ability to use an ECM as a drop in replacement for a PSC motor without having to reconfigure the system and simplifies field replacement work.

Value to the Warfighter The advantages of the ECM are: a. Simple Retrofit – Factory training is not required to perform a retrofit as the mount, shaft and basic wiring connections are designed to enable simple replacement. The User’s Installation Manual is very helpful and is provided with each ECM Green motor. b. Retrofits and installations of ECM technology in regions with higher electrical utility rates will have the greatest energy savings and fastest payback compared to other regions. c. Uses less energy at all motor speeds than PSC motors. d. Cheaper than PSC motors. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback Where an EC motor is installed in lieu of a new PSC motor, the payback is instantaneous since the per-unit cost of the EC motors tested ($228.95) were significantly lower than the per-unit cost of a new PSC motor of the same make and model ($330.92). In the second scenario, where a theoretical installation is retrofitted by an EC motor, we defined the “Simple Payback Period” as the point in time where the cumulative return of an investment to be equal to the total cumulative cost of the investment. A table of payback periods based on retrofits in different geographical regions is shown below: Simple Payback for Retrofits at Different Theoretical Installation Sites

Installation Location Naval Submarine Base New London (Groton, CT) Naval Station Norfolk (Norfolk, VA) Naval Station Everett (Everett, WA) Joint Base Pearl Harbor ‐ Hickam (Pearl Harbor, HI) Naval Base Ventura County (Port Hueneme, CA)

Cost per  Payback Period  kWh (USD) (Years) $0.1297 7.4 $0.0621 15.9 $0.0588 26 $0.1981 3.1 $0.1220 18.3

It should be noted that two main factors determine the payback, run hours and utility rates. Therefore it can be seen that locations with short run hours, especially in the summertime ventilation mode and/or low utility rates have long paybacks, i.e. Naval Station Everett, Naval Base Ventura County and Naval Station Norfolk. Locations that have high utility rates even though the run hours are average have moderate paybacks, i.e. Naval Submarine Base New London. Locations with both long run hours, especially in the summer and high utility rates have very good paybacks, i.e. Joint Base Pearl Harbor.

Technology Transition Documentation Category 4. The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

Site Implementation For the field demonstration, two of eight nearly identical furnaces installed at NBVC Pt. Hueneme were retrofitted for testing, and have been operating as pilot installations with EC motors-Indoors since September 2012. These installations are available for long-term monitoring and assessment by contacting NAVFAC EXWC.

Specific Applications Contact: Mr. Paul Kistler, EXWC PW61, [email protected], 805-982-1387

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1404

December 2013

Aerosol Duct Sealing Technology Description Duct Sealing is an energy reduction technology that was demonstrated under the Navy’s Techval Program performed by the NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center. This technology internally seals leaks in air distribution ducts by injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. The product keeps the particles suspended within the air stream. As the duct work is pressurized, the particles deposit at the leak edges, collect, and eventually seal the leaks. Energy savings are realized through sealing air leaks in the duct work, which reduces the amount of air requiring movement by fans throughout the air distribution systems. This will, in turn, result in fan motor power reduction. In addition, the reduction of air leaks in the duct work can reduce the thermal energy lost in the space heating and cooling systems.

Duct Sealing Application in Progress at NSA Orlando

Value to the Warfighter This duct sealant technology demonstration has shown that application of the aerosol duct sealant can reduce both thermal energy and fan energy consumption, depending on the HVAC system type and the location of the ducts that were sealed. The cost effectiveness of the technology is site specific, primarily a function of local energy costs, the building thermal loads, and the cost of sealant application.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback Of the four sites, the greatest impact from the duct sealant was at the DeFlorez Building in Orlando, which was also the site with the greatest cooling degree-day (CDD) value. At this site, the technology resulted in a total annual energy use savings of 103,438 kWh, resulting in the annual energy cost savings of $8,689 with a simple payback period of 5.7 years.

