advancing water - Garney Construction

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ADVANCING WATER

NEWSLETTER WINTER 2017

FEATURED PROJECT:

SOUTH POTOMAC SUPPLY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT by Clay Greene and Steve Ford LOCATION

OWNER

DESIGN ENGINEER

PROJECT DATES

PROJECT VALUE

TEMPLE HILLS, MARYLAND

WASHINGTON SUBURBAN SANITARY COMMISSION

BLACK & VEATCH

AUGUST 2015 - JANUARY 2017

$14.7 MILLION

INTRODUCTION Centered in Temple Hills, Prince George’s County, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC southeast of the downtown district, the South Potomac Supply Improvement Project (3215) is less than ten miles from the steps of our nation’s capital, located on the southern perimeter of Washington DC’s famed I-495 “beltway” where unpredictable traffic patterns can go from bad to worse at a moment’s notice. However, Garney is no stranger to the challenges of doing business in the bustling environment of the DC Metro area. In the late 1980s, under the leadership of Steve Ford, Greg Harris, and others, Garney developed a successful operation in the region, building several projects for the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC). WSSC is a unique owner in that it is one of the largest water and wastewater utility providers in the nation, maintaining 5,600 miles of potable water and 5,400 miles of sewer pipelines, which services over 1.8 million customers across 1,000 square miles of Maryland’s Prince George’s and Montgomery counties. As the South Potomac Supply Improvement Project is Garney’s first project for WSSC since the early 1990s, there was a steep

learning curve for the Garney project team given the nature of working for the large municipality. Specific challenges included learning to navigate SLMBE requirements, long submittal and RFI review periods, and strict inspection and procedural requirements. With a great deal of persistence, organization, and teamwork, the project team has learned to efficiently navigate WSSC’s demands and has built a healthy working relationship with the Commission, establishing a great deal of mutual trust along the way.

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FEATURE ARTICLE

PROJECT BACKGROUND The demand for the South Potomac Supply Improvement Project is rooted in WSSC’s ongoing, system-wide problem with its aging and failing infrastructure, specifically with a pipe product known as Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP). PCCP is a composite pipe product consisting of a concrete core, thin steel interior cylinder, high tensile prestressing wires wrapped longitudinally, and a mortar coating. This pipe product has earned a reputation in some areas of the country for failing well before its designed lifetime. This is a problem that plagues WSSC’s entire system and has caused a great deal of media attention and public concern as WSSC has the second most PCCP of any municipality in the United States. In an effort to combat the failing infrastructure, WSSC has placed a high priority on replacing sections of existing PCCP with ductile iron or steel pipe. In reference to the South Potomac Supply Improvement Project, Hala Flores of WSSC Engineering states, “…this main is a critical WSSC water supply line impacting approximately 180,000 customers in Southern Prince George’s County. The main serves as a primary feed to the National Harbor development. Currently, the main is not active due to extensive structural failure. The existing water supply and fire flow is not being met and future planned development in the entire Southern Prince George’s County region are halted until this transmission main is active. In addition, the WSSC PCCP inspection and repair program in Southern Prince George’s County highly depends on the functionality of this main.”

SCOPE OF WORK This project included the construction of approximately 10,000 LF of 42” CL-56 ductile iron pipe (DIP) with PRITEC® coating installed along Henson Creek, portions of which disturbed and disrupted an existing hike and bike trail through a park area. The removal and disposal of approximately 5,000 LF of the existing 42” PCCP water main pipe was called for, and there were four 60” jack and bore crossings totaling 725 LF. Also included was the installation of 10 precast concrete entry port / air release vaults, the demolition of an existing flow control vault and construction of a new cast-in-place flow control vault structure featuring remote flow adjustment using SCADA technology. The project required the implementation of wetland protection matting and other environmental controls in designated non-tidal wetland areas, dictated by permits issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). The project also included the installation of an extensive cathodic protection system, featuring an impressed current rectifier system, bonded and tape wrapped joints, and two deep well anode systems. Connections to WSSC’s existing system were required at each end of the water transmission main. PIPELINE MATERIALS The pipe material specifications for this project were unique, given the nearly one-inch thick CL-56 DIP and 50-mil PRITEC® coating. PRITEC® is a two layer anti-corrosion coating designed to protect pipes used in oil and gas and water and wastewater pipelines. PRITEC®’s side extrusion application method is ideal for coating small and large diameter pipes ranging from 4” (100 mm) to 145” (3680 mm) in diameter. This coating combines the proven protective qualities of a polyethylene outer coating with a special butyl rubber adhesive. The pipe was manufactured in Birmingham, Alabama, by American Cast Iron Pipe Company (ACIPCO) and then shipped

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FEATURE ARTICLE

to Pennsylvania for coating prior to being shipped to the job site. Since this was the project team’s first exposure to this coating, the team made a site visit to a local contractor installing DIP with the PRITEC® coating in an effort to better understand and predict any challenges in working with the coating, specifically in regard to handling, repairs, cutting / removal, and impact on push-on and mechanical joint assembly. This site visit proved to be valuable as the project team had insight into the field cut process for mechanical joints, which required a portion of the coating be removed for the installation of all mechanical joint connections. Specifically, the wedge action restraining glands at fittings are not designed to grip into the PRITEC® coating, therefore removal of the coating was required at each mechanical joint connection, drastically increasing the duration of each mechanical joint assembly. In addition to the PRITEC® coating, all fittings and appurtenances were required to have a factory applied fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) coating. The Garney team opted to use a #57 gradation bank run gravel (instead of crushed limestone) for pipe bedding and envelope, which was economical as well as offering the additional benefit of “blending in” much better with the excavated trench backfill material. This provided a much easier cleanup process along the environmentally sensitive right-of-way paralleling Henson Creek and through Henson Creek Park. A rock box, or “stone miser,” was used to better control stone usage. To complete the conservative, corrosion resistant pipe system, WSSC specified an extensive cathodic protection system that required all push-on, mechanical, and flange joints to have a three-part tape wrap system consisting of a primer, filler mastic,

and outer tape. To prevent isolated corrosion, the specifications also called for double joint bonding to ensure the entire pipeline functioned as an electrically conductive unit. Additionally, the cathodic protection system utilized a series of sacrificial anode beds designed to corrode at anticipated rates that are driven by an impressed current rectifier system that imparts an electrical current through the entire pipeline, grounded by deep anode wells drilled to approximately 150-ft deep. All five of the pipeline’s connections to existing infrastructure are electrically insulated using insulating flange connections. The South Potomac Supply project included the installation of ten precast concrete entry port and air release vaults, having a 10’x10’ footprint and 12’ inside height with the base sections weighing approximately 40,000 lbs. The project team performed a detailed vault engineering analysis, sizing all penetrations to accommodate the outside diameter of a DIP bell, providing push-on connections and eliminating the need for mechanical joint sleeves that would increase the installation time due to pipe bonding and joint wrapping requirements. Due to limited access to the project’s right-of-way, the project team prepared a detailed lifting and rigging plan that accounted for machine capacity, rigging design, and pick-point lay-out cast into the structures such that they could be lifted and placed using Garney excavators, eliminating the need for a crane at the final vault location. The John Deere 470G hydraulic excavator proved capable of lifting and setting the 40,000 lb. vault base sections. Cranes were required, however, to off-load the structures due to the pick height off the flat-bed trucks. The project team collaborated with a local shoring company to develop a plan for shoring the project’s 10 entry port / ARV vaults and nine blow-off assemblies. This plan consisted of using two 8’x16’ stacked boxes with spreaders sized for both the EP / ARV vaults and BO assemblies.