Technology Transition Documentation Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  Category 4. The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

Site Implementation The aerosol duct sealant technology was demonstrated on four buildings at four different Navy facilities around the country. The four demonstration buildings were 1) the DeFlorez Building at NAVAIR Orlando, FL; 2) Building 1268 at the Naval Station Newport, RI; 3) Building 865 at the Naval Base Kitsap in Bremerton, WA; and 4) Building 3339 at the Naval Base San Diego, CA. The four buildings represent four different climatic conditions and different air distribution systems types. Data on thermal energy and fan power was collected before and after the duct sealant material was applied. Annual energy and cost savings were predicted based on a typical weather year for each site. Since the above 4 sites were completed an additional 2 sites at NS Newport and 1 site at NB Kitsap have had duct sealant applied and data collection is currently in progress at those 3 sites.

Specific Applications Contact: Mr. Paul Kistler, EXWC PW61, [email protected], 805-982-1387

 

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1405

December 2013

Parking Lot LED Technology Description A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor-diode that emits light. LEDs present some advantages over conventional light sources including long lifetime, improved robustness, small size, fast switching, and greater durability. However, they are currently relatively expensive and require more specific current and precise thermal heat management than conventional light sources. A driver is used, much as a ballast, to provide the precise current to the LEDs. LEDs are typically integrated with the fixture and heat sink (thermal management system). LEDs are a directional light source emitting typically in only 180 degrees because of the way they are made. With good luminaire design, the LED light output can be aimed to where it is desired with minimal light going in unneeded directions, and therefore with minimal redirection and energy loss. This also allows the Close up view of the new LED LED luminaire to provide more uniformity of illumination. The luminaires atop an existing light pole. result is less overlighting of the area, such as immediately under the luminaire and, in some cases, less light spilling over into unneeded areas. Better use of lumens providing illumination where needed (and not providing illumination where it is not needed) allows LEDs to outperform other sources with respect to illumination per applied Watt.

Value to the Warfighter The advantages of LED technology in outdoor lighting applications are:     

LED provides a longer lamp life (expectations of 50,000 hours). However, the technology is too new for true lamp life to be validated. Based on the current state of LED technology, 50% reduction in power and energy while maintaining or improving maintained illumination levels is possible. LEDs offer improved optical control, which results in improved quality of light, improved uniformity ratios, and reduced waste in light. LEDs are mercury free. However, at end of life, LED equipment should be treated as electronic waste requiring recycling. LEDs are more durable, resulting in less lamp breakage.

Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  Table below summarizes the energy and economic performance of the demonstration projects. Energy and Economic Performance Comparison

Lighting Technology

NBVC NAVFAC EXWC

NBVC

NSPH

Bldg 1100 Parking

NEX Parking

Dormitory Complex Parking

HPS

LED

HPS

LED

HPS

LED

Total number of luminaires

23

19

14

14

34

34

Number of light poles

12

12

9

9

24

24

400

156

400

207

150

104

2.81

5.81

2.88

5.01

Rated lamp power, Watts Total measured power, kW

10.88

Reduction in measured power, %

74.2%

Operation*, hours per year Annual energy consumed, kWh/yr

50.4%

3.42 31.7%

1046

1046

4015

4015

3832

3832

11,968

3,091

23,327

11,563

19,198

13,105

Annual energy reduction, kWh/yr †

Annual energy cost reduction , $/yr Installed cost Simple payback, years

8,437

11,764

6,093

$1,012

$1,412

$1,280

$49,808

$36,746

$88,072

49.2

26.0

68.8

*

Operating hours based on timer control set points



Electric energy cost = $0.21/kWh (NSPH) and = $0.12/kWh (NBVC). Reference: FY2007 Energy Management Reports

Annual operating hours and local energy rates can have a major impact on cost effectiveness. In the case of the LED demonstration at building 1100, the reduction in load (kW) was significant. However, as a result of the extremely low operating hours, the resulting simple payback was very long. It should also be noted that since these demonstrations were performed, cost has continued to come down resulting in better economics.

Technology Transition Documentation Category 4. The transition of Research knowledge into products that provide information for the NAVFAC community to purchase services for SRM, special projects and energy performance performing contractual mechanisms.