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FEATURE ARTICLE

The project also called for 19 cast-in-place concrete thrust collars at major alignment changes with average dimensions of 2’-9” thick x 12’ tall x 18’ wide with steel reinforcement mats of #8 and #9 rebar. Garney hired a local rod-buster to preassemble the reinforcement mats, and had a local steel fabricator produce plates with “half-moon” cut outs for reusable form work so that the thrust collars could be constructed quickly without placing any personnel in the trench.

CONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES The construction procedures for this project were developed under the leadership of Senior Superintendent Mike Hall whose extensive experience with large diameter pipe proved to be invaluable to the project. Given the fact Garney left some money on the table on bid day, a strong emphasis was placed on the value engineering effort, which was fortified by thorough and exhaustive brainstorming, strategic planning, collaboration, and pre-job planning. Mike Hall utilized a John Deere 470G (operated by Greg Pilgrim) as the mainline excavator, supported by a Caterpillar 336E backfill excavator (operated by Ezequiel Penaloza) and John Deere 624k rubber tire loader (operated by Ray Shaw) outfitted with off-road “logger” tires for the often soupy right-of-way. Given the relatively low elevation of the project, ground water with flowing bank-run soils proved to be a recurring challenge. However, Mike Hall’s strategic use of a series of 4” dri-prime pumps with sacrificial 4” PVC suction pipe below the pipe adequately controlled the consistent flow of ground water. To combat the flowing soils and compensate for additional joint assembly time, the project team also collaborated with the local shoring vendor to modify Garney’s trench boxes to horizontally connect a 10’x28’ trench box to a 10’x20’ trench box via welded on pins, which extended the length of shoring and allowed the Pipelayer and Laborer to perform the joint wrapping and pipe bonding while the lead excavator continued with production. 4

The South Potomac Supply project included the demolition of an existing concrete flow control valve vault, followed by the construction of a new cast-in-place flow control valve vault at the same location. The excavation for the new flow control vault structure was shored using a four-sided slide-rail system with dimensions of 32’ long x 27’ wide x 12’ high. Garney’s cast-inplace concrete subcontractor, Eureka Concrete Construction, formed and poured the new flow control vault structure within the slide-rail system ahead of schedule, and Garney self-performed the installation of the flow control valves and appurtenances. VALUE ENGINEERING Under the leadership of Steve Ford, the project team performed a detailed value engineering analysis of the project prior to construction. The first value engineering proposal consisted of modifying the pipeline alignment to reduce the number of mechanical joint fittings. An exhaustive effort was put in to developing the pipe lay schedule for the project. With the assistance and engineering analysis from ACIPCO, Garney provided a revised alignment to WSSC that utilized pushon joint deflection (in several instances by means of extradeflection bells) to achieve the necessary alignment changes along the right-of-way. WSSC accepted Garney’s proposed

FEATURE ARTICLE

variations with no change in contract value, which improved the design and reduced the total number of mechanical joint fittings and associated thrust collars. Within the Henson Creek Park, the original design of the project called for the new 42” DIP watermain to come within 9’ horizontally from an existing 69kV high tension overhead electric line and pole, which required an extensive shoring system consisting of H-piles and lagging where the pipeline was within the zone of influence of the power pole. The project team met with Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), the electric utility, and conveyed a safety concern for driving H-piles in close proximity to the overhead power lines. With the support of PEPCO and WSSC, Garney proceeded with modifying the alignment of the 42” watermain using joint deflection to avoid the overhead power lines and pole, thereby eliminating the safety concerns and improving the efficiency of pipe installation.

floods easily and, therefore, developed an emergency action plan to deal with flooding. Part of this plan required the monitoring of precipitation forecasts to predict flooding and prevent damage. With large rainfall events, the creek often over-topped the banks of the creek and flowed freely down the right of way, causing damage to Garney’s erosion and sediment control devices and environmental controls. With the project in low lying areas, a significant portion of the alignment passed through U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ designated non-tidal wetlands, requiring special considerations for equipment access, excavations, and documentation. The non-tidal wetland permit required weekly erosion and sediment control inspections and rainfall monitoring, and required the use of 340 three-ply fabricated hardwood mats for wetland protection related to building access roads for construction equipment. Spoils from excavations within wetland areas were stockpiled separately to maintain the wetland seed bank and local ecology. Implementation of environmental best management practices was a high priority for the project team, and Clay Greene did an exceptional job working closely with WSSC and MDE. During the construction of the 274 LF of 60” jack and bore below Henson Creek, Garney’s jack and bore subcontractor encountered a hard layer of what turned out to be an ancient

The South Potomac Supply project specified four trenchless crossings via 60” jack and bore method with a combined length of 725 LF below two Prince George’s county roadways and two creeks. With WSSC’s approval, Garney decreased the depth of each jack and bore by an average of 5’, decreasing the bore pit excavation and shoring requirements. The project team collaborated with Colorado Shoring Systems and GME to design a set of bore pit boxes to meet the shoring requirements for the bore pits and meet the needs of Garney’s tunneling subcontractor, Snyder Environmental Services. PROJECT CHALLENGES With the 42” DIP alignment paralleling Henson Creek, the majority of the project is below the 100-year floodplain elevation. The project team was aware that Henson Creek 5

FEATURE ARTICLE

ocean floor oyster bed. When traditional auger bore proved futile to get through this hard layer, our subcontractor implemented pipe ramming. This alternative method was only marginally successful and the resulting vibration from the pipe ramming operation ultimately led to the collapse of Henson Creek, resulting in the flooding of the tunnel and tunnel shaft. Garney immediately notified the appropriate parties and stabilized the situation by damming the creek and installing by-pass pumping. With expeditious approval from the jurisdictional environmental regulatory agencies, Garney installed the remaining portion (60 LF) of the trenchless crossing by open cut across Henson Creek in an emergency situation. One 12” and two 6” Godwin Dri-Prime pumps were needed to bypass Henson Creek during the installation of the remaining 60 LF of 60” steel casing pipe, and the work was completed over the weekend. Prior to the construction of the 180 LF of 60” jack and bore below Brinkley Road, the utility marking service identified a federal government fiber optic communication line at the site of the trenchless crossing. After multiple attempts, the utility could not be located. After establishing the fiber optic line was not in the path of the jack and bore, Garney directed the jack and bore subcontractor to proceed with the tunnel. However, after installing 40 LF of 60” casing, Garney’s subcontractor encountered the abandoned 42” PCCP water main in direct conflict. Limited by the existing fiber optic utility and right-ofway constraints, Garney was forced to abandon the trenchless

crossing and install the 42” DIP water main across Brinkley Road by open-cut excavation. Over the course of six months, the project team went through multiple iterations of plan preparation, review, and comments with Prince George’s County before the open cut plan was ultimately approved. Garney implemented a substantial temporary traffic control plan and executed the open cut crossing as planned in two days.