Site Implementation   

NAVFAC EXWC office building parking lot, Building 1100, Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, CA Navy Exchange parking lot, Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, CA 1300 Dormitory Complex parking area, Naval Station Pearl Harbor, HI.

Specific Applications Contact: Mr. Paul Kistler, EXWC PW61, [email protected], 805-982-1387

Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1406

TechData Sheet December 2013

Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Roofs for Sustainability & Energy Efficiency Technology Description Rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems have gained popularity partly due to the availability of unused roof space. However, the increased load can compromise roof integrity and void the roof warranty. One solution is to use a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof consisting of flexible, amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules adhered to a reflective polyvinyl-chloride (PVC) carrier sheet, which is then bonded to an Energy Star-rated PVC roof membrane. The BIPV system provides benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy, can potentially cost less than a conventional roof and PV system and result in a shorter payback period. DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program funded EXWC to demonstrate and validate how well BIPV roofs perform as both PV and roofing systems. The study evaluated an existing BIPV roof at Luke AFB and new systems at NAS Patuxent River and MCAS Yuma. Roof integrity, energy output, roof reflectivity and roof temperature data were collected and analyzed. Operations and maintenance requirements were qualitatively evaluated.

Before (left) and after (right) photos of the demonstration system at NAS Patuxent River, MD

Value to the Warfighter Potentially reduces funding required to meet renewable energy and net zero goals, which allows for funding to be reallocated to other Dept. of Navy requirements. Economics of the Technology: ROI or Payback BIPV roof cost effectiveness is best compared to conventional roofs and rooftop PV systems. Roofing labor and material costs are relatively steady, but costs vary based on roofing type and quality, so a $5$20 per square foot range was used in comparison scenarios. The California Solar Statistics website shows that the installed cost range of PV was roughly $7.5-$10 per Watt (W) in 2008 and $4-$7.5/W in 2012. The BIPV roof contract was awarded in 2008. The price reduction is significant due to the selling price of crystalline PV modules. Unfortunately, a-Si PV modules did not experience as significant a Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

 

price reduction. Savings-to-investment (SIR) ratios for sample cases and comparison to BIPV roof costs are shown in the following tables. SIR SIR with SIR with SIR with SIR with Avoided Avoided Avoided Avoided Avoided Re-roof Re-roof Re-roof Re-roof at Re-roof at $5/sq.ft. at at $5/sq.ft. & $20/sq.ft. HVAC $5/sq.ft. $20/sq.ft. Rebates & Rebates Savings

Syste m Life

with

SIR with SIR with Avoided SIR with Avoided Avoided Re-roof at Re-roof at at Re-roof at $5/sq.ft. & HVAC $20/sq.ft. & & $20/sq.ft. & Savings & HVAC Savings & HVAC Savings Rebate Rebate

15Year

0.10

0.30

0.13

0.84

0.14

0.44

0.18

1.22

20Year

0.16

0.48

0.20

1.34

0.22

0.66

0.28

1.85

SIR values of various scenarios based on Arizona case study at electric rate of $0.073/kWh.

Location Site I (Luke AFB)

Site II (Patuxent River)

Site III (MCAS Yuma)

Conventional Conventional Roof Conventional Roof Conventional Roof BIPV Cost at time Roof @ $5/sq.ft. @ $5/sq.ft. and @ $20/sq.ft. and @ $20/sq.ft. and of Award and PV @ $4/W PV @ $7.5/W PV @ $4/W PV @ $7.5/W ~$6M (2005)

$2.2M

$3.5M

$4.4M

$5.7M

$363K w/ roof repairs; $332K w/o

$188K

$282K

$428K

$522K

$254K w/o rebate

$129K

$201K

$268K

$340K

Actual BIPV roof costs compared to estimated 2012 capital costs for conventional roofs and PV systems