PROJECT TEAM PROFIT CENTER OFFICER

STEVE FORD

INTERNS

KENDALL DEVRIES ETHAN LOUIS

PROJECT MANAGER

STEVE FORD

ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGER

C. CLAY GREENE

SUPERINTENDENT

MIKE HALL

FIELD ENGINEER

DEVON EBERTH

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CREW

EZEQUIEL PENALOZA GREG PILGRIM RAY SHAW HECTOR REYES ZACH GALLAHAN TOMAS LOPEZ

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Project Nos. 0520 & 2238

Project

ESTIMATORS: Mike Parrish, Mark Kelly, Dan Smolik,

Charles Parker, Ilana Mann, Kevin Nehila, Dean Odom, Brendon Smith PROJECT COST: $26,164,000

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE Project No. 0521

OWNER: Tennessee Department of Environment &

Conservation

PROJECT NAME: Emergency Water System Job at Fall

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CHERRY POINT, NORTH CAROLINA Project No. 0525

OWNER: Naval Facilities Engineering Command PROJECT NAME: Cherry Point Water Treatment Plant ESTIMATORS: Eric Wagner, Mike Parrish, Cameron Henry,

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HAYWARD, CALIFORNIA Project No. 1129

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KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA Project No. 2237

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Project No. 2241

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PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Project No. 2242

OWNER: Bay County Wastewater Systems PROJECT NAME: 48-Inch Gate Valve Cut-In ESTIMATORS: Eric Malvin PROJECT COST: $512,000

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DENVER, COLORADO Project No. 6271

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Repair Clifton Avenue ESTIMATORS: Jeff Seal PROJECT COST: $78,386

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE Project No. 3248

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Main

ESTIMATORS: Jeff Seal, Steve Ford, Katie McKenzie, Gary

Goff, Marissa Vona, Kevin Griffin, Trent Roszell, Jordan Inman, Matt Burton PROJECT COST: $32,871,695

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MESA, ARIZONA Project No. 6273

OWNER: City of Mesa, AZ PROJECT NAME: Brown Road Water Treatment Plant

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OWNER: Metro Water Services PROJECT NAME: 28th Avenue North and Clifton Avenue

WYLIE, TEXAS

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

Emergency Repair ESTIMATORS: Jeff Seal PROJECT COST: $45,150

LAWRENCE, KANSAS Project No. 5227

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ROSSER, TEXAS Project No. 5228

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OWNER: Toho Water Authority PROJECT NAME: San Lorenzo Road and Valnera Court

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Project No. 7242

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SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Project Nos. 9209 & 5224

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Build)

ESTIMATORS: Scott Parrish, Eric Coe, Dave Farkas, Marcus

Grace, Scott Setter.

ESTIMATED CONSTRUCTION COST: $540,000,000

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ESTIMATORS: Dan East, Phil Naylor, Sarah Ferry PROJECT COST: $1,112,050

ORLANDO, FLORIDA

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

OWNER: City of Orlando, FL PROJECT NAME: West Central Boulevard Phase 2 - OUC

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Duct Bank (Design-Build) ESTIMATORS: Dan Smolik PROJECT COST: $2,732,865

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PROJECT NAME: DI-2 Deep Well Injection Pump Station

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NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

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Authority TOC and DBP Interim Compliance Project ESTIMATORS: Dan Eckdahl DESIGN PHASE SERVICES COST: $199,000

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JOB SHOTS WESTAR ENERGY SCRUBBER SUPPLY PUMP STATION

WAKARUSA WWTP AND CONVEYANCE CORRIDOR

LAWRENCE, KANSAS

LAWRENCE, KANSAS

WESTAR ENERGY

CITY OF LAWRENCE, KS

JOB 5225: $0.6 MILLION

JOB 5211: $45.2 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

Paul Bailey

Tim Diamond

Kelly Coffelt

Mike Thies Dale Brecheisen

PROJECT MANAGERS

Bart Slaymaker Luke Messer Brian Schultz

SUPERINTENDENTS

Pete Godin Tim Holliday Terry Dix Sean Bryson Art Turner Cole Rawson Bryan Clark

PROJECT ENGINEER

Tim Hockett

FIELD ENGINEERS

Cody Croucher Kirk Resseguie

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Sonya Puskas CREW

Chris Campbell, Lane Carpenter, Richard Cleveland, Casey Clines, Ben Dinwiddie, Brandon Dix, Chris Dix, Derek Dix, Joe Dix, Josh Dunn, Diego Duran, Alfredo Flores, James Gerdes, Andrew Godin, Luke Harden, Frank Lara, Joe Marchand, Terry Miller, James Moore, Kerry Putthoff, Miguel Ramirez, Octavio Ramirez, Michael Roberts, Justin Shields, Chance Sinclair, Anthony Sisneros, Mathew Wiles, Freedom Baldwin, Manuel Mota, Antonio Ramirez

Finishing touches at the addition to the scrubber pump station.

ABOVE: Administration building ready for roof and veneer. LEFT: BNR walls completed. Elevated deck and walkway installation ongoing.

24” equalization line and slide gate vault between lagoons.

LEFT: Headworks walls and channel construction. RIGHT: Backfill, yard pipe installation, and operating deck forming at PS-10 site.

Submitted by Tim Diamond

Submitted by Bart Slaymaker

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JOB SHOTS

GREEN MEADOWS WATER TREATMENT PLANT EXPANSION

MAIN STEM PS & PL - DIVERSION WEIR BOX

FORT MYERS, FLORIDA

SEAGOVILLE, TEXAS

LEE COUNTY UTILITIES

NORTH TEXAS MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT

JOB 0466: $70.0 MILLION

JOB 5220: $0.6 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGERS

Josh Petro Rex Hiatt

SUPERINTENDENTS

John Kenny George Burns Gary Juarez Jorge Perez

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Matt McCreary Kristyan Rodriguez

FIELD ENGINEER

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

QUALITY CONTROL MANAGER

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

CO-OPS

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Bryce Boucher

Ritchie Singletary Brad Owens Juan Villafuerte

Mark Miner Joe Godin

Kyle Puskas Anthony John

Kelly Coffelt

Alfonso Grifaldo, Juan Grifaldo, Charles Schmid, Victor Lopez, Sid Schultz

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Rocio Torres Maria Soucy CREW

Dave Thomas

Rear view of the operation building and the RO building.

LEFT: Weir box wall forms in place. RIGHT: Weir box wall placement in progress.

Installation of prefabricated well house with the use of a crane.

An aerial photo of the Green Meadows project taken in November.

Submitted by Kristyan Rodriguez

LEFT: Concrete stairway placement in progress. RIGHT: Completed and backfilled structure.

Submitted by Mark Miner 9

JOB SHOTS

WATER PROTECTION FACILITY AMMONIA REMOVAL IMPROVEMENTS AND BIOSOLIDS DRYER ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI

JOB 4440: $51.3 MILLION Joey Perell Steve Harris

SUPERINTENDENT

Chad Markley

CARTERSVILLE, GEORGIA PAULDING COUNTY

JOB 2211: $11.1 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

Billy Page

CITY OF ST. JOSEPH, MO

PROJECT MANAGERS

RCR RAW WATERLINE D/B

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Charles Woody

PROJECT ENGINEER

Nathan Hancock

Sonya Puskas

Jere Wujcik

Caleb Graham, Matt Mertz, Casey Bradford, Tommie Creasy, David Garmon, Cody Womack, Mike Seal, Jesse Wigley, Jimmy Atkins

CREW

Alex Duran, Marlon Borrayo, Javier Escamilla, Guillermo “Paco” Mojica

PROJECT 4440 REACHED SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION ON DECEMBER 23, 2016. PUNCHLIST CREW LISTED ONLY. THANKS TO ALL EMPLOYEE-OWNERS WHO CONTRIBUTED TO THE SUCCESS OF THIS PROJECT!

Winter Wonderland on Series 52 - industrial aeration basin.

TOP LEFT: Dryer building - start-up of dryer equipment completed. BOTTOM LEFT: Dryer building - overview of Andritz dryer equipment. This equipment will dry 20,000 pounds of sludge per day and produce a fertilizer. ABOVE: RAS pump station - retro-fit of existing structure to new pumps and process piping.

Submitted by Steve Harris 10

LEFT: Crew laying 48” steel through one of the tougher sections of the project. RIGHT: View of the pipe laying operation.

LEFT: Matt Mertz and Mike Seal installing a 48” steel o-ring joint. RIGHT: Crew getting ROW accessible after snow hits Georgia!

Submitted by Billy Page

JOB SHOTS

SECTION 14-1 OF THE INTEGRATED PIPELINE PROJECT

TINKER AIR FORCE BASE, KC-46A INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT

WAXAHACHIE, TEXAS

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA

TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, CONTRACT ADMINISTERED BY THE ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS

JOB 9208: $48.1 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

Rob Fults

SUPERINTENDENTS

Chris Roberts Chris Heffern Blake Rabel Roger Dell Wes Woods Bryan Muench

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Ryan Moloney Zach Steinbach

CREW

Bryan Roberts, Chester Rigsby, Elwin Claros, Chris Grana, Larry Pacheco, Bobby Ledbetter, Terry West, Billy Grant, Jose Rojas, Richard Richards, James Townsend, Chris Landry, Scott Sanders, Bryce Latson, Zach “Sabin” Elder, Eduardo Vasquez, Blaine Eldreth Jr. , Michael Caudill, Chris Rogers, Gregorio Pereida, Jaime Perez Jimenez, Fermin Lopez, Troy Patterson, Ricardo Perez Jimenez, Stuart Martin, Justin Kirk, Blake McIntire David Garcia, Dustin Pacheco, Jose Alonzo, Anthony Christensen, Kaleb Wilks

108” pipe installation aerial view - west heading.

108” pipe installation aerial view - east heading.

Submitted by IPL Team

JOB 1496: $36.2 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

QUALITY CONTROL MANAGER

SUPERINTENDENTS

SITE SAFETY HEALTH OFFICER

Shoja Rezvani

H.T. Johnson Thomas Oakerson Justin Kurdupski Jeff Riddle

PROJECT ENGINEER

Dan Holms

Leonard Rabago

PROJECT COORDINATORS

Kelly Johnson Beth Melchior

David Lewis

FIELD ENGINEERS

Josh Brown Jarred Britton Andrew Schreiner Joey Bingham

LEFT: On the Military Base, the Star Spangled Banner plays over loudspeakers all across the base. Our employee-owners find a flag and pause. RIGHT: Western region crew from Denver placing concrete for Conspan Bridge footings.

LEFT: The “snow crew” setting shallow storm drain inlets in hanger pad. RIGHT: Encasing 6” electrical and communication conduits for new KC-46a airplane hanger.

Submitted by David Lewis 11

JOB SHOTS

MARKS STREET UTILITY IMPROVEMENTS ORLANDO, FLORIDA CITY OF ORLANDO, FL

EASTERN PARKWAY 48” TRANSMISSION MAIN REHABILITATION LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY LOUISVILLE WATER COMPANY

JOB 2222: $4.4 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

JOB 3241: $6.8 MILLION

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

PROJECT MANAGERS

Will Poczekaj

Humberto Del Cid PROJECT ENGINEER

Ben Snider

Jere Wujcik

Pedro Landau Hall, Jesus Ledesma, Heinrich Walker, Maxruris Gonzalez Hall, Fred Keith, Uris Gonzalez, Eddie Holding

Ben Janson Jordan Carrier

SUPERINTENDENTS

Chad Englebright Austin Rexroat

CREW

Darryl Countiss, Landon McMillian, Boyd Knaack, Justin Ledford, Steven Spurlin, Derrick Smith, Chris West, Matt Stucker, Joshua Wells, John McGuffey, Joshua Keaton

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Saige Redd

The Marks Street crew and the local Orlando Heavy Rescue squad practice and freshen up on their trench rescue skills.

Staged 42” spiral welded pipe and installing casing spacers for a 1,100’ push through existing 48” pipe.

ABOVE LEFT: Setting a 20’ stick of 42” welded pipe with casing spacers installed into a trench to be “slip lined” / pushed through an existing 48” pipe. ABOVE RIGHT: Installing a butt strap to join a 25’ section of slip lined pipe and a 32’ section poly coated section of open cut pipe in one of the pushing trenches. LEFT: Installing a 42” flex ring gate valve with steel adapter pieces to connect to bell and spigot spiral welded pipe.

ABOVE LEFT: Installing a layer of crushed concrete road base around utilities. ABOVE RIGHT: Crews have to demo and rebuild full width roadway after open cut installation. LEFT: Marks Street crew using the new wire line saw on an old 16” line.