Technology Transition Documentation BIPV roofs are still relatively new and evolving. The type studied is no longer available due to adhesion problems and better design practices. In some newer systems, thermoplastic-olefin (TPO) membranes have replaced PVC because some claim that TPO is more adhesive-compatible; flexible PV modules based on other materials have been used because of higher conversion efficiencies; conduit became surface-mounted to be more firefighter friendly. UFC and UFGS documents were not created due to product changes and a lack of data on the new components. In addition, the Navy roofing subject matter expert does not recommend BIPV roofs at this time with a significant reason being the lack of long term performance data. Therefore this product is recorded under transition category 4. Site Implementation In spite of the improvements, the problems identified by this study may still occur with new adhered systems. The National Electric Code addresses some PV safety concerns, but fire and firefighter safety standards still need development, so consult with base safety personnel before and during the design phase. Improper water drainage can reduce roof longevity and may be remedied with a thorough review of the design by a roofing specialist, using a rigorous quality assurance/control plan, and

 

performing a BIPV roof assessment before the workmanship warranty expires. In the case of a retrofit, problems with the existing roof need to be remedied prior to BIPV roof installation. Mold growth can reduce roof reflectivity even if it does not reduce roof longevity so ensure that the manufacturer and installer warranties address this aspect. PV adhesives may still fail and improperly tested solutions may worsen the situation by making other remedies more difficult to implement. A comprehensive warranty may mitigate risk, but is ineffective if the warrantor goes out of business as was the case during this study. Third-party solutions may be available, but may void any remaining warranties. Various acquisition vehicles can mitigate the technical risks, but contracting complexity, costs, and risk must be balanced. The concerns with BIPV roofs can be mitigated, so DoD personnel in charge of rooftop solar projects need to determine whether or not the cost and benefits outweigh those of conventional rooftop PV systems. It is recommended that DoD personnel interested in BIPV roofs be aware of the issues, consult with a roofing specialist and obtain training and/or consultation from experienced personnel prior to the design and construction phases. Specific Applications It is recommended that DoD maintain a list of adhered PV systems and their basic PV and roof components and survey a sample set every few years to identify performance/durability trends. Contact: Mr. Peter Ly, EXWC PW61, [email protected], 805-982-1367

 

APPENDIX E TECHNOLOGY TRANSISTION CATEGORY 5

E-1

This page is intentionally left blank.

E-2

 

Engineering Expeditionary Warfare Center Port Hueneme, California 93043-4307

TechData Sheet

TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EX-1408

February 2013

Water Well Drilling Operations SME Support Technology Description The NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center (EXWC) is providing direct technical expertise to deployed Naval Construction Force water-well drill teams to support geotechnical and hydro-geological missions. EXWC, working with the water well drilling team from NMCB 3, provided a detailed technical report using geologic, hydrologic, vegetation, road, and topographic maps including the use of satellite images and other pertinent material to enable more informed in-country well-siting decisions to be made in areas that were difficult to obtain a clean potable water supply source. EXWC identified subsurface layers that contained contaminants as well as layers that were less advantageous for potable water extraction. As a result of EXWC’s report, water well drilling efforts were redirected from high risk areas to alternative site areas resulting in savings in operational risk, labor hours, equipment time, and cost drilling unproductive wells. EXWC is also working with US Navy Water Well Drilling personnel to identify alternative water well drilling training sites allowing drilling school exercises to realistically train in areas that mimic onsite conditions in deployed locations. Analysis for this effort is in the form of a desktop survey and boots-on-the-ground to accurately select a site that is suitable for all stakeholders. See EXWC’s Figure 1 for details of a typical water well design. Figure 1. Water well design (Saenz, 2014). Value to the Warfighter EXWC is assisting the Navy water well drill team to increase levels of drilling accuracy and expediency to enhance mission readiness while reducing operational risk and training time for rapid deep well drilling missions (Figure 2).

Figure 2. NMCB 4 water well drilling (US Navy Photo, 2011).

EXWC provided data also supports and facilitates other horizontal geotechnical construction tasks. Data provided enables the warfighter to better select construction sites for bridges, roads, and airfields and improves performance of these construction efforts. EXWC is also investigating providing, via NMCI approved technology, real time reach-back capability and communication with stateside expert personnel and resources such as the EXWC developed DoD Water Resource Database. The EXWC team proposes to provide real-time information and technical support to fill the capability gap in water well drilling missions resulting in a higher success rate of drilling productive wells, increased water productivity of the wells, decreased time spent in the field for surveying and drilling, reduced costs and reduced operational risk to both military and civilian personnel on the ground. Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  Technology Transition Documentation The water-well support provided falls within category 5 (Warfighter Support In-Theater) of the NAVFAC Technology Usability Model.