Submitted by Ben Snider 12

Submitted by Ben Janson

JOB SHOTS

WWTP IMPROVEMENTS PH CONTROL PROJECT GRAND ISLAND, NEBRASKA MCCAIN FOODS

BELLEVUE, NEBRASKA

JOB 5226: $0.5 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

Gary Bittner

FIELD ENGINEER

Darous Allton

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Kelly Coffelt

PLATTE SOUTH WATER PRODUCTION FACILITY - VALVE REPLACEMENT PROJECT

FOREMEN

Casey Sikes Alan Bolich CREW

Gerber Perez Jason Watts

METROPOLITAN UTILITIES DISTRICT

JOB 5221: $0.2 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

FIELD ENGINEER

CREW

Gary Bittner

Darous Allton

Kelly Coffelt

Braden Sikes Stephen Maddox

This picture shows the exterior connection piping to the above ground storage tank. The 6” pipe on the ladder racks (on the left) circulate water through the mixing pump to integrate pH adjustment chemicals. The larger pipes from the tank and into the building, take the effluent from storage to the final mixing tank inside.

ABOVE LEFT: Employee-owner Braden Sikes is lowering a 54” butterfly valve from the process pipe, with Field Engineer Darous Allton monitoring the work in progress. ABOVE RIGHT: Braden Sikes is completing the removal of a 54” butterfly valve from the process pipe. LEFT: This picture shows two sections of pipe that were removed in the plant for preparation for cleaning. In the foreground a section of 48” steel pipe “dogleg,” and in the background a section of 36” steel pipe with an elbow, were removed for pipe cleaning operations.

ABOVE: This picture shows the jet mixing pump and the pipe to the exterior storage tank in the foreground. In the background, the “fine adjustment” FRP mixing tank is shown where final pH adjustment is made before being discharged to the City of Grand Island sanitary sewer system. RIGHT: This picture shows the jet mixing pump (right) and the wastewater influent connection to the final mixing tank (left)

Submitted by Gary Bittner

Submitted by Gary Bittner 13

JOB SHOTS

DSP SOUTHEAST TANK AND PUMP STATION SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS SAN ANTONIO WATER SYSTEM

JOB 5218: $10.7 MILLION

V.C. SUMMER UNITS 2 & 3 RWS INTAKE AND WWS DISCHARGE STRUCTURES JENKINSVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA SOUTH CAROLINA ELECTRICAL AND GAS

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

JOB 0459: $15.0 MILLION

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

PROJECT MANAGER

SAFETY PROFESSIONAL

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

Justin Wilson

T.J. McKinney

PROJECT ENGINEER

Ryan Kendrick

Laurie Grace

Ruben Munoz, Lino Banuelos, Lionel Banuelos, Jose Banuelos, Robert Murphy, Steven Keyser, Serafin Villanueva, Inocente Ramirez, Weston Wolfe

Josh Flammer

Wayne Cooksey

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Matt Dauk Brandon Gerardy Cameron McGaw David McCullough

John O’Connor

Benjamin Santoyo, Alejo Ramirez, Jose Rivera, Thaleese Shivers, Landy Bell, Gumaro Soto, Arturo Sierra, Daniel Ramirez, Stanley Bell, Hal Warmbrod

LEFT: RWS intake waterside wall lift 4 formwork installation. RIGHT: Removal of cofferdam concrete waler ring sections during backfill. LEFT: DN tank- installing precast sections on the tank roof. The tank is 3.5 million gallons. TOP RIGHT: Final bentonite water proofing installed on electrical building walls. Garney EOs are getting the block outs ready for backfill. BOTTOM RIGHT: Garney EOs performing the deck pour for the electrical building.

DN tank - starting the tank foundation pour.

Submitted by T.J. McKinney 14

LEFT: RWS phase 1 cofferdam sheet pile removal. RIGHT: WWS casing pipe bent support structure.

Submitted by Brandon Gerardy

JOB SHOTS

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT CAPACITY EXPANSION CASTROVILLE, TEXAS

BRICK CHURCH PIKE PIPE IMPROVEMENTS NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

CITY OF CASTROVILLE

METRO WATER SERVICES

JOB 5219: $9.1 MILLION

JOB 3239: $5.4 MILLION

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

FIELD ENGINEER

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT ENGINEER

PROJECT MANAGERS

PROJECT COORDINATOR

PROJECT MANAGER

CREW

CREW

SUPERINTENDENT

Marcus Grace

Justin Wilson Wade Pierpoint

SUPERINTENDENT

Joe Ross

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Weston Wolfe Ryan Reibenstein Emanuel Hernandez

Sean Mann

Laurie Grace

Fernando Salinas, Roberto Garza, Pepe Villegas, Robert Murphy, Jody Bermudez, Steven Kaiser, Jeffrey Perales

Jeff Seal

Trent Roszell Derik Smith

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT

Gary Minnich

Jordan Inman

Brad Akins, Kenneth Wilson, Raul Saldana, Rudy Rangel, David Santi, Jason Taylor, Jerry Shearron, Phillip Payne, Teo Binuelo, Ron Johnson, Ascension Mendoza

Existing site before construction.

LEFT: Installation of 27” PVC pipeline. RIGHT: Sun setting on a busy day of pipe laying operations.

BNR basin subgrade slab preparation.

Pipeline operation sets manhole on upstream side of creek bore.

Existing carousel basin demolition.

Submitted by Justin Wilson

Boring subcontractor drills pilot hole with laser guided axis boring system.

Submitted by Jordan Inman 15

JOB SHOTS

WATER DISTRIBUTION AND DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS FOR JEFFERSON STREET NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

EVANS WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT EVANS, COLORADO CITY OF EVANS, CO

METRO WATER SERVICES

JOB 6261: $37.0 MILLION

JOB 3231: $4.9 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT MANAGER

Trent Roszell

SUPERINTENDENT

Matt Burton

PROJECT ENGINEER

Gary Minnich

CREW

Jerry Shearron, Phillip Payne, Ron Johnson, Teofilo Binuelo, Rudy Rangel, Ascension Mendoza, Rogelio Real, Dustin Rush, James Babb, Gary Dumont, Robert Caldwell, Brett Keener

Keith Hinds

Stephen Hagy

Abel Alvarez Susan Hagen Kaleb Schwab Daniel Gibbons

SUPERINTENDENTS

FIELD ENGINEERS

ASST. PROJECT MANAGER

Wes Conaway Chance Galentin Eric Griffin Lance Bunyan Juan Campbell Jose Alvarez Mike Skadburg

Installation of Oldcastle’s Modular Precast Storm Capture System.

Three clarifiers.

The installation took four days, setting and coordinating 83 loads of precast structures.

Panoramic of the project site.

LEFT: The system consisted of 166 precast modules totalling 55,336 CF of storm storage. RIGHT: After final restoration and backfill, the end product is an inconspicuous dirt lot. Aeration basins.

Submitted by Trent Roszell 16

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Submitted by Tommy Barth

Tommy Barth Austin Herren Jesus Castro CREW

Raul Ballesteros crew, Tobias Felix crew, Paco Guevara crew, Manuel Bencomo crew, Jose Alvarez crew, Jose Canales crew, Manuel Aguilar crew, Mike Skadberg crew

JOB SHOTS

FORT COLLINS WATER TREATMENT FACILITY CHLORINE CONTACT BASIN YARD PIPING FORT COLLINS, COLORADO CITY OF FORT COLLINS UTILITIES

JOB 6242: $1.0 MILLION

24-INCH GRAVITY SEWER MAIN EMERGENCY REPAIR AT OSCEOLA PARKWAY AND JOHN YOUNG PARKWAY KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA TOHO WATER AUTHORITY

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

JOB 2237: $0.4 MILLION

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

Jeff Moore

Rich Trimble

PROJECT ENGINEER

Zacary Fry

Heidi Haberkorn

Mario Armendariz, Hayden Trimble, Conor Osgood, Turner Steinke, Daniel Lubbers II, Marty Martinez

Dan Smolik

Steve Mertz

PROJECT ENGINEER

Jere Wujcik

Tim Burrage, Ricky Lopez, Stevie Mertz, Curtis Jefferson

Ethan Tramp

The crew installed sheet piles within a guide frame shoring system to reach the necessary depth and make the repair.

72” influent and 54” effluent lines.

After ensuring everything was in alignment, the 24” DR18 pipe was repaired using 24” MJ sleeves and gland packs.

LEFT: The downstream joint of pipe at the location of the repair had sunk and was out of alignment. Vac trucks were brought in to perform hydro-static excavation around the pipe and downstream of our excavation in order to realign the pipe. ABOVE: Digging within our shoring in order to reach the repair depth, all while avoiding existing communications utilities.

42” and 36” tie-ins to finished water reservoir lines.

Submitted by Jeff Moore

Submitted by Ethan Tramp 17

JOB SHOTS

TRANSFER STATION NO. 3 UPGRADE

BELTLINE ROAD NORTHERN AREA SEWER EXTENSION PHASE 4: FM

MESA, ARIZONA

DECATUR, ALABAMA

CITY OF MESA, AZ

DECATUR UTILITIES

JOB 6258: $5.5 MILLION

JOB 3240: $3.8 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGERS

PROJECT ENGINEER

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT ENGINEER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Phil Naylor James Hensley

SUPERINTENDENT

Ubaldo Esparza

Carl Rodgers Dee Sander

Jeff Seal

Chris Coston

Devin Powell Saige Redd

SUPERINTENDENT

Steve Dunlap

The first section of the slide rail system being installed.

Pipe crew assembling 30-inch RJ DIP above ground prior to sinking it into place.

The finished slide rail system sized at 95’ long x 35’ wide x 32’ deep.

Backfilling the first marine crossing using a temporary 1,200 LF wooden mat road and a track dump to bring in stone.

The roughed in 30” suction supply lines for the vertical turbine pumps.

Worn out after a long day working in the muddy lake bottom.

Submitted by Carl Rodgers

Submitted by Chris Coston

18

JOB SHOTS

STONEY FILTER REHABILITATION PROJECT AT HANAHAN WTP

BEES FERRY ROAD WATER STORAGE TANK

HANAHAN, SOUTH CAROLINA

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

CHARLESTON WATER SYSTEM

CHARLESTON WATER SYSTEM

JOB 0470: $9.6 MILLION

JOB 0490: $10.2 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT ENGINEER

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT ENGINEER

ASST. PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

ASST. PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

SUPERINTENDENTS

CREW

Matt Reaves Nick Judd

Jay Matthews

Sean Hutchinson Margie Lewis

Dustin Matthews, Charles Lee, Mike Allen, Ernest Williams, William Wall, Johnie Osborne

Removal of influent / backwash trough.

Matt Reaves Nick Judd

Jay Leonard E.J. Jiles

Sean Hutchinson Margie Lewis

Phillip Mills, David Lowery, Darwin Smalls, Keith Smalls, Mike Street, Johnie Osborne, William Wall, Ernest Williams

LEFT: Crew photo. RIGHT: Flushing of pipeline.

Storage tank and pump station.

Removing anthracite and sand with a vacuum.

Completed filter.

Inside the new pump station.

Submitted by Matt Reaves

Submitted by Matt Reaves 19

JOB SHOTS

SOUTH KINGS TRANSMISSION MAIN

T.Z. OSBORNE WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY UPGRADE

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA

MCLEANSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA

FAIRFAX COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY

CITY OF GREENSBORO, NC

JOB 3238: $5.4 MILLION

JOB 0468 / 0472 / 0478: $52.0 MILLION

PROJECT MANAGER

Josh Klassen

SUPERINTENDENT

Les Carr

PROJECT ENGINEER

Syed Sarwar

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Teasha Bayles CREW

Oscar Pacas, Elder Abzun, Guillermo Marquina, Sean Klassen, Briam Giron, Jose Lopez

PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

ASST. PROJECT MANAGER

CREW

Don Trujillo Tim Rice

SUPERINTENDENTS

Dave Dwyer Ryan Roznowski Lee Curtis

PROJECT ENGINEERS

Warren Donnelly Philip Teten Sal Hernandez FIELD ENGINEER

Derek Caddis

Mary Parker

Jeff Smeak, Joe Bay, CJ Kingsbury, Jesus Hernandez, Edgar Lara, Gustavo Luevano, James Garret, Jose Ramirez, Oswaldo Diaz, Zeferino Vasquez, Epifanio Cruz, Barry Smith, Dewayne Lipscomb, Jonathon Lipscomb, Timothy Lipscomb, Richard Brooks, Max Navarro, Jesus Lara, Armando Cruz, Morris Dixon, David Slaughter Sr., David Slaughter Jr., Jonathan Macdonald, Tonya Dwyer, Khalir Johnson, Herbert Watlington, Brian Blanford

Les and his crew installing the new 24” DIP at South Kings Highway Transmission Main project in Alexandria, VA.

Three 3-million gallon secondary clarifiers.

LEFT: 3238 crew cutting 24’’ DIP in preparation for a 45 degree bend installation. RIGHT: New CAT 335FL delivered for South Kings Highway Transmission Main project.

LEFT: This is a portion of the large diameter (48, 30, and 24-inch) ductile iron pipe from the newly constructed equalization meter vault. RIGHT: We have to lay just shy of 1,000 feet of 60-inch PCB to tie the equalization meter vault to the aeration basin influent channel.

LEFT: Les’s crew setting the trench box at 3238. RIGHT: Superintendent Leslie Carr and his crew. From left to right: Sean Klassen (Laborer), Guillermo Marquina (Pipelayer), Elder Abzun (Operator), Oscar Pacas (in excavator, Lead Operator), Les Carr (Superintendent), Briam Giron (Laborer), Jose Lopez (Laborer).

LEFT: We have laid 600 feet of 60-inch PCCP tying the clarifiers to the effluent filters. RIGHT: We laid 120 feet of 78-inch PCCP in one day using a crane.