Specific Applications Specific applications in support of the warfighter during expeditionary water well drilling efforts will be to explore the use of NMCI and US Navy approved technologies in support of reach back capabilities. Followed by the improvement and population of the existing DoD Water Resource Database, geotechnical and hydro-geological information will be used to support the warfighter in different theaters of operations. The information in the form of satellite images, aerial photographs, geologic maps, hydrologic maps, topographic maps and other pertinent data will be used to accurately complete a site analysis (Figure 3). The computerized mapping capabilities will provide significant cost savings and minimize operational risk exposure to personnel on the ground.

All this up front analysis will be used to further recommend the use of alternative technologies such as the down-hole geophysical electric loggers that can provide a more accurate understanding of the formation penetrated by a well, the fluid in the well, and physical Figure 3. Geologic map of Cambodia characteristic of the borehole. The use of (US Geological Survey, 1977). alternative water drilling technologies can be expanded to the use of well drilling bits for both soft and hard rock, including the use of alternative water well development chemicals that are phosphate free detergents that do not promote bacterial growth which attacks and corrodes steel components down hole. Finally, to explore different water well casing blank and screen types that are lightweight, durable, less prone to damage, having a higher tensile strength, less resistant to corrosion or weathering, and can easily be assembled for rapid deployment to ensure the warfighter can continue to meet goals in extreme conditions.

Contact: Mr. Joseph M. Saenz, EXWC EX 320, [email protected], 805-982-1314.

 

Loading...

ar-navfac-exwc-ci-1401 january 2014 annual technology transition

ANNUAL REPORT AR-NAVFAC-EXWC-CI-1401 JANUARY 2014 ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSITION REPORT FISCAL YEARS 2012 AND 2013 Technology Governance Board Approve...

4MB Sizes 1 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

January 2014
... Reconnaissance. 09:15, Parallel Programming Concepts (WT 2013/14): Assignment Feedback 4. 11:00, Business Process Co

163 Annual Meeting January 26, 2014 Kempton Hall Immediately
Jan 26, 2014 - 22. ARTS (part of Parish Community Life). 23. Committee Reports. ANNUAL GIVING CAMPAIGN/STEWARDSHIP. 24.

NUSTNEWS January-2014
Jan 25, 2014 - coverage. Student Reporters: Taimoor Ahmad, Zainab Kainat, Muhammad Yahya. In the midst of fast-evolving

January | 2014 | Ahsan Wibowo
Jan 18, 2014 - 4 posts published by ahsanwibowo during January 2014.

FAIZAL'S THOUGHTS: January 2014
Jan 28, 2014 - PEGAWAI DAPUR RUMAH SAKIT. Profesi yang satu ini memang agak merepotkan gan. Selain butuh ilmu pengetahua

BrandArena: January 2014
Jan 30, 2014 - According to data compiled by Twitter and 87AM, the GRAMMY's garnered 15.7 million mentions on Twitter du

nur zaenudin: January 2014
Jan 13, 2014 - Kode yang saya buat masih tidak efisien, dan saya juga menemukan tutorial yang lebih efisien dengan mengg

Shalom : January 2014
Jan 19, 2014 - Apakah hubungan antara saiz dengan JLP/I? - Semakin besar saiz sesuatu objek, semakin kecil nisbah jumlah

January 2014 ~ HIKAM READER
Jan 31, 2014 - Karenanya, sanksi pemiskinan adalah yg paling proporsional sebagai penjeraan, pendidikan, dan bahkan sesu

January | 2014 | ischoolslasconia
Jan 23, 2014 - V. ASSIGNMENT Read the poem “ Little Sampaguita” Natividad Marquez: http://sja82.wordpress.com/sja-hi