Submitted by Josh Klassen

Submitted by Derek Caddis

20

JOB SHOTS

CROWN NEIGHBORHOOD 3 60” AND 36” WATER MAIN REPLACEMENTS

HILLCREST RESERVOIRS

GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND

JOB 6255: $24.4 MILLION

VII CROWN FARM OWNER, LLC

JOB 3244: $2.7 MILLION PROJECT MANAGER

PROJECT COORDINATOR

SUPERINTENDENT

CREW

Loren White

Eldon Burns

PROJECT ENGINEER

Grant Tabor

Teasha Bayles

Brian Link, John Drummond, Tito Abzun, Manuel de Jesus Alvarez Gomez, Luis Faustino Bonilla Barrera, Wade Holmes

DENVER, COLORADO DENVER WATER

PROJECT MANAGERS

PROJECT ENGINEER

SUPERINTENDENTS

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Dan Eckdahl Mike Moore

Jose Castro Eric Griffin Steve Jordan Brad Juracek Juan Campbell

Neil Bonham Austin Dillow

Janel Tannatt

PROJECT SAFETY

Janet Marriage

With new buildings springing up all around, the developer of Crown Neighborhood in Gaithersburg had to replace existing WSSC 36” and 60” PCCP water mains crossing their property in order to be allowed to construct new infrastructure in close proximity.

First of three 15mg water storage tank slab on grade 1,460cy.

Submitted by Mike Moore

JOB WELL DONE

QUALITY CONTROL COUNCIL Cathodic protection, including joint bonding, is required on the 36” DIP; all joints are tape wrapped.

LEFT: A connection to the existing 36” PCCP is required at each end. RIGHT: Installing 36” PRITEC coated DIP; Brian Link operating Cat 336E excavator.

Scott Potter, Director of Metro Water Services (Nashville, TN), visited the job site and gave the Garney Team at Project 3203, WTP Disinfection System Improvements, congratulations on a job well done.

Submitted by Steve Ford 21

EMPLOYEE-OWNER SPOTLIGHT JUAN MUNOZ Juan Munoz started his journey as a Garney employee-owner in 2003 as a Pipelayer. Prior to this, Juan moved to the United States in 1998 from Mexico and worked for another pipeline construction company for two years before finding his Garney family. Juan is now working on Jerry Taylor’s crew on the Citrus County Combined Cycle project in Crystal River, Florida. Juan’s goal is to help maintain a safe working environment for himself and his fellow employee-owners each and every day. He also aspires to become a Foreman for Garney before he reaches his ultimate goal of retirement. Juan also has a family of his own including his wife, Irma, and two daughters, Cynthia and Mirna. When Juan has time off, he spends his time cooking and having picnics with his family. Juan’s supervisors describe him as a good, kind person that keeps a positive attitude towards work, even when projects get tough. His fellow employee-owners also agree that he is a great cook!

FIREFIGHTER TRAINING In December, Garney partnered with United Rentals and the Orlando Fire Department to conduct trench rescue training for local firefighters. Employee-owners from the Marks Street Utility Improvements (2222) project, along with Garney’s Eastern Regional Safety Manager, Ryan Smith, assisted with the training.

22

SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY Garney employee-owners working out of Bedford, Virginia, gathered donations and raised enough money to buy 56 bicycles for a local event benefiting children in the community. Garney employee-owner, Curtis Hefley, heard about the Christmas party that the nearby Smith Mountain Lake (SML) Moose Lodge was organizing to benefit less fortunate kids in the local community and encouraged employee-owners on the Bedford project to get involved. Curtis gathered donations from fellow employee-owners and utilized Garney’s charitable contribution match to raise money to buy 56 bicycles, which were donated to the SML Moose Lodge for their Christmas party. Every child that attended the Christmas party left with a new bike. “We made a lot of kids happy that otherwise weren’t going to have a very good Christmas,” said Curtis. Want to be featured in the newsletter? Share your community service story with [email protected]!

Employee-owners Steve Vasseur (back left) and Curtis Hefley (back right) with members of the SML Moose Lodge.

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE

MIKE SWIFT RETIRES

Employee-owners from the Winter Garden office made chili, cornbread, and chicken and dumplings for families staying at the Ronald McDonald House. They also delivered more than 100 snack packs, using the food collected in the Employee Ownership Month food drive.

In December 2016, Garney Superintendent Mike Swift retired. Mike was an employee-owner since 1991. We wish him all the best as he enters retirement!

Rob Fults, Mike Swift, and Steve McCandless pose for a photo at Mike’s retirement dinner.

23

SAFETY TRAINING Throughout 2016, Garney’s Safety Team embarked on various trips to Denver, Colorado, and Red Wing, Minnesota, to participate in training preparation for upcoming technical rescue safety training that Garney will be providing its employee-owners across the country. During the training session, Garney’s safety professionals performed challenging hands-on simulations for fall protection rescue and confined space rescue. Each member of the team had to practice rescuing a person suspended from a fall, and pulling “Resuce Randy” out a of a 60’ long pipe. The Safety Team looks forward to bringing these exercises to employee-owners in the field.

24

Employee-owners Ryan Smith (left) and Brandon Blevins (right) practice rescuing a person suspended from a fall.

PROJECT SPOTLIGHT FALL CREEK FALLS STATE PARK TEMPORARY WATER TREATMENT FACILITY Shout out to the following employee-owners who worked on the project:

Dwight Jones



Brandon Butler



Brett Ardizone



Bobby Adkins



Lorenzo Lopez



Lonnie Holder



Josh Wilson



Tony Smith



Bryan Olea-Aleman

In four days, this group completed piping, connections, floating intake, drainage ponds, disinfection, and had the water moving again. A big thanks to Erik Reynolds and other employee-owners that moved things around on their projects to make these guys available to work on Fall Creek Falls. Fall Creek Falls is a great example of Garney’s professionalism, ingenuity, and abilities.

IN MEMORY OF MATT FRENCH

IN MEMORY OF CHUCK SAPP

Matt French, 48, former Garney Superintendent, passed away on January 12, 2017 in Smithville, Missouri. Matt began his career with Garney in 1992 as a Project Administrator after completing his education with a Construction Management degree from Central Missouri State University. Matt’s career as a Project Administrator was short, as he realized his real passion and calling was to be in the field as a Superintendent. Matt worked the majority of his career in and around the Kansas City metro area, but never said no when asked to go to Texas, Nebraska, or wherever needed. Matt exceled when the project required unique and challenging action, and was not your everyday dig and lay operation. Outside of work, Matt was passionate about his children and restoring classic cars and trucks. He was always quick to express pride in his kids, and would visit at length about how they were doing at school or their activities. He was especially fond of the classic Pontiac muscle cars, and had impeccably restored a Trans Am that he drove while in high school. Our condolences go out to Matt’s family and friends.

Charles (Chuck) T. Sapp, 82, former Garney Superintendent, passed away on January 19, 2017. Chuck began his career with Garney in 1965, only 4 years after its founding, and dutifully served the company until his retirement in 1996, completing 31 years of service. Chuck was always willing to travel when the company made the decision to start working out of town due to the depressed market in the Kansas City area. Chuck was ready to go wherever the company needed him to go, and that’s what he and his wife, Nancy, did. From Missouri, Oklahoma, Colorado, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, and other states in between, Chuck never balked about going where he was needed. Chuck is a former recipient of Garney’s Spirit and Dedication (George Enright) Award. He was best known for his knowledge of PCCP pipe and, with some owners, when a critical tie-in or emergency repair was required, they would only hire Garney to perform the work so long as Chuck was assigned to the task. Chuck’s health had been failing in recent years and he passed peacefully at home sitting in his chair. Our condolences to the Sapp family. ON IT.

25

FAMILY CORNER

Judy Ann Pacheco was born on October 5, 2016 to Dustin and Bonnie Pacheco. Congratulations!

Michael and Christina Parrish welcomed their son, Owen William, on November 23, 2016. Owen was 8 lbs, 6 oz and 20 inches long.

Cash Baker was born on January 13, 2017 to Matthew and Christina Baker. Cash was welcomed to the family by older sisters Charlotte and Grace.

The Ford family at the Taylor Twins garden in Jackson, Missouri, over Thanksgiving. The garden was named in honor of Steve Ford’s mother and her twin sister. Included in the photo is Steve’s 95 year old father and all of his kids (including Steve) and grandkids.

TRAINING AT GARNEY LEFT: Employee-owners on the 6261 job site in Evans, Colorado, completed training for various topics, including skilsaw and hammer drill, for December’s Training Day(s). RIGHT: Superintendents and Field Engineers in the East participated in training on alternative saws for cutting pipe. 26

Congratulations to Whitney and Sam Briggs on the birth of their son, Nolan Thomas, who was born on December 19, 2016. Nolan weighed 5 lbs, 11 oz and was 18 inches long.

ESOP COMMITTEE UPDATE BACK TO THE BASICS Garney is a 100% employee owned company. One of the many benefits of being part of Garney’s employee ownership is participating in the retirement benefit – the ESOP. What is ESOP? ESOP is an acronym for Employee Stock Ownership Plan. The ESOP is a retirement plan that allows all Garney employee-owners to receive stock in Garney Holding Company. This stock is given to each employee-owner based on their earnings at the end of every plan (calendar) year. Employee-owners do not have to buy this stock; it is given to employee-owners as a benefit for being an owner of the company. A stock account is established for every employee-owner participating in the ESOP. As an employee-owner accrues stock each year, their account value grows. In addition, if the company continues to be successful, the stock price per share will also grow. This is how an employee-owner can build a secure retirement over the course of their career at Garney. Please remember, the ESOP is a retirement plan. It is not intended to be a “get rich quick” scheme. You have to be a participant in the ESOP for a period of time in order to see your account grow. If you work at Garney for a long time, you will have a secure retirement. Every employee-owner has to contribute to the success of the company in order to ensure this happens. Everything you do each day to make this company successful makes a difference. Living the Goals and Philosophies of the company – SAFETY, QUALITY, ALLOW ALL EMPLOYEE-OWNERS TO ACHIEVE THEIR FULL POTENTIAL, JOB SECURITY AND ESOP PERPETUATION, PROFITABILITY, SERVICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND THE COMMUNITY, INTEGRITY IS THE SHORTEST PATH TO SUCCESS, WIN / WIN, EXCELLENCE IS THE STANDARD, 100% EMPLOYEE OWNED – will go a long way to achieving this secure retirement. NOTE: Garney employee-owners that work for us under collective bargaining agreements (Union Craft Employees) are not part of the ESOP, but the company pays their retirement benefits as part of those agreements.

ACTUALIZACIÓN DEL COMITE DEL ESOP DE VUELTA A LO BÁSICO Garney es una empresa 100% propiedad de los empleados. Uno de los muchos beneficios de ser parte de Garney, una empresa propiedad de los empleados es poder participar en el beneficio de jubilación - el ESOP. ¿Qué es ESOP? ESOP es la abreviatura de Plan de Acciones Propiedad de los Empleados. El ESOP es un plan de jubilación que le permite a todos los empleadospropietarios de Garney recibir acciones de Garney Holding Company. Estas acciones se las dan a cada empleado-propietario sobre la base de sus ganancias al final de cada año calendario del plan. Los empleados-propietarios no tienen que comprar estas acciones, se les dan a los empleados-propietarios como beneficio por ser un dueño de la compañía. A cada empleado-propietario que participa en el ESOP se le establece una cuenta de acciones. Los empleados-propietarios acumulan acciones cada año, asi que el valor de su cuenta crece. Además, si la empresa sigue teniendo éxito, el precio de las acciones también crecerá. Es así como un empleado-propietario puede construir una jubilación segura en el transcurso de su carrera en Garney. Por favor recuerde, el ESOP es un plan de jubilación. No se pretende que sea un plan para “hacerse rico rápidamente”. Usted tiene que participar en el ESOP por un período de tiempo para ver su cuenta crecer. Si usted trabaja en Garney durante mucho tiempo, tendrá una jubilación segura. Cada empleado-propietario tiene que contribuir al éxito de la empresa para asegurar que esto suceda. Todo lo que haces cada día para hacer que esta empresa tenga éxito hace la diferencia. Hay que vivir los Objetivos y las Filosofías de la empresa - SEGURIDAD, CALIDAD, PERMITIR A TODOS LOS EMPLEADOS-PROPIETARIOS DESARROLLAR SU POTENCIAL COMPLETO, SEGURIDAD LABORAL Y CONSERVACIÓN DEL ESOP, RENTABILIDAD, SERVICIO A NUESTROS CLIENTES Y A LA COMUNIDAD, INTEGRIDAD ES EL CAMINO MÁS CORTO AL ÉXITO, GANAR / GANAR, LA EXCELENCIA ES EL ESTÁNDAR, 100% PROPIEDAD DE LOS EMPLEADO - usted recorrerá un largo camino para lograr este retiro seguro. NOTA: Los empleados-propietarios de Garney que trabajan con nosotros bajo los convenios colectivos (Sindicato de Empleados Especializados) no forman parte del ESOP, pero la compañía paga sus beneficios de jubilación como parte de esos acuerdos.

27

PARTING SHOTS

American Spiral Weld Facility Tour. Employee-owners Clay Greene, Grant Tabor, Mark Solebello, and Josh Payne check out the inside of some American pipe during a plant tour.

Check these guys out. Employee-owners on the Wakarusa job site in Lawrence, Kansas, got creative and transformed their bobble heads into fellow employeeowners. From left to right: Terry Dix, Tim Holliday, Pete Godin, and Terry Miller.

28

Pizza Party. Employee-owners at the Tinker AFB job site in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, celebrated Vista Ridge’s financial close by chowing down on some pizza.

Twinning. Employee-owners at the Kansas City office were doing double takes when Hanna Larsen (left) came to work dressed up as Heather Manning (right) for Halloween.

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construction manual - Irvine Ranch Water District
Jan 2, 2017 - W-7. Reduced Pressure Principle Backflow Assembly. January 2017. W-8. Fire Hydrant. January 2017. W-9. Rec